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Marvel Masterworks: The Uncanny X-Men, Vol. 3

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The heart of an Antarctic volcano. The steamy jungles of the hidden Savage Land. Coastal Japan in flames and the far-flung Canadian city of Calgary buried in drifts of snow. All these locales and more await our merry band of mutants in the following eleven issues- and there's no time to catch your breath! This volume reads as one long story, setting the tone for the heavy The heart of an Antarctic volcano. The steamy jungles of the hidden Savage Land. Coastal Japan in flames and the far-flung Canadian city of Calgary buried in drifts of snow. All these locales and more await our merry band of mutants in the following eleven issues- and there's no time to catch your breath! This volume reads as one long story, setting the tone for the heavy continuity approach the next two decades would take. The first issue the X-Men wake up somewhere strange and by the end of the book, they still haven't gotten home! Collecting: X-Men #111-121


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The heart of an Antarctic volcano. The steamy jungles of the hidden Savage Land. Coastal Japan in flames and the far-flung Canadian city of Calgary buried in drifts of snow. All these locales and more await our merry band of mutants in the following eleven issues- and there's no time to catch your breath! This volume reads as one long story, setting the tone for the heavy The heart of an Antarctic volcano. The steamy jungles of the hidden Savage Land. Coastal Japan in flames and the far-flung Canadian city of Calgary buried in drifts of snow. All these locales and more await our merry band of mutants in the following eleven issues- and there's no time to catch your breath! This volume reads as one long story, setting the tone for the heavy continuity approach the next two decades would take. The first issue the X-Men wake up somewhere strange and by the end of the book, they still haven't gotten home! Collecting: X-Men #111-121

30 review for Marvel Masterworks: The Uncanny X-Men, Vol. 3

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    The first "Masterworks" volume to feature front-to-back Claremont/Byrne X-Men. This volume reads like one long shaggy dog story, with the X-Men bouncing from Antarctica to the Savage Land, to Japan, to Calgary after they're kidnapped by Magneto. There's lots of really funny, silly stuff in this volume (Magneto's Nanny-Bot, Cyclops realizing Corsair is his father because they look the same with a mustache, etc.), but Claremont still makes you care deeply about these neurotic characters, as they f The first "Masterworks" volume to feature front-to-back Claremont/Byrne X-Men. This volume reads like one long shaggy dog story, with the X-Men bouncing from Antarctica to the Savage Land, to Japan, to Calgary after they're kidnapped by Magneto. There's lots of really funny, silly stuff in this volume (Magneto's Nanny-Bot, Cyclops realizing Corsair is his father because they look the same with a mustache, etc.), but Claremont still makes you care deeply about these neurotic characters, as they fret over their personal doubts and identity issues while punching androids and dinosaurs.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    For me, this is the beginning of the classic era of X-Men, when Claremont, Byrne, and Austin were throwing out the twists and turns not just every issue but every page!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Holli

    Warning: Smallish rant ahead. I apologize, but I had to let this out otherwise I was going to scream and throw things. And everything I wanted to throw is breakable and probably expensive. 1) The mounting references to outside comics is insane! If you can't find a synopsis for the comic that one throwaway line of another story comes from, you have to go through pages of bios to find out what they are talking about. Interesting, but it takes a long time to find it and by the time I did I really di Warning: Smallish rant ahead. I apologize, but I had to let this out otherwise I was going to scream and throw things. And everything I wanted to throw is breakable and probably expensive. 1) The mounting references to outside comics is insane! If you can't find a synopsis for the comic that one throwaway line of another story comes from, you have to go through pages of bios to find out what they are talking about. Interesting, but it takes a long time to find it and by the time I did I really didn't care anymore. Makes me wonder what happened when this series first came out and someone back then didn't have access to every comic ever written and couldn't borrow them from anyone or find them in a store near them. 2) The X-Men seem to completely forget they have the magical power to close their eyes when it's called for. If someone is trying to hypnotize you or you have a power that blasts out of your eyes, close your eyes already! It's not hard. You do it every time you blink, sleep, get something in it, whatever. Unless the bad guy is holding them open (which he wasn't with Beast, by the way) you have this talent. 3) The X-Men are taken by (view spoiler)[Magneto (hide spoiler)] 70,000 feet in the air. This is almost as high up as Olympus Mons is tall: the volcano on Mars and the tallest mountain in the whole solar system. The highest point on Earth is Mount Everest, which is 29,029 feet high. A place where cold and lack of oxygen kills very quickly. How did those in the circus cart breathe, not have their blood boil, and not freeze to death? They may be mutants, but they still have human bodies which are suseptable to the elements and can die in such extremes. I realize in the 1970s researching things was limited, but there were no doubt people around the writers could ask about such things. You don't even have to learn some weird, secret handshake. Mostly it's all a matter of "can I borrow you and your brain for a moment?" type of things. Most people are delighted to share their knowledge in such matters as they want it done right in books, movies, shows, etc. 4) Erm, when was Lilandra's exile ended? She's on Earth because she can't go home. Then suddenly, she can and takes Xavier with her. I missed something here. She didn't even say "oh, sweetums, my exile's over with. They sent me a memo this morning I'me free to rule my world now. I can go home now, isn't that wonderful? Wanna come with?" 5) I've also decided I'm not really crazy about the solid backstory issues. Yes, they fill in holes. But they are a mega info-dump in the middle of a storyline. It's distracting, no matter how interesting they might be. It must have been entirely frustrating when these comics came out originally and you had to wait a month to find out what happened next in the story you were reading before the history lesson. I realize they still work this way in being monthly issue releases, but they didn't have electronic, instant access to those comics the moment they came out as we have now. They had to wait for the local comic book store to open before they could race in, find the latest issue, and learn what happened next to their superhero friends in the main storyline. Okay, rant over. I feel better now. Overall, I liked this comic book collection (or graphic novel bindup, whichever term you prefer) but they continue to drive me batty. Despite my problems here, I plan to continue. I'll just keep some non-breakables around to fulfill my need to throw things when they gang up on me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    Reading through the GNs of all the old X-men I bought and read as single issues so long ago, enjoying the visual power of Byrne's greatest art, and remembering when Chris Claremont was at the height of his game and hadn't descened into over-wordy, repetivity. This and the next volume are the penultimate chapters, leading up to the Dark Phoenix Saga. Getting to share these original works with my wife, who only knows the characters from the movies, is a real blast. She is enthralled with the compl Reading through the GNs of all the old X-men I bought and read as single issues so long ago, enjoying the visual power of Byrne's greatest art, and remembering when Chris Claremont was at the height of his game and hadn't descened into over-wordy, repetivity. This and the next volume are the penultimate chapters, leading up to the Dark Phoenix Saga. Getting to share these original works with my wife, who only knows the characters from the movies, is a real blast. She is enthralled with the complex charcters that are so thinly represented on the screen. I hand her each volume as I finish, enjoying the idea of her getting to read these for the very first time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Thaggard

    The X-Men have become friends :.)..

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tony Romine

    This collection houses issues #111-121 of the Uncanny X-Men. These 11 issues take the team everywhere, starting with the X-men trapped in a circus as victims of Mesmero and ends with them fighting Alpha Flight in Canada. In between they are once again faced with fighting Magneto on Astroid M, trapped in the Savage Land fighting Sauron, and helping the citizens of with the help of Sunfire. One major thing missing here though is Professor X, as he is not featured at all for most of the issues aside This collection houses issues #111-121 of the Uncanny X-Men. These 11 issues take the team everywhere, starting with the X-men trapped in a circus as victims of Mesmero and ends with them fighting Alpha Flight in Canada. In between they are once again faced with fighting Magneto on Astroid M, trapped in the Savage Land fighting Sauron, and helping the citizens of with the help of Sunfire. One major thing missing here though is Professor X, as he is not featured at all for most of the issues aside from a couple pages explaining how he thinks the X-Men are dead and now is going to leave the school to go to space with his alien lover (not like he has a giant effing mutant tracking machine or psychic powers to telepathically confirm they are dead or anything). He does get a whole issue to explain some weird backstory that is him have a psychic battle with another mutant in a Casablanca setting. He is really poorly written here and his powers are wasted. It's quite the run with a lot of story, but you could tell it was still finding it's footing in terms of storytelling with storylines still married to this idea of 2-3 issue arcs. Instead of investing time in making some actual progress in terms of character building with the team, it's more of just a bunch of action scenes with about 2-5 pages of just poor exposition that sort of give context to what's happening and, of course, 2-3 pages recapping what happened in the previous 2-3 issues of the storyarc. The worst thing about this is how conveniently everything seems to fall in line (the Alpha Flight storyline is terrible about this...they literally destroy like a major portion of Calgary fighting each other and in the end Wolverine just surrenders and then just escapes from them to reunite with the X-Men...it's pointless and dumb). It's fun for a while, but I can see where it would frustrate some people.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph R.

    Magneto attacks again, this time kidnapping the X-Men and taking them to his Antarctic base underneath a volcano. While they are trapped, he works on his orbiting base. The X-Men just barely manage to escape, though they are split up and each group think the other has died. Beast and Jean Grey make it to the Antarctic surface where they are discovered by a search plane. They return to New York where Jean tells Professor X the others are dead. Xavier closes up the school and leaves with the new l Magneto attacks again, this time kidnapping the X-Men and taking them to his Antarctic base underneath a volcano. While they are trapped, he works on his orbiting base. The X-Men just barely manage to escape, though they are split up and each group think the other has died. Beast and Jean Grey make it to the Antarctic surface where they are discovered by a search plane. They return to New York where Jean tells Professor X the others are dead. Xavier closes up the school and leaves with the new love of his life, the space queen Lilandra. He leaves for her kingdom while Jean goes to Scotland. Beast goes back to the Avengers. Meanwhile, Cyclops, Storm, Banshee, Colossus, Nightcrawler, and Wolverine have escaped by tunneling away from the base. They wind up in the Savage Land, an Antarctic pre-historic jungle heated by geothermal sources. They have adventures with the local inhabitants, finally escaping to the sea where they wind up on a Japanese science vessel that's in lockdown until they return to Japan. Six weeks later, in Japan they try to contact Xavier only to find no one answering. That's just as well, because a supervillain threatens Japan. The X-Men team up with Japanese superhero Sunfire to take out the threat. They almost make it back to America--the Canadian government detours their plane so they can get Wolverine back. He was a multi-million dollar experiment and part of a plan to develop a Canadian superhero team. The world-travelling nature of the story keeps things interesting, as does the human drama of dealing with the supposed deaths of their comrades (even by the end, no one finds out the others survived). The plotting is fantastic and fun, making this a very enjoyable read. Highly recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bill Coffin

    Chris Claremont's legendary run on the Uncanny X-Men is largely collected in a 12-volume (and counting) set in the Marvel Masterworks series that takes us through some of the most pivotal stories in X-Men lore. (As of volume 12, it gets up to Uncanny X-Men #200.) Here we see the launch of a new X-Men team that includes, over time, Cyclops, Jean Grey/Phoenix, Storm, Colossus, Nightcrawler, Wolverine, Kitty Pryde, Rogue and many others. The stories include some of the most iconic in X-Men history, Chris Claremont's legendary run on the Uncanny X-Men is largely collected in a 12-volume (and counting) set in the Marvel Masterworks series that takes us through some of the most pivotal stories in X-Men lore. (As of volume 12, it gets up to Uncanny X-Men #200.) Here we see the launch of a new X-Men team that includes, over time, Cyclops, Jean Grey/Phoenix, Storm, Colossus, Nightcrawler, Wolverine, Kitty Pryde, Rogue and many others. The stories include some of the most iconic in X-Men history, including the Hellfire Club saga, the Dark Phoenix saga and the Trial of Magneto. All told, the Marvel Masterworks - Uncanny X-Men series is must-read material for anyone who wishes to dive deeply into the rich (and often difficult to navigate) history of the X-Men. It is must-read material for anyone who wants to get a taste for what it was like during a period of time when the X-Men grew from an also-ran Marvel title into one of the greatest superhero tentpole franchises of all time. And if all that isn't enough, within these volumes are some of the most enjoyable writer/artist pairings you'll find from this era of Marvel comics, including Claremont's epic collaborations with John Byrne, Dan Green and John Romita, Jr. Within these volumes are stories that continue to resonate today, tales that beyond beyond people in colorful tights punching each other out and into an ongoing commentary on what it means to be hated for one's nature, on what it means to protect those who see you as an enemy, and what it means to live with heroic dignity in a world committed to stripping that very thing from you. These are some of the finest comic book stories ever published. They are deeply fun to read, and most of all, they are an important chapter of a beloved medium.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    Chris Claremont and John Byrne are an amazing paring. These are the comics that really introduced me to reading comics and the Marvel universe. The stories are tightly written and the art is detailed, bright, and entirely eye catching. This is the world of the X-men for me. It's a soap opera full of larger than life characters who are a family. The look and flavor of the setting is hard to describe but is very uniquely X-men for me, equal parts 60's and 70's aesthetic/Op art style mixed with cin Chris Claremont and John Byrne are an amazing paring. These are the comics that really introduced me to reading comics and the Marvel universe. The stories are tightly written and the art is detailed, bright, and entirely eye catching. This is the world of the X-men for me. It's a soap opera full of larger than life characters who are a family. The look and flavor of the setting is hard to describe but is very uniquely X-men for me, equal parts 60's and 70's aesthetic/Op art style mixed with cinematic high-tech/sci-fi. If you love the X-men and X-Universe and haven't read this magnificent run I suggest starting here. This may not be the exact starting point of the New X-men, but for my money its certainly where they hit their stride.

  10. 5 out of 5

    nae

    Favorites: #112 and #113. We get a whole lot of new storylines, still can’t believe there’s this tiny thing they can’t solve between the entire team. But well, just have to wait to see how that ends up. I really enjoyed most of the issues, the only ones I didn’t enjoy were the ones situated in the savage land, idk, maybe it’s just me but i always get kind of bored when there’s a story in that place, also it ends the same always. Still, I appreciate all the insight we have for some characters, now I Favorites: #112 and #113. We get a whole lot of new storylines, still can’t believe there’s this tiny thing they can’t solve between the entire team. But well, just have to wait to see how that ends up. I really enjoyed most of the issues, the only ones I didn’t enjoy were the ones situated in the savage land, idk, maybe it’s just me but i always get kind of bored when there’s a story in that place, also it ends the same always. Still, I appreciate all the insight we have for some characters, now I’m seeing Ororo as my favorite, there’s a lot to see about her in this volume, also from some others as Jean and even Professor X.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lenny

    Still classic X-Men, with some great character moments, but this one shows its age a bit more than the other collections so far. To be honest, I personally can't stand the Savage Land, and Claremont's vision of Japan is problematic in several ways. Two groups of X-Men stay apart under the mistaken impression that the other group is deceased; it's drawn out to be sure, but also allows several characters to bond and grow in ways that might not have been possible otherwise. Regardless of its faults Still classic X-Men, with some great character moments, but this one shows its age a bit more than the other collections so far. To be honest, I personally can't stand the Savage Land, and Claremont's vision of Japan is problematic in several ways. Two groups of X-Men stay apart under the mistaken impression that the other group is deceased; it's drawn out to be sure, but also allows several characters to bond and grow in ways that might not have been possible otherwise. Regardless of its faults, this classic Claremont/Byrne run is still required reading for X-Men fans, especially fans of Wolverine, Nightcrawler and Storm.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lloyd

    Chris Claremont, John Byrne and Terry Austin made this volume a visual treat to read. And reading it in digital really brings out the detail of the work that Terry Austin put into his inking. On the other hand, if someone was rushing or not such a great inker, that stands out too. Either way, these are just comics and entertainment - and produced by some of the best talents of their time. I'm having a great time re-reading and haven't even gotten to the meat of what I loved back in the day! Chris Claremont, John Byrne and Terry Austin made this volume a visual treat to read. And reading it in digital really brings out the detail of the work that Terry Austin put into his inking. On the other hand, if someone was rushing or not such a great inker, that stands out too. Either way, these are just comics and entertainment - and produced by some of the best talents of their time. I'm having a great time re-reading and haven't even gotten to the meat of what I loved back in the day!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Crazed8J8

    Some classic stories and some great characters, but this run/collection feels like it is just a placeholder between the Phoenix Saga and the Dark Phoenix Saga. The Sauron story was one of the best, but the Magneto, Moses Magnum, and Sunfire stories were foregetable. Classic X-Men tales though, and for that alone, it was worth the read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    I'm not the biggest fan of the Savage Land stories, but they're not bad stories, and everything else in this volume is exceptional, particularly the battle with Magneto. There's a reason these stories are classics. I'm not the biggest fan of the Savage Land stories, but they're not bad stories, and everything else in this volume is exceptional, particularly the battle with Magneto. There's a reason these stories are classics.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Drunken_orangetree

    This from the Chris Claremont/John Byrne run. The art's usually pretty good: not the detail of present comic books, but dynamic. The story-telling is a little more awkward. Worth a look if you're an X-Men fan. This from the Chris Claremont/John Byrne run. The art's usually pretty good: not the detail of present comic books, but dynamic. The story-telling is a little more awkward. Worth a look if you're an X-Men fan.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mary Kate

    These issues dragged for me, unfortunately. They contained some great moments and story beats, but I ended up frustrated by just how long it was taking them to get back from Antarctica. I’ve never been happier to see the mansion.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Clark

    Excellent From Antarctica to Japan to Canada, this is classic Claremont and Byrne. The story is exciting and cohesive. I highly recommend this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Shanks

    This volume took me a bit to get into, but I enjoyed it overall.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vidu

    Oh the team bonding! So freaking great. I really love all the different settings we got in this volume. And seeing Beast again in the beginning! My heart!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rich

    I miss the days of unconvoluted X-men stories. These first three collections are so refreshing to go back to w/o all of today's overly ridiculous storylines and crossovers. I miss the days of unconvoluted X-men stories. These first three collections are so refreshing to go back to w/o all of today's overly ridiculous storylines and crossovers.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shim

    Classic.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Graham

    The Savage Land, Japan, and exotic Calgary! Beautiful John Byrne art and a lot of development for Wolverine. Always a good time!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Ellis

    Still love the direction X-Men is going after the reboot. I can't believe how dry it was before. Still love the direction X-Men is going after the reboot. I can't believe how dry it was before.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Characterizations are beginning to stack. World is beginning to fill. This is the book that changed comics (along with plenty of others, of course) but still shy of the peak.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Doom70

    Excellent. The foundations of so many X-Men Legends. A fun read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tom Britton

    Fun rereading old X-Men . Wolverine was real asshole back then . Not till Miller got hold of home . Turn out what got today Funny how they change from the early days Fun read of nostalgia

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sananab

    The last few issues take place in Calgary. For a person who grew up in Calgary, that couldn't possibly be more weird. Calgary is not an interesting or pleasant place, so its pop-culture footprint is almost non-existent. It's just normal that Calgary isn't in books, or on TV. Most Canadians seem to barely know Calgary exists, in spite of it being one of the country's largest cities. Some of it takes place near my old appartment. Some takes place near my old high school. What's extra strange is th The last few issues take place in Calgary. For a person who grew up in Calgary, that couldn't possibly be more weird. Calgary is not an interesting or pleasant place, so its pop-culture footprint is almost non-existent. It's just normal that Calgary isn't in books, or on TV. Most Canadians seem to barely know Calgary exists, in spite of it being one of the country's largest cities. Some of it takes place near my old appartment. Some takes place near my old high school. What's extra strange is that downtown Calgary changed very little from the 70s to the 00s, when I last lived there. About a dozen landmarks show up in these comics, and none of them had changed an iota.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Mann

    Didnt plan to read this in just 2 sittings, but once i started, i literally could not stop. The Claremont/Byrne XMEN have always been my own personal comic book version of "The Beatles" - Top of the top, A - number one, top of the heap, the best....(for me) - as a wee small laddie, I stumbled on the bi-monthly xmen around issue 127 ("Proteus" saga) and i was totally hooked. It was a little more "adult" than all the other books and it was just so weird for that time. Truly alternative and made th Didnt plan to read this in just 2 sittings, but once i started, i literally could not stop. The Claremont/Byrne XMEN have always been my own personal comic book version of "The Beatles" - Top of the top, A - number one, top of the heap, the best....(for me) - as a wee small laddie, I stumbled on the bi-monthly xmen around issue 127 ("Proteus" saga) and i was totally hooked. It was a little more "adult" than all the other books and it was just so weird for that time. Truly alternative and made the other marvel & DC heroes look boring, staid & conservative. Mutants were exotic, strange societal freaks! And thus, a very small cult sprang up at that time....It exploded in full-on popularity as the Dark Phoenix saga unfolded...and It was pretty cool to nod my adolescent head and say "yep, been on board for a year" when everyone else had just "found" uncanny xmen. Fast forward 35 years later, half of this compliation i had not read before. It was always hard to buy back issues before about #120, too damn expensive.....Happy to report this TPB held my interest & attention. (I was afraid it might not). Still have a few of these original stories from this TPB in the individual issues! But they are "yellowed" :-( and i dont like to handle them, thus this wonderful compilation to re-read 30 years later! :-) -- i am not going to critique claremont/byrne, that would be mindless ---If you like them, do yourself a favor, Retrace their earliest steps as a team on this title. Buy this!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This collection sees Magneto separating the team shortly after they return from Phoenix fixing reality. The X-Men really start to gel as a team during a series of adventures on their way back home from the Magneto encounter. The Byrne art is really amazing and it just really pops even after all these years and rereads. I have been slowing down to study the panels. Noticed the reprint colors are redone and I even caught an edit that removed that Magneto had a run in with the FF and Dr. Doom betwee This collection sees Magneto separating the team shortly after they return from Phoenix fixing reality. The X-Men really start to gel as a team during a series of adventures on their way back home from the Magneto encounter. The Byrne art is really amazing and it just really pops even after all these years and rereads. I have been slowing down to study the panels. Noticed the reprint colors are redone and I even caught an edit that removed that Magneto had a run in with the FF and Dr. Doom between his appearances. So far I prefer the older colors, which seem moodier and less flat. The continuity edit probably made for some clarity for the new reader, but I didn't realize how much tighter appearances could be in the Marvel U in the 70's until I started this chronological read. Quite a shift with Byrne too. According to the supplemental material I have read recently, Byrne rescued Wolverine and highlighted him because he is Canadian, so it's all his fault. The characters seem more familiar with each issue by Byrne--sure they are continuing the story, but something about Byrne really anchors them. I need to edit the above statement that I am studying the panels to say more accurately that I am TRYING to study the panels, but I get swept up in the story and read it at a natural pace. These are essential X-Men stories.

  30. 5 out of 5

    B. Jay

    The description of this trade paperback may read that it collects a series of issues which read as one story, and in a way that's true. It spans a remarkably long time in which the X-Men were divided and lost as a team, and which Professor X, in fact, believes most of the team to be dead. But the issues still jump from one story line to another, with no overriding story arc. This is no graphic novel, folks, merely a collection of vintage X-Men comics. Where these issues do shine is the excellence The description of this trade paperback may read that it collects a series of issues which read as one story, and in a way that's true. It spans a remarkably long time in which the X-Men were divided and lost as a team, and which Professor X, in fact, believes most of the team to be dead. But the issues still jump from one story line to another, with no overriding story arc. This is no graphic novel, folks, merely a collection of vintage X-Men comics. Where these issues do shine is the excellence that is Marvel continuity and Claremont's developing ability to build a storyline. The fact that the team of mutants struggle through the better part of a year's worth of comics trying to get home and let Xavier know what's been going on with them must have left fans at the time breathless with the notion of a cliffhanger that kept them hanging. My only real complaint, even given the conventions of seventies comics, is the Phoenix. Mostly for her lack of involvement, but a plot point has been nagging at me. With Jean Grey's mysterious rebirth and new powers, why doesn't Professor X look into it? Why does he have no curiosity about this? I know this is a hugely minor point, but both Jean and the Prof sit around for a few weeks doing nothing but moping about their dead comrades. Just seems weird.

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