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50 Psychology Classics: Who We Are, How We Think, What We Do: Insight and Inspiration from 50 Key Books

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With 50 Psychology Classics: Who We Are, How We Think, What We Do-Insight and Inspiration, Tom Butler-Bowdon introduces readers to the great works that explore the very essence of what makes us who we are. Spanning fifty books and hundreds of ideas, 50 Psychology Classics examines some of the most intriguing questions regarding cognitive development and behavioral motivati With 50 Psychology Classics: Who We Are, How We Think, What We Do-Insight and Inspiration, Tom Butler-Bowdon introduces readers to the great works that explore the very essence of what makes us who we are. Spanning fifty books and hundreds of ideas, 50 Psychology Classics examines some of the most intriguing questions regarding cognitive development and behavioral motivations, summarizing the myriad theories that psychologists have put forth to make sense of the human experience. Butler-Bowdon covers everything from humanism to psychoanalysis to the fundamental principles where theorists disagree, like nature versus nurture and the existence of free will. In this single book, you will find Carl Jung, Sigmund Freud, Alfred Kinsey, and the most significant contributors to modern psychological thought. From the author of the bestselling 50 Self-Help Classics, 50 Success Classics, and 50 Spiritual Classics, 50 Psychology Classics will enrich your understanding of the human condition. Includes: 1. Alfred Adler "Understanding Human Nature" (1927) 2. Gavin Becker "The Gift of Fear" (1997) 3. Eric Berne "Games People Play" (1964) 4. Edward de Bono "Lateral Thinking" (1970) 5. Robert Bolton "People Skills" (1979) 6. Nathaniel Branden "The Psychology of Self-Esteem" (1969) 7. Isabel Briggs Myers "Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type" (1980) 8. Louann Brizendine "The Female Brain" (2006) 9. David D Burns "Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy" (1980) 10. Robert Cialdini "Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion" (1984) 11. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi "Creativity" (1997) 12. Albert Ellis & Robert Harper (1961) "A Guide To Rational Living" (1961) 13. Milton Erickson "My Voice Will Go With You" (1982) by Sidney Rosen 14. Eric Erikson "Young Man Luther" (1958) 15. Hans Eysenck "Dimensions of Personality" (1947) 16. Susan Forward "Emotional Blackmail" (1997) 17. Viktor Frankl "The Will to Meaning" (1969) 18. Anna Freud "The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense" (1936) 19. Sigmund Freud "The Interpretation of Dreams" (1901) 20. Howard Gardner "Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences" (1983) 21. Daniel Gilbert "Stumbling on Happiness" (2006) 22. Malcolm Gladwell "Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking" (2005) 23. Daniel Goleman "Emotional Intelligence at Work" (1998) 24. John M Gottman "The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work" (1999) 25. Harry Harlow "The Nature of Love" (1958) 26. Thomas A Harris "I'm OK - You're OK" (1967) 27. Eric Hoffer "The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements" (1951) 28. Karen Horney "Our Inner Conflicts" (1945) 29. William James "Principles of Psychology" (1890) 30. Carl Jung "The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious" (1953) 31. Alfred Kinsey "Sexual Behavior in the Human Female" (1953) 32. Melanie Klein "Envy and Gratitude" (1975) 33. RD Laing "The Divided Self" (1959) 34. Abraham Maslow "The Farther Reaches of Human Nature" (1970) 35. Stanley Milgram "Obedience To Authority" (1974) 36. Anne Moir & David Jessel "Brainsex: The Real Difference Between Men and Women" (1989) 37. IP Pavlov "Conditioned Reflexes" (1927) 38. Fritz Perls "Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality" (1951) 39. Jean Piaget "The Language and Thought of the Child" (1966) 40. Steven Pinker "The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature" (2002) 41. VS Ramachandran "Phantoms in the Brain" (1998) 42. Carl Rogers "On Becoming a Person" (1961) 43. Oliver Sacks "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" (1970) 44. Barry Schwartz "The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less" (2004) 45. Martin Seligman "Authentic Happiness" (2002) 46. Gail Sheehy "Passages: Predictable Crises of Adult Life" (1974) 47. BF Skinner "Beyond Freedom & Dignity" (1953) 48. Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen "Difficult Conversations" (2000) 49. William Styron "Darkness Visible" (1990) 50. Robert E Thayer "The Origin of Everyday Moods" (1996)


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With 50 Psychology Classics: Who We Are, How We Think, What We Do-Insight and Inspiration, Tom Butler-Bowdon introduces readers to the great works that explore the very essence of what makes us who we are. Spanning fifty books and hundreds of ideas, 50 Psychology Classics examines some of the most intriguing questions regarding cognitive development and behavioral motivati With 50 Psychology Classics: Who We Are, How We Think, What We Do-Insight and Inspiration, Tom Butler-Bowdon introduces readers to the great works that explore the very essence of what makes us who we are. Spanning fifty books and hundreds of ideas, 50 Psychology Classics examines some of the most intriguing questions regarding cognitive development and behavioral motivations, summarizing the myriad theories that psychologists have put forth to make sense of the human experience. Butler-Bowdon covers everything from humanism to psychoanalysis to the fundamental principles where theorists disagree, like nature versus nurture and the existence of free will. In this single book, you will find Carl Jung, Sigmund Freud, Alfred Kinsey, and the most significant contributors to modern psychological thought. From the author of the bestselling 50 Self-Help Classics, 50 Success Classics, and 50 Spiritual Classics, 50 Psychology Classics will enrich your understanding of the human condition. Includes: 1. Alfred Adler "Understanding Human Nature" (1927) 2. Gavin Becker "The Gift of Fear" (1997) 3. Eric Berne "Games People Play" (1964) 4. Edward de Bono "Lateral Thinking" (1970) 5. Robert Bolton "People Skills" (1979) 6. Nathaniel Branden "The Psychology of Self-Esteem" (1969) 7. Isabel Briggs Myers "Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type" (1980) 8. Louann Brizendine "The Female Brain" (2006) 9. David D Burns "Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy" (1980) 10. Robert Cialdini "Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion" (1984) 11. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi "Creativity" (1997) 12. Albert Ellis & Robert Harper (1961) "A Guide To Rational Living" (1961) 13. Milton Erickson "My Voice Will Go With You" (1982) by Sidney Rosen 14. Eric Erikson "Young Man Luther" (1958) 15. Hans Eysenck "Dimensions of Personality" (1947) 16. Susan Forward "Emotional Blackmail" (1997) 17. Viktor Frankl "The Will to Meaning" (1969) 18. Anna Freud "The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense" (1936) 19. Sigmund Freud "The Interpretation of Dreams" (1901) 20. Howard Gardner "Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences" (1983) 21. Daniel Gilbert "Stumbling on Happiness" (2006) 22. Malcolm Gladwell "Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking" (2005) 23. Daniel Goleman "Emotional Intelligence at Work" (1998) 24. John M Gottman "The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work" (1999) 25. Harry Harlow "The Nature of Love" (1958) 26. Thomas A Harris "I'm OK - You're OK" (1967) 27. Eric Hoffer "The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements" (1951) 28. Karen Horney "Our Inner Conflicts" (1945) 29. William James "Principles of Psychology" (1890) 30. Carl Jung "The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious" (1953) 31. Alfred Kinsey "Sexual Behavior in the Human Female" (1953) 32. Melanie Klein "Envy and Gratitude" (1975) 33. RD Laing "The Divided Self" (1959) 34. Abraham Maslow "The Farther Reaches of Human Nature" (1970) 35. Stanley Milgram "Obedience To Authority" (1974) 36. Anne Moir & David Jessel "Brainsex: The Real Difference Between Men and Women" (1989) 37. IP Pavlov "Conditioned Reflexes" (1927) 38. Fritz Perls "Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality" (1951) 39. Jean Piaget "The Language and Thought of the Child" (1966) 40. Steven Pinker "The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature" (2002) 41. VS Ramachandran "Phantoms in the Brain" (1998) 42. Carl Rogers "On Becoming a Person" (1961) 43. Oliver Sacks "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" (1970) 44. Barry Schwartz "The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less" (2004) 45. Martin Seligman "Authentic Happiness" (2002) 46. Gail Sheehy "Passages: Predictable Crises of Adult Life" (1974) 47. BF Skinner "Beyond Freedom & Dignity" (1953) 48. Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen "Difficult Conversations" (2000) 49. William Styron "Darkness Visible" (1990) 50. Robert E Thayer "The Origin of Everyday Moods" (1996)

30 review for 50 Psychology Classics: Who We Are, How We Think, What We Do: Insight and Inspiration from 50 Key Books

  1. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

    I feel that I’ve missed out on a large part of my education and am only coming to terms now with the breadth of my ignorance in many fields. One of those is Psychology, which up until recently I had mostly disregarded as being philosophy for those not really smart enough to do philosophy. But I’ve found myself becoming increasingly fascinated by the consistent and logically surprising errors we humans are all too prone to. It seems there is more to psychology than either wanting to have sex with I feel that I’ve missed out on a large part of my education and am only coming to terms now with the breadth of my ignorance in many fields. One of those is Psychology, which up until recently I had mostly disregarded as being philosophy for those not really smart enough to do philosophy. But I’ve found myself becoming increasingly fascinated by the consistent and logically surprising errors we humans are all too prone to. It seems there is more to psychology than either wanting to have sex with one’s mother or racing mice through a maze. And this more has implications for ethics, political science, economics and why I have put on so much weight lately (that is, questions I am deeply interested in) that I can no longer afford the luxury of ignoring psychology by referring to it as a ‘science’ whilst sniggering behind my hand. So, what to do? My good friends on good reads have been keeping me busy with suggested titles; too many, to be honest. But even that hasn’t proven to be enough. When I saw this one I decided this would be just the thing to give me just enough of an introduction to the vast world of psychology. Okay, this actually gives an introduction to the wonderful world of Popular Psychology, but given it also included summaries of some of the works of Freud (or as that Bill and Ted refer to him – Frood Dude), Adler, Pinker, Sacks, Erickson and so, I figured it would probably be a more than adequate summary of the field. Some of these books I’ve already read. Pinker’s Blank Slate, for example, and Gladwell’s Blink. Others I’ve read other books by the same author. I haven’t read Sack’s The Man who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, but I have read his Seeing Voices, Island of the Colour Blind and Awakenings. It looks like I will need to read the first mentioned now too. There are other books here that I had already decided to not read. And this shows one of the real advantages on this site. One quite quickly learns to trust the opinions of certain people here. For example, I really enjoyed a review by Jennie of The Female Brain (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...) mostly because what she had to say more or less confirmed by prejudices on a lot of what is said about the differences between male and female brains. Having been brought up with two sisters and a brother a lot of what passes for absolute differences between the sexes strikes me as tending towards the lies or possibly even damned lies end of the statistics continuum. The review in this book did nothing to change my view or to invalidate Jennie’s visceral reaction to the book. This book is well worth reading – especially if you are like me and haven’t read as many of these books as perhaps I should have. It is beautifully structured. Firstly, it is alphabetical, by author. Now, why I like this is because ever since Darwin we have tended to have an incredibly stupid idea that knowledge ‘evolves’ and that stuff that was written a long time ago is simply not as worthwhile as stuff that was written recently. Sometimes this is the case – especially in a fast developing field like psychology – but often it is just nonsense. Alphabetical mixed up the authors in a nice way and gets rid of our internal ladder that would have been there if the books had been arranged by publication date, for example. One of the things that struck me was how many of these people had changed their names – and not just their first names, but even their surnames. I’ve said elsewhere that I have been finding how unimaginative I am, and this is another instance. It would literally never occur to me to change my surname. The other interesting thing about the structure of this one is that the reviews of each of the texts is structured so that you get some quotes from the book, then the idea of the book in a nutshell, then a discussion of the content of the book, then some final thoughts summing up the book, then a brief biog of the writer. As I said, I’ve read some of these books already and so found the reviews contained in this book as good as some of the best reviews provided here on this site. These are Manny quality reviews. Many of the books I will do no more than read the reviews printed here. I’m just not interested enough in psychosis or other dysfunctions to be bothered reading further on these subjects. But some of these reviews have made me want to read more of the authors discussed. V. S. Ramachandran is definitely one of those. His work on phantom limbs was one of the most interesting things discussed in The Mind that Changes Itself. He sounds like an utterly fascinating character. The other is Stumbling On Happiness, which I’m about half way through already (having only started it yesterday) and is proving to be one of the best books I’ve read in ages. Unfortunately, I’ve been reading so many books on these topics lately that my head is spinning a little. Like I said, I feel like a whole world has been opened up for me and I’m a little like the kids in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory after they are first let loose amongst all of the delights. So, for what this book seeks to achieve, it achieves it very well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tim Pendry

    This book is an easy introduction to the current state of popular psychology (or rather to the arrival of serious psychological research into mainstream culture). It is particularly valuable for anyone whose education in these matters ended before the massive flow of insights since the early 1980s on sexual difference, techniques of persuasion, emotional intelligence and the actual rather than theoretical workings of the unconscious. A quiet revolution has taken place since the Generation of '68 This book is an easy introduction to the current state of popular psychology (or rather to the arrival of serious psychological research into mainstream culture). It is particularly valuable for anyone whose education in these matters ended before the massive flow of insights since the early 1980s on sexual difference, techniques of persuasion, emotional intelligence and the actual rather than theoretical workings of the unconscious. A quiet revolution has taken place since the Generation of '68 stopped reading and started working. It helps to explain a lot about the disconnect between the political classes of the West and both the academic community and those who are under 35 - and why the latter have taken a conservative turn that often mystifies their elders. The psychologists are a-political in general but their findings generally place to one side and forever the theory of the 'blank slate' that has driven so much progressive thinking for so long. Men and women are now recognised as thinking profoundly differently for very fundamental hormonal and brain structure reasons. Society is better for that common sense realisation - even if ageing feminists of both sexes just cannot get their head around this fact of life. The new gender psychology gives its due to both sexes' rights to negotiate their own sexual identity and remain responsible for themselves. I guess that our kids are going to be a lot more 'together' (on average) than anyone hitting their late 30s and above. As for the manipulative aspects of psychology, thinking on these matters started as early as Stanley Milgram's experiments and the analyses of the Jonestown massacre in the 1970s. It has taken almost thirty years and Abu Ghraib (and recent child abuse scandals) for it to sink into public consciousness that any claim of authority must be looked on with a very jaundiced eye if we are to avoid being dragged back into the social criminalities of the last century. This, too, is fundamentally political. If the rising generations are conservative, they are also profoundly distrusting of the State and libertarian - and often more highly educated and resistant to the persuasive techniques of the market. They will accept the latter but only as a form of permanent consumer-led entertainment, a process helped by the critical role of new technologies in moving sentiment against those who would manipulate too crassly. On the other hand, through movements like NLP, 'manipulation' has become democratised, creating an uncertain environment in interpersonal relations. It may take a while for these changes to work through the system. Post-35 voters clearly dominate the agenda in recent US elections (this review has been revised slightly since it was originally written in 2008). Each book is covered in a short, usually six-page, summary, that helps one choose which books might be chosen to read later because of one's particular interests. The author (who has produced recent similar guides on self-help, spiritual and wealth creation) has a talent for distilling complex arguments into sufficient narrative that you move on feeling that you have both learnt something and want to learn more. The only quibble is a common irritation that publishers always seem to insist on introducing books or ideas alphabetically - an irrational approach derived from the dictionary and encyclopedia. This is wholly inappropriate for contextual learning, ironically showing that the publishers and author (in this case) have not mentally moved on from older patterns of thinking. This approach weakens the reader's ability to see how the discipline of psychology has developed, from William James, Sigmund Freud and Jean Piaget to Pinker, Seligman, Schwartz, Gladwell, Brizendine and Gilbert. Fortunately, the author is intelligent enough to provide a useful introduction on the 'themes' at the beginning of the book and then a chronological list of texts (and another 50 influential books also introduced chronologically) at the back. Highly recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amir Tesla

    This book as the title implies, briefly surveys 50 psychology classics. Is the abstractions good enough to provide you with the big picture? I don't think so. I couldn't figure out what the purpose of this book was, yet I managed to add several titles for further readings. Amongst these 50 titles I already have consumed 8 of them and the presentations provided in the book by no means were crafted in a worthy manner. So, I would not recommend this book since it neither provides you with any coher This book as the title implies, briefly surveys 50 psychology classics. Is the abstractions good enough to provide you with the big picture? I don't think so. I couldn't figure out what the purpose of this book was, yet I managed to add several titles for further readings. Amongst these 50 titles I already have consumed 8 of them and the presentations provided in the book by no means were crafted in a worthy manner. So, I would not recommend this book since it neither provides you with any cohere history of psychology nor would it serve as a proper introduction to the titles included. I guess I have a mild OCD of having to finish what I've started, so that's why I've tolerated the shallowness of the book :D

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Johnson

    In an effort to become the supreme expert on everything important within my friend cycle I have been reading smart not hard. To cover the natural sciences I simply read "A short history of nearly everything"; for history a read "The story of man", "The Mental Floss History of the World" and "Fifty Things You Need to Know about World History"; I covered genetics and biology in one with Richard Dawkins "The selfish gene"; Philosophy was more difficult and I might have made the wrong move with "The In an effort to become the supreme expert on everything important within my friend cycle I have been reading smart not hard. To cover the natural sciences I simply read "A short history of nearly everything"; for history a read "The story of man", "The Mental Floss History of the World" and "Fifty Things You Need to Know about World History"; I covered genetics and biology in one with Richard Dawkins "The selfish gene"; Philosophy was more difficult and I might have made the wrong move with "The history of western philosophy" which seems too complex for beginners; Managed to learn about Hinduism and cognitive science in one go with "The embodied mind"; And most of both neuroscience and evolutionary psychology beautifully summarised by the great Robert Winston in "The human mind" and "Human instinct" respectively. Most recently I have been saved the trouble of reading 50 psychology classics which is fantastic because truthfully a lot of these books (particularly the older ones) did strike me as unscientific nonsense. But even those were made interesting when given the context of the ideas, the story of the author and the way their ideas shaped attitudes since. However many of these books really struck a cord with my own thinking and I am extremely grateful to the author for getting the main points across in a mere chapter. The gems for me were; "I'm Ok- youre ok", "The seven principals for making marriage work", "Obedience to authority", "The will to meaning" and definitely Skinners "Beyond Freedom and Dignity". I think I will also go and actually read "The origin of everyday mood" and "The paradox of choice".

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erwin

    I've got to give Tom Butler-Bowdon credit. At first I was quite skeptical of his work, as he doesn't really add a lot of value in his writing - he's really just summarizing the works of other writers. However, after reading 50 Prosperity Classics: Attract It, Create It, Manage It, Share It and 50 Success Classics: Winning Wisdom for Life and Work from 50 Landmark Books, I've got to give Butler-Bowdon credit for mastering such a large body of knowledge. He focuses on the clear, the practical, the " I've got to give Tom Butler-Bowdon credit. At first I was quite skeptical of his work, as he doesn't really add a lot of value in his writing - he's really just summarizing the works of other writers. However, after reading 50 Prosperity Classics: Attract It, Create It, Manage It, Share It and 50 Success Classics: Winning Wisdom for Life and Work from 50 Landmark Books, I've got to give Butler-Bowdon credit for mastering such a large body of knowledge. He focuses on the clear, the practical, the "relevant", but without being an accountant about it. He doesn't loose sight of the art, the emotion, the humanity of the material he's covering. He has good judgement, and does an excellent job wading through all of the material and choosing to cover works relevant to the wider audience. I don't think that reading many of Butler-Bowdon's summaries are substitutes for reading the actual books he's covering, but it does help to familiarize yourself with a broad body of knowledge, and quickly focus on the books that are the most relevant to your own purposes. Well worth your time!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sotiris Makrygiannis

    I believe that this is a good book for everyone. Is basically a summary of all publications in Psychology and major books, Psychologists of the last century. The trio of Andler, Froyd, Frank are must read as books of their own, however, the EQ, IQ, Ego, Confidence building are also topics that one should cover, if not extensively at least on high-level concepts. Ayn Rand has such big influence in the USA that is another must as for the Kinsey, I saw the movie so its OK. This is a good summary an I believe that this is a good book for everyone. Is basically a summary of all publications in Psychology and major books, Psychologists of the last century. The trio of Andler, Froyd, Frank are must read as books of their own, however, the EQ, IQ, Ego, Confidence building are also topics that one should cover, if not extensively at least on high-level concepts. Ayn Rand has such big influence in the USA that is another must as for the Kinsey, I saw the movie so its OK. This is a good summary and highly recommended, I wonder why such a book is not part of the educational curriculum, as is or copied. Books like this help us understand human nature in a deeper level and such knowledge is important in the age of AI.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Borbala Hidegh

    The book offers an interesting snapshot on psychology and the self. It's a good starting point to find out basic information about several great minds and ideas, and each subject can be followed up by reading the books related to certain chapters. I specifically liked the parts relating to authentic happiness, the brain and its phantoms, genuineness and non-possessive love, feelings as mirrors of our thoughts, thinking patterns, communicational situations, the differences between the wiring of m The book offers an interesting snapshot on psychology and the self. It's a good starting point to find out basic information about several great minds and ideas, and each subject can be followed up by reading the books related to certain chapters. I specifically liked the parts relating to authentic happiness, the brain and its phantoms, genuineness and non-possessive love, feelings as mirrors of our thoughts, thinking patterns, communicational situations, the differences between the wiring of men and women... It was an educational and fun read!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Greene

    I loved this book! The summaries are beefy and left me wanting more from each classic. My reading list has expanded yet again, after reading this. It was also really nice to get a refresher on some of the classics I've already read. You can never get enough of those. I'll be moving on to this author's 60 Spiritual Classics next. Woo hoo!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Darian Onaciu

    A good introduction to some of the most prominent figures in Psychology, with a summary of the most important ideas, similar books and a short bio on each of the 50 personalities. Read this if you want a brief intro and lots of recommendations for future lectures.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Coulstock

    A fascinating dip into the world of psychology that showed me how much more there is to the subject than I initially thought. Butler-Bowden did a fantastic job of exploring a wide variety of psychological works in just enough detail to teach me something while keeping me interested. Really well done.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    50 Psychology Classics: Who We Are, How We Think, What We Do; Insight and Inspiration from 50 Key Books Tom Butler-Bowdon Nicholas Brealey Publishing In the Introduction, Butler-Bowdon provides an overview on the development of modern psychology as a field of study, once “early titans” (e.g. Williams James, Sigmund Freud, Jung, and Adler) had written books that the general public could understand. Within the Introduction, he also suggests seven themes that offer different perspectives on “who we 50 Psychology Classics: Who We Are, How We Think, What We Do; Insight and Inspiration from 50 Key Books Tom Butler-Bowdon Nicholas Brealey Publishing In the Introduction, Butler-Bowdon provides an overview on the development of modern psychology as a field of study, once “early titans” (e.g. Williams James, Sigmund Freud, Jung, and Adler) had written books that the general public could understand. Within the Introduction, he also suggests seven themes that offer different perspectives on “who we are, how we think, and what we do” and assigns to each a cluster of relevant commentaries. Readers can then decide which themes are of greatest interest to them, and, on which selections to focus. For example, five sources are suggested for “Tapping the unconscious mind: Wisdom of a different kind.” They are: The Gift of Fear (Gavin de Becker) My Voice Will Go With You (Milton Erickson by Sidney Rosen) The Interpretation of Dreams (Sigmund Freud) Blink (Malcolm Gladwell) The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (Carl Jung) For those who feel overwhelmed by the number of books in print and need help selecting what will be of greatest interest to them, the volumes in the “50 Classics” series will be especially valuable. Butler-Bowdon is an erudite “travel agent” for readers, but also as an enthusiastic “tour guide” who then accompanies them from one “landmark” to the next. One of this book’s several value-added benefits Butler-Bowdon introduces authors and works of which many (if not most) of his readers may have been previously unaware. He also does a skillful job of comparing and contrasting perspectives on a specific subject as in this volume, for example, when noting that a “central idea in Adlerian psychology is that individuals are always striving toward a goal. Whereas Freud saw us as driven by what was in our past, Adler had a teleological view – they we are driven by our goals, whether they are conscious or not.”

  12. 4 out of 5

    Esther DuBois

    This was an interesting book to read especially since it's a book that reviews other books. I think I added 30+ books to my to-read list and im okay with that I love reading. Anyway I would have rated this book higher but the author just pissed me off on a section in which he was describing the biological differences between men and women and because of those physical differences we then cannot be equal on femminists standards...I don't think he quite understands that the equality we seek isn't This was an interesting book to read especially since it's a book that reviews other books. I think I added 30+ books to my to-read list and im okay with that I love reading. Anyway I would have rated this book higher but the author just pissed me off on a section in which he was describing the biological differences between men and women and because of those physical differences we then cannot be equal on femminists standards...I don't think he quite understands that the equality we seek isn't to be exactly the same as one another physically but to be treated with respect and to have equal opportunities to succeed without the stupid gender stereotypes to hold us back!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Antonio

    This book serves a great introduction to the field of psychology, offering general brief information about 50 classic psychology books. I'd highly recommend it for anyone who wants to get into the field of psychology, but doesn't know quite where to start. This book has opened many doors for me, as i am now reading on further into books by people such as c.g jung, d. goleman, d. burns, ect. This book will open many doors for anyone interested the in growing field of psychology.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marsinay

    Essentially an elaborate Table of Contents—or outline—to help in determining which primary sources to read. It also introduced me to some names I’d previously bypassed, which was a plus.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Yasmin

    -I am less than half way though this book and i am already totally excited about it. It represents 50 psychological fields illustrated from specialised books in each feild. -I am starting to wonder, as Freud did believe that psychological issues root from repressed sexual feelings, and similarly Alfred Alder came up with the term "inferiorty complex", stating that your sense of inadequecy makes you desire to overachieve, and that the feeling of inferiorty and insecuirty determines the goals of h -I am less than half way though this book and i am already totally excited about it. It represents 50 psychological fields illustrated from specialised books in each feild. -I am starting to wonder, as Freud did believe that psychological issues root from repressed sexual feelings, and similarly Alfred Alder came up with the term "inferiorty complex", stating that your sense of inadequecy makes you desire to overachieve, and that the feeling of inferiorty and insecuirty determines the goals of human beings. I say I am wondering if human psych was really shaped in childhood. I once went through a novel in which the narrator kept wondering whenever he met someone new, how his childhood was. -My next thought is about "feeling good". How old were you when you first realised that feelings are not facts! You can change them by changing your thinking. If you're willing to invest more in yourself you can master your feelings effectively. One reason of depression is illogical and negative thinking. How we feel is a result of how we think. Such thoughts -most of the time- are wrong or distorted from the truth. This was basically the idea upon which the cognitive behavioral therapy was founded. -One thing that matters to me most is the concept of "listening". Robert Bullton assumes that listening is not a physical act, but rather a psychological engagement with the other person. Paraphrasing one's problem in our own words, indicates understanding and acceptance, that their feelings are recognised, validated and acknowledged without judgment or critisicm. Similarly, Eric Berne assumes in "Gmaes people play", one game called " yes but" , when someone complains to you about their issue and you start offering solutions, they begin the "yes but" game, basically because what they truly needed was sympathy and containment rather than the rationality of offering solutions. -finally, the book is so rich, and opens many doors to exploring more about those psychology feilds. Less than half way and I am in love with psychology already.

  16. 4 out of 5

    M. Nasiri

    50 Psychology Classics-Who We Are It is a nice collection of 50 famous psychologists views recommended for psychology and philosophy fans.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Titan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book "50 Psychology Classics" is a short cut to the topic of human nature, a summary of 50 psychology classic book by several famous psychology talking about characteristics in human nature, include prejudice, fear, and many other things. It takes time to understand, but it is even harder and take more time to understand if you read the original books that "50 Psychology Classics" has summarized. so if you are interested in the topic of human nature, but you don't want to be professional at This book "50 Psychology Classics" is a short cut to the topic of human nature, a summary of 50 psychology classic book by several famous psychology talking about characteristics in human nature, include prejudice, fear, and many other things. It takes time to understand, but it is even harder and take more time to understand if you read the original books that "50 Psychology Classics" has summarized. so if you are interested in the topic of human nature, but you don't want to be professional at this, "50 psychology classics" is a good choice.

  18. 4 out of 5

    James

    Very long audio book... This was the science-literary equivalent of a "NOW! This is what I call Psychology!" album, playing all of the "hits" from the past 175ish years. I did not get the impression that the author/editor themselves knew much about psychology and hadn't worked in the field, but was just reporting their research on others' research. Seeing that the author has also produced similar books but pertaining to philosophy, religion, economics, and so forth, I suppose that makes sense. And Very long audio book... This was the science-literary equivalent of a "NOW! This is what I call Psychology!" album, playing all of the "hits" from the past 175ish years. I did not get the impression that the author/editor themselves knew much about psychology and hadn't worked in the field, but was just reporting their research on others' research. Seeing that the author has also produced similar books but pertaining to philosophy, religion, economics, and so forth, I suppose that makes sense. And not that there's anything wrong with that, per se, but as someone who's read and studied in greater detail a lot of the stuff the author talks about, I can't help but feel that some crucial details were left out. My main beef is that, similar to most all "Intro to Psychology" college courses, most of the stuff the public considers "psychology" is outdated and scientifically obsolete. While Freud rightly deserves a lot of credit for pulling psychology out of the realm of pseudo-science and starting the process of hypothesizing, observing, and comparing to get that whole brain thing figured out, most of his theories about the subconscious and treatment have been shown to not hold much water and are no longer accepted among the vast majority of scientific and counseling professions. The same goes for folks like Jung and Myers-Briggs. The problem is that this book essentially still reports these folks as if they're fact, spending 30-45 minutes on a subject, but then might spend 30 seconds at the end of a chapter saying something along the lines of "Today, some psychologists are skeptical..." The author also throws Malcolm Gladwell into the mix, who is a journalist with no scientific background. Not that there's anything wrong with that, as I think we need more scientific reporting in the country. Except Gladwell has stated he uses the research he finds to tell the best stories, throwing out the boring bits, ignoring the contrary evidence, and exaggerating the research so it sounds more "fun" in order to make his books best sellers. That's pretty bad for research, and whenever I hear somebody say "psychology isn't a real science!" I blame the folks like him for mischaracterizing the subject matter and in the end making the non-scientific community doubt the process and findings of actual research. But, with that off my chest, 50 Psychology Classics is a useful jumping off place to learn about other realms of psychology research you may not have been aware of and the books one should read to gain more knowledge. I most certainly added a few more books to my Goodreads "Want to Read" shelf in the process of listening to this one. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy sounds legit, yo. The audio book itself is a long 12-hour beast, and I had to keep digitally checking it out of my library every couple of weeks to finish it (thanks Hoopla!). The author is a little.... quiet and monotone, so my mind drifted back and forth often. I'd frequently move the book position back 30 minutes or so because I had no idea what was talked about. :/ This book is probably best suited for those brand new to the wonderful world of psychology, or those needing something to listen along to while they take an into to psych course. If you were a psych major back in the day, you've already heard most of it. And I'm hurt that the author didn't talk much about I/O or Human Factors psychology. Positive psychology, the study of making people happier, does get a large chunk of attention near the end of the book though. And I think more folks should personally research that particular line of study as most seemingly have a very poor idea of what exactly it takes to achieve that.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rana Tarek

    A brief or much more of a Summary for multiple Psychology topics .. you won’t find anything into details. A bit of a good start to know which topics you’ll be interested in psychology

  20. 5 out of 5

    Unknown

    In fact, I started to read the book from 2013 until now 2016, which is really too long. The book offers a great deal of information in a short way, so I would go to find more information. If you are a big fan of psychology, then you will read it and try to find more information about the books online, just like what I did. So I stopped on chapter 16, then I decided to move on another book. I really recommend the book. I'm not specialist, but I study it with deep understanding, and I found it a g In fact, I started to read the book from 2013 until now 2016, which is really too long. The book offers a great deal of information in a short way, so I would go to find more information. If you are a big fan of psychology, then you will read it and try to find more information about the books online, just like what I did. So I stopped on chapter 16, then I decided to move on another book. I really recommend the book. I'm not specialist, but I study it with deep understanding, and I found it a great food of thought. والله، انا بدآت في قراءة الكتاب من ٢٠١٣ الى ٢٠١٦، ادري انها مده كبيره، ولاكنني لم اكن اقراه للمتعة فقط، وإنما للفائده. لم تكن قراءة ولاكن كانت دراسه للكتاب. للاسف ماخلصته، ولاكن قررت اني اقرأ كتاب اخر. حاب اغير توجهي الى التطوير من مهاراتي، بدل ما ازيد من معلوماتي. انصح الجميع بقرائته، او بمعنى اصح، "دراسته جيدا" لانه اكثر من مجرد كتاب، الكتاب يضم معلومات من فلاطحه في علم النفس، مثل الفريدو ادلع وسيغموند فرويد ، وايضا وليام جيمس، فيلسوف رائع جدا وعالم نفس. تشكيه جيده يعني وكذا :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Renae

    If you’re interested in Psychology, this covers almost all of the founding fathers and major advances in psychological thought. The author does his best to summarize the main ideas of each author and their most well known works and often will add other achievements at the end. He also does a short bio of the authors at the end of each chapter. I thought that the complicated psychological ideas were explained in a way that just about anyone could understand while keeping enough quotations to get t If you’re interested in Psychology, this covers almost all of the founding fathers and major advances in psychological thought. The author does his best to summarize the main ideas of each author and their most well known works and often will add other achievements at the end. He also does a short bio of the authors at the end of each chapter. I thought that the complicated psychological ideas were explained in a way that just about anyone could understand while keeping enough quotations to get the sense of the original authors style and thoughts. My only gripe with this is not a writing one, just that it’s hard to get through this because of the complex subject matter and the various different ways views. Trying to absorb it all can be mentally taxing. Take breaks, is my suggestion or your brain might malfunction. Overall, thus was a really great refresher for me and allowed me to deepen my knowledge of many of the household names of psychology, as well as learning about newer ones I hadn’t heard of before. Unfortunately, it’s added a lot of books to be TBR. Haha

  22. 5 out of 5

    Olga Inozemtseva

    Great guide for further exploring the field of psychology. Covers a wide range of works chronologically and topic-wise. I just found it fun to read a book about books and am now looking forward to pick up some of the ones I got really interested in. I realized that my interest is in more contemporary works/theories, although many of them are based on the founding theories that were established decades before. I would recommend this book to someone who is interested in psychology but doesn't know Great guide for further exploring the field of psychology. Covers a wide range of works chronologically and topic-wise. I just found it fun to read a book about books and am now looking forward to pick up some of the ones I got really interested in. I realized that my interest is in more contemporary works/theories, although many of them are based on the founding theories that were established decades before. I would recommend this book to someone who is interested in psychology but doesn't know where to start. This will help you identify some of the psychology books you may enjoy reading. The chapter summaries are informative but don't give everything away. This is the kind of book you can take your time with and take a while to read while reading other books. I actually enjoyed doing that because I was able to look up more information along the way and just felt like I was learning something every time I picked it up. It's a nice read. Definitely recommend.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andreea Obreja

    Basically a collection of summaries of some of the most important figures and writings in psychology. Pretty good but... A bit of a double-edged sword: it's a way to start because you get an idea about what to read but at the same time it seemed to me like you should already have some level of insight into psychology to understand it. I had already read some of the books described and it was great to be reminded of them, as well as got new books for my to-read list.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    This is an intriguing collection of findings, well written, with complementary quotes and psychologist bios. Chapters are short, and you can skip around depending on your interests. It also presents recent contributions from Blink, The Female Brain and The Paradox of Choice.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Adusumilli

    A handy catalogue of some of the more popular psychology books. However, I don't understand this need to be instrumental. Why does everything have to be so life-changing? Why can't it just be an exploration of how it is? Why this need to blur the lines between psychology and the self-help genre?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Raphael Lysander

    excellent list to make it a reading-list for everyone

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jurij Fedorov

    2,5 stars. Just meeh. Not bad, but nothing you need to read either I think. Pro I listened to the audiobook. It's a compact intro to overall psychology ideas presented via popular books. It's probably not a bad book to read for people starting out in psychology and needing just a ton of info fast to pass exams. Consider it a handbook you can look up in. It's not a fun read overall but it may be a useful book to have if you need to look up a psychology book. But then so is Wikipedia and several site 2,5 stars. Just meeh. Not bad, but nothing you need to read either I think. Pro I listened to the audiobook. It's a compact intro to overall psychology ideas presented via popular books. It's probably not a bad book to read for people starting out in psychology and needing just a ton of info fast to pass exams. Consider it a handbook you can look up in. It's not a fun read overall but it may be a useful book to have if you need to look up a psychology book. But then so is Wikipedia and several sites made just for this so I'm not sure this is an essential book to own. It's just something you can have on a shelf if you love psychology books. The book does have good intros to some of the best psychology books out there. About maybe 15 of the books are good and still recommended reads in 2020. I've read 8 so far and would say that even some of the self-help books are fun enough if you don't mind them being unscientific. And books such as The Blank Slate are just considered timeless classics that are must-read for all social scientists. It's one of those books you have to read if you are in any way interested in social science so having a summary for it makes sense. But you must read the book too either way to take part in the modern intellectual debate, don't settle with just the outline alone. Con Overall it's just not that educational or fun to get through. It could have been a historical overview but he jumps back and forth in time. So don't read this for the history itself as there are specific books for that. It could have been a cool intro to psychology. But half the books mentioned are pseudoscience like the several Freudian books. Then he even mentions a feminist who rewrote psychoanalysis to contain feminist elements. I've never heard of such silliness. You take a pseudoscience and then just throw your subjective biases onto it hoping it will somehow improve things? Back then people tried out a ton of stuff and just messed around in psychology on the hypotheses stage. In the 80' psychology became a different beast and started to get some structured scientific elements with the foundation of evolutionary psychology. Finally good researchers had a clear understanding of psychology as a subject. If you mix this with historical philosophy psychology you'll just get a mess. And as he keeps mentioning older books he is bound to mention a ton of bad science that's only historically relevant. This could have been a great book if he focused on books that are still accepted as valid ideas. It's also a huge issue that he mixes good modern science with outdated self-help philosophy but then is not critical enough. I like that he avoids picking sides but when 10 of the books are self-help books written for laymen and containing very little science then they deserve to be hung out to dry. Some advice book based on personal experiences is not the same as a book about research. It's all psychology but not all psychology is good psychology. Then you throw in the psychoanalysis books, research that was later expanded upon, and ideological books. You are left standing with a book that just doesn't really try to present a clear picture of anything concrete. It would actually even have been better if it was only about self-help books or only about Freudian books. Then at least you could explore a singular topic and understand it deeper. It could have been focused on the historical values of the books and on how they changed some thinking in the overall society. Right now it frankly reads like a bunch of high quality Wikipedia articles. It's not a terrible thing but it's just super long for something like this. Yet the Wikipedia articles have at least some "Criticism" passages. So there you at least can look into the science itself and click on the links to read the studies. The more I think about it the less use I see for this book in 2020. Who is it for? Any type of audience would find something lacking in this book no matter how scientific you are. There are also the endless info boxes that make this an even less focused read. All in all it's not one single book but rather a collection of good summaries. Conclusion I guess if you just started studying psychology at university this is a good information bomb if you are willing to focus on the boring chapters too. This type of history is not that interesting as such even for psychology nerds like myself. Most of this is low-tier philosophy. Overall it feels weird and overdrawn. I much rather recommend documentaries on these things. There are also good YouTube videos on this with clear photos and examples. Freud and Jung among others have several documentaries on YouTube. Other modern authors have interviews and lectures online. Some of the pseudoscience is also presented in a more critical light on YouTube and Wikipedia. The Myers–Briggs Type Indicator is presented largely uncritically in this book. His critique of it is mainly that personality tests overall are lacking. This is just not good critique. He should have pointed out how this specific test is unscientific while the OCEAN test is not. YouTube videos and the Wikipedia article on MBTI do just that. They present the test but also present the modern science showing us that the test is not measuring anything consistently. The book just doesn't win out if you compare it to other sources. Yeah, you can read the book if it really sounds fascinating, but you will likely be better off with the videos. It's up to you. Either way you'll likely forget most of this psychoanalysis and self-help stuff. It's boring and pointless and there are a million ideas on this stuff all telling us different things.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emily Rosewater

    I started reading it only because it was a gift by my father (he didn't know what could i want - and i've said that books are good choice), and now after 'thumbing' around it for two month i can repeat words i've never said in March when i've got it: don't you (a reader of this piece of 'review') dare to waste money on this kind of 'literature', moreover don't ever try to write (or compilate) this kind of book for the sake of "fundraising" (means don't waste your precious time). Anyway, there wer I started reading it only because it was a gift by my father (he didn't know what could i want - and i've said that books are good choice), and now after 'thumbing' around it for two month i can repeat words i've never said in March when i've got it: don't you (a reader of this piece of 'review') dare to waste money on this kind of 'literature', moreover don't ever try to write (or compilate) this kind of book for the sake of "fundraising" (means don't waste your precious time). Anyway, there were some curious names and titles, but one shouldn't find them in such a way. В самом деле, сложно представить необходимость (объяснить спрос) в том, чтобы отдельный (самостоятельный) автор занимался составлением подобного рода текстов для широкой публики - в конце концов, публика, со всей её широтой, и без того достаточно поверхностна, чтобы загромождать её несчастные (и несчётные) головы такими вот "крупицами мудрости", напоминающими бумажки, вытягиваемые из шляпы при игре в "мафию" (к слову, в жизни автор рецензии участвовал в подобной игре не более 5 раз). Объяснение усложняется ещё тем, что эту книгу не порекомендуешь, к примеру, такому бестолковому и многообещающему явлению как студент - если последнему, в его многогранности и ограниченности, конечно, свойственно испытывать волю к знанию через глубину и связность этого знания, а не через количество потребляемых в первые минуты ночи перед экзаменом "фактов", именуемых таковыми только лишь по причине их письменной формы. Автор рецензии не имеет права и намерения критиковать автора книги и принятые им решения, но первый всё-таки предпочитает совершить попытку обесценивания по отношению к "труду издательств", связавших свою 'судьбу' с такого рода 'литературой'. Как бы там ни было, подарок отца включал и ещё один аналогичный "опус", касающийся сферы, предсуществовавшей в отношении психологии - не сложно догадаться, о чём речь; но не будем загадывать.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jodie Angold

    I feel like this book should cost a lot of money because it contains SO MUCH! If you're even slightly interested in psychology then buy this book (I actually found it in the 2 for £5 offer at Fopp). It does what it says on the tin, and it can be used to dip into for reference (I particularly like the similar topic suggestions with each chapter) or read cover to cover, which I did. In doing so, I've bookmarked about 20 of the featured books that I'd like to read more on, or acquire the book itself, I feel like this book should cost a lot of money because it contains SO MUCH! If you're even slightly interested in psychology then buy this book (I actually found it in the 2 for £5 offer at Fopp). It does what it says on the tin, and it can be used to dip into for reference (I particularly like the similar topic suggestions with each chapter) or read cover to cover, which I did. In doing so, I've bookmarked about 20 of the featured books that I'd like to read more on, or acquire the book itself, and I have in fact already added two to my bookshelf whilst reading this title! What's been the most valuable to me though, is that by noting which books made me curious to read in more detail, I've begun to understand better my own interest in the field of psychology. This is genuinely a great book that summarises some of the biggest classics in 4-5 pages each and so can easily be digested in small chunks, or just used as a reference guide. I also have the 50 Philosophy Classics, and look forward to discovering the contents of that book too!

  30. 4 out of 5

    William Schram

    With 50 Psychology Classics, we are introduced to a distilled version of fifty works in Psychology. They aren’t all classics, so the title might be a bit misleading. The book spans from William James to Walter Mischel. Some of the works are quite recent but have influence in other ways. They might be bestsellers or quoted a great amount. Some of the works are ones that I have read or at least have heard of. This is a pretty good introduction to Psychology in general in that it recommends books a With 50 Psychology Classics, we are introduced to a distilled version of fifty works in Psychology. They aren’t all classics, so the title might be a bit misleading. The book spans from William James to Walter Mischel. Some of the works are quite recent but have influence in other ways. They might be bestsellers or quoted a great amount. Some of the works are ones that I have read or at least have heard of. This is a pretty good introduction to Psychology in general in that it recommends books and gets you interested in the material. The same guy does this series and I have read the one on Philosophy. I really enjoyed the book and would recommend it pretty highly. I actually bought a copy of it but I don’t remember where I got it from.

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