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Death in a Tenured Position

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When Janet Mandelbaum is made the first woman professor at Harvard's English Department, the men are not happy. They are unhappier still when her tea is spiked and she is found drunk on the floor of the women's room. With a little time, Janet's dear friend and colleague Kate Fansler could track down the culprit, but time is running out.... When Janet Mandelbaum is made the first woman professor at Harvard's English Department, the men are not happy. They are unhappier still when her tea is spiked and she is found drunk on the floor of the women's room. With a little time, Janet's dear friend and colleague Kate Fansler could track down the culprit, but time is running out....


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When Janet Mandelbaum is made the first woman professor at Harvard's English Department, the men are not happy. They are unhappier still when her tea is spiked and she is found drunk on the floor of the women's room. With a little time, Janet's dear friend and colleague Kate Fansler could track down the culprit, but time is running out.... When Janet Mandelbaum is made the first woman professor at Harvard's English Department, the men are not happy. They are unhappier still when her tea is spiked and she is found drunk on the floor of the women's room. With a little time, Janet's dear friend and colleague Kate Fansler could track down the culprit, but time is running out....

30 review for Death in a Tenured Position

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Three stars for merit, not for my enjoyment of reading this book. I can't really state the reason I am sad after reading this one without spoiling the book for others. Actually, I would recommend skipping this Kate Fansler book unless you have loved all the preceding books as I have. On the face of it, Kate is called for help to Harvard by the first female English professor in Harvard's history. There is a bit of fun she did have in her portrayals of the male ruling class of the institution. They Three stars for merit, not for my enjoyment of reading this book. I can't really state the reason I am sad after reading this one without spoiling the book for others. Actually, I would recommend skipping this Kate Fansler book unless you have loved all the preceding books as I have. On the face of it, Kate is called for help to Harvard by the first female English professor in Harvard's history. There is a bit of fun she did have in her portrayals of the male ruling class of the institution. They were, of course, horrified to be granted a million dollars only if they appointed a female to join them. From the search committee: "The dame we seek ought to be well established and, if possible, not given to hysterical scenes." Reed was "junketing about the world to advise on police methods," leaving Kate without excuse when called on by the selected Harvard English professor to come to her aid. The initial plea came from member of a Lesbian group, predictably portrayed in motley clothing with aggressive dog, to bring up other problems this old classmate of Kate's was experiencing...now the lone female professor at Harvard. Very melodramatic and perfectly unbelievable behavior was enacted by the male professors of the English Department such as sneaking vodka into the woman's campari until she was unconscious whereupon she was transferred to a bathtub. That was just a small part of the scene that met Kate's arrival and only a small part of what she was to unscramble. After attempts to uncover who was behind some dirty tricks, the ill-chosen female professor is found dead. Arrested for the crime is the former husband who was also a college boyfriend of Kate's. Kate hires her expensive lawyer friend and begins her investigation. This was published in 1981. (view spoiler)[ This book has a brilliant English professor committing suicide, something this author also enacted a little more than 20 years after this book was published. Sad to say. (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Julie Ehlers

    Talking, talking, talking. So much talking. So many characters saying so many things as wordily as humanly possible. Don't get me wrong, they were usually talking about interesting things, and I don't mind a lot of talking in novels in general. But mystery novels should have more action than talking, and this one was about 90 percent talking, 10 percent action. This is the fourth Amanda Cross mystery I've read but, I believe, the earliest one I've read in terms of when she wrote them. Now I'm wo Talking, talking, talking. So much talking. So many characters saying so many things as wordily as humanly possible. Don't get me wrong, they were usually talking about interesting things, and I don't mind a lot of talking in novels in general. But mystery novels should have more action than talking, and this one was about 90 percent talking, 10 percent action. This is the fourth Amanda Cross mystery I've read but, I believe, the earliest one I've read in terms of when she wrote them. Now I'm wondering if I was too easy on her other novels, or if she just got better at writing them as time went on. Probably the latter, but that didn't make this one any more fun to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I read this book as part of a book group. We were charged with reading something fictional "about academia," and in fairness, the conversation we had as a result of reading the novel was quite strong, especially in considering how the role of women in academia has changed (or not changed) in the intervening 40 years between when the book is set and now. We also laughed a lot, too, because it's really a dreadfully, awfully written book. Every single character is a type. The protagonist, Kate, is a I read this book as part of a book group. We were charged with reading something fictional "about academia," and in fairness, the conversation we had as a result of reading the novel was quite strong, especially in considering how the role of women in academia has changed (or not changed) in the intervening 40 years between when the book is set and now. We also laughed a lot, too, because it's really a dreadfully, awfully written book. Every single character is a type. The protagonist, Kate, is a privileged, married woman with limitless freedom and seemingly no end of money, who is both a respected academic and a keen detective. She is never wrong, and she has almost no self awareness. (She's the sort of character you could only love if you were exactly like her, and troublingly, a little basic research reveals more than a few similarities between Kate and the author who created her.) Her former classmate, whom she is called in to assist but doesn't really like, is snooty and career-driven. Her former lover, who is also the classmate's ex-husband, is a hippieish veteran with a guitar and a suitably hippie name ("Moon"). The bigwig tenured faculty member is overweight, red-faced, and suitably parochial. The lesbians who live in the local commune all believe in separatist politics, refer to each other as "sisters," and keep feminine clothing for when they need their driver's license photo taken because of course they do. It goes on, and on, and on. Nobody acts like a real, full-blooded person; everyone's just there to fulfill their little role. Worse, there's almost no actual mystery, because Kate does so little for herself. She talks to people, certainly, but they tend to bring her her clues on a platter. Toward the end of the book, she makes some absolutely incredible mental leaps based solely on the contents of books she's seen lying around, which requires the reader to either be equally familiar with those works or very, very easily impressed. That type of story - the mystery where the reader is kept from knowing vital information until the reveal - can work when you have really interesting characters or really high tension. Death in a Tenured Position provides neither of these. In fact, I'm not sure what it does provide, aside from 150 pages of text. I did like the dog, though.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Seana

    I read all the Amanda Cross mysteries a long time ago. I really enjoyed them, particularly for whatever author or issue she was examining in the course of the mystery. I seem to have run into a fair amount of people who find them wanting in some way, but I didn't. I also really like the nonfiction she wrote under her real name, Carolyn Heilbrun. I read all the Amanda Cross mysteries a long time ago. I really enjoyed them, particularly for whatever author or issue she was examining in the course of the mystery. I seem to have run into a fair amount of people who find them wanting in some way, but I didn't. I also really like the nonfiction she wrote under her real name, Carolyn Heilbrun.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    I am very interested in what Cross writes about, and what the characters think about, and you would think that a literary mystery is just my speed. But this is very, very dull. What do you call wit without humor? Archness? Academia? There’s plenty of that in here. I’d love to read this story by someone who is better at people (like Sayers), or mysteries (like Christie), or wit WITH humor (like Christianna Brand or Sarah Caudwell). I understand that she gets better at writing later. I will give t I am very interested in what Cross writes about, and what the characters think about, and you would think that a literary mystery is just my speed. But this is very, very dull. What do you call wit without humor? Archness? Academia? There’s plenty of that in here. I’d love to read this story by someone who is better at people (like Sayers), or mysteries (like Christie), or wit WITH humor (like Christianna Brand or Sarah Caudwell). I understand that she gets better at writing later. I will give the later ones a chance.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    I am not certain what I think about this. I did not enjoy it very much. I liked the points of view on feminism, from Janet who thinks it is all nonsense and doesn't believe sexism exists, to the women's separatist commune, to Moon whom if we met him now would seem rather sexist (although if he continued to develop he might have become a respectable feminist ally), to Kate herself who looks at all these shades thoughtfully and considers them in their contexts. But I thought the mystery itself (view I am not certain what I think about this. I did not enjoy it very much. I liked the points of view on feminism, from Janet who thinks it is all nonsense and doesn't believe sexism exists, to the women's separatist commune, to Moon whom if we met him now would seem rather sexist (although if he continued to develop he might have become a respectable feminist ally), to Kate herself who looks at all these shades thoughtfully and considers them in their contexts. But I thought the mystery itself (view spoiler)[ was deeply unsatisfying; woman kills herself because she is isolated, all right, and Kate figures it out, all right, and we see all these other people react. And so? I do not think the faculty of Harvard is responsible for Janet's death, no matter how cruel and unsympathetic and isolating they were, nor do I think Kate and Sylvia were responsible, and so forth. It is not a mystery novel, it is a social commentary, and the social commentary is not in my mind particularly insightful of interesting. Cross could have dug much deeper into how much women oppress themselves, into just why Janet is so misogynistic, and so forth, but she keeps it on the surface and the book fails both as mystery and as commentary. (hide spoiler)] Also, Cross is back to the dialogue in long, long, long paragraphs of exposition, which I may forgive when Kate does as it is defined as part of her personality, but when other characters do it, especially characters who really should not speak like that given what we know of their background, it is annoying.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I adore Carolyn Heilbrun, so I thought I'd love this mystery under her pseudonym. This one drags through every preposterous murder scenario it's possible for the human mind to invent, and then settles on the least interesting. Maybe I blame it for reminding me how dreary sexism was in the 70s -- or how little editing used to be employed. Either way, I'll try reading at least one more Amanda Cross (hopefully, one with a more straightforward murder) before I give up. I adore Carolyn Heilbrun, so I thought I'd love this mystery under her pseudonym. This one drags through every preposterous murder scenario it's possible for the human mind to invent, and then settles on the least interesting. Maybe I blame it for reminding me how dreary sexism was in the 70s -- or how little editing used to be employed. Either way, I'll try reading at least one more Amanda Cross (hopefully, one with a more straightforward murder) before I give up.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    And some people in our book club didn't like Sayers' "Gaudy Night"! I found this very difficult to finish. Very wordy. Kind of preachy about the women's lib issues (quite boring--written in 1981, but living in a slightly earlier time) I simply could not warm up to any of the characters, and didn't even care if the 'victim' had been murdered or not! Not much to like here... And some people in our book club didn't like Sayers' "Gaudy Night"! I found this very difficult to finish. Very wordy. Kind of preachy about the women's lib issues (quite boring--written in 1981, but living in a slightly earlier time) I simply could not warm up to any of the characters, and didn't even care if the 'victim' had been murdered or not! Not much to like here...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rdonn

    The last of the three Amanda Cross books I've been given to read. I liked this one the least, though I still enjoyed reading it. I think another thing that I enjoy about her books are the unusual, eccentric characters one meets. In this book Harvard is almost the villain! Lots of women's issues in it. The last of the three Amanda Cross books I've been given to read. I liked this one the least, though I still enjoyed reading it. I think another thing that I enjoy about her books are the unusual, eccentric characters one meets. In this book Harvard is almost the villain! Lots of women's issues in it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Meg Lynch

    This mystery, published in 1981, made me remember the struggles that the first women professors hired at universities, especially ones like Harvard (where this takes place), which taught women but rarely hired them. More women are in academic professions now, but they still face resentment and restrictions that male faculty do not.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    This mystery really captured realities about universities and how faculty behave and function together with an historical period (when women were breaking into the professorate in Ivy League Universities in the 1970's). This mystery really captured realities about universities and how faculty behave and function together with an historical period (when women were breaking into the professorate in Ivy League Universities in the 1970's).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ben Loory

    Really enjoyed this. Smart, literate, full of feeling, and written at a high level of polish. The actual mystery isn't much of a mystery. But, whatever, we carry on. Really enjoyed this. Smart, literate, full of feeling, and written at a high level of polish. The actual mystery isn't much of a mystery. But, whatever, we carry on.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jack Heath

    Synopsis: when a woman joins Harvard's English Department, the men are not happy. Then someone spikes her tea. Can Professor Fansler find the culprit? Synopsis: when a woman joins Harvard's English Department, the men are not happy. Then someone spikes her tea. Can Professor Fansler find the culprit?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sulzby

    I was so looking forward to a mystery by Carolyn Heilbrun and especially one about academia, Harvard, and the women's movement. But this one is a real drag. It supposedly is in the late 70's/early 80's but reads like the 50's. I start grad school at Harvard in the 60's and got my first academic job (Northwestern University) in the 70's and moved to U of Michigan in the 80's. All of my experiences predated the way this book is written. Calling another woman a "libber" and talking about "frying and I was so looking forward to a mystery by Carolyn Heilbrun and especially one about academia, Harvard, and the women's movement. But this one is a real drag. It supposedly is in the late 70's/early 80's but reads like the 50's. I start grad school at Harvard in the 60's and got my first academic job (Northwestern University) in the 70's and moved to U of Michigan in the 80's. All of my experiences predated the way this book is written. Calling another woman a "libber" and talking about "frying and eating bras," whoever talked like that? Yes, boring meetings of pompous males--but we learned how to deal with them. There was a spot in which the book could have become more convincing and that is in explaining how Harvard used assistant professorships for women and then kept them from becoming tenured. (I had experience with that through reviewing a few of these talented women and following the case of one who stood up against Harvard's practices and got a tenured senior position in spite of them.) Harvard would hire talented women (and some men as well) in junior tenure track positions but when they came up for promotion and tenure would advertise the POSITION as if it were a new position. THEN the person coming up through Harvard's ranks for promotion to their "own position" had to prove via the review process that there was no one else in the nation better qualified for the position than this person was. This is different from most other top research universities in the US, although similar to many European universities. I read a number of reviews that found the beginning of this book OK but the ending disappointing (spoiler alert: I won't tell why). However, I found the redeeming grace of the book in Janet's despair at the end of the book and how Kate discovered it. I made a mistake in how I read this book. I thought it was the FIRST Kate Fansler mysteries even though the title here in Goodreads is clearly marked the 6th. So I thought Kate's dim personality and activities (as I judge them) were because she was just learning to become a "mystery-solver." But, alas, she is supposed to be an accomplished star. For me, it just doesn't work. I may read one or two more of these brief books just to give Carolyn Heilbrun/Amanda Cross as a fiction writer another chance.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David

    Book #: 40 Title: Death in a Tenured Position (Kate Fansler #6) Author: Amanda Cross Popsugar Category: Basic: A book set on a college or university campus Popsugar Category: Advanced: An "own voices" book Goodreads Category: A book by an author who has more than one book on your TBR Goodreads Category: A book that was nominated for or won an award in a genre you enjoy (Winner 1981 Nero Award for Mystery Novels) Dagonell Category: An book by an author on your RETAW list A-Z Title: D for Death A-Z Author: Book #: 40 Title: Death in a Tenured Position (Kate Fansler #6) Author: Amanda Cross Popsugar Category: Basic: A book set on a college or university campus Popsugar Category: Advanced: An "own voices" book Goodreads Category: A book by an author who has more than one book on your TBR Goodreads Category: A book that was nominated for or won an award in a genre you enjoy (Winner 1981 Nero Award for Mystery Novels) Dagonell Category: An book by an author on your RETAW list A-Z Title: D for Death A-Z Author: C for Cross Format: Hardcover, Local library Rating: **** four out of five stars Amanda Cross is the pen name for Carolyn Gold Heilbrun who used the pen name Amanda Cross because she wanted to protect her academic career. She has admitted in interviews that Kate Fansler, the protagonist, is her alter ego. However, this particular novel particularly strikes close to home because the murder victim was the first woman to receive tenure in the English department at Harvard. Carolyn was was the first woman to receive tenure in the English Department at Columbia. This is one of my wife's favorite authors and at one point, we owned all 14 books in the series. So, naturally, when I want to read the novel that has one of my favorite book quotes, our copy goes missing and I have to take it out of the library. RETAW stands for "Read Everything This Author Writes". In this case, just the Amanda Cross novels, as she has an extensive non-fiction bibliography in the field of women's studies. I intend to read the entire Kate Fansler series. "Professors of literature collect books the way a ship collects barnacles, without seeming effort. A literary academic can no more pass a bookstore than an alcoholic can pass a bar." -- Amanda Cross, Death in a Tenured Position, pg. 219

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Ouderkirk

    I read Death in a Tenured Position many years ago, when I was in university. Now, re-reading it, I get the humour of her many characterizations of certain types of men, who no doubt, were a torture to the feminists in the 70s and 80s. In a lot of ways, this novel is a revenge piece where Cross could vent her anger at the Janet Mandelbaums of the world who did not support feminism because they thought that if they made it, any woman could make it. She also took aim at men who lived in terror of ' I read Death in a Tenured Position many years ago, when I was in university. Now, re-reading it, I get the humour of her many characterizations of certain types of men, who no doubt, were a torture to the feminists in the 70s and 80s. In a lot of ways, this novel is a revenge piece where Cross could vent her anger at the Janet Mandelbaums of the world who did not support feminism because they thought that if they made it, any woman could make it. She also took aim at men who lived in terror of 'female hysterics' in the workplace, men who thought they were being magnanimous to say they had no objection to women who work, as long as home and kids came first. I think you have to be a certain age to appreciate the politics here; if you are too young, you might mistakenly think that Cross was a serious case of paranoia. Of course, Amanda Cross is the pen name for Carolyn Heilbrun, Columbia University professor, the first woman to receive tenure in the English department. She fought the battles of which she wrote. Her style is wordy, and often pretentious, filled with digressions that only an English professor would make, so she is definitely an acquired taste, and not for everyone. But I like her her novels still, even if the cutting edge radical attitude has morphed into a somewhat nostalgic take.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marci

    This was a troubling novel when it first came out, and it stands up well as a portrait of feminism in academia in the late 1970s. I read it in the early 1980s when I was a graduate student being awarded a one-year faculty position upon graduation before beginning advanced graduate work, so it really spoke to me. The complex issues at the heart of the plot--featuring a professor who wants nothing more than to be accepted as "one of the boys" by her fellow faculty members even as she is set up by This was a troubling novel when it first came out, and it stands up well as a portrait of feminism in academia in the late 1970s. I read it in the early 1980s when I was a graduate student being awarded a one-year faculty position upon graduation before beginning advanced graduate work, so it really spoke to me. The complex issues at the heart of the plot--featuring a professor who wants nothing more than to be accepted as "one of the boys" by her fellow faculty members even as she is set up by that faculty as the "token female" in a perfunctory nod to feminist studies which leads to her humiliation and eventual death--provides the background to an investigation into other kinds of feminists and all kinds of misogyny, chauvinism, prejudice, activism, and pragmatism. As professor Kate Fansler delves into the people around her dead former colleague, she uncovers uncomfortable attitudes and opinions aplenty, the aggregate weight of which lead to a terrible conclusion.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pam Walker

    From the reviews, it appears that people either love or hate this author. I am one of the ones who love her books. If you want your books to be full of action, then Cross is probably not for you. If you like a thought-provoking, literate, well written mystery, then you will like the Kate Fansler mysteries. In this installment, Kate is called to Harvard to help Janet Mandelbaum who has been appointed a professor because of an endowed chair, but is miserable in the all men world of Harvard. She is From the reviews, it appears that people either love or hate this author. I am one of the ones who love her books. If you want your books to be full of action, then Cross is probably not for you. If you like a thought-provoking, literate, well written mystery, then you will like the Kate Fansler mysteries. In this installment, Kate is called to Harvard to help Janet Mandelbaum who has been appointed a professor because of an endowed chair, but is miserable in the all men world of Harvard. She is found in a compromising position which makes matters worse, and then dies. Who killed her? That is what Kate wants to find out. I love the intelligent writing of Cross which is, to me, a welcome change from the shoot-em-up mysteries that are so popular today.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Rereading this excellent series. Kate goes to Harvard! The plot of this one is almost too convoluted to try to compress. The patriarchal English department at Harvard is forced to hire a (gasp!) female because someone has donated a million dollars to endow a chair to be filled by a woman. They select Janet as the most likely not to make waves, perhaps - their reasoning is not too clear. Of course she is very unhappy about the way she is treated, and at some point asks for Kate, with whom she was Rereading this excellent series. Kate goes to Harvard! The plot of this one is almost too convoluted to try to compress. The patriarchal English department at Harvard is forced to hire a (gasp!) female because someone has donated a million dollars to endow a chair to be filled by a woman. They select Janet as the most likely not to make waves, perhaps - their reasoning is not too clear. Of course she is very unhappy about the way she is treated, and at some point asks for Kate, with whom she was an undergraduate years before. When she is discovered passed out in a bathtub in the presence of a member of a lesbian group, Kate begins trying to find out what happened - it is so obviously a set-up. (Reed is off in Africa and doesn't make an appearance here.) Eventually Janet's body is found in the men''s restroom, and the suspect hunt begins, including her ex-husband, a friend of Kate's. This is not one of my favorites, but the story still grabbed me fairly soon upon rereading.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I found a copy of this in the latest local-library book sale. It looked like a late-70s, fun, pulpy mystery but it turns out it's really just a quality mystery, no pulp required. I got two other books by this author at the same sale and I'm looking forward to them. Well played, Amanda Cross. Well played. Also: even though this book occurs in the late 1970s, the issues it discusses--feminism, systems of oppression, equal-opportunity employment, and so on--are very current, and I heard them talked I found a copy of this in the latest local-library book sale. It looked like a late-70s, fun, pulpy mystery but it turns out it's really just a quality mystery, no pulp required. I got two other books by this author at the same sale and I'm looking forward to them. Well played, Amanda Cross. Well played. Also: even though this book occurs in the late 1970s, the issues it discusses--feminism, systems of oppression, equal-opportunity employment, and so on--are very current, and I heard them talked about in the same way THIS WEEK. (People are STILL "concerned" about hiring women because of menopause. What is it about menopause?)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This story is the tragedy of Ms. Janet Mandelbaum. An extremely intelligent woman, at the top of her game, who was invited to join a world of insular and misogynistic men. The men were compelled by a professorship that had been endowed to be filled by a woman. Janet believed she was admitted to "the boys club" based on her merits, which she was, but if they'd had a choice the men of Harvard's English Department would never have admitted her. This Amanda Cross story caused me to reflect on how si This story is the tragedy of Ms. Janet Mandelbaum. An extremely intelligent woman, at the top of her game, who was invited to join a world of insular and misogynistic men. The men were compelled by a professorship that had been endowed to be filled by a woman. Janet believed she was admitted to "the boys club" based on her merits, which she was, but if they'd had a choice the men of Harvard's English Department would never have admitted her. This Amanda Cross story caused me to reflect on how similar stories played out across many disciplines and fields over and over again. And, while "we've come a long way baby," forty years later, we still have a long way to go.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Katharine

    The mystery in this novel was not particularly gripping or mysterious but I felt that the author was much more interested in weaving the gender politics of academia in general, and Harvard in particular, into the story than she was in the detective aspects of the novel. I did enjoy the look at feminism as it was in the late 70s and early 80s when the book was published which made up for the slightly lacklustre mystery.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Amanda Cross has an excellent eye for academic satire, and this novel is particularly pointed about the academy's treatment of women. The sad thing is that it's nearly 40 years old and not that much progress has been made. While the book is quite incisive about academia and the characters are interesting, the plotting of this particular mystery is only so-so, leaving the ending feeling a bit rushed and a bit preachy, and thus unsatisfying. Amanda Cross has an excellent eye for academic satire, and this novel is particularly pointed about the academy's treatment of women. The sad thing is that it's nearly 40 years old and not that much progress has been made. While the book is quite incisive about academia and the characters are interesting, the plotting of this particular mystery is only so-so, leaving the ending feeling a bit rushed and a bit preachy, and thus unsatisfying.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    If you are an academic who likes mysteries, you really should try this one. Perhaps a bit dated now because the the theory wars of the 70's lurk in the background, but this one is delightful. Bonus points get awarded to this book for all the juicy "inside baseball" about Harvard's history with women in academia. Fun stuff. If you are an academic who likes mysteries, you really should try this one. Perhaps a bit dated now because the the theory wars of the 70's lurk in the background, but this one is delightful. Bonus points get awarded to this book for all the juicy "inside baseball" about Harvard's history with women in academia. Fun stuff.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Tew

    3.5/5 The mystery here wasn’t anything to sneeze at but I did find the discussion of Harvard’s English department and overall “boys club” vibe to be interesting. Some of the discussions surrounding feminism were absolutely cringeworthy and I’m shocked at how overtly sexist people could be so casually.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Fazio

    I am entering this many years later, after finding a list of books I needed to read for a Friends of Mystery conference, at which Amanda Cross (aka Carolyn Heilbrun) was to appear. I don't remember it well, but do remember liking her books somewhat. Educated guess as to the year I read it. I am entering this many years later, after finding a list of books I needed to read for a Friends of Mystery conference, at which Amanda Cross (aka Carolyn Heilbrun) was to appear. I don't remember it well, but do remember liking her books somewhat. Educated guess as to the year I read it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aline

    Read for the Harvard Novel seminar. This dabbled in trying to explore second wave feminism, in the most obvious way and it just ended up feeling regally shallow. Also the dialogue was just too contrived.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    The mystery was just alright but the feminist commentary was interesting. There were, of course, still some ideas that I disagree with as a modern feminist/reader, but I couldn't help but imagine what it would have been like to read such an overtly feminist text in the 1980s. The mystery was just alright but the feminist commentary was interesting. There were, of course, still some ideas that I disagree with as a modern feminist/reader, but I couldn't help but imagine what it would have been like to read such an overtly feminist text in the 1980s.

  29. 4 out of 5

    P

    “‘Who does Greek before reading period?’” “It was, indeed, extraordinary, or would have been anywhere but Harvard, that no member of the English Department had made the slightest attempt to get in touch with her, nor had she discovered any avenues of approach to them.”

  30. 4 out of 5

    Josephine Ensign

    This is the second time I have read this book. While I enjoyed it, I did find it doesn't hold up to the test of time as much as I had hoped it would. This is the second time I have read this book. While I enjoyed it, I did find it doesn't hold up to the test of time as much as I had hoped it would.

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