Hot Best Seller

Preacher, Volume 4: Ancient History

Availability: Ready to download

Four distinctive characters whose lives were forever changed by encounters with Preacher's Jesse Custer take center stage in this volume. Included: The Saint of Killers, telling the origin of this troubled, violent figure from the Old West, and The Story of You-Know-Who, in which a disaffected loser tries to escape the influence of his abusive sheriff father with tragic, y Four distinctive characters whose lives were forever changed by encounters with Preacher's Jesse Custer take center stage in this volume. Included: The Saint of Killers, telling the origin of this troubled, violent figure from the Old West, and The Story of You-Know-Who, in which a disaffected loser tries to escape the influence of his abusive sheriff father with tragic, yet comical, results, and more. Collects: Preacher Special: Saint of Killers #1–4, Preacher Special: The Story of You-Know-Who, Preacher Special: The Good Old Boys


Compare

Four distinctive characters whose lives were forever changed by encounters with Preacher's Jesse Custer take center stage in this volume. Included: The Saint of Killers, telling the origin of this troubled, violent figure from the Old West, and The Story of You-Know-Who, in which a disaffected loser tries to escape the influence of his abusive sheriff father with tragic, y Four distinctive characters whose lives were forever changed by encounters with Preacher's Jesse Custer take center stage in this volume. Included: The Saint of Killers, telling the origin of this troubled, violent figure from the Old West, and The Story of You-Know-Who, in which a disaffected loser tries to escape the influence of his abusive sheriff father with tragic, yet comical, results, and more. Collects: Preacher Special: Saint of Killers #1–4, Preacher Special: The Story of You-Know-Who, Preacher Special: The Good Old Boys

30 review for Preacher, Volume 4: Ancient History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    A "Most Interesting" review: He once read Ulysses by James Joyce… He composed a dirty limerick in Cuneiform… He once… He is… . . . “I don’t always read graphic novels, but when I do, I prefer Preacher by Garth Ennis.” . . . Nuff said...I mean when the coolest suds spokesman since Billy Dee was telling America that, "It works every time" spills that he enjoys Garth Ennis’s Preacher series, I’m not sure what more my rambling comments can add to the endorsement, so let me just give A "Most Interesting" review: He once read Ulysses by James Joyce… He composed a dirty limerick in Cuneiform… He once… He is… . . . “I don’t always read graphic novels, but when I do, I prefer Preacher by Garth Ennis.” . . . Nuff said...I mean when the coolest suds spokesman since Billy Dee was telling America that, "It works every time" spills that he enjoys Garth Ennis’s Preacher series, I’m not sure what more my rambling comments can add to the endorsement, so let me just give a brief rundown of the events transpiring in this fourth Volume. PLOT SUMMARY: Taking a break from the ongoing storyline, this installment provides some overdue back story on several important supporting characters, most notably and most awesomely, the immortal, badass extraordinaire, Saint of Killers. Taking up two-thirds of the page count, this terrific origin story lays out the history of this unstoppable murder machine, who until now has been the most mysterious characters of the series. While main character Jesse Custer is clearly the voice of the series, Ennis has described the Saint of Killers as its "soul," making his story an essential aspect of the narrative. Ennis intended the SOK to be the personification of the violence and cruelty of the old west, making him reminiscent of “the Judge” from McCarthy’s Blood Meridian. Only Ennis, master of the medium that he is, could tell the story of this destructive, cold-hearted (literally) killing machine and make you empathize with him. His actions may prevent you from truly caring about him, but you will grow to understand him and how he came to hold the position of Heaven’s chief assassin. Great story, great art, and Ennis’s usual superb writing. It is, put simply, EXCELLENT. Next, Ennis takes us on the sad, childhood journey of the most unusual characters of the series…ARSEFACE. Told with surprising emotion, Garth shows us an unloved, abused child, who nonetheless loves his verbally and physically abusive father, and we see the progression of events that culminated in the botched suicide attempt that gave birth to Arseface. While I did not enjoy this quite as much as the Saint of Killers storyline, it was well done and Ennis does an excellent job evoking empathy for the child that became this monster of a man. Finally, in what passes for a “lighter story” in this series, Ennis takes us on a violent, gore-strewn parody of action film clichés, when Preacher’s uncles, Jody and TC, take on a whole gaggle of bumbling soldiers and inept terrorists. Disgusting, profane and extremely funny, this was a great way to end this volume on a upbeat note…so to speak. 4.0 to 4.5 stars. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    A slight change of pace with back stories for the Saint of Killers, Arseface and surprsingly T.J. and Cody. On first reading the Saint of Killers origin is pretty hardcore, but tbh, I just wanted to get back to the main story. A solid 8 out of 12 though, as the short stories are all pretty interesting, darkly comedic and most definitely out-there! A slight change of pace with back stories for the Saint of Killers, Arseface and surprsingly T.J. and Cody. On first reading the Saint of Killers origin is pretty hardcore, but tbh, I just wanted to get back to the main story. A solid 8 out of 12 though, as the short stories are all pretty interesting, darkly comedic and most definitely out-there!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    Garth Ennis wrote an introduction to this volume of Preacher where he says that part of his inspiration for the story came from his love of western movies. He doesn’t explain why he included a kid disfigured after a botched suicide attempt who now goes by the name of Arseface. That’s probably for the best. I don’t think I want to know how Ennis came up with that character. This collection breaks away from the main storyline of Jesse Custer’s quest to find and punish God to give us some background Garth Ennis wrote an introduction to this volume of Preacher where he says that part of his inspiration for the story came from his love of western movies. He doesn’t explain why he included a kid disfigured after a botched suicide attempt who now goes by the name of Arseface. That’s probably for the best. I don’t think I want to know how Ennis came up with that character. This collection breaks away from the main storyline of Jesse Custer’s quest to find and punish God to give us some background of some of the supporting characters. We learn why Arseface decided to follow in Kurt Cobain’s footsteps and try to stage a quick exit via shotgun. For a character that’s been portrayed as disgusting comic relief to this point, it’s a surprisingly moving story. There’s a hilarious satire of action hero movies starring a couple of old acquaintances of Jesses’s. Watching Jody and TC’s violent redneck antics as they deal with a handsome male cop and a beautiful female lawyer being pursued through a swamp by a deranged terrorist is disgusting, and completely hilarious. But the pivotal story in this the origin of the Saint of Killers. The Saint was once just a man with a talent for murder that he used during the Civil War as well as hunting Apaches afterwards. When he was robbed of the only happiness he’d known, his rage is so fierce that it scares both Satan and the Angel of Death, leading to him taking up the mantle as God’s own killer. He carries out this duty as a kind of fucked up hybrid of a cowboy and the Grim Reaper. As Ennis puts it: Back when he was just a man, before the world shook to the thunder of his guns, there was still some good in his heart. And that was the tragedy. While not strictly necessary to the overall Preacher story, this collection is still great reading for fans of the series. Where else are you going to see a guy fight a gorilla with a baseball bat?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    I was all prepared to hate this volume. I mean...no Custer? No Tulip? N-n-n-n-o Cassidy, the world's coolest and most inebriated vampire? No freakin' way! But, geez, they got me. Right away I was slapped in the face with a glorious, bloody, Peckinpahish horse opera about how a loner seeking vengeance became the Saint of Killers. What's the devil to do when Hell literally freezes over? Then we revisit the sad, sad story of Arseface, and see the birth of yet another loner out for blood. And finally, I was all prepared to hate this volume. I mean...no Custer? No Tulip? N-n-n-n-o Cassidy, the world's coolest and most inebriated vampire? No freakin' way! But, geez, they got me. Right away I was slapped in the face with a glorious, bloody, Peckinpahish horse opera about how a loner seeking vengeance became the Saint of Killers. What's the devil to do when Hell literally freezes over? Then we revisit the sad, sad story of Arseface, and see the birth of yet another loner out for blood. And finally, there's a fun tale of mayhem and wild things gone wilder with Jody and T.C., fore they was dead. Watch as these good ole boys mix it up with a cop on the edge and a supermodel-turned-lawyer-with-a-dangerous-secret who just happen to find themselves marooned in the middle of a swamp. Even without the three main characters, there are some rip-roarin' times to be had in this collection.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Burhan Abdi Osman

    Im rating this 5 stars only for Preacher Special: Saint of Killers #1-4 and not the other two stories in this collection which isnt as powerful. The first 3 volumes of Preacher issues was good but not as great as the story of Saint of Killers and his old west days. Garth Ennis is a great comics writer and his writing of the Revisionist Western story is one of the best westerns i have read in comics form. Up there with the best Jonah Hex comics. A dark Western that deals frankly with the uglier a Im rating this 5 stars only for Preacher Special: Saint of Killers #1-4 and not the other two stories in this collection which isnt as powerful. The first 3 volumes of Preacher issues was good but not as great as the story of Saint of Killers and his old west days. Garth Ennis is a great comics writer and his writing of the Revisionist Western story is one of the best westerns i have read in comics form. Up there with the best Jonah Hex comics. A dark Western that deals frankly with the uglier aspects of violence and the myth of the Old West. A destruction of the myth and the same time a homage to the western movies of John Wayne,Clint Eastwood. I knew Ennis hero was Clint Eastwood like he is my fav western actor and i always wished he wrote a hardcore western like that. Steve Pugh and Carlos Ezquerra art fit the story better than Steve Dillion art would ever have.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Holy crap! The Saint's story was even better than I imagined! I mean, we're getting into some great ghost story stuff, but add a mountain of steroids and a man that both the Angel of Death and Satan, himself, is scared shitless of, and we've got Keyser Söze, or um, I mean, the Saint of Slaughter. :) Hell of a good story. Someone in Supernatural has been cribbing from this comic. :) And now that I know so much more about this guy, I can't believe that everyone got off so light, before. :) Holy crap! The Saint's story was even better than I imagined! I mean, we're getting into some great ghost story stuff, but add a mountain of steroids and a man that both the Angel of Death and Satan, himself, is scared shitless of, and we've got Keyser Söze, or um, I mean, the Saint of Slaughter. :) Hell of a good story. Someone in Supernatural has been cribbing from this comic. :) And now that I know so much more about this guy, I can't believe that everyone got off so light, before. :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    "Ancient History" is sort of a sidenote to the main story of Custer and Co. as this book (the fourth in the series) contains back story for the Saint of Killers, Arseface, and Jody and T.C. The best of the bunch is the Saint of Killers' story. From late 19th century wild west, cowboys and injuns, to the gates of Hell and beyond, we see how the Saint became the cold blooded killing machine he is in the main story. Carlos Eszquerra supplies some fantastic drawings for his part in the story, the He "Ancient History" is sort of a sidenote to the main story of Custer and Co. as this book (the fourth in the series) contains back story for the Saint of Killers, Arseface, and Jody and T.C. The best of the bunch is the Saint of Killers' story. From late 19th century wild west, cowboys and injuns, to the gates of Hell and beyond, we see how the Saint became the cold blooded killing machine he is in the main story. Carlos Eszquerra supplies some fantastic drawings for his part in the story, the Hell sequence. His Devil is brilliant and you find out his first name too. The story takes up a full half of the book and is perfect reading for upcoming Hallowe'en celebrations. That is, read it by candlelight with a drink and ignore the brats at the door. Arseface's backstory isn't that great. If you've read the first book (and why haven't you?) you'll know he looks the way he does because of his own actions and some other details. It's elaborated on more here but doesn't really provide that compelling a story. Jody and T.C.'s story is a satire on action films and has a fun story of the pair taking apart an international mobster's hitforce in the swamps of the South. Some really creative deaths in this part of the book. It's a great addition to the brilliant story of "Preacher", fleshing out the supporting players for the reader and providing some excellent reading for a couple of hours.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    This my favourite Preacher none Jessie book because find out the origin of Saint of killers No John Wayne or Clint Easterwood a reel fucken C##t . Arseface how he became so fucking horrible ,a sad tale of depression & stupidly The Good Old Boys a constriction in terms ,nothing fucken good about them. You could take Western story & make real blood & guts Western out of it with Daniel -Day Lewis, in the starring role.

  9. 5 out of 5

    توفيق عبد الرحيم

    Three amazing stories we get the origins of The Saint of killers and Arse-face and a story in the past of T.C and Jody They are all well made with Great Supporting characters dam am too distracted i don't feel like writing anything else Three amazing stories we get the origins of The Saint of killers and Arse-face and a story in the past of T.C and Jody They are all well made with Great Supporting characters dam am too distracted i don't feel like writing anything else

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Ah yes, what I've come to learn is a signature move on the part of Ennis (and others like Aaron in Scalped or Wood in DMZ): the volume of "side character stories". Related tangent: I was obsessed with Preacher when I first read it, and tracked down everything in print. Including some obscure little one-off of story about the Saint of Killers. I awaited that eBay/Amazon purchase like a rabid squirrel, and when it finally arrived I tore it open...only to discover it was the original printing of the Ah yes, what I've come to learn is a signature move on the part of Ennis (and others like Aaron in Scalped or Wood in DMZ): the volume of "side character stories". Related tangent: I was obsessed with Preacher when I first read it, and tracked down everything in print. Including some obscure little one-off of story about the Saint of Killers. I awaited that eBay/Amazon purchase like a rabid squirrel, and when it finally arrived I tore it open...only to discover it was the original printing of the very story collected in this volume. Bugger me - where's the extra-special secret stories I was seeking? Re-reads like this are both hard and gratifying - hard to think I've forgotten so much of what I once knew, and gratifying to see these old, vaguely familiar characters in scenarios that are so new to me, even if I have a funny idea I know where they're headed. Favourite character: well duh - the Saint Of Killers. Favourite moment: "Go an' look." Favourite surprise: the Devil playing cards, smoking a cigar and cursing. Least exciting story: the lame parody of 20th-century action films, even if there were a few fun puerile moments.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Much better one off stories than the Cassidy origin. The saint of killers story was phenomenal. The Arseface and The Jodi, T.C. stories were ok.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jim C

    This is a collection of three stories that provide background information for different characters. This collection does not move the story arc forward so one can read this collection at anytime. In this collection, we find out how the Saint of Killers comes to be, how the accident occurred to Arseface, and a side story to Jodi and T.C. who were characters in Jesse's teenage years. I absolutely loved the stories about the Saint of Killers and Arseface. Even though I knew about these stories from This is a collection of three stories that provide background information for different characters. This collection does not move the story arc forward so one can read this collection at anytime. In this collection, we find out how the Saint of Killers comes to be, how the accident occurred to Arseface, and a side story to Jodi and T.C. who were characters in Jesse's teenage years. I absolutely loved the stories about the Saint of Killers and Arseface. Even though I knew about these stories from the television series, these two stories were fantastic and emotional. One cannot help but feel empathy for the Saint of Killers and how he became so cold and ruthless. There are differences between the print and television story of Arseface and I prefer the comics story. It details how teenagers feel alone and how in some cases the parents are the problem and not the children. I was going to give this collection five stars based on these two stories and then I read the final story. Visually, there is nothing wrong with it. It was just a little too much on the nose for my liking as it was blatant what it was trying to spoof. I enjoy the background information aspect of universes as we get to see the motivations of characters. I would have never guessed that I would have enjoyed this universe's background information so much. Two out of the three stories were fantastic and a pure pleasure to read. I wish I stopped after the second story and moved on to the next collection.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Roman Kurys

    This caught me a bit off guard as this is not a continuation of where we left Preacher in the last volume. Which was, naturally, a bit of a cliffhanger so I was excited to see what happened and instead I found myself reading a collection of short stories set in the world of Preacher. It was solid, however. I enjoyed learning about the Saint of Killers, that really was a heck of a story. Just enough packed to not miss the main events of the series. The story of Assface was...ok. My least favorite This caught me a bit off guard as this is not a continuation of where we left Preacher in the last volume. Which was, naturally, a bit of a cliffhanger so I was excited to see what happened and instead I found myself reading a collection of short stories set in the world of Preacher. It was solid, however. I enjoyed learning about the Saint of Killers, that really was a heck of a story. Just enough packed to not miss the main events of the series. The story of Assface was...ok. My least favorite of the three. I guess there were enough people wondering why he looks the way that he looks and so now they have their answer. I never wondered. The last story was painful to read more so then anything, so I suppose: success! (At least from writing perspective). Digging deeper into Jessie’s past does give perspective as to what makes him tick. What kind of a man he really is. None of these are essentially necessary to the overall story and could be safely skipped. If I’d known ahead of time, I probably would have, especially since short stories aren’t my favorite. However, if you enjoy learning backstories of various characters, this might be a great one for you to pick up. And also now I get to feel good knowing I am following the series in a “proper order” and without skipping anything, so that’s a plus! And now, onto the next book on my never ending To Read list. Roman

  14. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    DISCLAIMER: I wasn't able to find the physical trade of this one and when I went out to get the single issues I could only find The Saint of Killers storyline. So I will only review that portion of this trade and not the other two stories. So with that out of the way, let's hop into this! So the story of this tells us the origin of The Saint of Killers; the unstoppable, completely OP cowboy who hunts Jessie in the main Preacher series. I always found this guy to be really scary and relentless in DISCLAIMER: I wasn't able to find the physical trade of this one and when I went out to get the single issues I could only find The Saint of Killers storyline. So I will only review that portion of this trade and not the other two stories. So with that out of the way, let's hop into this! So the story of this tells us the origin of The Saint of Killers; the unstoppable, completely OP cowboy who hunts Jessie in the main Preacher series. I always found this guy to be really scary and relentless in the series, so going back to the wild west and seeing his backstory was a treat. We get to learn more about him and how got his ridiculous powers. The story is pretty well written and in Garth Ennis fashion, is dark and gory on every level! The artwork was not too amazing, but I grew to love it the more I read; the last issue however switched to a completely different artist, which had a style that really didn't suit the book at all! Overall it's a bit of a break away from the main story in Preacher, but its a pretty solid volume!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This volume consists of three different Preacher tie in stories. Saint of Killers: This is the origin of the unstoppable gunslinger who has Jesse Custer in his sights. I enjoyed this one the most of the three as I'm a huge fan of Weird Westerns, and that's exactly what this is. Satan and The Angel of Death show up as well. 5 Stars Story of you-know-who: This is the origin of Arseface, and this was surprisingly deep. 5 stars. The Good Ol' Boys: This one was the weakest of the bunch. A story of Jody This volume consists of three different Preacher tie in stories. Saint of Killers: This is the origin of the unstoppable gunslinger who has Jesse Custer in his sights. I enjoyed this one the most of the three as I'm a huge fan of Weird Westerns, and that's exactly what this is. Satan and The Angel of Death show up as well. 5 Stars Story of you-know-who: This is the origin of Arseface, and this was surprisingly deep. 5 stars. The Good Ol' Boys: This one was the weakest of the bunch. A story of Jody and TC from before we see them in Preacher. Just a little too over the top, even for this series. I didn't find most of the jokes funny, and it almost seemed like a self parody. Still entertaining though. 3 stars. Overall not a bad volume at all, and a nice aside from the main storyline.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Britton

    Religion tends to be an easy touch point for satirists, so much so that it becomes dull rather quickly. We get it, religion has some rather silly concepts behind it, so much so that it almost makes fun of itself. With that in mind, I avoided Preacher for a while, fearing it would be another 'fuck religion' polemic disguised as a story (a la His Dark Materials), and while there are the 'fuck religion' moments layered in Preacher from time to time, Ennis never gets too lost in his message and allo Religion tends to be an easy touch point for satirists, so much so that it becomes dull rather quickly. We get it, religion has some rather silly concepts behind it, so much so that it almost makes fun of itself. With that in mind, I avoided Preacher for a while, fearing it would be another 'fuck religion' polemic disguised as a story (a la His Dark Materials), and while there are the 'fuck religion' moments layered in Preacher from time to time, Ennis never gets too lost in his message and allows his focus to be clear. Religious satire died with Preacher for me, as few others could ever get quite get as madcap, as strange, nor as deviously imaginative as Ennis' opus on religion was, and still very much is. I sometimes like to jokingly describe Preacher to friends as if Hunter S. Thompson decided to try his hand at writing a comic (without being Transmetropolitan), yet that comparison to too faint for this series. Ennis certainly shares Thompson's love for the demented and the depraved, but the vision that he dishes out for Preacher is purely his own. Ennis' satire is cutting, yet toned down in comparison to some of his other series' (I'm lookin' at you, The Boys), certainly his crass humor can become bothersome at times, but the characterization and the drama of the series are excellent. Many of the characters that are introduced throughout Preacher screams iconoclasm, with so many of them being unforgettable from Jesse to Ruth to Cassidy to The Saint of Killers and Preacher's version of God (who's not a very nice God to put it plainly), Ennis' talent for crafting interesting and well developed characters can sometimes be underrated, with most people focusing on his crass humor and dark intensity that would become landmarks of the series. But many forget the oddly heartfelt story that is told throughout the series I often point people to this series when people ask me what I find to be a golden standard for long form storytelling, there is never a moment in Preacher that feels like a misstep or a bit that's boring, it's a rare series where everything comes together so beautifully that I'll dare not ruin it for anyone. Despite the plot being very straightforward, much of the intrigue comes from the characters and their personalities, which are based on their history and psychologies, much like how real people form their personalities based on their life experiences. Ennis' keen awareness for characterization and conflicts arising from characters' motivations and desires is the crux of what makes Preacher compelling. Ennis does take his pot shots at religion, yet never tells you what to think and never condescends to the audience, as he can sometimes do. He allows himself to be utterly selfless with his pen and give us a good story, which is all what he could hope for nowadays. Steve Dillon's art is whole other thing entirely, and while I'm not always fond of his style (his characters often look similar), I find that the way that he and Ennis worked together was almost magical, something Ennis would lament. Ennis and Dillion's creative partnership is one of the great partnerships in comics, with few others being comparable: Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips, Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino. Dillon almost pitch perfectly captures the depravity, as well as the heart that lies within Preacher's story. Their influences are clear, from Hellblazer (which was the book that they cut their teeth on State side with Vertigo), to Leone's spaghetti westerns to The Bible, but they bring their influences together in order to make something truly unique and original. This is a series that I love because of how creatively ugly it is. It is so vile, so tasteless, and so utterly insane that it's hard not to appreciate it. One of the reasons that I found that the AMC show failed is because it didn't share the original comic's sense of vulgarity. It's like if NBC decided to try and make an adaptation of Transmetropolitan, it's vulgarity is a part of the series' charm. Then again I suppose it's fitting, to make something that's so depraved and unpleasant, one would have to tap into something that's also extremely depraved and unpleasant. There's simply nothing else like Preacher. Preacher is truly a once in a life time series, and Preacher is one of those series' that reminds me why I love comics. While Ennis may focus too much on the sales numbers, I find that Preacher is his magnum opus in terms of artistic merit. Is it high art? No, I don't think so, yet I often look back to a particular satirical fantasist when I'm asked such questions: "Susan hated literature, she'd much prefer to read a good book."

  17. 5 out of 5

    The Flooze

    Ancient History covers the background of some of Jesse's adversaries: the Saint of Killers, Arseface, and Jody & T.C. Saint of Killers struck me as the most interesting. It's got an haunting, mythic quality to it. I even found myself sympathizing with the man he was and the situation that brought him to what he is now. Arseface is a story of a quiet teen from an abusive home. Though I don't care all that much for the character, it was sad to see Sheriff Root's treatment, the mother's depression, a Ancient History covers the background of some of Jesse's adversaries: the Saint of Killers, Arseface, and Jody & T.C. Saint of Killers struck me as the most interesting. It's got an haunting, mythic quality to it. I even found myself sympathizing with the man he was and the situation that brought him to what he is now. Arseface is a story of a quiet teen from an abusive home. Though I don't care all that much for the character, it was sad to see Sheriff Root's treatment, the mother's depression, and the uncertainty that led "Arseface" to destruction. He inspires a lot of pity. Jody & T.C. What to say about these two. The entire story ran as a farce of a blockbuster action-comedy: the gorgeous model-turned-lawyer, the ruggedly handsome cop trying to protect her from the Bad Guy foreigner...until the good ol' boys show up. The two are sadistic and reprehensible, but damn if they don't know how to kick ass. Other than highlighting Jody's warped sense of honor this didn't add much to the world, but was still mildly entertaining. Because this is an add-on to the Preacher series, the artwork was handled by three different artists. Having grown used to the style of the previous books, I found some of these pages lacking by comparison. There was a realism missing from many of the fight scenes, and the work was somewhat inconsistent. Overall, worth reading for the Saint of Killers' origins, but I'll be glad to get back to Jesse, Tulip and Cassidy!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    Ancient History features 3 spinoff stories about The Saint of Killers, Arseface, and the Jody and T.C. tandem. I believe that these standalone chapters are not vital to the whole Preacher story as a whole, though they offer a deeper character development that the main series didn't show. All three stories are entertaining, though it's only with the origin of The Saint of Killers and Arseface I am invested in. The background story about Jody and T.C., with all the satires and violence and its inap Ancient History features 3 spinoff stories about The Saint of Killers, Arseface, and the Jody and T.C. tandem. I believe that these standalone chapters are not vital to the whole Preacher story as a whole, though they offer a deeper character development that the main series didn't show. All three stories are entertaining, though it's only with the origin of The Saint of Killers and Arseface I am invested in. The background story about Jody and T.C., with all the satires and violence and its inappropriateness, falls flat and hollow when compared with the other two. Arseface's story before the ass face is a sweet, tragic comedy about a teenage kid who grew up everyday with everything going against him. I pity him and the sad state he is in now while laughing my arse off (pun intended) as I read his muffled dialogue shown in boxed translations. Whu wuhn hur whu huhmuh du wuh hu wuuh? (Who wouldn't try to imitate the way he speaks)? The Saint of Killers origin story on the other hand might pass as a straightforward revenge-western story with a lot of glorious bloodbath from gun-slinging and sabre-cutting, if not because of his brief trip to hell and encounter with the devil himself. Damn, this saint is clearly NOT someone to piss-off! Preacher volume 4 gives a quick detour from the main storyline. It may not be at par with the main comics, but these spinoff chapters are definitely must-reads for Preacher readers and fans.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Holly (The GrimDragon)

    There are three parts to this volume, featuring some of the main supporting characters. It begins with the action-packed backstory of The Saint of Killers. He is so badass! This installment takes up a good portion of the book. I really enjoyed this! The second story was about the much talked about Arseface. Wow. There was a deep, intense sadness throughout. Surprisingly heartbreaking. I was quite drawn to it. The third was a satirical look at action hero movies, which focused on Jesse's uncles, Jod There are three parts to this volume, featuring some of the main supporting characters. It begins with the action-packed backstory of The Saint of Killers. He is so badass! This installment takes up a good portion of the book. I really enjoyed this! The second story was about the much talked about Arseface. Wow. There was a deep, intense sadness throughout. Surprisingly heartbreaking. I was quite drawn to it. The third was a satirical look at action hero movies, which focused on Jesse's uncles, Jody & TC. This was okay, but definitely my least favorite out of the three! Even though this takes away from the main storyline with Jesse, Cassidy & Tulip, it was nice to have a more fleshed out view of some of the important supporting characters. I just requested volumes 5 & 6 from the library. Now that I am back into reading them, I really cannot wait to see where the story goes next!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This should really be labeled Volume 3.5, as it does not follow the main cast of characters -- neither Jesse, Tulip nor Cassidy make an appearance in this volume -- nor does it push forward the main story line. That being said, these three unrelated back stories are still engaging and do a good job of fleshing out the ensemble cast of the Preacher universe. The first, chronicling how the Saint of Killers became who he is, is the highlight of the three, but the Arseface story is also revealing and This should really be labeled Volume 3.5, as it does not follow the main cast of characters -- neither Jesse, Tulip nor Cassidy make an appearance in this volume -- nor does it push forward the main story line. That being said, these three unrelated back stories are still engaging and do a good job of fleshing out the ensemble cast of the Preacher universe. The first, chronicling how the Saint of Killers became who he is, is the highlight of the three, but the Arseface story is also revealing and worth reading. The story of Jesse's redneck cousins was the only one that I really didn't love, as it was a little too farcical and over the top. I also didn't like the fill-in artist, Carlos Ezquerra, as much as Steve Dillon, the regular artist for the series.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I enjoyed how over the top the Jody/T.C. story was with the typical over the top action star, and the female with the over-complicated backstory. I also enjoyed reading how the Saint of Killers took up his enchanted pistols and began his reign of terror. Saying that, though...i didn't like the artwork and I felt that even though the stories were good, most of the book was a waste of time. An unwelcome break to the normal Preacher story arc. I enjoyed how over the top the Jody/T.C. story was with the typical over the top action star, and the female with the over-complicated backstory. I also enjoyed reading how the Saint of Killers took up his enchanted pistols and began his reign of terror. Saying that, though...i didn't like the artwork and I felt that even though the stories were good, most of the book was a waste of time. An unwelcome break to the normal Preacher story arc.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    this is just ...so incredibly boring and also unnecessary. i literally don't even think i read this 'volume' the first time i read through the series because NONE of this seems familiar in the slightest. anyway this is a volume comprised entirely of specials that have little to do with the main plot line. you can honestly skip it and not miss out on anything important. the saint of killers stuff was probably the best out of the three but still leaves me rolling my eyes, mostly because i have lite this is just ...so incredibly boring and also unnecessary. i literally don't even think i read this 'volume' the first time i read through the series because NONE of this seems familiar in the slightest. anyway this is a volume comprised entirely of specials that have little to do with the main plot line. you can honestly skip it and not miss out on anything important. the saint of killers stuff was probably the best out of the three but still leaves me rolling my eyes, mostly because i have literally zero patience for 'murdered wife and child' origin stories and also just because i don't caaare. the arseface story was ...okay i guess but again never in my life have i ever thought 'boy i wish i knew more about him'. plus we pretty much knew all of his stuff already from the main series. and the one with jody and ...the other guy was just ...entirely awful. who in the world wants to read more about them. [loud groaning]

  23. 5 out of 5

    C

    This is a collection of three spin-off stories. The first tells the much-needed backstory of The Saint of Killers. While part of this is actually one of the few areas where the TV series was true to the comics, some of it was new to me. It was well-done, creative, and interesting; it's also the reason that I didn't give this volume a more negative review. The second tells the little-needed backstory of Arseface, who is... basically a useless character. We learn how he became deformed, in a very da This is a collection of three spin-off stories. The first tells the much-needed backstory of The Saint of Killers. While part of this is actually one of the few areas where the TV series was true to the comics, some of it was new to me. It was well-done, creative, and interesting; it's also the reason that I didn't give this volume a more negative review. The second tells the little-needed backstory of Arseface, who is... basically a useless character. We learn how he became deformed, in a very dated and cliched plotline that adds virtually nothing to the story except satisfy one's curiosity as to how someone can survive a self-inflicted shotgun wound to the head. The third is an even less-needed story of two people (an intentionally cliche hero and his intentionally cliche naive female companion) who run into Jesse's family's enforcers, Jody and T.C. While the male "protagonist" is supposed to be foolish and annoying, I actually felt bad for him because of the cruelty of Jody and T.C.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ostrava

    I get that going from all praise to a one star review is a tremendous downgrade, but it's just me not thinking these stories needed to be told (within the canon of the series that is). Origin stories don't work more often than not. Sorry. Skip. I get that going from all praise to a one star review is a tremendous downgrade, but it's just me not thinking these stories needed to be told (within the canon of the series that is). Origin stories don't work more often than not. Sorry. Skip.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    The first half of this volume was just...straight confusion from me. The second half was great and interesting and a little different from what I've seen from this series thus far. "Well shit. Pardon me while I go fetch the fuckin' Bentley." I lol'ed. The first half of this volume was just...straight confusion from me. The second half was great and interesting and a little different from what I've seen from this series thus far. "Well shit. Pardon me while I go fetch the fuckin' Bentley." I lol'ed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    William

    Their history got old.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carrie-Anne

    I loved the first two parts of this volume, but I wasn't as fussed about the last one - don't get me wrong, I enjoyed it, but up against an Arseface origins story and the Saint of flippin' killers, a story about a couple of Hollywood starlets who get lost in the swap while trying to get away from a crazy guy intent on killing them, and accidentally teaming up with two considerably worse people just wasn't quite as good (which is saying something, because...well just read that last sentence back! I loved the first two parts of this volume, but I wasn't as fussed about the last one - don't get me wrong, I enjoyed it, but up against an Arseface origins story and the Saint of flippin' killers, a story about a couple of Hollywood starlets who get lost in the swap while trying to get away from a crazy guy intent on killing them, and accidentally teaming up with two considerably worse people just wasn't quite as good (which is saying something, because...well just read that last sentence back!) The Saint of Killers was rad, so freaking cool how he's just a badass to end all badasses Arseface's story was a bit more sad, involving terrible parenting and hero worship of the completely wrong kind

  28. 4 out of 5

    Garrison Kelly

    Three tales of bloodshed, three glimpses into the pasts of the famous Preacher characters we know today. The Saint of Killers started off as a wild west bounty hunter with a heart so cold he brought snowy weather to Texas (that’s not a clever joke, that’s a fact). Arse-Face’s was a disenfranchised teenager constantly bullied at school and abused by his corrupt cop father. The Good Old Boys Jody and TC were swamp fighters who stumbled upon a gang of mercenaries trying to recover a blackmail tape Three tales of bloodshed, three glimpses into the pasts of the famous Preacher characters we know today. The Saint of Killers started off as a wild west bounty hunter with a heart so cold he brought snowy weather to Texas (that’s not a clever joke, that’s a fact). Arse-Face’s was a disenfranchised teenager constantly bullied at school and abused by his corrupt cop father. The Good Old Boys Jody and TC were swamp fighters who stumbled upon a gang of mercenaries trying to recover a blackmail tape from a cop and a smoking hot lawyer. Nobody is safe in these homicidal stories. What doesn’t kill them will leave a scar. The level of violence in these stories is maximum tier, maybe even beyond that if it’s humanly possible. It’s more than just splattering blood across the scenery. It’s more than just broken bones and squishy organs. It’s psychological torture. It’s reliving those horrific scenes for the rest of your life (however long that may be). Maybe if you’re lucky, your brain will explode in this hurricane of violence and you can be spared from this maddening torture. But then there’s always the possibility of living with a sadistic devil or a corrupt god. In which case, the bloodshed and brutality will come full circle long before you’re ready to be reincarnated and have it happen to you all over again. Unfortunately, this kind of horrific display is also applicable to innocent animals that’ve done nothing wrong. The animal cruelty in this graphic novel is easily the hardest to stomach while the violence to humans is at least sick and twisted fun. Whether it’s Gumbo McCready’s gang shooting horses, Pube shooting a yappy dog, or Jody beating the hell out of a confused gorilla with a baseball bat, your heart will sink so far down it’ll think it’s in the ninth circle of hell. While the animal deaths are a true representation of how screwed up life can be, it doesn’t make them easier to read about, much less physically see on the pages of a graphic novel. Thank goodness for the ASPCA, which I donate to every month. Just as alarming is the way in which Arse-Face is treated throughout his story. He’s constantly beaten by his father, beaten by the students at school, and rejected pretty much everywhere else he goes, and this is all before his face became permanently disfigured. His only escape in life is through his punk rocker best friend Pube, who happened to be the one to shoot the yappy dog with a shotgun. Not much of an escape, huh? If I had to live that screwed up of a life in Texas, I too would want to find solace in even the most horrible people while smoking marijuana until the end of time. Disturbing as hell, yet the most poignant of the three stories, especially considering how Kurt Cobain’s suicide played a role in Pube and Arse-Face’s decision-making. Preacher, Vol. 4 is equal parts heartbreak and violent fun. The delightfully vulgar dialogue sets it all up with perfection and can be another entertaining part of the graphic novel, even with Saddam Hopper and his inability to swear properly. Garth Ennis knocks it out of the park yet again with these Preacher graphic novels. He probably needs many years of therapy, but it’ll be worth it if he continues pumping out awesomely violent fiction like this. How does a passing grade sound to all of you?

  29. 4 out of 5

    ***Dave Hill

    While this volume could be skipped as mostly backstory (even the Saint of Killers parts are recapped in the main tale), it's still worth a read (mostly for that Saint of Killers part). ----- NOV. 2011 RE-READ: This collection is three miniseries/specials in the Preacher-verse. The first details the origin of the Saint of Killers, a tragic and monstrous character driven into his profession as the angel of (particularly) bloody death by the machinations of the Lord ... a decision that the Lord will e While this volume could be skipped as mostly backstory (even the Saint of Killers parts are recapped in the main tale), it's still worth a read (mostly for that Saint of Killers part). ----- NOV. 2011 RE-READ: This collection is three miniseries/specials in the Preacher-verse. The first details the origin of the Saint of Killers, a tragic and monstrous character driven into his profession as the angel of (particularly) bloody death by the machinations of the Lord ... a decision that the Lord will eventually come to regret. The Saint of Killers represents humanity at its most tragic, dragged down into sin and despair by a deceptive God, seeking to pull ourselves out, only to not only fall but be pushed. This book is powerfully written, marred only by some truly ugly art by Steve Pugh; to a degree, that ugliness is part and parcel of the story, but too often distracts from it. The second tale is the origin of Arseface, the disfigured failed suicide and object of mockery in the Preacher saga. I've always had a mixed feeling about the character, thinking that the derision of him gets bumped up way to close to 11 ... but on this reread of the series, I realize the Arseface is the true Everyman character in the book, deluded and driven to self-destruction by his faith in others, abused and taken advantage of by the universe despite having essentially a good heart, and, ultimately, finding happiness with others as deluded and simple-minded as we are. The Arseface tale fleshes out the summary from the mainline Preacher saga. It's unnecessary in many ways, but not bad as a way to pad out a volume focused on the Saint of Killers. Nor is the final tale, a short story with Jesse's detestable cousins, played strictly for horrified laughs. While still horrid in their mindset and actions, their integrity in doing so compared to the other players in this spy drama gone horribly wrong in the bayou leads you to actually admire them as the least awful people of a bad, pretentious, incompetent bunch. --------- NOVEMBER 2019 This volume is a good spot to highlight some differences between the comic and the TV series. The TV series simplified (and scattered) the origins of the Saint of Killers, but he still remains a major presence in the show, nearly as daunting as his comic book version (and with a lovely leitmotif in the soundtrack). Graham McTavish does a fine job in the role. While the comic presents a broad arc to the character, from being roused from his rest by the angels to track down Genesis to his final confrontation at the end, the series tends to use him more often as a menacing background and increasingly foreground character, which robs him of a bit of his mystique. Arseface's presentation in the TV series is one of its high points, removing the elements of cruel fun-poking that the comic book had, and making Eugene a much more sympathetic, even likeable character (even if his overall arc was broken and mangled by the show's season structure). Ian Colletti had the thankless job of wearing that extensive prosthetic for most of the series, but turns in a fine portrayal.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Keith Moser

    Preacher Vol 4 Ancient History doesn't deal with Jesse's attempt to find God with Tulip & Cassidy at all, but is rather a collection of spin offs. Here, we have three Preacher Specials which expore the backstory of some other second tier characters. The first special, Saint of Killers, gives us the story of...the Saint of Killers. The preface explains the different look to the comic due to new artists brought onboard while Preacher' still was being published. There are some bits that look better Preacher Vol 4 Ancient History doesn't deal with Jesse's attempt to find God with Tulip & Cassidy at all, but is rather a collection of spin offs. Here, we have three Preacher Specials which expore the backstory of some other second tier characters. The first special, Saint of Killers, gives us the story of...the Saint of Killers. The preface explains the different look to the comic due to new artists brought onboard while Preacher' still was being published. There are some bits that look better than usual, but it was odd seeing such a different Saint (at times). The story is 4* and could have been 5* had it gone back to the Civil War days for more than a splash page to explain a little more about this man before he became the Saint. His time in hell was beautifully drawn and written, and his revenge on earth as the newly ordained Saint was brutal and bloody. The Story of You-Know-Who gives the back story of Arseface and is a solid 5* story. It's only half the length of SoK but still gives a damn fine arc. Set in the days of Nirvana, it introduces us to Root's teenage son before his botched suicide attempt. We meet his Cobain-loving friend; we see Root beat up his son; we see Mrs Root drink her way to oblivion; we see the struggles of being the son of a sheriff who makes the lives of every big jock miserable; we see the awkward attempts to talk to girls. It's all written so well with hints of the "future" (Columbine) and bombs from the "present" (Kurt's suicide). I'm anxious to see if Arseface will actually appear in future stories as he tried to take revenge on the man he feels is responsible for his father's death or if this is all we'll get. The Good Old Boys takes us back before Jody & T.C. crossed paths with Jesse for their last time & gives us a little story about them. It seems like it might have been written in a day. Here's an example of how two new characters are introduced on page 4: "Hey, don't mess with me lady! I'm a cop on the edge!" / "You watch how you talk to me, then! Remember, I'm a supermodel-turned-lawyer with a dangerous secret!" Page 4 is filled with even more horribly-written exposition and these characters and their whole story just stunk. Jody's a pretty bad ass character, but he was the bad guy in previous issues so it feels weird to root for him as he kills dozens of terrorists (oh yeah, there are terrorists chasing after the cop and model-cum-lawyer). And the continuity is absolute shit. On one page, our macho cop gets covered in shit (don't ask), and on the facing page, with no break in the action, he's completely clean. If I could give this less than 1* I would. But I can't, so it, plus the other two average out to a 3* overall. Here's hoping I still remember the important story when I (hopefully) get back to it in Vol 5.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.