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The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Presents America (The Audiobook): A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction

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Jon Stewart, host of the Emmy and Peabody Award-winning The Daily Show, and his coterie of patriots deliver a hilarious look at American government . . . Termed a "political king-maker" by Newsweek, and "the Dan Rather of infotainment" by Vanity Fair, Jon Stewart, along with the writers of The Daily Show, combines his riotous wit and razor-sharp insight in this hilarious b Jon Stewart, host of the Emmy and Peabody Award-winning The Daily Show, and his coterie of patriots deliver a hilarious look at American government . . . Termed a "political king-maker" by Newsweek, and "the Dan Rather of infotainment" by Vanity Fair, Jon Stewart, along with the writers of The Daily Show, combines his riotous wit and razor-sharp insight in this hilarious book.American-style democracy is the world's most beloved form of government, which explains why so many other nations are eager for us to impose it on them. But what is American democracy? In America (The Book), Jon Stewart and The Daily Show writing staff offer their insights into our unique system of government, dissecting its institutions, explaining its history and processes, and exploring the reasons why concepts like "One man, one vote," "Government by the people," and "Every vote counts" have become such popular urban myths.


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Jon Stewart, host of the Emmy and Peabody Award-winning The Daily Show, and his coterie of patriots deliver a hilarious look at American government . . . Termed a "political king-maker" by Newsweek, and "the Dan Rather of infotainment" by Vanity Fair, Jon Stewart, along with the writers of The Daily Show, combines his riotous wit and razor-sharp insight in this hilarious b Jon Stewart, host of the Emmy and Peabody Award-winning The Daily Show, and his coterie of patriots deliver a hilarious look at American government . . . Termed a "political king-maker" by Newsweek, and "the Dan Rather of infotainment" by Vanity Fair, Jon Stewart, along with the writers of The Daily Show, combines his riotous wit and razor-sharp insight in this hilarious book.American-style democracy is the world's most beloved form of government, which explains why so many other nations are eager for us to impose it on them. But what is American democracy? In America (The Book), Jon Stewart and The Daily Show writing staff offer their insights into our unique system of government, dissecting its institutions, explaining its history and processes, and exploring the reasons why concepts like "One man, one vote," "Government by the people," and "Every vote counts" have become such popular urban myths.

30 review for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Presents America (The Audiobook): A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    America (The Book) is not the Daily Show, but it's damn close. This is one of those cases where it might seem like a good idea to listen to the audiobook and hear the actors' deliveries in order to mimic the feeling of watching the tv show as much as possible. However, then you'd miss out on the high school textbook mock-up layout and that's missing half the point. A Citizen's Guid to Democracy Inaction is modeled after a civics class text replete with horrible study guides, misguided questions, America (The Book) is not the Daily Show, but it's damn close. This is one of those cases where it might seem like a good idea to listen to the audiobook and hear the actors' deliveries in order to mimic the feeling of watching the tv show as much as possible. However, then you'd miss out on the high school textbook mock-up layout and that's missing half the point. A Citizen's Guid to Democracy Inaction is modeled after a civics class text replete with horrible study guides, misguided questions, those pop-out boxes for more incorrect information, etc and also etc. It's all one big lampoon of laughter and I loved it! Yes, it can sometimes be silly in a juvenile way... “It's not that the Democrats are playing checkers and the Republicans are playing chess. It's that the Republicans are playing chess and the Democrats are in the nurse's office because once again they glued their balls to their thighs.” And its insight isn't exactly mindblowing (or is it?)... “If "con" is the opposite of pro, then isn't Congress the opposite of progress? Or did we just fucking blow your mind?!?” However, occasionally a particularly spot-on, cutting remark is made... “Classroom Activities 1. Using felt and yarn, make a hand puppet of Clarence Thomas. Ta-da! You're Antonin Scalia!” Stewart and crew roast the U.S. Government time and again, so as you could imagine, it's a great read for Jon Stewart Show fans, it's also a good one for liberals in general and a tolerable one for Republicans who can take a joke.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I really associate this book with the lead-up to and outcome of the last presidential election, and so while I remember really enjoying this a lot at the time I read it, every time I look at it now I get a heavy, sick feeling deep in my bowels, and I kind of feel like killing myself. It makes me flash back to riding the train around for work on November 3, 2004 with one of the most soul-crushing, emotionally annihilating hangovers I've ever had in my life. I remember staring at an excerpt of Yea I really associate this book with the lead-up to and outcome of the last presidential election, and so while I remember really enjoying this a lot at the time I read it, every time I look at it now I get a heavy, sick feeling deep in my bowels, and I kind of feel like killing myself. It makes me flash back to riding the train around for work on November 3, 2004 with one of the most soul-crushing, emotionally annihilating hangovers I've ever had in my life. I remember staring at an excerpt of Yeats's "Second Coming" hanging up on one of those little poetry-on-the-subway ads, just numbly reading the lines over and over and listening to Nina Simone singing "Oh Child" on my headphones, and periodically starting to sob. It was a bad day and, I think, an important developmental milestone. I mean, these past four years haven't really been so bad, have they? Well, for some others, yeah, but not for me. I really felt like that was the end of the world. I also felt this profound alienation from the rest of my country that was painful but probably necessary. Anyway, so somehow I associate this book with that time, and with seeing ole Chuck Schumer on the Daily Show a couple days later, just regurgitating the same old exhausted, embarrassing garbage -- "What the American People really want is what the Democratic Party has been offering them all along" -- and Jon Stewart practically shaking him, being like, "Don't you fucking GET it, retard??? Have you been in a COMA all week???? Obviously they DON'T!!! What are you SAYING? What is WRONG with you people????" And Schumer just being like, "Er, well, um... uh....?" Anyway, so this book, while funny, really depresses me. Maybe I won't take it with me when I move.

  3. 5 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    I know Jon Stewart, The Daily Show, and Colbert are more honest and reliable news sources than the rest of the media, I just don't believe it. Ironically, it is that same gap between knowledge and belief that has resulted in this sad state. the reactionary, opinionated pundits keep talking down to these little basic-cable comedy shows, but the fact that their feathers are so ruffled shows that they are afraid, and that they consider this to be as serious as the rest of us. Why is Stewart the journa I know Jon Stewart, The Daily Show, and Colbert are more honest and reliable news sources than the rest of the media, I just don't believe it. Ironically, it is that same gap between knowledge and belief that has resulted in this sad state. the reactionary, opinionated pundits keep talking down to these little basic-cable comedy shows, but the fact that their feathers are so ruffled shows that they are afraid, and that they consider this to be as serious as the rest of us. Why is Stewart the journalist who asks hard questions about the war? Why does he seem utterly ridiculous when he simply imitates real people? Why is Colbert the one who asked the senator who tried to put the ten commandments in his state courthouses (Lynn Westmoreland) just what they actually were, showing that the senator could name only three? More importantly, why doesn't this invigorate or upset anyone? Colbert's White House Press Corp address was the most impressive and honest satire on the state of our politics and the media who serve them. The fact that it was the only one should not diminish it. The world is gone mad. If Revelation is come, I can only hope that even bad Christians get to go to heaven, because I don't want to be stuck here with the likes of Bush and Westmoreland. If I didn't have a front seat to the odd implosion of American culture, I might think about moving to Canada. Oh yes, and Reuters has been bought out.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction. Note - the last word is not a mistake. The greatest democracy in the world is explained to people who live in it, or don't understand it, or fear it Ch. 1: Democracy Before America Ch. 2: The Founding of America Ch. 3: The President: King of Democracy Ch. 4: Congress: Quagmire of Freedom Ch. 5: The Judicial Branch: It Rules Ch. 6: Campaigns and Elections: America Changes the Sheets Ch. 7: The Media: Democracy's Guardian Angels (retitled two pages later as "The Me A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction. Note - the last word is not a mistake. The greatest democracy in the world is explained to people who live in it, or don't understand it, or fear it Ch. 1: Democracy Before America Ch. 2: The Founding of America Ch. 3: The President: King of Democracy Ch. 4: Congress: Quagmire of Freedom Ch. 5: The Judicial Branch: It Rules Ch. 6: Campaigns and Elections: America Changes the Sheets Ch. 7: The Media: Democracy's Guardian Angels (retitled two pages later as "The Media: Democracy's Valiant Vulgarians") Ch. 8: The Future of Democracy: Four Score and Seven Years from Now Ch. 9: The Rest of the World: International House of Horrors Bow down before me. I am your new president and I can . . um . . er The president, no matter how much he wants to, cannot 'make' laws, unless of course he calls it a police action. We also learn that "Did you know" is copyrighted by a competing publishing company, so our little sidenotes always begin with "Were You Aware?". There is a also a lovely map that shows (in the familiar boardgame fashion) how to become President, and how to stay President once you are there. What if . . .if Betsy Ross were alive and sewing American flags today, she'd be a 13-year-old Laotian boy. Historical inaccuracies, gross distortions, complete fabrications have been corrected by a real-life bearded college professor. And if you believe this then I have a bridge to sell you Enjoy!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sofia

    Published on my book blog. I'm a big fan of Jon Stewart and The Daily Show, but for some reason I'd never felt curious to read any of their books until this year. I considered starting with Earth (the book): A Visitor's Guide to the Human Race, but thought I'd go through this older one first. I have to admit, when I started I was a bit taken aback. I don't know what I expected, but the first chapter ("Democracy before America") was written with such an unapologetic disregard for History that I cou Published on my book blog. I'm a big fan of Jon Stewart and The Daily Show, but for some reason I'd never felt curious to read any of their books until this year. I considered starting with Earth (the book): A Visitor's Guide to the Human Race, but thought I'd go through this older one first. I have to admit, when I started I was a bit taken aback. I don't know what I expected, but the first chapter ("Democracy before America") was written with such an unapologetic disregard for History that I couldn't even find it funny, at first. However, once the initial "shock" had passed, this book got really funny. It's opinionated, scandalous, hilarious, and so spot-on that my bittersweet feeling of not knowing whether to laugh or get depressed was sustained throughout the whole book. This is presented in the form of an educational book for children, and since the content couldn't be further away from that demographic, it's doubly funny to see "helpful" diagrams, maps, games and illustration to help the reader understand a little better this wonderful but deeply flawed thing we call Democracy. Highly recommended. Read with an open mind!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rand

    I have lost track of the number of pristine copies of this book I have found on the side of the road. I have also lost track of the total quantity of marijuana I have broken up upon the pristine copy of this book I decided to take home. I have also lost track of where said copy ever went. It's really the ideal surface/size for all your joint-rolling needs. And no, I never bothered to read the damn book. We were too busy getting high and watching True Blood or pretending to read Winterson. Winter, s I have lost track of the number of pristine copies of this book I have found on the side of the road. I have also lost track of the total quantity of marijuana I have broken up upon the pristine copy of this book I decided to take home. I have also lost track of where said copy ever went. It's really the ideal surface/size for all your joint-rolling needs. And no, I never bothered to read the damn book. We were too busy getting high and watching True Blood or pretending to read Winterson. Winter, son.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    This was a quick read, I hate politics and find it boring and full of nonsensical bull****, but I enjoyed this book and even though it is full of slanderous lies I feel I have learnt quite a bit. It also raises some important questions like "If con is the opposite of pro, then is congress the opposite of progress?" Most interesting to me was the layout of the judicial system, from lower courts to the Supreme court, all previous knowledge on this subject was gained from watching Boston Legal, I now This was a quick read, I hate politics and find it boring and full of nonsensical bull****, but I enjoyed this book and even though it is full of slanderous lies I feel I have learnt quite a bit. It also raises some important questions like "If con is the opposite of pro, then is congress the opposite of progress?" Most interesting to me was the layout of the judicial system, from lower courts to the Supreme court, all previous knowledge on this subject was gained from watching Boston Legal, I now have a deeper understanding of their treatment of judges. Give this book a go and soon you'll be just like me and ready to start your own democracy, as the final words in the book say..."Just smash the concepts laid out in this book together and you'll already have something better than North Korea". Who's with me?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    I listened to the audio version of this book on both legs of a cross-country trip. I'll warn others who are thinking of doing the same that you will either be stifling your laughter to not bother your neighbors, or you will be laughing out loud and looking mighty strange. Hearing Jon Stewart's narration of the text, with his perfect timing, made this a very enjoyable listen. Some of the humor just came from crassness i.e. the thought of Patrick Henry calling someone "fucknuts," but for the most I listened to the audio version of this book on both legs of a cross-country trip. I'll warn others who are thinking of doing the same that you will either be stifling your laughter to not bother your neighbors, or you will be laughing out loud and looking mighty strange. Hearing Jon Stewart's narration of the text, with his perfect timing, made this a very enjoyable listen. Some of the humor just came from crassness i.e. the thought of Patrick Henry calling someone "fucknuts," but for the most part, this was incredibly on the mark satire. The chapter on Campaigns was so eerily spot-on for this recent election, its hard to believe it was written a few years ago. Highly recommended!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    I must admit, I’m quite a fan of Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show. In a sea of ridiculous immature and unethical news reporting brought to us by the big corporations, Stewart is not only hilarious, but often offers key insight. It is sad to me that a comedy show, brought to us by the same network that thought prank-calling puppets was funny, has risen to be one the most insightful sources of news and politics. That said, America (the Book) held great promise for me. Unfortunately, it fails to delive I must admit, I’m quite a fan of Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show. In a sea of ridiculous immature and unethical news reporting brought to us by the big corporations, Stewart is not only hilarious, but often offers key insight. It is sad to me that a comedy show, brought to us by the same network that thought prank-calling puppets was funny, has risen to be one the most insightful sources of news and politics. That said, America (the Book) held great promise for me. Unfortunately, it fails to deliver. Stewart quickly settles into a predictable shtick of summing up vast swaths of inaccurate history, finishing each paragraph with an amusing exaggeration or silly comment. He then backs this up with fake quotes from historical figures. It’s all well and good, but it gets very predictable very fast. The jokes are all very low-hanging fruit. The sharp, sardonic wit that Stewart is known for on his show are almost completely absent here, replaced with lame, dull jokes that feel like they were written by a much less worthy comedian. There are a few chuckles here and there. Few of the jokes are outright bad, most are just hum-drum. The pattern of it becomes incredibly monotonous: say two things that are simplifications but kind of true, follow it up with a silly comment. Then have fake Thomas Jefferson say something even more silly. See how Thomas Jefferson would never have said that? It’s funny! No, it’s not funny. You’ll see the jokes coming from a mile away, and while there are a small handful of snicker-out-loud moments, they just leave a lot to be desired. Some of the other Daily Show participants chime in with essays here and there. Ed Helms, Stephen Colbert Samantha Bee, and others try to enliven the book, but don’t succeed any more than Stewart himself does. The one moment where the book got really interesting was the beginning of the chapter on the media, where Stewart goes on a tirade about the irresponsibility and disgusting immorality of the current state of mainstream news reporting before a fake “editor” interrupts to put the book back on its mediocre track. The moment almost serves as a reminder of what the book could have been, although the passage is far too polemical to be used as a template. However, the reader gets the feeling that somewhere behind this book is a more insightful, more hilarious book that dealt with real issues in a funnier, more realistic way. Ultimately, this feels like an attempt to capitalize on the popularity of the show and get some extra cash out of it. Thus, it feels completely phoned-in. It’s not the worst book ever, and it’s just the right length. The average reader could crank through it in about an hour and a half. It’s probably good for a short plane ride, or a couple of stints in the waiting room or post-office line. Unfortunately, Stewart leaves his readers waiting for him to write a real book. It should be noted that this review refers to the audiobook version of this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pris robichaud

    I Laughed, I Cried,, I Wept A Little, and Laughed Again, 19 Nov 2006 "This book has many fine qualities, but its cavalier disregard for accuracy of quotations, its insufficient scholarly documentation, its often quixotic use of illustrations, and its frequent usage of inappropriate language and word choices all detract from its virtues. With just a little more attention to detail, (well, in some cases, considerably more attention to detail), this book would stand as a first-rate addition to the I Laughed, I Cried,, I Wept A Little, and Laughed Again, 19 Nov 2006 "This book has many fine qualities, but its cavalier disregard for accuracy of quotations, its insufficient scholarly documentation, its often quixotic use of illustrations, and its frequent usage of inappropriate language and word choices all detract from its virtues. With just a little more attention to detail, (well, in some cases, considerably more attention to detail), this book would stand as a first-rate addition to the literature." Prof. Stanley Schultz, Evaluation In 2004 'America, The Book" was let loose on the general public and gobbled up (pardon, but it is almost Thanksgiving) thousands of missives. However, much has changed in the past two years, and the authors have written a sequel, for 'teachers', or those most learned. As the authors say, "A sires of well-publicized scandals have called into question the very meaning of such terms as 'plagiarism', 'authenticity' and 'three-year crack binge'. In one of the paradigm shifts that periodically sweep the publishing world, truth has become this year's bullshit." They added Professor Schultz's notations on every page and sometimes his notations are the page. All in all, this book has the makings of the US History Book for all ages. Where to begin to describe this book, to shed a little light for those who unsuspecting buy the book and become part of the confused masses. To begin with there is a 'Timeline of Democracy' from Stonehenge through 1621 when the Plymouth Rock became too crowded and the Pilgrims left. The Founding of America, chapter 2 is filled with many mistakes, don't read it. Chapter 3 The president: King of Democracy has a few good points but go directly to chapters 4, 5, 6, and 7. The Congress, The Judicial Branch, Campaigns and Elections and The Media. Anything and everything you ever did not want to know is included here. You may never vote again after reading these chapters, but so be it. Chapters 8 and 9, The Future of Democracy and The Rest of the World are to be read immediately, maybe start with these chapters and work backwards like the politicians do. Jon Stewart and his cronies, mmhmm, writers have penned a marvelous book full of lies and deceit. Some useful information may be gleaned if you look hard enough. Thomas Jefferson wrote the forward and that may be the most important piece of writing in the entire missive. I do recommend this book to all serious students of history and those who are not serious at all. For everyone and don't forget the teachers. Warily recommended for intelligentsia.. Heartily recommended for the rest of us. prisrob 11/19./06.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kelly H. (Maybedog)

    This book taught me many things. It taught me that American History and Government is very boring. It taught me that even an hilarious parody of American History and Government cannot make the subject interesting. It taught me that it's not easy to get a good posed picture of an eagle. It also taught me that I am even more ignorant of popular culture than I think I am because there were some jokes I didn't get. I also learned that Stephen Colbert can look adorable in almost anything, even sadoma This book taught me many things. It taught me that American History and Government is very boring. It taught me that even an hilarious parody of American History and Government cannot make the subject interesting. It taught me that it's not easy to get a good posed picture of an eagle. It also taught me that I am even more ignorant of popular culture than I think I am because there were some jokes I didn't get. I also learned that Stephen Colbert can look adorable in almost anything, even sadomasochism leathers. The book is a spoof of text books and a scathing social satire at the same time. The writers and editors were brilliantly creative, using a plethora of different ways (without using Powerpoint) to convey information to make us laugh. Edward R. Tufte would be proud. There were charts, graphs, maps, photos, polls, a pull out poster, discussion questions, sidebars, quotes, forms, games, paper dolls, drawings, scans, quizzes, even a flip book. Visually, the book was extremely appealing. The jokes were fresh and funny and I even laughed out loud at times. But American History is still boring.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mattomic

    Try to do yourselves a favor and get your hands on the audiobook version. While the experience is quite different in the absence of the visuals (a BIG part of the book's humor), there's something to be said for hearing all of the DS's original cast reading passages of the book aloud. Most hilarious is Stephen Colbert's lessons for teachers/quiz questions at the end of each chapter. The audiobook made a long trip to Austin from Dallas that much faster! Beware! It might get you laughing so hard yo Try to do yourselves a favor and get your hands on the audiobook version. While the experience is quite different in the absence of the visuals (a BIG part of the book's humor), there's something to be said for hearing all of the DS's original cast reading passages of the book aloud. Most hilarious is Stephen Colbert's lessons for teachers/quiz questions at the end of each chapter. The audiobook made a long trip to Austin from Dallas that much faster! Beware! It might get you laughing so hard you'll commit a traffic violation.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    If you are at all familiar with The Daily Show With John Stewart, then you pretty much know what this book will be like. Two notes: (1) The book is also a parody of school textbooks, from the obvious (and great) "Classroom Activities" at the end of each chapter to more subtle touches like the bold text used for key vocabulary words. (2) There is a fair amount of profanity, sometimes used well but sometimes a jarring attempt at a cheap laugh.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    One of the few times I enjoy the movie or tv show (in this case: The Daily Show with Jon Stewart) more than the book. Took me a while appreciate the book, but there are many funny and clever parts in the book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    Full Disclosure--I am addicted to The Daily Show. When I miss the show, I can be found at my desk at work sneaking a peek at the internet repeat. So this was absolutely the book for me. A totally entertaining look at the "citizen's guide of democracy inaction". Lots of moments when I found myself laughing out loud. That wouldn't be so bad, but again I was at my desk. I really need to get a grip on my behavior. Loved this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    A humorous and satirical look at our country, the ideals it was based on, those who founded it, and how it compares to other areas of the world. Unless you are already an expert on America, democracy and everything pertaining to it, you will find yourself wondering whether the information contained in this book is the truth, or a joke. The answer to that question is, "yes." I had to resort to an internet search more often than I care to admit, but I found that I learned more by being prompted by A humorous and satirical look at our country, the ideals it was based on, those who founded it, and how it compares to other areas of the world. Unless you are already an expert on America, democracy and everything pertaining to it, you will find yourself wondering whether the information contained in this book is the truth, or a joke. The answer to that question is, "yes." I had to resort to an internet search more often than I care to admit, but I found that I learned more by being prompted by my ignorance of their point than I would have from reading a dry textbook. The design is early-elementary-school-textbook, which I found quite entertaining. The "Were You Aware" margin notes were especially hilarious, as were the footnotes. It's unfortunate; however, that in order to point out distressing truths about our 'great nation' the authors were forced to resort to humor. I have long been a fan of the Daily Show because, albeit in the guise of 'comedy', they are not afraid to engage in the kind of true and necessary journalism that the 'legitimate' media seems to have let fall by the wayside. This book is an extension of that aim, and accomplishes its purpose quite well.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Suz

    I got this as a gift because my friend knew I love Jon Stewart. If I had picked it up at a bookstore and perused a few pages I wouldn't have bought it. It was ok and at times humorous but it didn't really add anything to my life. I still watch his show here and there of course, but I wanted more from his book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I'm a big fan of The Daily Show, and was very happy when I received this book as a gift. But, I actually couldn't do much more than flip through it, after trying to read the first 20 pages or so and being miserably disappointed. In my opinion, Jon Stewart's wit, sarcasm and wry insight just doesn't translate well off the small screen and into print.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Lol. This short "history" of democracy and all "about" our democratic institution is accurately hilarious in a way only the Daily Show writers could produce... And so it's irreverent and sometimes vulgar too.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Reid Harbin

    Brilliant satire of a broken system. Some parts are just insanely funny

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vladimir

    When a talent behind one of the best shows America has to offer writes a book, you buy it no questions asked. If you do so you are in for one hell of a ride.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Xxertz

    Yikes... This book did not transform well into an audiobook.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

    13 years after publication this is still bang on.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    Thanks to blessedly isolated geography, a can-do spirit and an indigenous population with primitive weapons and surprisingly weak immune systems, the United States has experienced consistent growth and expansion over its entire history. Ah. 'Merica. This book is set up like a text book. I've been years out of practice reading one, but it turns out it's like riding a bicycle when it includes naked (and I mean stark naked) Supreme Court Justice paper dolls and the essential news interviewer facial Thanks to blessedly isolated geography, a can-do spirit and an indigenous population with primitive weapons and surprisingly weak immune systems, the United States has experienced consistent growth and expansion over its entire history. Ah. 'Merica. This book is set up like a text book. I've been years out of practice reading one, but it turns out it's like riding a bicycle when it includes naked (and I mean stark naked) Supreme Court Justice paper dolls and the essential news interviewer facial expressions demonstrated by Stephen Colbert. In all seriousness, this is simultaneously hilarious and sad. It's hilarious because it's true. It's sad because it's true. My favorite chapter was when the press was being chewed out for not doing their damn jobs. In case there was anyone who would get too offended, it was made to be a short rant/intro that was interrupted by an apology. It packed quite the punch in both what it said and the apology that followed - as if we should always apologize for being too loud about what is right and what is wrong. I'm afraid that much of this book would be right over the heads of those who would need it the most. 4 Stars

  25. 4 out of 5

    Will Crim

    This book, not to sound like one of those who constantly praise every book they read, was the funniest book I have ever read. And another plus to reading this book was that I felt smart doing so. I love political satyre especially from the mind of Jon Stewart. In the very beginning John or apparently the corpse of Thomas Jefferson writes a foreword to the book. My favorite line in the foreward was "Sally may not like it, but as we used to say in the back parlours of 18th-century Paris, 'tough t This book, not to sound like one of those who constantly praise every book they read, was the funniest book I have ever read. And another plus to reading this book was that I felt smart doing so. I love political satyre especially from the mind of Jon Stewart. In the very beginning John or apparently the corpse of Thomas Jefferson writes a foreword to the book. My favorite line in the foreward was "Sally may not like it, but as we used to say in the back parlours of 18th-century Paris, 'tough titties' ." The quote is completely meaningless and irrelevant to the book but I guess I'm just immature in thinking such crude humor as... Humorous. In the middle of the book however, John makes a good observation of our congress "Lawmaking is tedious and never-ending. If not for the good salary and godlike sense of ultimate power it would hardly seem worth it." This makes me feel like I'm not alone when I concluded that "congressman are either okay or power-hungry belligerents," which made me feel comfortable lol (sorry it's too tempting to type like I would on a social netowrking site). Honestly, this book was named one of the worst books of the year in 2005 but I don't understand how you could give such a title to literature which is an art in itself so... I don't know, I think It's a great book, It takes about a week to read. It's very funny if you're not a conservative republican. Jonathan Stewart is a comedic genius and this is everything he doesn't dare to put out on the Daily Show. Pick it up... Read it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I bought this book for five dollars from Borders. Yay for me. I started reading a bit, it's pretty hilarious. I love the faux textbook-esque style of it. I opened it up to a random page and read under a "Discussion questions" section "List the top 100 tv shows you would rather watch than the evening news". Hahahhhaha. Awesome.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jackie "the Librarian"

    Very funny, sad but true look at our screwed up, dysfunctional government. I only give it 4 stars because the delivery of the humor by my inner voice wasn't nearly as good as Jon Stewart's on the show. When does the movie version come out?

  28. 5 out of 5

    April

    I was all for this book. It was VERY funny and quite entertaining, until I saw pics of all supreme court justices faces photoshopped onto naked bodies. (Shudder)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Combining political analysis and witty social commentary, this faux textbook serves as an all inclusive parody guide to the history, function, and failure of American culture. This guide includes topics such as America's colonial history, bicameral legislative process, relationship to it's media and citizens, the future of the country, and naked photos of the Supreme Court Justices. This abridged history of America provides an elegant, and sometimes low brow, introspective look into our way of l Combining political analysis and witty social commentary, this faux textbook serves as an all inclusive parody guide to the history, function, and failure of American culture. This guide includes topics such as America's colonial history, bicameral legislative process, relationship to it's media and citizens, the future of the country, and naked photos of the Supreme Court Justices. This abridged history of America provides an elegant, and sometimes low brow, introspective look into our way of life. This book was published in 2004 and features contributions from some of the "The Daily Show"'s greatest pundits including Ed Helms, Samantha Bee, and Stephen Colbert (too bad he didn't do much after leaving the show). These side essays and musings provide helpful critique and further insight into the book's central theme. Plus, there are some interjections about Canada. Stewart had only helmed the show for a few years when the book was published. He was gaining traction as a voice of reason and critic of the major news media, but he was still a few years away from being a respected satirical juggernaut. He would continue to host "The Daily Show" for another 11 years while setting the bar for political satire and analysis much higher. Last year, I was featured in a photography series involving people with a book that changed their life (http://www.9musesphoto.com/Photos/Pro...). I don't know what that says about me, but this was the book I chose. It had been over 12 years since I last read it at 16. Rereading, I understood a lot more and appreciated the message. It continues to be very important to me for it's critical social analysis, investigative approach, and the dick jokes. But, really the dick jokes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sammy

    I love the Daily Show and I loved this book, which literally had me laughing out loud. Which was sort of embarassing because it was at work. Written out in the style of your typical high school history text book, the book is engaging, and oddly truthful in many ironic ways. The one problem I found in this book was that it tended to drag a bit in a few parts, specifically when sections became really fact heavy and didn't have that much humor in them. Part of the reason people want to buy/read this I love the Daily Show and I loved this book, which literally had me laughing out loud. Which was sort of embarassing because it was at work. Written out in the style of your typical high school history text book, the book is engaging, and oddly truthful in many ironic ways. The one problem I found in this book was that it tended to drag a bit in a few parts, specifically when sections became really fact heavy and didn't have that much humor in them. Part of the reason people want to buy/read this book is for the humor and not so much the information. But I have a feeling it was hard for the writers to address every piece of democracy humorously, so considering how much they did make funny, it's quite impressive. There's not really a lot to say about this book, I liked it, it was a fun read that many people will be able to enjoy. If you don't think that one thing is funny, you'll most likely think another thing is. Also, the text book format I'm sure will bring back many memories. One problem though... if you're reading this at work, like I was, don't look at page 99... I think that's the page. Because that's the page that has the naked Supreme Court Justices. I thought I'd do a favor and give you a warning about that.

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