Hot Best Seller

Through the Drowsy Dark: Short Fiction & Poetry

Availability: Ready to download


Compare

30 review for Through the Drowsy Dark: Short Fiction & Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Swirsky manages to include in this collection, to varrying degress, each of my favorite genres. What I remember most include the title story, with two characters who I deeply sympathized with and liked as though they were real people. Heartstrung, a limited view of a family in a dystopic and detached world. Detours on the Way to Nothing and No Longer You felt similar, both urban-fantasy stories. The Debt of the Innocent is the shiny gem in this collection, a terrifying story that is too easy to Swirsky manages to include in this collection, to varrying degress, each of my favorite genres. What I remember most include the title story, with two characters who I deeply sympathized with and liked as though they were real people. Heartstrung, a limited view of a family in a dystopic and detached world. Detours on the Way to Nothing and No Longer You felt similar, both urban-fantasy stories. The Debt of the Innocent is the shiny gem in this collection, a terrifying story that is too easy to image happening. This one made my eyes water up but I'm not putting it on my i-cried shelf as I was not bawling. Everything in this book is sad. I felt heavier after reading. Swirsky is an amazing and gifted writer.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    I decided to get this after reading Swirsky's short stories on Tor.com. I don't think anything in this collection makes it to the level of A Memory of Wind or Eros, Philia, Agape, for me, except perhaps the final story, 'No Longer You'. But they are all good, interesting, little views on other worlds (even if that other world is only someone else's headspace). One or two of them are very powerful. There's poetry as well as prose, here, which I'm not as interested in. It was competent enough, some I decided to get this after reading Swirsky's short stories on Tor.com. I don't think anything in this collection makes it to the level of A Memory of Wind or Eros, Philia, Agape, for me, except perhaps the final story, 'No Longer You'. But they are all good, interesting, little views on other worlds (even if that other world is only someone else's headspace). One or two of them are very powerful. There's poetry as well as prose, here, which I'm not as interested in. It was competent enough, some nice imagery, but it didn't get my attention.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eva Folsom

    Several of the stories in this collection are profoundly emotionally evocative. I read the collection on a crowded airplane, and at several points, it was all I could do not to break into tears in front of my fellow passengers. I found the unflinching, painful honesty of these stories moving, and am impressed with Swirsky's courage in confronting the truths they capture. As Swirsky has a character say in “The Debt of the Innocent,” “To stare into the heart of (these) arguments was to stare into Several of the stories in this collection are profoundly emotionally evocative. I read the collection on a crowded airplane, and at several points, it was all I could do not to break into tears in front of my fellow passengers. I found the unflinching, painful honesty of these stories moving, and am impressed with Swirsky's courage in confronting the truths they capture. As Swirsky has a character say in “The Debt of the Innocent,” “To stare into the heart of (these) arguments was to stare into the sun.” In these emotionally-fraught tales, Swirsky renders abstract feminist ideas of identity, bodily sovereignty, and social justice into gripping and persuasive narratives by grounding them strongly in the human and the emotional. Through strong character development and skillful evocation of physical sensation, the ideas Swirsky grapples with are rendered real. The intensely emotional stories are interspersed with more thought-driven pieces, which provide leavening and a balanced reading experience, along with the fun and enjoyment of engagement with the ideas themselves. The final story, “No Longer You,” co-written with Katherine Sparrow, is perhaps the best of these. As a stand-alone story, it might be too emotionally distanced for my taste, but coming as it does at the end of the collection, it provides a welcome transition out of the emotional intensity of the previous pieces, back into the world outside the book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mely

    Early work, mostly finger exercises. Carefully structured, maybe too carefully, you can see the author shaping things, and sometimes metaphor slips into allegory. "No Longer You" with Katherine Sparrow is a real story, though not as good as some of Swirsky's more recent work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    tish

    http://www.strangehorizons.com/review... http://www.strangehorizons.com/review...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Schaff-Stump

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  8. 5 out of 5

    Seth Frost

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tim Jones-Yelvington

  10. 4 out of 5

    George

  11. 5 out of 5

    F. Robertson

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Haggqvist

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mike Woods

  15. 5 out of 5

    i_hate_books

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mord

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bob

  19. 4 out of 5

    DMS

  20. 5 out of 5

    Teagan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Swirsky

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Bene

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nic

  26. 4 out of 5

    Evannai2018

  27. 5 out of 5

    Forestofglory

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emely

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.