Hot Best Seller

Family Friendly Farming: A Multi-Generational Home-Based Business Testament

Availability: Ready to download

Saving the landscape, rebuilding entrepreneurial rural families, and protecting nutritious food are the themes of this timeless treatise-hence the word "testament." Delving into the soul of the Salatin family's nationally acclaimed Polyface Farm, author Joel Salatin offers Family Friendly Farming as the key to dealing with resource issues, food policy, and social fabric. Wi Saving the landscape, rebuilding entrepreneurial rural families, and protecting nutritious food are the themes of this timeless treatise-hence the word "testament." Delving into the soul of the Salatin family's nationally acclaimed Polyface Farm, author Joel Salatin offers Family Friendly Farming as the key to dealing with resource issues, food policy, and social fabric. With humor and personal stories, he opens his family and farm convictions for all to see, share, and enjoy. Written from his unabashed "Christian libertarian environmentalist capitalist" perspective, his ideas are guaranteed to encourage and challenge virtually every "ism" in the culture. It will captivate anyone passionate about healing the land, healing families, and healing the food supply. For several decades young people have been leaving the family farm. The ones left behind are now responsible for society's greatest resources: clean land and clean food. Anyone dedicated to preserving these resources will find in these pages a nongovernmental, self-empowerment approach to environmentalism and food safety. The heart of this book is aimed toward parents tired of their Dilbert cubicle at the end of the expressway who want to reconnect with their children through a pastoral lifestyle. It's written for anyone who yearns to grow old working with and being adored by value-sharing grandchildren and honored by passionate, productive adult children. Family Friendly Farming can make any family business more viable and any family more functional. The ten-chapter section on how to get the kids to love the farm is an invaluable addition to any collection of child-rearing manuals. Salatin moves from the family team-building section into a practical discussion on how to increase income per acre and create new, white-collar salaries without buying more land, equipment, or buildings. He deals with the unique and thorny issues surrounding any family business by using his own multi-generational family farm experience as his base for insight and wisdom.


Compare

Saving the landscape, rebuilding entrepreneurial rural families, and protecting nutritious food are the themes of this timeless treatise-hence the word "testament." Delving into the soul of the Salatin family's nationally acclaimed Polyface Farm, author Joel Salatin offers Family Friendly Farming as the key to dealing with resource issues, food policy, and social fabric. Wi Saving the landscape, rebuilding entrepreneurial rural families, and protecting nutritious food are the themes of this timeless treatise-hence the word "testament." Delving into the soul of the Salatin family's nationally acclaimed Polyface Farm, author Joel Salatin offers Family Friendly Farming as the key to dealing with resource issues, food policy, and social fabric. With humor and personal stories, he opens his family and farm convictions for all to see, share, and enjoy. Written from his unabashed "Christian libertarian environmentalist capitalist" perspective, his ideas are guaranteed to encourage and challenge virtually every "ism" in the culture. It will captivate anyone passionate about healing the land, healing families, and healing the food supply. For several decades young people have been leaving the family farm. The ones left behind are now responsible for society's greatest resources: clean land and clean food. Anyone dedicated to preserving these resources will find in these pages a nongovernmental, self-empowerment approach to environmentalism and food safety. The heart of this book is aimed toward parents tired of their Dilbert cubicle at the end of the expressway who want to reconnect with their children through a pastoral lifestyle. It's written for anyone who yearns to grow old working with and being adored by value-sharing grandchildren and honored by passionate, productive adult children. Family Friendly Farming can make any family business more viable and any family more functional. The ten-chapter section on how to get the kids to love the farm is an invaluable addition to any collection of child-rearing manuals. Salatin moves from the family team-building section into a practical discussion on how to increase income per acre and create new, white-collar salaries without buying more land, equipment, or buildings. He deals with the unique and thorny issues surrounding any family business by using his own multi-generational family farm experience as his base for insight and wisdom.

30 review for Family Friendly Farming: A Multi-Generational Home-Based Business Testament

  1. 5 out of 5

    Del

    I love all of Joel Salatin's books. This book explains why farming today isn't working (i.e., why farmers hope their kids LEAVE the farm instead of stay) and how to change that. A good child-rearing book from an seeminly unlikely source. I've read all but Joel's newest book, and they're all terrific, but I probably won't review them here because I think their appeal to others is limited. I love all of Joel Salatin's books. This book explains why farming today isn't working (i.e., why farmers hope their kids LEAVE the farm instead of stay) and how to change that. A good child-rearing book from an seeminly unlikely source. I've read all but Joel's newest book, and they're all terrific, but I probably won't review them here because I think their appeal to others is limited.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    I found this book to be very inspirational and moving. I appreciated the deeper look into Salatin's philosophies. I found this book to be very inspirational and moving. I appreciated the deeper look into Salatin's philosophies.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Garza

    Another great book from Joel Salatin. Many of his concepts apply to life in general, which is fantastic. However there was much of the book that speaks primarily to full-time farmers. With today's movement towards small scale or urban homesteaders, the full-time farm talk was difficult to apply personally. Overall, this was well worth the read. Detracted 1 star for the farm specifics Another great book from Joel Salatin. Many of his concepts apply to life in general, which is fantastic. However there was much of the book that speaks primarily to full-time farmers. With today's movement towards small scale or urban homesteaders, the full-time farm talk was difficult to apply personally. Overall, this was well worth the read. Detracted 1 star for the farm specifics

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jesscia

    If you own a piece of ground and expect to die someday you have no business doing so until you've read this book:). Had my own family read this I believe we could have avoided a great deal of irreperable hurt and what very likely will end in the cutting up and sale of the family farm or at the very least the poisoning and pillaging of it. Absolutely tragic. Read it. If you own a piece of ground and expect to die someday you have no business doing so until you've read this book:). Had my own family read this I believe we could have avoided a great deal of irreperable hurt and what very likely will end in the cutting up and sale of the family farm or at the very least the poisoning and pillaging of it. Absolutely tragic. Read it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Audie

    This is a parenting book disguised as a farming book. I love his definition of Greenhouse Kids!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    4+ stars

  7. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    390 pages

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shannan

    I wanted to love this book, I really did. I so admire and appreciate what Joel Salatin is doing with Polyface and hope that his approach revolutionizes how we grow our food. But I just did not like this book much. It was so generalized and judgemental that I just couldn't get into it. He has some great points about including children in enterprise and other family friendly topics, but saying that kids are sissies if they can't happily slaughter their own animals is a bit much. I was excited to se I wanted to love this book, I really did. I so admire and appreciate what Joel Salatin is doing with Polyface and hope that his approach revolutionizes how we grow our food. But I just did not like this book much. It was so generalized and judgemental that I just couldn't get into it. He has some great points about including children in enterprise and other family friendly topics, but saying that kids are sissies if they can't happily slaughter their own animals is a bit much. I was excited to see the chapter on how to financially support yourself while starting a family farm, but was most disappointed in that chapter. There were no details, no practical advice, no other suggestions than "Just do it". Thanks, but that doesn't really feed my family while I get the farm going. I still love what Salatin is doing and maybe "You Can Farm" has more practical information, but I think I'll stick to the concept of his work rather than reading his books from now on.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book was an amazing surprise. I was about 50 pages into it and describing what I'd read to my husband. He said, "I thought you were reading that book to learn to grow vegetables." Well, that wasn't exactly why I was reading it, but not too far off. Joel Salatin covers an amazing array of territory in his testament. Yes, he does write about farming, pastured poultry farming in particular and it's ugly cousin, industralized poultry farms. However, this book also discusses goal setting, busine This book was an amazing surprise. I was about 50 pages into it and describing what I'd read to my husband. He said, "I thought you were reading that book to learn to grow vegetables." Well, that wasn't exactly why I was reading it, but not too far off. Joel Salatin covers an amazing array of territory in his testament. Yes, he does write about farming, pastured poultry farming in particular and it's ugly cousin, industralized poultry farms. However, this book also discusses goal setting, business planning, child training, estate planning, and many problems inherent in the family farms of today. This is a fabulous book. One that I encourage everyone to read and will re-read myself in the future. Hopefully, the next time I read it I'll have a small farm of my own. :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cara Bergeron

    This book is WAY better than "You Can Farm." Especially if you don't like farming. Because the book is more about building a business with your family than it is about farming. Salatin opens up wide in this book and spills his guts and his heart about all that he believes about the family. It was challenging to our family to see his vision for his family. And though it isn't better-written than "You Can Farm," it's way more interesting. This book is WAY better than "You Can Farm." Especially if you don't like farming. Because the book is more about building a business with your family than it is about farming. Salatin opens up wide in this book and spills his guts and his heart about all that he believes about the family. It was challenging to our family to see his vision for his family. And though it isn't better-written than "You Can Farm," it's way more interesting.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    I disagree with a lot of Salatin's beliefs, but he had some useful insights, I thought, about creating a sustainable, scalable business and making agriculture an appealing career. The flow between chapters is not great and there's certainly some repetition - a good editor would have tightened this up significantly. I disagree with a lot of Salatin's beliefs, but he had some useful insights, I thought, about creating a sustainable, scalable business and making agriculture an appealing career. The flow between chapters is not great and there's certainly some repetition - a good editor would have tightened this up significantly.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Kidd

    Well worth your time to read! As others have said, Salatin in his early books could have used an editor. Though in not having an editor, we do get a better picture of the real Salatin. Salatin's vision of a family and locally-centered society is beautiful. His parenting advice is countercultural and often sage. Much to think about and apply. Well worth your time to read! As others have said, Salatin in his early books could have used an editor. Though in not having an editor, we do get a better picture of the real Salatin. Salatin's vision of a family and locally-centered society is beautiful. His parenting advice is countercultural and often sage. Much to think about and apply.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Ok, honestly, I didn't get this book finished because it is so convicting, it makes me stop and think about it for a while. I am definitely going to check it out again though, and probably even buy it--and that is high praise indeed. It doesn't even ONLY apply to farmers either--if you want to keep your LIFE family friendly--read this book! Ok, honestly, I didn't get this book finished because it is so convicting, it makes me stop and think about it for a while. I am definitely going to check it out again though, and probably even buy it--and that is high praise indeed. It doesn't even ONLY apply to farmers either--if you want to keep your LIFE family friendly--read this book!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Grinshtein Eber

    Salatin is passionate but wordy and rambly. I love the ideas in this book though and his passion for their lifestyle comes through. An inspiring read for those interested in making a go of farming together as a family.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mary Wescott

    I'm such a ranchers daughter! Oh, to live off the land, these people are soooo resourceful. I would do it accept, Star Valley just isn't conducive to outdoor living as a whole. I'm waiting for my greenhouse and indoor barn! I love rural America! I'm such a ranchers daughter! Oh, to live off the land, these people are soooo resourceful. I would do it accept, Star Valley just isn't conducive to outdoor living as a whole. I'm waiting for my greenhouse and indoor barn! I love rural America!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    Not just a book about farming, but a great explanation of the benefits of a family-run business, and the advantages of integrating your children into your business rather than allowing them to "express" themselves through video games, sports, tv, and movies. Not just a book about farming, but a great explanation of the benefits of a family-run business, and the advantages of integrating your children into your business rather than allowing them to "express" themselves through video games, sports, tv, and movies.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I really enjoyed this book. I did however have to keep reminding myself of his intended audiance, as many parts of the book could be taken out of context. Love Joel Salatin.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alix

    This book is TJED at it's finest..... This book is TJED at it's finest.....

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tony Paulson

    This is one of the best books on child-rearing period. Whether you are into farming or not, this book has some of the best philosophy on raising children I've found. This is one of the best books on child-rearing period. Whether you are into farming or not, this book has some of the best philosophy on raising children I've found.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I love joel salatin but he is in desperate need of an editor. this book was so repetitive and preachy that I quit reading it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael Berkompas

    Salatin has a refreshing perspective on life. Although I find myself in slight disagreement on some points, I can't help but be motivated by his vision for the future. Salatin has a refreshing perspective on life. Although I find myself in slight disagreement on some points, I can't help but be motivated by his vision for the future.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brian Wood

    Joe is a great proponent of natural small business family farming. He is a great soul

  23. 5 out of 5

    Benaiah

    This book is about so much more than farming, it's really about being a family. This book is about so much more than farming, it's really about being a family.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This is an excellent philosophy book for the family farm. He addresses relationships, approach, money, retirement, complementary crops, etc. He addresses family relationships as well. Very enjoyable.

  25. 5 out of 5

    william grabendike

  26. 5 out of 5

    Margo

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Galloway

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karen Morris

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Peak

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rick

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.