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The Disciplined Life: The Mark of Christian Maturity

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With bold, deft strokes, Dr. Richard S. Taylor penetrates the shallowness of our culture and lays bare the dire need for disciplined living.


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With bold, deft strokes, Dr. Richard S. Taylor penetrates the shallowness of our culture and lays bare the dire need for disciplined living.

30 review for The Disciplined Life: The Mark of Christian Maturity

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    My second time reading this book. As helpful and practical now as before!

  2. 5 out of 5

    L.A.

    I can’t say enough about this book. I think I first read it years ago in college and simply had so much rich info coming at me during that phase of my life that I didn’t fully appreciate this treasure. I feel I was blessed to be taught a lot of these principles, but wish I’d grasped the book sooner to have seen my lack of discipline in some other areas. I have work to do! Oh, and the last chapter is definitely excellent, but Taylor calls you out if you try to start there, and indeed, it won’t be I can’t say enough about this book. I think I first read it years ago in college and simply had so much rich info coming at me during that phase of my life that I didn’t fully appreciate this treasure. I feel I was blessed to be taught a lot of these principles, but wish I’d grasped the book sooner to have seen my lack of discipline in some other areas. I have work to do! Oh, and the last chapter is definitely excellent, but Taylor calls you out if you try to start there, and indeed, it won’t be as meaningful if you haven’t read the whole book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    Inspiring book I read when I was in college and trying to get myself organized and to quit wasting so much time. Shows the importance of being disciplined in order to be a good tool in the Christian cause.

  4. 4 out of 5

    David Lysenko

    Excellent book. It's got a lot of ideas missing from today's society. I recommend it to anyone interested in improving the quality of life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Excellent, short, practical book! Much-needed in this generation . . . we each need to guard ourselves carefully, because culture is pulling very hard in the direction of undiscipline in every area. "Without such ruggedness [disciplined character] there will be maudlin self-pity and moral deterioration. With it one can face the moral hazards of life and rise to higher and higher heights of strength and nobility. But the finest discipline of all is not that which struggles out of a near-tragic sit Excellent, short, practical book! Much-needed in this generation . . . we each need to guard ourselves carefully, because culture is pulling very hard in the direction of undiscipline in every area. "Without such ruggedness [disciplined character] there will be maudlin self-pity and moral deterioration. With it one can face the moral hazards of life and rise to higher and higher heights of strength and nobility. But the finest discipline of all is not that which struggles out of a near-tragic situation, but foresees and forestalls the situation in the first place." "Frankness is indeed a virtue when coupled with intelligent, loving tact and discretion. But it becomes a sadistic vice when it is merely the unbridled eruptings of opinions without regard to times and places or human feelings . . . It often takes a far higher display of discipline to refrain from speaking than it does to speak." "To become well read is vastly more than reading; it is a matter of exclusion as well as inclusion." "It requires neither intelligence nor character to assert loudly, 'No one can tell me what to do.' But it requires both to submit to the inescapable and necessary constraints of society; and submit, not grudgingly, but graciously, with mature understanding and cheerful good will." How to become a disciplined person: * no short cuts! * where to begin * training the body * whip the hard ones * cultivate punctuality * girding up the mind * exploiting the unexpected * love your critic * self-restraint * conquer gluttony! * learn to respect time tags * welcome the yokes of life * cultivate prayer patterns * a philosophy of discipleship

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Anger

    This was an incredible read. So so so many things to underline! I'm sure I'll go back and reread several sections. Very convicting, and yet also gave me a game plan for the next step towards being a disciplined person. Would definitely recommend!

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Weis

    Excellent. Worth re-reading, especially at the beginning of the year. (Read once before in 2009.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Loy Hower

    Good book overall. Challenged me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Ward

    I've just finished part one of the book : "The Place of Discipline in Christian Living" and so far have been very impressed with the authors presentation of the role of discipline in the physical and spiritual life of a person. R.S. Taylor presents discipline as the key to power and the truest mark of maturity. He explores the results of discipline working on the appetites, emotions, moods, speech, priorities and submission to authority. He follows with a few chapters on the dangers of extreme " I've just finished part one of the book : "The Place of Discipline in Christian Living" and so far have been very impressed with the authors presentation of the role of discipline in the physical and spiritual life of a person. R.S. Taylor presents discipline as the key to power and the truest mark of maturity. He explores the results of discipline working on the appetites, emotions, moods, speech, priorities and submission to authority. He follows with a few chapters on the dangers of extreme "discipline" which can lead a person to Christian asceticism. He also makes a point to spell out for his readers that discipline and holiness are not the same thing and also that discipline is not a means to holiness in and of itself. Holiness is itself the basis for discipline. The very last section of this part of the book is dedicated to the discussion of imposed discipline mainly in the life of a child. He disputes the popular idea that discipline injures the personality of a child. Excerpt from page 72: "There is already a twist toward self-centeredness and lawlessness which will not right itself under the benign rays of Christian environment, but will feed on kindness, turn liberty into license, and grow alarmingly with the years, if not rigorously curbed by firm rule from the cradle onwards. Such curbing, while not able to extirpate the twist, will at least bring it clearly to light; it will also make adjustments to the restraints of an adult society much easier , to say nothing of the greater ease in submitting to the rule of God, at first partially, and then with that full submission which enables God to correct the nature at its base." I really enjoyed the first half of this book :) It is so very insightful. I cannot wait to see what he presents in Part two: The Path to discipline in Christian Living.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Havebooks Willread

    Well, this book stepped all over my toes! Taylor holds nothing back in this short little book exhorting the christian to live a disciplined life in every area, from controlling moods and emotions, to speech and gluttony, and even avoiding procrastination and honoring time commitments. (!!!!!) "none can qualify for the high rating of a truly disciplined character whose tongue is not restrained by the bridle of prudence and directed by the reins of love" (39). "When students glibly cast off their t Well, this book stepped all over my toes! Taylor holds nothing back in this short little book exhorting the christian to live a disciplined life in every area, from controlling moods and emotions, to speech and gluttony, and even avoiding procrastination and honoring time commitments. (!!!!!) "none can qualify for the high rating of a truly disciplined character whose tongue is not restrained by the bridle of prudence and directed by the reins of love" (39). "When students glibly cast off their tardiness by the cliche, 'Better late than never,' their professor would invariably retort, 'Better never late" (102). I thought it was interesting that he also examined some perils of self-discipline, such as pride or going to extremes, or even confusing discipline with holiness. "Persons so afflicted (with unnatural self-discipline in an effort to conquer sin) often live a life of strain: they are overscrupulous and petty; prudish to the point of morbidity; easily shocked and quick to criticize others; afraid to laugh lest they be guilty of levity" (68). I'm still mulling over the following quote, particularly as it applies to those who tend to have perfectionist tendencies anyway. "Consecration to God carries with it the obligation to excel, not in competition with others, but in competition with oneself. God's work demands trained minds. You have no right to be mediocre if you are capable of something better" (105).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Groot

    My, what a potent little book and yes, it's dated--written to a 1960s world--but the message isn't. I think what I liked best isn't Taylor's message on what discipline is, but what it isn't: "We have mistakenly labored under the delusion that holiness is the fruition of discipline." Or this: "It is a mistake to suppose that disciplined living is entirely a matter of rigid rule, routine, and habit; or that its highest exhibition is in being able to determine a course of action for the day and the My, what a potent little book and yes, it's dated--written to a 1960s world--but the message isn't. I think what I liked best isn't Taylor's message on what discipline is, but what it isn't: "We have mistakenly labored under the delusion that holiness is the fruition of discipline." Or this: "It is a mistake to suppose that disciplined living is entirely a matter of rigid rule, routine, and habit; or that its highest exhibition is in being able to determine a course of action for the day and then batter one's way through at any cost. Too many other people and legitimate demands are apt to get trampled on by that kind of obstinacy. Such self-discipline is too akin to bull-headedness and self-will. It may be a symptom of basic selfishness." Too true! I'd read this little gem 20 years ago, and still find the message fresh and needed. "Far more important than our hidebound little systems are people. Helping people should be the supreme objective of all our self-discipline." I kinda forget it's not all about my rabid quest to cross the next thing off the List. Basically, it's a book about getting our crap together and not squashing others to do it. It's a challenge, really, a call to see what we can do to up the ante to our personal best. Dated, yes. Still applicable, certainly. Doesn't take a rocket scientist to extrapolate.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ed Washington

    Can't write a book about the mark of Christian Maturity and use scriptures incorrectly. He talks about breaking your fast to appease family. And that it is okay for married couples to not have sex, instead they must find new ways to deepen their relationship to not give in to their impulse of cheating. - The Bible clearly states that wives submit to their husbands. And that the wife's body is not her own in marriage. And for the husband to love his wife as Christ loved the church, which is to di Can't write a book about the mark of Christian Maturity and use scriptures incorrectly. He talks about breaking your fast to appease family. And that it is okay for married couples to not have sex, instead they must find new ways to deepen their relationship to not give in to their impulse of cheating. - The Bible clearly states that wives submit to their husbands. And that the wife's body is not her own in marriage. And for the husband to love his wife as Christ loved the church, which is to die for her, let alone have sex with her. The Bible says do not deprive each other. Again, the doctrine is off.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Godwin

    I love this book! In fact, it is a "tradition" for me that I read it every year at the beginning of the year. It is the first book I read the first of each year. This is because it sets the tone for my year - to be focused, disciplined, growing,... As best as I can recollect, this is the seventh year in a row that it has been my first book read of the year. I know I have read it before then but can't recollect the year.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    So I thought this was a good book. Mr. Taylor really does a great job of discussing discipline and how to become a disciplined person. I recommend this book to anyone that wants to become a little more disciplined.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    This is an extremely good book. Contains very practical suggestions for becoming a more disciplined person. One of my favorite books right now. I checked it out from the library, but I definitely will buy it to add to my personal shelf.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marc Hutchison

    I first encountered this fine little book in college in a class taught by Stephen Covey about 40 years ago. It was originally published in 1962, but it's message is more needed than ever. The fruits of undisciplined living are the problems of our times. I recommend this book very highly.

  17. 5 out of 5

    M

    The illustrations are all woefully out-of-date, but the basic teachings are sound and somewhat helpful. Perhaps the cover shown here is from an updated edition; the one I read was published in 1962.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    I loved this book. Made me serious about life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Rico

    I am on my 3rd reading of this book. Hopefully it will begin to sink in.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura Simons-luke

    Oh my! A book every Christian, every parent, every person should read. This book was written in 1962 and is more relevant today than it was then.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Moffett

    Dated but not totally without merit. He encourages participation in fine arts, good manners, excellence in all endeavors as a Christian responsibility. Doesn't like rock music, tho!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ibasanmi Temitope

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Govan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  27. 5 out of 5

    David J. Harris

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dan Tillinghast

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeannine

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

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