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The Fine Art of Insincerity

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Three grown Southern sisters have ten marriages between them—and more loom on the horizon—when Ginger, the eldest, wonders if she’s the only one who hasn’t inherited what their family calls “the Grandma Gene”: the tendency to like the casualness of courtship better than the intimacy of marriage. Could it be that her two sisters are fated to serially marry, just like their Three grown Southern sisters have ten marriages between them—and more loom on the horizon—when Ginger, the eldest, wonders if she’s the only one who hasn’t inherited what their family calls “the Grandma Gene”: the tendency to like the casualness of courtship better than the intimacy of marriage. Could it be that her two sisters are fated to serially marry, just like their seven-times wed grandmother, Mrs. Lillian Irene Harper Winslow Goldstein Carey James Bobrinski Gordon George?  It takes a “girls only” weekend, closing up Grandma’s treasured beach house for the last time, for the sisters to really unpack their family baggage, examine their relationship DNA, and discover the true legacy their much-marrying grandmother left behind . . .


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Three grown Southern sisters have ten marriages between them—and more loom on the horizon—when Ginger, the eldest, wonders if she’s the only one who hasn’t inherited what their family calls “the Grandma Gene”: the tendency to like the casualness of courtship better than the intimacy of marriage. Could it be that her two sisters are fated to serially marry, just like their Three grown Southern sisters have ten marriages between them—and more loom on the horizon—when Ginger, the eldest, wonders if she’s the only one who hasn’t inherited what their family calls “the Grandma Gene”: the tendency to like the casualness of courtship better than the intimacy of marriage. Could it be that her two sisters are fated to serially marry, just like their seven-times wed grandmother, Mrs. Lillian Irene Harper Winslow Goldstein Carey James Bobrinski Gordon George?  It takes a “girls only” weekend, closing up Grandma’s treasured beach house for the last time, for the sisters to really unpack their family baggage, examine their relationship DNA, and discover the true legacy their much-marrying grandmother left behind . . .

30 review for The Fine Art of Insincerity

  1. 4 out of 5

    Judi

    I'm thankful for "The Fine Art of Insincerity". Often I read fiction when I need a brain break, but Angela Hunt isn't interested in distracting me from my life. She writes to make me contemplate my life. This book masquerades as a light-hearted beach book, but the books is more than Chick-lit. Hunt explores families who sweep pain and darkness under the rug, and our tendency to by myopic about our own problems at the expense of those around us. In such a small paperback, Hunt manages to touch on I'm thankful for "The Fine Art of Insincerity". Often I read fiction when I need a brain break, but Angela Hunt isn't interested in distracting me from my life. She writes to make me contemplate my life. This book masquerades as a light-hearted beach book, but the books is more than Chick-lit. Hunt explores families who sweep pain and darkness under the rug, and our tendency to by myopic about our own problems at the expense of those around us. In such a small paperback, Hunt manages to touch on marriage and divorce, self-esteem, adultery, abortion, infertility, suicide, and legacy. Perhaps the breadth of subjects deserved more treatment. The solution and resolution to much of the issues in the book seems to come a little to conveniently and easily. And yet, maybe that's a good thing, in that maybe Hunt is showing us that forgiveness shouldn't be so hard. In the end, the book I hoped to relax with has challenged me to think about my own relationships, about the perspective of others and about the power of forgiveness, of myself and others.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christy Trever

    The Fine Art of Insincerity by Angela Hunt is an insightful look at the relationships that shape us especially that between sisters. Ginger, Penny, and Rose spent their childhood summers that their Grandma Lillian's cottage on St Simon's Island. Since then, they've racked up nine marriages between them, rivaling Lillian's seven marriages before her death. The three have grown apart in many ways over the years, and are forced to come together to clean out the cottage for its sale. Each woman arri The Fine Art of Insincerity by Angela Hunt is an insightful look at the relationships that shape us especially that between sisters. Ginger, Penny, and Rose spent their childhood summers that their Grandma Lillian's cottage on St Simon's Island. Since then, they've racked up nine marriages between them, rivaling Lillian's seven marriages before her death. The three have grown apart in many ways over the years, and are forced to come together to clean out the cottage for its sale. Each woman arrives on the brink of major change in her life (even if she isn't aware of it yet). Penny has decided to leave her husband, Bob, because even though he loves her, he wants a child, and she's already found his replacement. Rose has postponed her impending suicide to spend this weekend fooling her sisters into thinking she's fine, so when she drives off of a bridge they will think it was an accident. Since a miscarriage two years ago, Rose has isolated herself from any joy in the world, including in her relationship with husband, Wort. Ginger has always felt like she knows better than her younger two sisters, especially after she nearly raised them herself after their mother's abandonment. She arrives filled with advice and judgment on their many marriages, but when a phone call to her husband Mike shocks her and shakes her foundations, she is forced to reconsider everything she thought she knew. Hunt is absolutely one of the best writers in the business. I love how she never shoves religion on readers. Narration alternates between the sisters, giving readers an inside view into their lives and how they view this weekend of reconciliation. This is a fantastic read about relationships, faith, love, and most of all hope.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    At first, I wasn't sure if this book was worth my time. Three sisters, with messed up lives, get together to clean out their grandmother's house who had been married seven times before she passed away. I didn't like some of the choices these women made but I became interested in them as people. I wanted to learn what the result of the weekend they spent together would be. They learn about being honest with each other and their husbands, facing pain, and the love of family and importance of maint At first, I wasn't sure if this book was worth my time. Three sisters, with messed up lives, get together to clean out their grandmother's house who had been married seven times before she passed away. I didn't like some of the choices these women made but I became interested in them as people. I wanted to learn what the result of the weekend they spent together would be. They learn about being honest with each other and their husbands, facing pain, and the love of family and importance of maintaining healthy relationships. This book addresses many of the painful issues of today's world with love and grace.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nora St Laurent

    I always learn something from Angela Hunt’s novels and The Fine Art of Insincerity is no exception. I’m thankful to have received a review copy of such a powerful and moving story! Once again Angela delivers an unexpected story with multi-dimensional characters that evoke a depth of thought and emotion which surprise the reader. Three sisters come together for a weekend to clean their grandmother’s house because it’s sold. They are here to split up their grandmothers’ belongings. Each hopes to f I always learn something from Angela Hunt’s novels and The Fine Art of Insincerity is no exception. I’m thankful to have received a review copy of such a powerful and moving story! Once again Angela delivers an unexpected story with multi-dimensional characters that evoke a depth of thought and emotion which surprise the reader. Three sisters come together for a weekend to clean their grandmother’s house because it’s sold. They are here to split up their grandmothers’ belongings. Each hopes to find that special something of hers to keep their memory of her alive. Being together in this house they once had called home, reminded them of precious times with their grandmother and each other. Angela Hunt quotes this scripture 1 Cor 13:3 …”So, no matter what I say, what I believe, and what I do, I’m bankrupt without love.” (The Message) Love, the topic of the weekend, each saw the depths of their grandmothers’ love. Love! Ginger didn’t think her sisters knew about that kind of love. They’d been married so many times - Love hung in there when the times were tough, right? Ginger and Michael were married 25 years she knew that kind of love and that marriage took time and hard work. She felt her sisters just needed to work a little harder at their relationships before they called it quits. In the middle of it all these sisters see, “People aren’t really free to love someone until they know us, warts and all – and then the warts don’t matter because it’s so freeing to be loved completely! The truth will set you free – free from bondage and vows we made as children. When we are free it allows us to begin to love like Jesus.” Angela captures the camaraderie, love and joy sisters share as they play the role each learned to play in their family of origin. I could relate to this because of what I’ve experienced this with my three sisters. I appreciate these sisters’ relationships and how they challenged and loved each other through thick and thin. Can these sisters get the house clean, reminisce about the past, remember the special times, the sadness and still love each other at the end of the weekend? Could they trust each other with their heart ache, and their mistakes? Angela Hunt is a brilliant, thought provoking writer who talks about unusual and interesting subjects in her books that grip the readers’ heart, mind and emotions. Angela has the gift of writing a novel you think you have figured out – then she comes up with a few surprises that are a shock to her characters and also the reader. I love that. Looking for a great summer read that will stir your heart, make you laugh and cry? You’ll definitely want to read this one. Angela will get you looking at relationships, love and marriage in a whole new light….especially the intricate relationship between sisters. Thanks Angela for another entertaining surprising ride through time, relationships and life. It’s definitely made me think about loving others in an honest, practical way. This is a rich story with loving colorful characters that won’t disappoint. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising” Nora St.Laurent The Book Club Network www.bookfun.org The Book Club Network blog www.psalm516.blogspot.com Book Fun Magazine www.bookfunmagazine.com

  5. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Angela Hunt's books never disappoint me. I love her style of writing. Once you start to read her books you can't seem to put them down. They just suck you in. This book is about 3 sisters who have their own set of problems and a whole lot of issues. When they go to clean out their grandmothers house after she dies, they discover who they really are and how they need to change to come to grips with their own lives. They discover why they have spoken to each other that much over the years and the Angela Hunt's books never disappoint me. I love her style of writing. Once you start to read her books you can't seem to put them down. They just suck you in. This book is about 3 sisters who have their own set of problems and a whole lot of issues. When they go to clean out their grandmothers house after she dies, they discover who they really are and how they need to change to come to grips with their own lives. They discover why they have spoken to each other that much over the years and the years pass without them really knowing each other even though they are sisters. Cleaning out the house brings them closer to the truth and discoveries and they finally understand the messages that their grandmother had tried to tell them over the years. The grandmother leaves a photo album and a legacy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Follow the link below to see my review of this fantastic book! http://shereads-sheblogs.blogspot.com... ~Melissa Follow the link below to see my review of this fantastic book! http://shereads-sheblogs.blogspot.com... ~Melissa

  7. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    Quite enjoyable, really a 3.5. I enjoy Hunt's books as they're clean and decently written, but not the stereotypical inspirational fare where the reader must endure recounted sermons or homilies from the wise neighbor. Grandma came to Christ later in life, and the three girls find evidence of what that meant to her -- but no one is miraculously changed in a single evening or anything. So three sisters, each struggling in her own way, come together for a weekend to get a job done. I found the pers Quite enjoyable, really a 3.5. I enjoy Hunt's books as they're clean and decently written, but not the stereotypical inspirational fare where the reader must endure recounted sermons or homilies from the wise neighbor. Grandma came to Christ later in life, and the three girls find evidence of what that meant to her -- but no one is miraculously changed in a single evening or anything. So three sisters, each struggling in her own way, come together for a weekend to get a job done. I found the personalities well developed and their confrontations very believable. I can't say that anything deeply affected me, though (even with (view spoiler)[Rose planning her suicide (hide spoiler)] ) or that I will be pondering this book for the next few weeks.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy Meyers

    Interesting, made me cry at times, good writing, and good observations on human nature. But I do kind of hate when women who are hurt by adulterous husbands end up making themselves out to be the culprits or just as much to blame... There is a touch of that in this book. 3.5 stars, just because the topic wasn't my favorite, and I really don't like insincerity or hypocrisy, or conflicts in a book that rely so heavily on lack of openness: I get impatient. Interesting, made me cry at times, good writing, and good observations on human nature. But I do kind of hate when women who are hurt by adulterous husbands end up making themselves out to be the culprits or just as much to blame... There is a touch of that in this book. 3.5 stars, just because the topic wasn't my favorite, and I really don't like insincerity or hypocrisy, or conflicts in a book that rely so heavily on lack of openness: I get impatient.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Robison

    I never know what to expect when I pick up a book from this author, except that I won't be able to put it down. This family drama between three sisters and their husbands made me uncomfortably interested and pulled me through quickly to the end. True to life characters and women as different from each other as night and day make up an interesting tale of betrayal, pride, selfishness, and a host of other sins we all battle. Another good read by Angela Hunt. I never know what to expect when I pick up a book from this author, except that I won't be able to put it down. This family drama between three sisters and their husbands made me uncomfortably interested and pulled me through quickly to the end. True to life characters and women as different from each other as night and day make up an interesting tale of betrayal, pride, selfishness, and a host of other sins we all battle. Another good read by Angela Hunt.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Janet Friesner

    Really liked this. Read it all in one day. Story of three sisters, in their 40's who go to their deceased grandmother's cottage to clean it out since it has been sold. Sisters who have lived their lives in a totally different way and how they worked out their differences in a three day weekend. Christian fiction. Easy reading and I thought extremely good. Really liked this. Read it all in one day. Story of three sisters, in their 40's who go to their deceased grandmother's cottage to clean it out since it has been sold. Sisters who have lived their lives in a totally different way and how they worked out their differences in a three day weekend. Christian fiction. Easy reading and I thought extremely good.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Another great one by Angela Hunt. It's the story of three sisters. Their grandmother was a bit unusual having quite a few husbands. However, she showed them love. Each sister is struggling with something different and they have to work together to help each other. All three sisters are quite interesting. Another great one by Angela Hunt. It's the story of three sisters. Their grandmother was a bit unusual having quite a few husbands. However, she showed them love. Each sister is struggling with something different and they have to work together to help each other. All three sisters are quite interesting.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cara Noyes

    What a dramatic tale! I loved it! All 3 sisters lived thru such tragedy and bottled their emotions up. Their grandma was a wise woman indeed! I'd like to read it again and make a list of granny truths. 😀 What a dramatic tale! I loved it! All 3 sisters lived thru such tragedy and bottled their emotions up. Their grandma was a wise woman indeed! I'd like to read it again and make a list of granny truths. 😀

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I really appreciated the message that real love involves honesty, openness, and acceptance... of the good, bad, and ugly.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cindi

    Nicely written. Good, strong characters. Great storyline to hold the reader's interest. Nicely written. Good, strong characters. Great storyline to hold the reader's interest.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Boehm

    Angela never disappoints. Excellent novel

  16. 5 out of 5

    April

    I enjoyed the book and the writing. I found some of the plot somewhat contrived.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    It gets confusing at times because it is told from three first-person perspectives. It takes some getting used to.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ranette

    Just not that interesting or well-written. Sorry

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Tough subjects, well written novel that digs deep. Resolution is too quick and unrealistic, but glad the characters change was wrapped up. I do appreciate a book that has an ending.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carmella

    This book has some amazing insights in relationships. Amazing what a person takes for granted and doesn’t open their eyes to the real truth.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Deedee

    3.5 Stars.....

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    What a great story..... really touched my heart.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pattyo

    I enjoyed this book. My thoughts are: I think allowing negativity to come between us is sometimes easier than being vulnerable and suffering the humility of being exposed. Especially we women.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Brand

    Ginger, Penny and Rosemary Lawrence are all in denial. Ginger is convinced that she knows how to make a marriage work, despite the fact that her husband of twenty-seven years has started getting changed in the closet and hasn’t kissed her goodbye in weeks. Her younger sister, Penny, believes that the perfect way to deal with the lack of romance in her life is to move on to a new man, and is on the hunt for her sixth husband. And Rose still hasn’t recovered from the loss of her unborn child two y Ginger, Penny and Rosemary Lawrence are all in denial. Ginger is convinced that she knows how to make a marriage work, despite the fact that her husband of twenty-seven years has started getting changed in the closet and hasn’t kissed her goodbye in weeks. Her younger sister, Penny, believes that the perfect way to deal with the lack of romance in her life is to move on to a new man, and is on the hunt for her sixth husband. And Rose still hasn’t recovered from the loss of her unborn child two years previously, but would rather leave this world than ask for help. None of them are aware that they’re heading down the wrong path, and it will take a weekend at their grandmother’s house to teach them new lessons about life, love and marriage. As the memories of the summers spent with their seven-times married grandmother resurface, the girls come to terms with the legacy that their beloved Grandma left them and wonder what they can learn from her life. As the weekend progresses, these three sisters soon discover that they have more to worry about than who gets Grandma’s piano. While Penny is having second thoughts about the new man in her life, a bombshell is dropped on Ginger’s perfect marriage and in the midst of it all, the two of them suddenly realise that something isn’t quite right with their baby sister. Is it too late for these women to realise how blessed they’ve been in life, and that some things are worth fighting for? From the synopsis and cute cover, I assumed that this would be a light, chick-lit novel. But within a few chapters, I realised that the Lawrence sisters had much deeper issues to deal with than the average chick-lit heroine. I was quickly enveloped into the lives of this dysfunction group of women, all of whom had a lot to learn about love and marriage. Despite probably being her polar opposite, I found Penny the most relatable character. I loved her sassy, Southern flirtations and I could identify with her yearning to be loved and romanced. Although I hope that in twenty-seven years times I’ll be living a similar life to Ginger, living in a nice house in suburbia after having sent my kids off to college, Ginger’s “perfect” marriage didn’t feel right at all and I found myself hoping that she’s be taken down a peg or two and stop judging her sisters long enough to sort her own life out. While I longed for someone to notice that Rose was struggling, I found it hard to identify with her. Maybe it was her obsession with her dog – although I love my cats, I’m really not an animal fanatic – or simply the fact that I found her sections hard to read because of the strange choice in font, but I didn’t feel like I connected with her particularly well. As the novel progressed, I came to understand the intriguing and heartbreaking legacy that the Lawrence women had received from their family. Their father, mourning the loss of his young wife so soon after the birth of his third daughter, had sent his daughters to live with their grandmother every summer because he never truly recovered from their mother’s death. And the sad truth behind their grandmother’s seven marriages, and insights into the life of a woman who had so many husbands snatched away from her in wars, in an age when women were vulnerable without a man’s protection. This book contained some really fascinating and heartfelt family dynamics. It probably has a thing or two to teach all of us about the true inheritances our families have given us. Inspirational women’s fiction is slowly growing on me, and while I wouldn’t class this novel among my favourites I did enjoy reading it. The eclectic blend of characters made for a compelling read and I didn’t want to put this book down when I got to the final chapters. I’m a bit disappointed that I never truly felt that I connected with the characters, but that wouldn’t stop me from trying another of Angela Hunt’s books in the future. This is one that I’m sure fans of deeper chick-lit and women’s fiction would appreciate. 7/10

  25. 4 out of 5

    Haelie

    Here's something new for me. I have not yet reviewed a fiction book--until today. And this takes place in the perfect setting for starting off my summer: a three day holiday weekend in a beach cottage. Here is the publisher's description of the story: The Fine Art of Insincerity features three Southern sisters with ten marriages between them and more looming on the horizon. It takes a "girls only" weekend spent closing up Grandma's treasured beach house for the sisters to really unpack their family Here's something new for me. I have not yet reviewed a fiction book--until today. And this takes place in the perfect setting for starting off my summer: a three day holiday weekend in a beach cottage. Here is the publisher's description of the story: The Fine Art of Insincerity features three Southern sisters with ten marriages between them and more looming on the horizon. It takes a "girls only" weekend spent closing up Grandma's treasured beach house for the sisters to really unpack their family baggage, examine their relationship DNA, and discover the true legacy their much-marrying grandmother left behind. And a bit about Angela Hunt, the author: Angela Hunt is the bestselling author of more than 100 books, including The Tale of Three Trees, Don't Bet Against Me, The Note, and The Nativity Story. Her nonfiction book Don't Bet Against Me, written with Deanna Favre, spent several weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. She and her husband make their home in Florida with their dogs. You can learn more at AngelaHuntBooks.com. So, with the introductions out of the way, my thoughts. Like the characters in this book, I also have two sisters. And, I was reading this book over the long holiday weekend in a southern home very similar to the beach home they stayed in for their holiday weekend--complete with porch swing and all. Setting and characters aside, or included, this story stirred up emotions in me which I thought were dormant or even non-existent. It had me considering my relationship with my own sisters as well as other family relationships and friendships I hold dear. As the title suggests, ultimately these sisters had been insincere with each other and actually with everyone else including they themselves their whole adult lives. Honestly, I kept mistaking the title of the book to be The Fine Art of Insecurity every time I glanced at the cover. Truly, that mistaken title is not too far off as well. Angela Hunt so creatively developed her theme and storyline with these sisters that the reader can sense that the one of the main reasons for each of their insincerity truly is their own insecurity. This book is not only a good summer read because of its setting but is also a great wake up to facing the reality of life and relationships before it is too late. As is clearly portrayed in this book, we never know how little time we may have left to truly show our love to those who need it most. Don't assume that because they are your family or lifelong friend(s) they know you love them. How have you shown them? Not how have you said it? How have your actions and unspoken words proven (or disproven) your love for them? Trust me, I am preaching right back at myself with this one. Because of the wake-up call from this delightfully intrusive book, I pray I will make this the Summer of Love Lived Out toward my family and dear friends. Disclosure: I received this free from Glass Road PR Blogger reviews. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions expressed are my own.

  26. 5 out of 5

    ForstRose

    Although I have several of Angela's titles on my shelf, this is the first of her books I have read in a very long while. I have always considered her work exceptional and it seems it just continues to get better as time progresses. Ginger, Rosemary, and Pennyroyal apparently had a mother who favored plant names for her children. Rose and Penny have shortened their names to something a little simpler to fit a mouth around pronouncing. Though they've moved from their childhood home and lives have Although I have several of Angela's titles on my shelf, this is the first of her books I have read in a very long while. I have always considered her work exceptional and it seems it just continues to get better as time progresses. Ginger, Rosemary, and Pennyroyal apparently had a mother who favored plant names for her children. Rose and Penny have shortened their names to something a little simpler to fit a mouth around pronouncing. Though they've moved from their childhood home and lives have each progressed along their own independent track, phone calls between times that they are having a silence war amongst themselves are the last semblance of family and connection these women posess. Their Grandmother became what bit of a mother they had after their own could no longer be there for them. Summers became a time that Dad shuttled them off to Grandma and out from under foot. With no school and an island primarily focused on tourist business, summers may have otherwise been a carefree time for the girls. Now as grown women the house on St Simons is all they have left. Can the process of grieving and closing up Grandma's long empty cottage on the island till its new owner takes possession bring unity and understanding among these sisters despite the distance both emotional and physical that has been allowed to grow between them? At times it seems we are each so focused on our own troubles and struggles we are blind to those of people around us with whom we should be the most connected. Though the circumstances of this book are regrettable in that Ginger, Penny, and Rose are thrown into situations no one should have to handle especially a child, their Grandmother's influence begins to soak back into their lives in her absence as they choose what is most important to preserve the few joyful memories left of their childhood days. In the end they all three not only have to face hard truths about their own lives and how to clear the hurdles that have been developing in their personal lives but take the time and effort to recognize the hurdles facing their sisters, acknowledge those hurdles, and lovingly support each other maneuvering the accompanying valleys. Though truth is sometimes hard to swallow and treating others as we ought rather than as we'd like to feels impossible, God and faith are the rocks which give the firm foundation necessary to keep us on the path over which He directs us.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Victor Gentile

    Angela Hunt in her new book, "The Fine Art Of Insincerity" published by Howard Books takes us to a cottage house on St. Simons Island. Grandmother Lillian had a cottage house in St. Simons Island and left it to her three granddaughters, Ginger, Penny and Rose. The sisters were shipped off to stay with their grandmother during the summer months and this place is like a second home to them. However they are all feeling a financial pinch so they decide to sell it and split the profits. So all three Angela Hunt in her new book, "The Fine Art Of Insincerity" published by Howard Books takes us to a cottage house on St. Simons Island. Grandmother Lillian had a cottage house in St. Simons Island and left it to her three granddaughters, Ginger, Penny and Rose. The sisters were shipped off to stay with their grandmother during the summer months and this place is like a second home to them. However they are all feeling a financial pinch so they decide to sell it and split the profits. So all three of them must travel to their grandmother's cottage one last time to clean it out for the new owner. Get ready for a page turning, emotional journey. Grandmother Lillian had been married seven times and her granddaughters have nine marriages between them. This book covers a wide range of topics one of them is "generational curses", curses that are passed down from one generation to the next until someone says enough and breaks the curse. This is an important subject as many of us are motivated from "generational curses" and we have no idea. We are responsible for our own actions but when we realize what is behind these actions it is much easier to repent and move on. Angela Hunt has given us a terrific book in "The Fine Art Of Insincerity". I have never had sisters so I have no reference point but it was fun watching the family dynamic work among them. Each sister tells the story, chapter by chapter, from their point of view and it is fascinating to see how each view their situation. Ms. Hunt has them dealing with divorce, infidelity and suicide. Not topics that you think would be reader friendly but Ms. Hunt is such an accomplished writer this is handled extremely well. If you are looking for a nice summer read where God can show off the power of His mercy and forgiveness then "The Fine Art Of Insincerity" is the book for you. If you would like to listen to interviews with other authors and professionals please go to www.kingdomhighlights.org where they are available On Demand. To listen to 24 Christian music please visit our internet radio station www.kingdomairwaves.org Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book for free from Glass Road Public Relations for this review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    The three Lawrence sisters were as different as night and day, but they had a few things in common, they all loved their grandmother Lillian and each have been dragging around emotional baggage for years. When Lillian dies she leaves them a tiny cottage and when it finally sells the girls go on Labor Day weekend to clean it out, so as the trio reconnects they come to realize the things and money Lillian left them aren't nearly as important as the life lessons she left behind. Ginger is the oldest The three Lawrence sisters were as different as night and day, but they had a few things in common, they all loved their grandmother Lillian and each have been dragging around emotional baggage for years. When Lillian dies she leaves them a tiny cottage and when it finally sells the girls go on Labor Day weekend to clean it out, so as the trio reconnects they come to realize the things and money Lillian left them aren't nearly as important as the life lessons she left behind. Ginger is the oldest sister who felt that she had to keep everything together, she is the sister that has what everyone considers the perfect marriage, she has sort of looked down on her other sisters because they have been married so often, but when she learns that her husband has been unfaithful how will she handle it? Pennyroyal (Penny) is the middle child, she has been married five times. She has based her latest marriage to Bob on lies and she thinks its about to dissolve so she is on the lookout for husband number six. Rosemary (Rose) is the youngest. She feels that she is the blame for the death of her mother, not to mention that she is grieving the loss of two babies. She dotes on her aging terrier and has made plans that she and her terrier will die together. She has convinced herself that everyone will be better off without her. This was an interesting contemporary fiction that deals with several tough issues, such as divorce, suicide and grief and finding forgiveness. It was interesting how different the personalities of each sister was. I really enjoyed how the author allowed the reader to see the perspective from each sister, and she does it in a clear way that is never confusing. Rose was a character that was easy to feel sympathy for, I could easily understand why she would think Ginger didn't love her. I was a bit shocked at what Ginger advised Rose to do which ultimately cost her the chance of ever having children. I think some of my favorite parts of the story where when the girls stumbled upon things that had them recalling bits of their past. While I thought the end of the book was a bit rushed, overall I really enjoyed reading this one. If your someone who enjoys reading a realistic story about family relationships that just might have you examining your relationships with your siblings then you should defiantly pick up this one. I was provided a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    My Thoughts: The Fine Art of Insincerity pulls you right into the lives of Gingerbread, Pennyroyal and Rosemary -- sisters whose lives have been touched by tragedy, all trying to cope in their own unique ways. Responsible, list-making Ginger, always trying to stay in control of every situation. Restless, defensive Penny, always ready to end a relationship before she gets her heart broken. And sad, melancholic Rosemary plotting to end her own life. Right away, we learn that Rosemary is plotting he My Thoughts: The Fine Art of Insincerity pulls you right into the lives of Gingerbread, Pennyroyal and Rosemary -- sisters whose lives have been touched by tragedy, all trying to cope in their own unique ways. Responsible, list-making Ginger, always trying to stay in control of every situation. Restless, defensive Penny, always ready to end a relationship before she gets her heart broken. And sad, melancholic Rosemary plotting to end her own life. Right away, we learn that Rosemary is plotting her own death, Penny is contemplating starting an affair with a handsome Dr. and something appears to be wrong with Ginger's 27 year marriage. Each chapter, told from the first-person perspective of each of the sisters, allows the reader to understand the thoughts and motives behind their actions. It also allows a unique peak into how they perceive one another, and just how far from reality each of their perceptions really are. Their weekend together will bring back memories both happy and tragic, and utlimately brings to light secrets that were buried deep in the past. It takes an averted tragedy for the sisters to finally open up to one another, and to find the true legacy their Grandma Lillian left them. The legacy of true love. Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. --1Corinthians 13:4-7 If you decide to read this book, I advise you to have your tissues nearby. While not totally sad, the book does dwell quite a bit on the tragedies that have touched these sisters lives, but only as a vehicle for understanding why they are the way they are. And why they do the things they do. The book is an easy read, with very believable characters. The Christian content in the book is presented in a subtle, yet realistic way and should not hinder the enjoyment of the book for non-Christian readers. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free through the Glass Road Public Relations blog tour program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Some novels are like mirrors. As you read them, you glimpse a reflection of the ugliness that sin produces in your own heart and life. That’s the affect of Angela Hunt’s latest story, The Fine Art of Insincerity. In the novel, Penny, Rose, and Ginger—three grown Southern sisters—meet to close out “Grandma’s treasured beach house for the last time. Two of the sisters seem fated to marry serially, like their seven-times wed grandmother.” And Ginger, though only married once, is having problems of h Some novels are like mirrors. As you read them, you glimpse a reflection of the ugliness that sin produces in your own heart and life. That’s the affect of Angela Hunt’s latest story, The Fine Art of Insincerity. In the novel, Penny, Rose, and Ginger—three grown Southern sisters—meet to close out “Grandma’s treasured beach house for the last time. Two of the sisters seem fated to marry serially, like their seven-times wed grandmother.” And Ginger, though only married once, is having problems of her own. As the women pack up the place, the struggles they’re each currently facing come to light. Soon, along with the present day problems, old resentments come poring out. As the book progresses, it becomes clear that the girls’ relationships with each other have been jeopardized by jealousies, selfishness, misconceptions, and judgmental attitudes. Wondering what revelation would come next kept me riveted. As one reviewer stated, “Only Angela Hunt could write a relationship novel that’s a page-turner!” I find reading this type of novel equal parts pain and pleasure. It hurt to see characters say and do things that damaged the ones they were supposed to love—especially if any of the words or actions mirrored attitudes I’ve harbored. However, as the sisters identified their flaws and began to establish a connection, I was encouraged. As they say, acknowledging you have a problem is the first step to recovery. Angela’s story brought to mind these verses from I Corinthians 13 . . . If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing. If this book truly represents life, I believe many of the problems in the sister’s relationships and the marriage relationships would have been smoothed over or solved completely if those involved had allowed the love of Christ to dwell richly in them.

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