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Oz. The Marvelous Land of Oz

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The epic continues! Fresh off their landmark THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF OZ, superstars ERIC SHANOWER (Age of Bronze) and SKOTTIE YOUNG (X-MEN) return with L. Frank Baum's MARVELOUS LAND OF OZ. Join new characters Tip and Jack Pumpkinhead as they're whisked to Oz, and meet foes and friends! You've NEVER seen L. Frank Baum's masterpiece like this before... COLLECTING: The Marvel The epic continues! Fresh off their landmark THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF OZ, superstars ERIC SHANOWER (Age of Bronze) and SKOTTIE YOUNG (X-MEN) return with L. Frank Baum's MARVELOUS LAND OF OZ. Join new characters Tip and Jack Pumpkinhead as they're whisked to Oz, and meet foes and friends! You've NEVER seen L. Frank Baum's masterpiece like this before... COLLECTING: The Marvelous Land of Oz #1-8


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The epic continues! Fresh off their landmark THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF OZ, superstars ERIC SHANOWER (Age of Bronze) and SKOTTIE YOUNG (X-MEN) return with L. Frank Baum's MARVELOUS LAND OF OZ. Join new characters Tip and Jack Pumpkinhead as they're whisked to Oz, and meet foes and friends! You've NEVER seen L. Frank Baum's masterpiece like this before... COLLECTING: The Marvel The epic continues! Fresh off their landmark THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF OZ, superstars ERIC SHANOWER (Age of Bronze) and SKOTTIE YOUNG (X-MEN) return with L. Frank Baum's MARVELOUS LAND OF OZ. Join new characters Tip and Jack Pumpkinhead as they're whisked to Oz, and meet foes and friends! You've NEVER seen L. Frank Baum's masterpiece like this before... COLLECTING: The Marvelous Land of Oz #1-8

30 review for Oz. The Marvelous Land of Oz

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    OZ-esome!!! Creative Team: Writer: Eric Shanower (based on the original works by L. Frank Baum) Illustrator: Scottie Young BACK TO OZ If you think that since Dorothy was back in Kansas, that meant that it was the end of the adventures in Oz... ...you can't be more wrong about it! The wonderful creative team of Eric Shanower and Scottie Young return to adapt the second book by L. Frank Baum and you are able to return to the magical land of Oz with them. Some of the popular characters of the firs OZ-esome!!! Creative Team: Writer: Eric Shanower (based on the original works by L. Frank Baum) Illustrator: Scottie Young BACK TO OZ If you think that since Dorothy was back in Kansas, that meant that it was the end of the adventures in Oz... ...you can't be more wrong about it! The wonderful creative team of Eric Shanower and Scottie Young return to adapt the second book by L. Frank Baum and you are able to return to the magical land of Oz with them. Some of the popular characters of the first adventure made appearances but you get a big bunch of totally new characters in this story. I enjoyed at the fullest since while I was quite aware of the events in the first book due the classical movie adaptation, not matter the changes in the story, you had all the essential elements and moments, however, when I read for the first time The Marvelous Land of Oz was indeed terra incognita and I think that it was like to be another member in the party discovering and getting surprises about all what was happening at Oz. If you want to read it, don't try to research much ahead, just dive in the book! Since there is a major twist in the story that if you know about it before the reading, you will miss a lot of the fun, stun and punch! If you loved the first trip to Oz... ...you'll have a blast with the second one!!! Highly recommended to readers of all ages.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    A bit heavy on the gender roles but otherwise cute

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Eric Shanower and Skottie Young return to adapt the 2nd Oz book. Both the Scarecrow and the Tin Man return when General Jinjur and her army of fed up women take over the Emerald City. New characters Tip, Jack Pumpkinhead and the Sawhorse are also on board in this journey across Oz. It's also the first appearance of the long running character Ozma. Skottie Young and Jean-Francois Beaulieu continue to wow on art. If anything, they've gotten even better with their character designs. Eric Shanower and Skottie Young return to adapt the 2nd Oz book. Both the Scarecrow and the Tin Man return when General Jinjur and her army of fed up women take over the Emerald City. New characters Tip, Jack Pumpkinhead and the Sawhorse are also on board in this journey across Oz. It's also the first appearance of the long running character Ozma. Skottie Young and Jean-Francois Beaulieu continue to wow on art. If anything, they've gotten even better with their character designs.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Everybody is familiar with The wizard of Oz mostly I suspect through the amazing movie with Judy Garland, in my humble opinion that is the definitive Oz movie. What less people know especially those that do not read, or do not read chidren literature is that Baum actually wrote quite a few sequels after the unexpected succes of the first OZ book he was bombarded with letters from children. So here is the sequel and it is Dorothy free with a guest role by the scarecrow and the Tin man. This is the Everybody is familiar with The wizard of Oz mostly I suspect through the amazing movie with Judy Garland, in my humble opinion that is the definitive Oz movie. What less people know especially those that do not read, or do not read chidren literature is that Baum actually wrote quite a few sequels after the unexpected succes of the first OZ book he was bombarded with letters from children. So here is the sequel and it is Dorothy free with a guest role by the scarecrow and the Tin man. This is the story of Tip who lives with a witch and after he pranks her she decides to change him in a statue and tip decides to do a runner with the creation of his joke a pumpkin headed wooden man. They run towards the Emerald city. The city is in danger of being besieged by an all girl army who want to throw of the reigns of male domination. The thread is serious enough that the current king Scarecrow runs with them to travel to Glinda the sorceress to ask her to help them to set everything right. It is a beautiful fairytale that actually continues the story of the land of Oz through the eyes of new players and is a brilliant effort that really is very enjoyable. The Woggle-Bug is a brilliant new character that will be easy a children favorite as well it is mine. Marvel set a brilliant team on this collection of 8 comics who tell the tale and their drawn character do add to the charm of the story as written by L. Frank Baum. If you want to switch off reality and Covid, this is the perfect potion.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Absolutely no clue what this book would be about, which is strange considering what a pervasive part of modern culture the original Oz story is. Lot of fun and fantastical characters here - Tip, Mombi, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Straw Horse, the Woggle-Bug, the Gump, and the last-pages introduction of Ozma - plus some welcome expanded roles for Scarecrow, Tin Man (aka Nick Chopper in this book), Glinda and the Queen of the Field Mice. On the downside, Baum's vision of the "silly," all-female army that Absolutely no clue what this book would be about, which is strange considering what a pervasive part of modern culture the original Oz story is. Lot of fun and fantastical characters here - Tip, Mombi, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Straw Horse, the Woggle-Bug, the Gump, and the last-pages introduction of Ozma - plus some welcome expanded roles for Scarecrow, Tin Man (aka Nick Chopper in this book), Glinda and the Queen of the Field Mice. On the downside, Baum's vision of the "silly," all-female army that takes over Oz is laughably un-PC 115 years on...but it's also hard to hold someone's views up to today's standards after more than a century, and as Shanower notes in his introduction, Baum was the son-in-law of prominent suffragette and women's rights leader Matilda Joslyn Gage, and a strong supporter of her cause. So I guess...just different times, man. But once again, the real stand-out here is Young's artwork and Beaulieu's coloring. This book is much brighter than the first, which I found a little gray and dark - again, after reading the whole story, it was just fun to go through again and study the drawings, as there's just so much to find there.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Quinn Rollins

    After finishing Eric Shanower and Skottie Young's graphic novel adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz last year, I was hoping they'd adapt other L. Frank Baum novels. We're all most familiar with the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion of course, but there are other bizarre Oz friends and enemies that would shine with the right treatment. The next book in the series is out in a trade paperback that collects all eight issues of the ongoing comic: The Marvelous Land of Oz. The 200 page book i After finishing Eric Shanower and Skottie Young's graphic novel adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz last year, I was hoping they'd adapt other L. Frank Baum novels. We're all most familiar with the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion of course, but there are other bizarre Oz friends and enemies that would shine with the right treatment. The next book in the series is out in a trade paperback that collects all eight issues of the ongoing comic: The Marvelous Land of Oz. The 200 page book is printed on high quality paper, and is a fun journey back to Oz for either new readers or those who have already read Baum's original books. I've read the first seven or eight of the Oz books, but it's been a while, so some of the stories and characters tend to run together. Reading this adaptation was a good reminder of the fun vision that Baum had of that magical world, and also overcomes some of the weaknesses that his writing has. The Marvelous Land of Oz starts off in the Land of the Gillikins, somewhere north of the Emerald City. There we meet a young boy Tippetarius, known simply as Tip. He lives with an old witch Mombi, and is basically her servant. One day to frighten her, he builds a large wooden man and gives him a pumpkin for a head. After he sprinkles some Powder of Life on the man, he comes to life, and Tip names him Jack Pumpkinhead. Soon Jack and Tip are on the run from Mombi, are joined by a living Sawhorse, and head to the Emerald City to get some advice by King Scarecrow. Like The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, this entry in the series feels more episodic than most novels do. It's also the tale of a group of companions traveling from place to place in Oz, having adventures, and then escaping. In addition to the new characters mentioned, there's a large insect called the Highly Magnified Wogglebug, and a flying sofa called the Gump. The only repeated characters from Wonderful Wizard of Oz are the Scarecrow and Tin Man--there's no Dororthy or Lion in this particular adventure. Some of the story points will be familiar to people who remember 1985's Return to Oz, which was kind of a mash-up of the books Marvelous Land of Oz and Road to Oz. Others, like a "girl rebellion" overthrowing the Scarecrow haven't been adapted before. Shanower explains some of the language and situations that might come across as misogynistic in a Foreword--that Baum was a proponent of female empowerment, as evidenced by his many heroines. That said, the dismissal of General Jinjur and her "Girl Army" will probably leave a bad taste in many readers' mouths. The artwork by Skottie Young is as good--if not better--than it was in Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Because this story is less familiar than the first, it's not jarring to see his version of Tip, or Mombi, or other characters. He's taken the descriptions and classic illustrations by Denslow and adapted them--made them more colorful and lively than anything we've seen before. Assisted by colorist Jean-Francois Beaulieu, the pages are vibrant and lively and pull your eyes along, even when Baum's sometimes clunky dialogue doesn't. This is a fun book for lovers of fantasy of all ages. If your only experience with the land "Over the Rainbow" is the 1939 movie, pick up the first graphic novel and this one, and become a citizen of Oz.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Beaumont

    An excellent graphic adaptation of L. Frank Baum's original novel. Eric Shanower and Skottie Young do a wonderful job with the storytelling and artwork respectively. This story, the second in the series, is notable for the introduction of Jack Pumpkinhead, the Woggle-Bug (hilarious), the young boy Tip, and the witch Mombi. To date there are three other graphic novels in this series that I haven't read yet, and I hope there will be more. Also, I want to go back and reread Baum's 14 original Oz bo An excellent graphic adaptation of L. Frank Baum's original novel. Eric Shanower and Skottie Young do a wonderful job with the storytelling and artwork respectively. This story, the second in the series, is notable for the introduction of Jack Pumpkinhead, the Woggle-Bug (hilarious), the young boy Tip, and the witch Mombi. To date there are three other graphic novels in this series that I haven't read yet, and I hope there will be more. Also, I want to go back and reread Baum's 14 original Oz books as well as the 14 by Ruth Plumly Thompson (and there are more by various other authors).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Johnson

    First cab off the rank this year is Eric Shanower and Skottie Young’s adaption of L. Frank Baum’s The Marvelous Land of Oz. Much like its predecessor The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (adapted by same), I was highly impressed by its loyalty to the original. Not only is its plot accurate, it has captured the spirit and youthful energy of Baum’s world superbly. For those not familiar with the tale, The Marvelous Land of Oz tells the story of Tippetarius, known more commonly as “Tip”. Unlike Dorothy, Tip i First cab off the rank this year is Eric Shanower and Skottie Young’s adaption of L. Frank Baum’s The Marvelous Land of Oz. Much like its predecessor The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (adapted by same), I was highly impressed by its loyalty to the original. Not only is its plot accurate, it has captured the spirit and youthful energy of Baum’s world superbly. For those not familiar with the tale, The Marvelous Land of Oz tells the story of Tippetarius, known more commonly as “Tip”. Unlike Dorothy, Tip is a native of Oz who, when he runs away from the evil witch who is his guardian, finds himself entwined with the politics of Oz. General Jinjur and her army of Ozian girls have marched onto the Emerald City, revolting against the Scarecrow King and the long standing patriarchal rule of Oz... which would be more impressive if the soldier-girls were a little more skilled in their work and noble in their intentions. Tip and his magical creations Jack Pumpkin Head and Saw Horse join the Scarecrow and the Tin Man in restoring order to Oz. As I said, this is a faithful adaption of Baum’s book, yet it possesses a charm unique to its form. Skottie Young’s highly stylistic artistry is beautiful and lends the perfect degree of whimsy to Shanower’s treatment of Oz’s political scene.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David

    Charming. Belongs in every home.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Justyn Rampa

    I enjoyed this volume even more. With the exception of the Scarecrow and the Tin Man, we have an entirely new roster of characters including Tip, Jack Pumpkinhead, Sawhorse, Woggle-Bug, the flying Gump, Mombi, and General Jinjur. The text of the original book is one half of the inspiration behind the fantastic film, "Return to Oz" which I have seen at least 10 times if not more and LOVE!!! Apparently the book is somewhat controversial because of the way some people read the character of General Ji I enjoyed this volume even more. With the exception of the Scarecrow and the Tin Man, we have an entirely new roster of characters including Tip, Jack Pumpkinhead, Sawhorse, Woggle-Bug, the flying Gump, Mombi, and General Jinjur. The text of the original book is one half of the inspiration behind the fantastic film, "Return to Oz" which I have seen at least 10 times if not more and LOVE!!! Apparently the book is somewhat controversial because of the way some people read the character of General Jinjur and argue that it is anti-feminist and to them I say...nay. Within the context of the story, Jinjur works and her whole storyline. Baum has no shortage of strong female characters nor is he making blanket statements about females in the military. Controversy aside, I really enjoyed some of the characters in this one although Jack Pumpkinhead was a bit dimmer than I remembered. Baum's characterizations are started to get a little obvious and he likes to keep his sidekicks relatively simple with bursts of little wisdom coming from their mouths. Again, Eric Shanower's intro notes are a must read and him and Skottie Young do a fantastic job adapting the text. Truly, one of the most shocking plot twists occurs in this book and is incredibly fascinating to consider. I really really enjoyed this!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Marvelous Land of Oz is one of my favorite of the Oz books, and it would be better if not for how very much General Jinjur's revolt is a product of its time. It's profoundly sexist to modern readers, and was hardly forward thinking at the time. Shanower reads it as Baum clumsily attempting to address suffrage issues, and there's something to be said for that. (Jinjur and her army are varying degrees of sexist stereotypes of what women in the army would be like, but Glinda's female army is unfail Marvelous Land of Oz is one of my favorite of the Oz books, and it would be better if not for how very much General Jinjur's revolt is a product of its time. It's profoundly sexist to modern readers, and was hardly forward thinking at the time. Shanower reads it as Baum clumsily attempting to address suffrage issues, and there's something to be said for that. (Jinjur and her army are varying degrees of sexist stereotypes of what women in the army would be like, but Glinda's female army is unfailingly professional.) But I can put this aside since it comes from a 100+ year old book. I love Marvelous Land for the rest of it, especially Jack Pumpkinhead, one of my favorite residents of Oz. Shanower's adaptation is very faithful, and I've really come to like his signature art style in his Oz adaptations.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

       It’s been years since I read an Oz novel, yet I quickly fell into Marvel’s The Marvelous Land of Oz. I think the last one I read was something like Grandpa in Oz a good, oh, 17 or so years ago. It is the story of a little Gillikin boy named Tip, Jack Pumpkinhead, and the Sawhorse as they go on a journey across much of Oz, meeting faces both familiar and new and having quite an adventure. It took me no time at all to adapt to the wonky way logic and magic work in Oz, and the way the Scarecrow’    It’s been years since I read an Oz novel, yet I quickly fell into Marvel’s The Marvelous Land of Oz. I think the last one I read was something like Grandpa in Oz a good, oh, 17 or so years ago. It is the story of a little Gillikin boy named Tip, Jack Pumpkinhead, and the Sawhorse as they go on a journey across much of Oz, meeting faces both familiar and new and having quite an adventure. It took me no time at all to adapt to the wonky way logic and magic work in Oz, and the way the Scarecrow’s brains (he’s the wisest!) and the Tin Man’s heart (he has the best heart!) play such exaggerated yet…not exaggerated roles in the story. Broadly, Scarecrow’s wisdom sometimes makes sense in our world, and when it doesn’t, it somehow fits into the Land of Oz.    Perhaps one of my favorite scenes happens early on, when Jack Pumpkinhead from the country of the Gillikins visits the Scarecrow in the Emerald City. They “realize” they need a translator since Pumpkinhead is a foreigner in the Emerald City, and as such he clearly must speak a different language than the Scarecrow. I loved the absurdness of it, and how it shakes out from there. (Yes, you’ll just have to read it to find out for yourself!) The story is full of this, and I’m pretty sure that Mr. Shanower pulled lines directly from L. Frank Baum’s text. Despite the years it has been since I really read a Baum Land of Oz novel, I was sent right back to the world he created in this adaptation. And you know, now I rather want to pick up the couple random Oz novels I know we have in the house to read them. It’s a distinctly almost-Alice-in-Wonderland kind of absurdness, yet Oz doesn’t go quite as far into absurdity as Wonderland. But it’s pretty close.    As for the art, I definitely must spare a few words to address it directly. Mr. Young’s style quickly grew on me so thoroughly that it felt like the perfect art style to portray such a wacky world which somehow manages to make sense in its own kooky way. He had me a few scant pages into the story, his style quickly becoming The Style for at least this Oz book, and quite possibly a solid style for many Oz books. All in all it makes for a very fun read, and an enjoyable way to (re)visit the land and stories of Oz. Now, how easily accessible are the Oz books we own…? Favorite quotes:    I can’t claim great experience, but it often occurs to me that I know more than those around me. [said the Sawhorse]    Perhaps you do, for experience doesn’t always mean wisdom. [replied the Tin Man] - page 78    Laws were never meant to be understood, and it’s foolish to make the attempt. [said the Tin Man] - page 107    I’m convinced that the only people worthy of consideration are the unusual ones. Common folks are like the leaves of a tree, and live and die unnoticed. [said the Scarecrow] - page 117

  13. 5 out of 5

    asmaa🌻

    Book 3 of 7 finished for the booktubethon! This was such a delightful read and the gorgeous artwork deserves a whole star of its own (so far, Skottie Young has never failed to impress me with his stunning works). I like this second instalment better, the plot and events were much more enjoyable. Also, can I just say, I'm very fond of these marvel adaptations now, especially of how the team seems to take great care with how they work with the original books (granted, I appreciate the inclusion of Book 3 of 7 finished for the booktubethon! This was such a delightful read and the gorgeous artwork deserves a whole star of its own (so far, Skottie Young has never failed to impress me with his stunning works). I like this second instalment better, the plot and events were much more enjoyable. Also, can I just say, I'm very fond of these marvel adaptations now, especially of how the team seems to take great care with how they work with the original books (granted, I appreciate the inclusion of a passage from the original works at the start of the issues because it encourages me to go ahead and try them out). I'm probably going to continue with this Oz comic series; I'm looking forward to it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This was my first graphic novel. The book started out slow, but picked up by the middle. It turned out to be a cute story, but so much different then I had imaged. Being that I am a big fan of the Wizard of Oz I now would like to read more of the Oz graphic novel.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Books on Stereo

    Oz introduces far too much content that fails to add relevant to an already captivating story resulting in a drawn narrative.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nikki in Niagara

    Reason for Reading: Next in the series. Another absolutely fabulous rendition of an OZ book by Shanower and Young. This is actually only as far as I've read of the original novels and I am inspired to start reading them now so that I can have read the book before continuing on with the next graphic novel. I own a gorgeous collection of the Baum books. This story only brings back a few old friends from our first encounter with Oz namely Scarecrow and Tinman and briefly for the last chapter Glinda. Reason for Reading: Next in the series. Another absolutely fabulous rendition of an OZ book by Shanower and Young. This is actually only as far as I've read of the original novels and I am inspired to start reading them now so that I can have read the book before continuing on with the next graphic novel. I own a gorgeous collection of the Baum books. This story only brings back a few old friends from our first encounter with Oz namely Scarecrow and Tinman and briefly for the last chapter Glinda. Otherwise the story centers around a young boy, Tip, an old witch whom he runs away from, Mombi, and Tip's two companions, Pumpinkhead and Sawhorse. They set off on their own adventure to Emerald City and meet many strange people or dangerous circumstances along the way. A jolly, rollicking fun story. I really enjoyed Shanower's detailed essay introducing us to the circumstances under which the original book was written. Baum's motives, his state of mind and the times in which he was living add a certain look at the story through fresh eyes with this understanding. I really enjoyed this adaptation and will say I even enjoyed it more than the book for one particular reason, The Woggle-Bug. The highly magnified bug who has been thoroughly educated is a conceited know-it-all who talks on and on, full of puns and word play, facetious and self-centered. He drove me absolutely bonkers in the book! Sometimes his dialogue would go on for more than a page and I just wanted to throttle him, not finding him the least humorous at all. However, Shanower's adaptation, has taken him into small doses which are easy to take and I find it hard to say, but I actually enjoyed his part in the story this time. Of course, the illustrations are pure joy. I sincerely hope this team manages to stay together and find the time to at least adapt Baum's original 14 books if not the entire Famous Forty!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emilie

    Hm... Okay, so I think I liked the first book better than this one. The art felt a bit rushed at times and I don't think I'll continue with this, especially since there are no libraries in Stockholm with this series and it is quite expensive. I'll just read the actual books and be happy with that. I must say that two things that I though about when I read the book got extremely apparant in the graphic novel and can no longer be ignored: 1) Tip is so rude and angry. It is not as magical a story wh Hm... Okay, so I think I liked the first book better than this one. The art felt a bit rushed at times and I don't think I'll continue with this, especially since there are no libraries in Stockholm with this series and it is quite expensive. I'll just read the actual books and be happy with that. I must say that two things that I though about when I read the book got extremely apparant in the graphic novel and can no longer be ignored: 1) Tip is so rude and angry. It is not as magical a story when every whimsical thing the characters say and do is met with a frown and yelling. 2) They were so MEAN to the Woggle-Bug! I loved him and his "thoroughly educated-ness" and his puns. Yet he was forbidden to make puns and everytime he did everyone became so angry. He was so happy at the beginning but as the story went on, the life kinda got sucked out of him. Not cool. Made me sad. Also, the saw-horse was the cutest thing ever. Everytime he was present in a drawing, I started to smile!

  18. 4 out of 5

    zaCk S

    the main draw of the marvel oz series is skottie young. he's why you pick up individual issues. why you buy the bound hardback volumes. he's why this oz series is selling and winning awards. which is why i can give this 4 stars here. while the writing in volume 1 felt new and concise, the similar tone in this second volume, instead of feeling quick and to-the-point, feels less like it's geared to a younger audience and more like a reader's digest. the wit feels like it's leaving in favor of simp the main draw of the marvel oz series is skottie young. he's why you pick up individual issues. why you buy the bound hardback volumes. he's why this oz series is selling and winning awards. which is why i can give this 4 stars here. while the writing in volume 1 felt new and concise, the similar tone in this second volume, instead of feeling quick and to-the-point, feels less like it's geared to a younger audience and more like a reader's digest. the wit feels like it's leaving in favor of simply providing captions to young's character-filled artwork.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    A graphic version of the Frank Baum Wonderful Wizard of Oz series books. I think it will be a creative way to introduce kids to the dynamic book. Not being a graphic arts fan, I found it creative, but I wasn't taken away with it as some of the reviewers were. On that note, I will say that I enjoyed this one more than the first in series. A graphic version of the Frank Baum Wonderful Wizard of Oz series books. I think it will be a creative way to introduce kids to the dynamic book. Not being a graphic arts fan, I found it creative, but I wasn't taken away with it as some of the reviewers were. On that note, I will say that I enjoyed this one more than the first in series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nickcole

    Rating: 4 Oh what fun I had reading this retelling of the story. The art was fantastic and the forwarding letter was again and good part on letting you know why the author loves Oz so much.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erica McGillivray

    Art super cute. Story remains true to original book, but it means it has the same mixed messages about gender and gender identity.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emma Gear

    The second of five comics based on the original Wizard of Oz books! The first one was hard to review because EVERYONE knows the story of the first Wizard of Oz because EVERYONE'S seen that old movie. Even if it was based more on the book than the movie you still knew 90% of the plot beats and knew what to expect (The art by Skottie Young was gorgeous though!) This is the second, and where most people drop off of knowing anything. Centered around a boy named Tip who is living with a very evil old The second of five comics based on the original Wizard of Oz books! The first one was hard to review because EVERYONE knows the story of the first Wizard of Oz because EVERYONE'S seen that old movie. Even if it was based more on the book than the movie you still knew 90% of the plot beats and knew what to expect (The art by Skottie Young was gorgeous though!) This is the second, and where most people drop off of knowing anything. Centered around a boy named Tip who is living with a very evil old woman by the name of Mombi, who is also kind of a witch. But not really, because there were only allowed to be 4 witches in Oz at a time so she was kind of practicing magic illegally. Or something. It's not important. What matters is she's essentially a new evil witch and Tip is essentially her child slave who she intends to turn into a statue one day so he can live for all eternity as a decoration. Naturally, Tip doesn't like that idea, so he runs away with a jar full of magic powder that brings things to life, and a wooden man with a pumpkin for a head he built himself that is brought to life thanks to the powder. The two run away and have more amusing silly adventures in the bizarre world of Oz. While I did enjoy this more on a story front as I wasn't at all familiar with it compared to the first, I did also think that it had a lot of weaknesses that haven't aged particularly well. While on the one hand I do feel it should be commended that they stuck so faithfully to the source material, having an army of women take over the Emerald city using sewing needles as their lone weapons is uh, not a good look, to put it nicely. Nor is it so good when a small handful of mice are enough to send them all squealing as they run away in terror and abandon their post later in the story. And considering the women rose up and took over the city because they were tired of doing all the housework and... none of that seems to get resolved when they're eventually overthrown it's- It's just not a story that's aged well. And that's the biggest portion of the story, with the Mombi plot mostly taking a backseat until the end when all of that gets resolved. The Mombi sections are pretty fine and I've no complaints there, and the art is still wonderful and makes this worth reading all its own. Will not say more for spoilers but it's got the same warm, friendly tone that the first series had that's just very nice to go through. It's not aged well in many regards that make it kind of hard to read without cringing, but the overall package is still attractive enough that I'd rank it perfectly average.

  23. 5 out of 5

    SarahKat

    I own this series solely because of Skottie Young's artwork. It does not disappoint in this, though I missed the lion. The story is fun and silly. I have never read past the first book of Baum's novels so I don't know how close the rest of these will be. This book is a silly kind of fun. (view spoiler)[Scarecrow is king of the Emerald City, Nick Woodsman is king of the Winkies. Tip is a child in the care of a witch named Mombi. Jack Pumpkinhead, Sawhorse, and Gump are inanimate objects brought t I own this series solely because of Skottie Young's artwork. It does not disappoint in this, though I missed the lion. The story is fun and silly. I have never read past the first book of Baum's novels so I don't know how close the rest of these will be. This book is a silly kind of fun. (view spoiler)[Scarecrow is king of the Emerald City, Nick Woodsman is king of the Winkies. Tip is a child in the care of a witch named Mombi. Jack Pumpkinhead, Sawhorse, and Gump are inanimate objects brought to life with magical powder. The woggle-bug (I don't remember his full name) is a giant, highly educated bug, who has a lot of puns. General Jinjur is the general of an all-woman army that takes over Emerald City and start making men cook and clean (hehe). "I'm glad you've come back to restore order. Doing housework and minding the children is wearing out every man in the Emerald City." Hm. How did the women manage it so easily? I really don't know. Perhaps the women are made of cast-iron." This made me laugh. And yes I know it's 2021 and it's not politically correct to giggle at stereotypical gender roles, but this is how it is at my house, and many of my friends' houses, and therefore it is amusing to me. Anyway, this hodge-podge group of friends travel away from, and then back to, the Emerald City to get Scarecrow back on the throne, but it turns out the real heir to the throne is Ozma, daughter of Pastoria. Mombi was in charge of hiding Ozma, and she had turned her into a boy to hide her! It's Tip. Tip is Ozma. He turns back into her at the end. Favorite interaction: when Jack Pumpkinhead first meets Scarecrow alone and assumes they speak different languages and asks for a translator even though they are speaking the same language. Also loved the dry humor and woggle-bug's puns, and everyone hating woggle-bug's puns. (hide spoiler)]

  24. 5 out of 5

    Toi Thomas

    I read this book in comparison with the original story and was very pleased. I was surprised at how well these books kept to the original source material considering the transfer of written words into a visual medium. Kudos to Marvel for doing a great job releasing a quality product. Eric Shanower adapted the story simplistically and beautifully. The art of Skottie Young was intricate and engaging. I loved his use of light and altering color schemes to set the tone and establish the ever-changin I read this book in comparison with the original story and was very pleased. I was surprised at how well these books kept to the original source material considering the transfer of written words into a visual medium. Kudos to Marvel for doing a great job releasing a quality product. Eric Shanower adapted the story simplistically and beautifully. The art of Skottie Young was intricate and engaging. I loved his use of light and altering color schemes to set the tone and establish the ever-changing settings. In this installment, I felt the facial expressions really captured the emotions and tone of each scene, which is saying a lot since many of the characters are supposed to be alive. Here's my short review of the original story- As much as I will always adore the first book, I found this one to be even more enjoyable. It was difficult at first to miss not seeing Dorthy, but Tip, Jack, and all their friends were just so sweet and endearing. Plus, I liked the army of girls. The comparison- Much of what I felt reading the original was there when reading this version. However, I do admit that sometimes the images really helped to bring the characters to life in a way I sometimes struggled with when simply reading the words. This is a perfect children's series for a reluctant young reader and any adults who may not have the time to read the original. I'm so blessed to have been able to read both. Highly recommended.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chasity

    This was delightful and silly and absurd graphic novel with great art and great characters. My favorite character was Pumpkinhead with his constant fear of his own mortality. Was such an odd group of characters ever assembled as a tin man with the warmest heart, a scarecrow with valuable brains, a woggle-bug who is highly magnified and thoroughly educated, a living saw horse, a pumpkin head, and a young boy on the run from an evil witch who wants to turn him into a marble statue for her garden? This was delightful and silly and absurd graphic novel with great art and great characters. My favorite character was Pumpkinhead with his constant fear of his own mortality. Was such an odd group of characters ever assembled as a tin man with the warmest heart, a scarecrow with valuable brains, a woggle-bug who is highly magnified and thoroughly educated, a living saw horse, a pumpkin head, and a young boy on the run from an evil witch who wants to turn him into a marble statue for her garden? I don't think so but it makes for great fun. There's also a great twist at the end of the story that I didn't see coming and I always award points to a book for catching me by surprise. It's a good twist, trust me. Some of the female characters are portrayed as quite silly which is discussed better in the foreword of the book than I could possibly do here and it's worth noting that there are strong female characters as well particularly Glinda the Good and her army. Highly recommended for some light-hearted reading.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    If Marvel didn't publish this, I honestly wouldn't read a single thing from their current output. This series, however, is superb. Marvelous isn't as good as the original, through no fault of Shanower or Young. The story's just a little vague at times: Scarecrow's overthrown, flees to Tin Woodman for aid, they return and can't reconquer Emerald City (with only one more ally, even if he does have an axe? what else did they expect?), so it's off to see Glinda - with a cute, but longish side-trip al If Marvel didn't publish this, I honestly wouldn't read a single thing from their current output. This series, however, is superb. Marvelous isn't as good as the original, through no fault of Shanower or Young. The story's just a little vague at times: Scarecrow's overthrown, flees to Tin Woodman for aid, they return and can't reconquer Emerald City (with only one more ally, even if he does have an axe? what else did they expect?), so it's off to see Glinda - with a cute, but longish side-trip along the way. Shanower delivers a strong script , effectively pacing all the adventures, and the Skottie Young's designs and layouts capture the whimsy and fun of Oz. I'm looking forward to Ozma!

  27. 4 out of 5

    A B

    Another well-done adaptation of a beloved novel to the graphic novel format. The color was nice and did a better job than the previous volume of bringing the bright, vibrant world of Oz to the page. It follows the story well. I particularly liked this version of the Wogglebug, T.E., which still pains me to learn was not a particularly popular character. I love his puns! What I did not like: WTF is up with the Scarecrow? He looks like something from a horror movie. The Tin Man, my favorite charact Another well-done adaptation of a beloved novel to the graphic novel format. The color was nice and did a better job than the previous volume of bringing the bright, vibrant world of Oz to the page. It follows the story well. I particularly liked this version of the Wogglebug, T.E., which still pains me to learn was not a particularly popular character. I love his puns! What I did not like: WTF is up with the Scarecrow? He looks like something from a horror movie. The Tin Man, my favorite character, is nearly as horrifying.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Molly Lazer

    I've now finished this for a second time, this time reading it with my four-year-olds. They really enjoyed it, as did I. Skottie Young's artwork continues to delight, and Jean-Francois Beaulieu's coloring is easily one of the best parts of the book. So why the four stars? This story isn't quite as engaging for me as The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, simply because it's mostly spent just journeying to, from, and back to the Emerald City. (Granted, so is TWWoO, but I found that one's journey to be more I've now finished this for a second time, this time reading it with my four-year-olds. They really enjoyed it, as did I. Skottie Young's artwork continues to delight, and Jean-Francois Beaulieu's coloring is easily one of the best parts of the book. So why the four stars? This story isn't quite as engaging for me as The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, simply because it's mostly spent just journeying to, from, and back to the Emerald City. (Granted, so is TWWoO, but I found that one's journey to be more entertaining).

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

    A pure delight. The illustrations and colouring are enchanting and the dialogue, based on Baum's distinct style, makes this a delightful read. It is the second in this series of trade publications that I have read and they make for a neat package on the comics bookshelf. Highly recommend for anyone who enjoys comic adaptations of much-loved novels. A pure delight. The illustrations and colouring are enchanting and the dialogue, based on Baum's distinct style, makes this a delightful read. It is the second in this series of trade publications that I have read and they make for a neat package on the comics bookshelf. Highly recommend for anyone who enjoys comic adaptations of much-loved novels.

  30. 4 out of 5

    K

    This contains all 8 volumes from The Marvelous Land of Oz series. It follows the journey of Tip & his friends as they try to outwit the evil witch who has raised Tip from an infant. They must make their way to the Emerald city & beyond to find help in defeating her. Excellent illustrations! This contains all 8 volumes from The Marvelous Land of Oz series. It follows the journey of Tip & his friends as they try to outwit the evil witch who has raised Tip from an infant. They must make their way to the Emerald city & beyond to find help in defeating her. Excellent illustrations!

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