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The Complete Fiction

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Here is the complete collection of fiction by H. P. Lovecraft. The Stories included are: The Nameless City The Festival The Colour Out of Space The Call of Cthulhu The Dunwich Horror The Whisperer in Darkness The Dreams in the Witch House The Haunter of the Dark The Shadow Over Innsmouth Discarded Draft of "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" The Shadow Out of Time At the Mountains of Madness Th Here is the complete collection of fiction by H. P. Lovecraft. The Stories included are: The Nameless City The Festival The Colour Out of Space The Call of Cthulhu The Dunwich Horror The Whisperer in Darkness The Dreams in the Witch House The Haunter of the Dark The Shadow Over Innsmouth Discarded Draft of "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" The Shadow Out of Time At the Mountains of Madness The Case of Charles Dexter Ward Azathoth Beyond the Wall of Sleep Celephaïs Cool Air Dagon Ex Oblivione Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family From Beyond He Herbert West-Reanimator Hypnos In the Vault Memory Nyarlathotep Pickman’s Model The Book The Cats of Ulthar The Descendant The Doom That Came to Sarnath The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath The Evil Clergyman The Horror at Red Hook The Hound The Lurking Fear The Moon-Bog The Music of Erich Zann The Other Gods The Outsider The Picture in the House The Quest of Iranon The Rats in the Walls The Shunned House The Silver Key The Statement of Randolph Carter The Strange High House in the Mist The Street The Temple The Terrible Old Man The Thing on the Doorstep The Tomb The Transition of Juan Romero The Tree The Unnamable The White Ship What the Moon Brings Polaris The Very Old Folk Ibid Old Bugs Sweet Ermengarde, or, The Heart of a Country Girl A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson The History of the Necronomicon


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Here is the complete collection of fiction by H. P. Lovecraft. The Stories included are: The Nameless City The Festival The Colour Out of Space The Call of Cthulhu The Dunwich Horror The Whisperer in Darkness The Dreams in the Witch House The Haunter of the Dark The Shadow Over Innsmouth Discarded Draft of "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" The Shadow Out of Time At the Mountains of Madness Th Here is the complete collection of fiction by H. P. Lovecraft. The Stories included are: The Nameless City The Festival The Colour Out of Space The Call of Cthulhu The Dunwich Horror The Whisperer in Darkness The Dreams in the Witch House The Haunter of the Dark The Shadow Over Innsmouth Discarded Draft of "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" The Shadow Out of Time At the Mountains of Madness The Case of Charles Dexter Ward Azathoth Beyond the Wall of Sleep Celephaïs Cool Air Dagon Ex Oblivione Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family From Beyond He Herbert West-Reanimator Hypnos In the Vault Memory Nyarlathotep Pickman’s Model The Book The Cats of Ulthar The Descendant The Doom That Came to Sarnath The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath The Evil Clergyman The Horror at Red Hook The Hound The Lurking Fear The Moon-Bog The Music of Erich Zann The Other Gods The Outsider The Picture in the House The Quest of Iranon The Rats in the Walls The Shunned House The Silver Key The Statement of Randolph Carter The Strange High House in the Mist The Street The Temple The Terrible Old Man The Thing on the Doorstep The Tomb The Transition of Juan Romero The Tree The Unnamable The White Ship What the Moon Brings Polaris The Very Old Folk Ibid Old Bugs Sweet Ermengarde, or, The Heart of a Country Girl A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson The History of the Necronomicon

30 review for The Complete Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    "That is not dead which can eternal lie, And with strange aeons even death may die." 326 days later... I have finished reading this collection of HP Lovecraft's complete fiction. The master of weird fiction and cosmic horror delivers a range of different short stories and novellas, from chilling tales to the downright terrifying. This complete fiction is chronological, so it's interesting to see Lovecraft progress over the years. Admittedly, it was tough to get through some of the stories at the be "That is not dead which can eternal lie, And with strange aeons even death may die." 326 days later... I have finished reading this collection of HP Lovecraft's complete fiction. The master of weird fiction and cosmic horror delivers a range of different short stories and novellas, from chilling tales to the downright terrifying. This complete fiction is chronological, so it's interesting to see Lovecraft progress over the years. Admittedly, it was tough to get through some of the stories at the beginning, but once you get accustomed to the way Lovecraft writes, it becomes a lot easier. Not only that, but Lovecraft himself gets better at writing and the quality of his stories vastly improve. Therefore, quite predictably, my favourite stories are actually towards the end of the collection, when Lovecraft has really mastered his craft. Lovecraft is not the master of creating memorable characters, but he is the master of building an atmosphere and writing unforgettable tales of dread and horror. As a King fan, strong character development is something I look for in a lot of my books (this just brings me back to a review I read recently for Sleeping Beauties where the reviewer commented on how King has never been great at character development.... hahahahahaha, okay, sure), but Lovecraft has taught me that that's not always needed in order to truly create an incredible story. Ask me the names of the characters in stories such as The Shadow over Innsmouth and I would look at you with a blank stare, but ask me to tell you that story and the dread and fear it instilled in me, and you couldn't shut me up (I actually did tell Matthew that story one morning over breakfast and I'm pretty sure I made a mess of it - Lovecraft I ain't). Don't get me wrong, there are negative aspects to Lovecraft's writing - it's pretty dense, which I'm sure some readers would love, but that kind of writing requires me to be sitting in a silent room where I can concentrate. Given that I do a decent amount of reading with background noise (as I like to be in the heat of my living room), I struggled at times and would find myself reading the same paragraph over and over again. That also might help explain why it took 326 days! He's a huge fan of going into unnecessary detail, which can be frustrating at times. I can completely understand that Lovecraft is not for everyone - his stories don't read as easily as King's, there isn't a lot of dialogue, but there is no harm in trying a story or two before deciding if you want to explore further. So! I thought I would recommend some stories to begin with if you want to venture into some cosmic horror.... 1. The Shadow over Innsmouth - creepy, creepy, creepy. The tension and dread is built and sustained for the majority of this one, and it also has one of my favourite endings. 2. The Thing on the Doorstep - also, a greatly crafted tale, with another epic ending - Lovecraft knows how to bring them endings!! 3. The Colour out of Space - this one blew me away, and possibly might be my favourite tale. Highly recommend. 4. At the Mountains of Madness - chilling and tense... loved this one! 5. The Call of Cthulhu - come on! You're gonna read Lovecraft and not read about the Great Old One?! That would be unheard of!! Lovecraft has firmly cemented his position as one of my favourite authors, and I will revisit these stories in years to come. It's been a pleasure. 5 stars out of 5 from me! And just remember.... "ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" which translates into "In his house at R'lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    HP Lovecraft, the Complete D&D5E Character Name: HP Lovecraft Class & Rating: Warlock, 3 stars Race: Human Alignment: Chaotic Neutral HP Lovecraft is famously nativist (i.e. racist) – his way of describing non-white personages isn’t by describing the color of their skin so much as using a word like ‘mongoloid’ or ‘savage’ – AND female characters are almost non-existent in his works as anything besides window dressing. Nevertheless, if you delve into Lovecraft’s life, you can’t help but feel patho HP Lovecraft, the Complete D&D5E Character Name: HP Lovecraft Class & Rating: Warlock, 3 stars Race: Human Alignment: Chaotic Neutral HP Lovecraft is famously nativist (i.e. racist) – his way of describing non-white personages isn’t by describing the color of their skin so much as using a word like ‘mongoloid’ or ‘savage’ – AND female characters are almost non-existent in his works as anything besides window dressing. Nevertheless, if you delve into Lovecraft’s life, you can’t help but feel pathos. He was devoted to his mother, becoming near suicidal when she was committed to an asylum. He visited her and wrote her regularly, and was quite broken by her death. He struggled all his life to make ends meet and sometimes had to choose between paying for the postage to mail his latest story and feeding himself. So evil? By no means. For the other axis, nearly every Lovecraft story explores some aspect of how people respond when their perceptions of reality and cosmology are shaken. The result is, invariably, mental chaos. Stat Block Strength: 7 The emotional strength of a HP Lovecraft story is low. They sometimes sort-of-kind-of have character arcs, but these arcs aren't compelling. His stories aren’t horrors either. There’s no sense of dread when turning the page. Rather, I would classify them as mysteries and more milieu mystery than character mystery. Any page-turning quality of a Lovecraft story arises because we’re interested in exploring the world-building and uncovering the truth of the story's strange cosmic mystery. We don’t particularly care about the fate of the protagonists, especially as most of the stories are narrated after-the-fact, anyway. Dexterity: 16 Lovecraft’s stories often remind me of how nudity was depicted in early film. It was never shown directly. The Hays code didn’t allow it. Instead, you might see a silhouette. Or a dress fall to the ground at the woman’s feet. Or there’d be a bannister in the way. Lovecraft likewise has this propensity to avoid actually describing his cosmic horrors. His characters will instead simply say, ‘I cannot describe it, for my very mind rebelled against grasping such a reality! Mouth and teeth and tentacles!’ or ‘I refuse to share this knowledge, for it will inspire madness in all who hear it.’ It is, frankly, annoying. Constitution: 13 My copy of HP Lovecraft, The Complete Fiction is highly sturdy and well constructed. When it became temporarily possessed, I struck it with a hammer. It survived this blow intact. Intelligence: 16 HP Lovecraft was clearly a man of high intelligence. In particular, he possessed a certain arcane vocabulary that gives his stories an other-worldly aesthetic. I was delighted to discover him use not one but TWO of my favorite rare words: chiaroscuro (a word I once used in a story, which earned me a rejection note from the editor: ‘pass. too pretentious.’ bwahaha) as well as tenebrous, which I snuck into the opening for my review for PKD’s Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. I even encountered a few words whose meaning I had to look up, which is quite the feat, given I am a connoisseur of words: fulgurite and noisome, for example. And of course there’s the classics that you’ve no doubt encountered if you’ve ever played a Cthulu game, words like eldritch or daemon or aeons or what have you, all of which serve to imbue his stories with a sense of vast cosmic mystique. Wisdom: 5 I’m probably least impressed by the humanity of HP Lovecraft’s stories. Despite his clear intelligence, I’m quite certain Lovecraft didn’t understand people. Because of this, the characters come across less as human beings with rich inner lives and more as generic passive receptors of the world. At the least, the book displays a profound lack of insight when compared to modern psychology. Today we know that ‘insanity’ isn’t a single affliction at all – it’s not even a term used in medicine anymore. Rather, what might once have been called ‘insanity’ now has a much more specific classification, such as dementia or schizophrenia, and we have some grasp of the neurological reasons behind these illnesses. Thus the madness we encounter throughout Lovecraft's stories is less a specific ailment of a specific human being than it is the general madness of our entire race as a whole. Charisma: 6 The stories aren’t charming or magical or inspiring or anything like that. Which is fair, they’re cosmic horror. But don’t expect to come out of reading these stories energized to do good in the world or to treat your fellow human beings with greater love and kindness. Unless you think doing good in the world involves sacrificing a goat to the Elder Gods to stave off their hunger and imminent return. In which case you may well be plenty inspired. Class Features Otherworldly Patron: The Great Old One In Lovecraftian mythos, the universe contains vast and powerful beings - Gods to some - who are beyond mortal ken. To them, we are but ants, and we draw their attention at our peril. Thus, science is in many ways foolish to so wantonly sift through the mysteries of the universe. What happens when we uncover something that is beyond our comprehension – or, worse, our control? Pact Boon: Pact of the Tome …Yeah. Eldritch Invocation: Knowledge of New England Much like Stephen King, HP Lovecraft set most of his stories in New England, where he lived all of his life. His knowledge of its towns, history, and geography comes through strongly and confidently. Eldritch Invocation: False Knowledge of Ancient Tongues HP Lovecraft didn’t know Sumerian, Babylonian, or Aramaic. But that didn’t stop him from making up incantations in other worldly languages. ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn! Yi-nash Yog-Sothoth-he-lgeb-fi-throdog-Yah! Eldritch Invocations: Frame Narrative HP Lovecraft’s stories consistently use a literary technique called the Frame Narrative, which was popular at the time but is now rather antiquated. Most of HP Lovecraft’s stories actually consist of an outer framing narrative, within which the (outer) narrator encounters someone who relates the inner, usually more interesting story. The result is that each story is actually being told AFTER THE FACT. This technique makes Lovecraft’s stories more philosophical/reflective, but at the cost of drastically lowering the tension. Spellbook Dagon 1st-level conjuration Components: Madness, Deep Ocean, Elder Gods Casting Time: 5 pages A man shipwrecked at sea finds himself on a strange island… Dagon is to Call of Cthulhu what Magic Missiles is to Fireball. It’s not that one is superior to the other per se, but Dagon is the clear precursor, containing many of the same elements while being generally shorter and simpler. Given that, Dagon was a quicker, lighter read, but with less oomph than Call of Cthulhu. (...and yes I know Magic Missiles and Fireball aren't Warlock spells.) The Outsider 2nd-level divination Components: Death, Otherworldly Casting Time: 6 pages A man who lives in a remote land seeks to escape… This is a short and fairly simple story that, while undeniably atmospheric, is also undeniably juvenile. It all builds toward a twist that is – these days at least – a bit overdone. Whereas many of these other stories are uniquely Lovecraftian, I found this one derivative. The Lurking Fear 4th-level transmutation Components: NE, Madness, Rural, Death, Atavism Casting Time: 17 pages A rural legend tells of a haunted abandoned mansion, and creatures of death who lurk within… The Lurking Fear is a bit different than others on the list, and consequentially, I found it refreshing. For one thing, it’s less of a frame story. The narrator is the one who actually experienced the events of the story, which grants it a much better immediacy than the other stories. For another, instead of the horrors coming from outside of us, this is more about the horrors that dwell within us. The Call of Cthulhu 7th-level conjuration Components: Frame, NE, Deep Ocean, Madness, Elder Gods Casting Time: 25 pages A landmass rises from the sea, and the Call of the Priest of the Elder Gods tolls forth… Probably my favorite spell in the book. It’s one of the better plotted, with a real sense of unfolding layers of mystery. And, rarely for Lovecraft, it actually directly addresses the greater mythos. Most of the other stories indirectly reference a world-view in which humanity is insignificant. For example, the following spell - The Case of Charles Dexter Ward - contains some necromancy, sure, but it never actually talks about where the souls of the dead reside or what that might mean for us. Call of Cthulu, however, specifically speaks of the Elder Gods and humanity’s place in a universe where such beings exist. This made it more coherent and interesting. The Case of Charles Dexter Ward 3rd-level necromancy Components: Frame, NE, Madness, Death, Doppleganger Casting Time: 104 pages A young historian becomes obsessed with an ancestor who delved deeply into arcane matters… Not a big fan of this spell. That casting time. 104 pages! And it hits this slump in the middle where there’s a REALLY OBVIOUS plot-twist every reader will guess, but the characters are totally oblivious, and it just drags on and on and on. To the point that I began to feel a little embarrathy (this is a word I invented and am foisting upon you: it means second hand embarrassment) for Lovecraft because a huge chunk of suspense in the story hinged on this reveal. The Colour out of Space 6th-level evocation Components: Frame, NE, Rural, Madness, Otherworldly Casting Time: 23 pages A strange meteor falls from space, and it begins to warp its environs… I don’t think I’d call this Lovecraft’s most iconic story – that one must be Call of Cthulu – but I might consider it his most prototypical. Many consider it his best. You have an otherworldly visitor. In this case, it’s a comet or meteor with an, umm, let’s say a chromatic passenger (Dexter reference...). It strikes in a rural New England locale. And it’s largely told by proxy. That is, the (outer) narrator himself didn’t experience the primary events of the story. Even the (inner) narrator can only offer a first-hand account of SOME aspects. So the story is actually a frame-within-a-frame! This second-hand, third-hand approach just drains the tension from the story. That said, I had great fun because it’s dripping with horrific wonder, a uniquely Lovecraftian emotion. In fact, hey wow, actually, what? Did I just roll a 20 with that phrase, that ‘horrific wonder’? Was that a critical hit? Because really those two words are a perfect summary of what makes Lovecraft Lovecraft, and why he’s endured for over a hundred years. He combines two emotions that are usually considered completely different – wonder and horror – and he shows how, really, they’re two sides of the same coin. When something new rises up from beyond the depths of our current experience, we experience either a fear that our world-view is under threat or a sense of wonder at the evolution of our world-view. Or, as is the case in many of Lovecraft’s stories, we manage to experience both, simultaneously. A horrified wonder. Let us say, we are wondrrified.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mindi

    The Master. This book is the entirety of his works, so obviously there are some weaker titles included in this hefty volume. I really enjoyed reading this edition though, because each story is listed in the order that it was written. You can really get a sense of Lovecraft's increasing genius, and I loved seeing that evolution. I would recommend reading the most lauded of his stories first, and then if you are still obsessed pick this one up. My favorite is the incredible "At the Mountains of Ma The Master. This book is the entirety of his works, so obviously there are some weaker titles included in this hefty volume. I really enjoyed reading this edition though, because each story is listed in the order that it was written. You can really get a sense of Lovecraft's increasing genius, and I loved seeing that evolution. I would recommend reading the most lauded of his stories first, and then if you are still obsessed pick this one up. My favorite is the incredible "At the Mountains of Madness", and I still can't understand how this fabulous tale hasn't been made into a film yet! I admit that I'm ashamed to have waited this long to read his stories, especially since they have influenced some of my favorite authors so heavily. However, now that I have read his entire body of work, I can finally understand what all the fuss is about.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Werner

    Finally, Chartwell Books has brought together, in one handsome hardcover volume, the entire corpus of H. P. Lovecraft's fictional writings: the novel/novella length works The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath, and At the Mountains of Madness, plus 55 short stories. The arrangement is chronological by writing (not publication) date, though the dates aren't given; and there's also a good, jargon-free 8 1/2 page Introduction by Dr. Eric Carl Link of the Univ. of Memphis Finally, Chartwell Books has brought together, in one handsome hardcover volume, the entire corpus of H. P. Lovecraft's fictional writings: the novel/novella length works The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath, and At the Mountains of Madness, plus 55 short stories. The arrangement is chronological by writing (not publication) date, though the dates aren't given; and there's also a good, jargon-free 8 1/2 page Introduction by Dr. Eric Carl Link of the Univ. of Memphis, which provided some biographical information I didn't previously know, though I've read several other accounts. (A chronology of "The Life and Times of H. P. Lovecraft" is also provided, which starts with the 1837 publication of The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym by Poe, who greatly influenced Lovecraft, and continues with publication history of HPL works down to 1959.) Having discovered the author's work back in 1989, I'd already read the three longer works, and many of the stories in anthologies and partial collections (and have already reviewed or commented on most of these). But I seized the opportunity to read the 25 remaining stories I'd never read; and these are the ones I'm reviewing here. Most of these works are short, no more than eight pages, and some as short as a page of two; but "Through the Gates of the Silver Key" is an exception, with over 30. (This is a sequel to "The Silver Key," and is best appreciated with the latter story read first.) A few of these are quite different from Lovecraft's usual work. "Old Bugs," written ca. 1920 (the title is a character's nickname, not a reference to aged insects), has no real speculative fiction element at all, save for being set in 1950 --but a 1950 with no apparent difference from 1920, including Prohibition still being in effect, and still illegally flouted. (It would have worked as well or better set in the author's present.) Basically a morality tale about the harmful results of alcohol/drug addiction, it's reasonably effective though a bit melodramatic (though I guessed the surprise ending well before the denouement). A few pieces are actually humorous, the best of them being "Sweet Ermengarde," a send-up parody of the stereotypical and unrealistic popular stage dramas, with cardboard characters and a formulaic plot, that proliferated in that era. It's a hoot, and as cynical as the junk being parodied was typically cloyingly sentimental. All but eight of the stories were written before "the Call of Cthulhu" in 1927, but a number of these earlier ones written in typical Lovecraft fashion contain marked foreshadowings of the Cthulhu Mythos in both themes and details. The tie-ins with stories like "Nyarlathotep" and "The Nameless City" are particularly obvious, as are references to the Necronomican, etc. ("History of the Necronomican" was written post-1927; it's simply a pseudo-nonfiction account of the imaginary author and origins of the sinister book, and its translation/printing "history," but adds enjoyable texture to the Mythos for committed fans.) As I've commented before, Lovecraft's own perception of his main fictional corpus was probably much more unified than that of later critics who carve it up into "Mythos" vs. "non-Mythos," and he never coined the term "Cthulhu Mythos" himself; there's a great degree of similarity of conception in many stories on both sides of the supposed divide. One can definitely say, though, that "The Very Old Folk" is certainly a Mythos tale (and as eerie and chilling as any I'd read before), as well as one which reflects HPL's fascination with ancient Rome. Having read The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath earlier this year, I could recognize several of the other stories as part of the (marginally) more optimistic and less grim strand of Lovecraft writing that I would characterize as fantasy, rather than as horrific SF. In those written before the latter work, such as "The Cats of Ulthar" (which cat-loving readers should be warned has some animal cruelty, albeit offstage --though cats would definitely approve of the ending!) and "Celephais," readers will actually find back-story that relates directly to the novel. This is a strand of Lovecraft writing that, before this year, I'd read virtually nothing of, except for "The White Ship" (and I'd also include "The Doom That Came to Sarnath"); but it's a significant one and includes some of his best work. (I would class "The Strange High House in the Mist," which was my favorite story in this read, with this group.) Lovecraft's writing here can actually be lyrical and prose-poetic (according to Link, he wrote a good bit of poetry --I've never read any of it, but I'd like to!) and it's in these writings that he voices a message of longing for beauty and graciousness that the modern world of urbanization, commercialization, and pragmatism was stomping into the dirt. (Some pundits class the Silver Key stories in this group, but I'd consider them more SF.) If readers don't like Lovecraft's usual style from examples they've previously read, this collection isn't apt to convert them. He usually writes "purple prose," in long sentences with often complicated structure, much use of big words (many of them of Latin derivation), and liberal use of adjectives, adverbs, and atmospheric description, the atmosphere conjured usually being one of sinister antiquity and ominous menace. 18th and 19th century Gothic tales (August Derleth called HPL's writing "Gothic") and the work of Poe were big stylistic influences for him. Personally, I greatly admire both writers as stylists, and think this type of writing is ideally suited to the subject matter and the intended effect; but your mileage may vary. :-) Some stories here, notably "Polaris" and "Beyond the Wall of Sleep," contain especially wince-worthy examples of the racism and prejudice against Appalachian mountain dwellers that mars some of his other work as well; and his existential pessimism and hostility to traditional religion are on display in places ("Ex Oblivione" prompts one to think that he had a death wish, at least at times.) But despite these caveats, this definitive collection is a must for Lovecraft fans, and I'd recommend it for genre fans in general.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Harry Lang

    Indispensable for serious fans. Lovecraft was a tireless writer who covered a little more territory than he is generally given credit for. "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" is a fine example of Lovecraft's ability to merge his sharp observation and engaging knowledge of his native New England with his outrageous imagination. The fate of the protagonist, while horrifying in typical Lovecraft fashion, is also truly sad and moving. While many stories follow a predictable, well worn groove (the horrified p Indispensable for serious fans. Lovecraft was a tireless writer who covered a little more territory than he is generally given credit for. "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" is a fine example of Lovecraft's ability to merge his sharp observation and engaging knowledge of his native New England with his outrageous imagination. The fate of the protagonist, while horrifying in typical Lovecraft fashion, is also truly sad and moving. While many stories follow a predictable, well worn groove (the horrified protagonist declares his horror upon discovering the horrifying truth of some ancient horror)the gems polished by the abrading action of these efforts are some of the most satisfying short stories of any genre. "The Strange High House in the Mist" immediately became one of my all time favorites when I first read it in the 70's and time has taken nothing away from it. "He" did not seem particularly original or striking until I read it in the light of the editor's assertion that it reflected Lovecraft's unhappy experience with life in New York City. This awareness added a human element rarely, if ever, associated with Lovecraft and I suspect such an element may be hiding in other stories as well. Overshadowed by Lovecraft's reputation as a master of horror is his unique contribution as a science fiction visionary. There are no supernatural elements in his stories. None. All of his horrifying creations are creatures of an incomprehensible but strictly materialistic science. Last but not least is Lovecraft's facility as a lyrical, poetic fantasist. I was surprised to find that many of these stories were rejected for publication. That's too bad; I think they may be his most honest works, revealing the dreams and longings of a notoriously atheistic materialist trapped in a brutish world. They are more beautiful than his horror is horrifying.

  6. 4 out of 5

    P.E.

    4.5/5 - indispensable for ye seasoned H.P. Lovecraft reader. Table of Contents: (view spoiler)[ An Introduction by Eric Carl Link, Ph.D. in American Literature The Beast in the Cave The Alchemist The Tomb Dagon A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson Polaris Beyond the Wall of Sleep Memory Old Bugs The Transition of Juan Romero The White Ship The Stret The Doom that Came to Sarnath The Statement of Randolph Carter The Terrible Old Man The Cats of Ulthar The Tree Celephaïs The Picture in the House The Temple Facts Concerni 4.5/5 - indispensable for ye seasoned H.P. Lovecraft reader. Table of Contents: (view spoiler)[ An Introduction by Eric Carl Link, Ph.D. in American Literature The Beast in the Cave The Alchemist The Tomb Dagon A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson Polaris Beyond the Wall of Sleep Memory Old Bugs The Transition of Juan Romero The White Ship The Stret The Doom that Came to Sarnath The Statement of Randolph Carter The Terrible Old Man The Cats of Ulthar The Tree Celephaïs The Picture in the House The Temple Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family From Beyond Nyarlathotep The Quest of Iranon The Music of Erich Zann Ex Oblivione Sweet Ermengarde The Nameless City The Outsider The Moon-Bog The Other Gods Azathoth Herbert West - Reanimator Hypnos What the Moon Brings The Hound The Lurking Fear The Rats in the Walls The Unnamable The Festival Under the Pyramids The Shunned House The Horror at Red Hook He In the Vault Cool Air The Call of Cthulhu Pickman's Model The Strange High House in the Mist The Silver Key The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath The Case of Charles Dexter Ward The Colour Out of Space The Descendant The Very Old Folk History of the Necronomicon The Dunwich Horror Ibid The Whisperer in Darkness At the Mountains of Madness The Shadow Over Innsmouth The Dreams in the Witch House Through the Gates of the Silver Key The Thing On the Doorstep The Evil Clergyman The Book The Shadow Out of Time The Haunter in the Dark The Life and Times of H.P. Lovecraft : Chronology and Context Further Reading : A Short Bibliography (hide spoiler)] Matching soundtrack : - Rue d'Auseil - The Great Old Ones - Any album by Cryo Chamber

  7. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Evans

    The complete fiction of H.P. Lovecraft is pretty much that;complete. Missing only one Story which was "In the walls of Eryx" co-written by Lovecraft and Kenneth J. Sterling. The complete works embodies Lovecraft's progression as a writer and fills his mythos well. The only complaint I could find is some earlier works do not stand the test of time or hold well. However having to find other compilations would no longer be needed. For those into noir horror, epic monsters, and the diminished mind se The complete fiction of H.P. Lovecraft is pretty much that;complete. Missing only one Story which was "In the walls of Eryx" co-written by Lovecraft and Kenneth J. Sterling. The complete works embodies Lovecraft's progression as a writer and fills his mythos well. The only complaint I could find is some earlier works do not stand the test of time or hold well. However having to find other compilations would no longer be needed. For those into noir horror, epic monsters, and the diminished mind seeing the unspeakable terrors and having to rationalize the fear, this is a great book. With some being into lovecraftian lore from gaming, other authors, or even the creepypasta craze, and not reading the original works: buy it now. No other book covers as much. Every other book will have most of the popular selections, not all. At the price you cannot go wrong. There is a warning with this: please buy the second printing. The first has many spelling errors, all of which were fixed in the second printing. The noticeable difference is the cloth bookmark. Gold for first print, purple for second.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Arisawe Hampton

    If you don’t mind elevated writing and first-person POV then this is a classical weird fiction must-read. This is the most complete and attractive volume of the master Lovecraft! Loved every story, but especially The Tree and Dunwich Horror. I’m sure I will come back to this one again as I tend to do every year or so.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Well it took a year but I finally finished all of HP Lovecraft’s tales of horror. Some were very boring but most were extremely good and creepy!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mina

    This "Knickerbocker Classics" edition of Lovecraft's (more or less) Complete Fiction is actually an apparently licensed dupe of the contents of the infamous, typo-riddled Barnes and Noble edition (complete with the same font), namely the second "corrected" edition that fixes most of the typos, but introduces a few new ones of its own. The B&N edition has more material, but this edition features an introduction by Eric Carl Link, not S.T. Joshi (Joshi's introductory notes for each story have also This "Knickerbocker Classics" edition of Lovecraft's (more or less) Complete Fiction is actually an apparently licensed dupe of the contents of the infamous, typo-riddled Barnes and Noble edition (complete with the same font), namely the second "corrected" edition that fixes most of the typos, but introduces a few new ones of its own. The B&N edition has more material, but this edition features an introduction by Eric Carl Link, not S.T. Joshi (Joshi's introductory notes for each story have also been excised). I have checked the text against some of both the typos found in the original B&N edition by Martin Andersson, and the typos in the second "corrected" printing found by myself and another dedicated reader who scoured the B&N "corrected" version for further errors. This new edition issued by Knickerbocker Classics features corrections to some of the additional typos found in the "corrected" second B&N printing, but not all of them (it seems whoever did the corrections for this Knickerbocker volume googled our proofing work and then made the corrections... but stopped at a certain point). I haven't actually read the entire volume yet, so it may have its own special "surprises" lurking, but it seems be a very fine volume in tandem with the corrected second B&N printing, with a few less typos, albeit this one features none of the "Juvenilia" or other bonuses in the B&N volume, and is slightly less visually beautiful compared the Leatherbound edition. It does, however, come with a nice slipcover, and is quite heavy and sturdy. These are the typos I've verified so far that are ported over to this volume, left uncorrected from the last B&N volume (please note that the typos are on the left, bordered by hyphens since Amazon doesn't allow formatting, with the correct version on the right): 202.11: sins like Ptolemaism, Calvinism, -anti-Darwinisn-,] sins like Ptolemaism, Calvinism, -anti-Darwinism-, 456.34: The next day they -spoke with- a ship with violet sails] The next day they -spoke- a ship with violet sails 902.11: I made no -progess-.] I made no -progress-. 994.1 I had seen him -one- or twice in my youth ] I had seen him -once- or twice in my youth The contents don't seem to be listed anywhere, so I'll transcribe from the table of contents: CONTENTS: - "Introduction" [by Eric Carl Link] - The Beast in the Cave - The Alchemist - The Tomb - Dagon - A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson - Polaris - Beyond the Wall of Sleep - Memory - Old Bugs - The Transition of Juan Romero - The White Ship - The Street - The Doom That Came to Sarnath - The Statement of Randolph Carter - The Terrible Old Man - The Cats of Ulthar - The Tree - Celephaïs - The Picture in the House - The Temple - Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family - From Beyond - Nyarlathotep - The Quest of Iranon - The Music of Erich Zahn - Ex Oblivione - Sweet Ermengarde - The Nameless City - The Outsider - The Moon-Bog - The Other Gods - Azathoth - Herbert West-Reanimator - Hypnos - What the Moon Brings - The Hound - The Lurking Fear - The Rats in the Walls - The Unnamable - The Festival - Under the Pyramids - The Shunned House - The Horror at Red Hook - He - In the Vault - Cool Air - The Call of Cthulhu - Pickman's Model - The Strange High House in the Mist - The Silver Key - The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath - The Case of Charles Dexter Ward - The Colour Out of Space - The Descendant - The Very Old Folk - History of the Necronomicon - The Dunwich Horror - Ibid - The Whisperer in Darkness - At the Mountains of Madness - The Shadow Over Innsmouth - The Dreams in the Witch House - Through the Gates of the Silver Key - The Thing on the Doorstep - The Evil Clergyman - The Book - The Shadow Out of Time - The Haunter of the Dark - "The Life and Times of H.P. Lovecraft" [essentially a condensed timeline style biography] - "Further Reading"

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    I started this book back in October for a Halloween themed catch-up read. Lovecraft's creatures are referenced so often in urban fantasy that I wanted to see for myself where it all came from. The stories are interesting individually, but their shared format gets pretty repetitive when reading them one after the other. So I put the book down for a while before coming back to finish it up. Skipping around a bit, I finished up with The Mountains of Madness, which seems to tie together all the diffe I started this book back in October for a Halloween themed catch-up read. Lovecraft's creatures are referenced so often in urban fantasy that I wanted to see for myself where it all came from. The stories are interesting individually, but their shared format gets pretty repetitive when reading them one after the other. So I put the book down for a while before coming back to finish it up. Skipping around a bit, I finished up with The Mountains of Madness, which seems to tie together all the different threads of his various stories, even if it does seem to drag on forever. (It feels like a short story stretched out to fill the space of a novella.) Definitely original (though often imitated) these stories still excite the imagination.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brenton

    Sorry for this absolutely huge review, I couldn't help myself. I've known of Lovecraft for quite some time, but somehow had never gotten around to reading more than two short stories of his until several months ago, when I figured it was time to see what all the fuss was about. I found out that he wrote nearly all short stories, and had finished just under 70 by the time of his death, so I figured I'd read them all to get a complete overview of his output. I started looking around and found that Sorry for this absolutely huge review, I couldn't help myself. I've known of Lovecraft for quite some time, but somehow had never gotten around to reading more than two short stories of his until several months ago, when I figured it was time to see what all the fuss was about. I found out that he wrote nearly all short stories, and had finished just under 70 by the time of his death, so I figured I'd read them all to get a complete overview of his output. I started looking around and found that to do so I'd have to check out a variety of overlapping collections of his tales to do this, and bemoaned the fact that a cult author as widely cited as Lovecraft had not been collected into a complete volume. Then, in December, I walked into Barnes and Noble and here it was, the complete works of H.P. Lovecraft, with an introduction and notes on each story. The volume is over 1000 pages long and includes every piece of fiction that Lovecraft wrote and published in his own name, as well as a handful of unfinished fragments and some of his early tales he wrote as a child. These stories are all unabridged and corrected against the original documents (though, being a first printing, I did find numerous missing letters and even a whole word or two). The book even closes with his highly regarded essay on supernatural literature. An all around sturdy, wonderful volume, my one minor quibble is the fact that Lovecraft ghostwrote or rewrote a few dozen stories for other authors in his lifetime, and I wish that some of those had been included as well, or that they were put into their own volume or something, because I've read a few and one of them ended up being the most evocative bit of story that I've read from the man. But aside from that, this collection is complete. Now, on to the fiction itself. Lovecraft is regarded as one of the best authors of supernatural horror and weird fiction in the 1920s and 1930s, and is credited with turning the concept of horror in literature at that time on its head, casting the gaze of the reader out into the endless cold beyond our atmosphere while his precursors and many of his contemporaries dealt with far more terrestrial and comparatively homely methods of inspiring dread and fright. I found this cosmological horror to be fascinating more than terrifying. To be sure, this work is all at least seventy years old now, and emulation has dulled the impact of Lovecraft's machinations, but that in no way lessens the vitality of the mythos that the man put together: Man is but a mote of dust in the universe, and what we worship as gods are not divine in any way other than the mere fact that, in the grand scheme of things, they are larger motes of dust than we, and are just as impartial to our lives as we are to the dust mites in our pillows. All of the stories within being placed chronologically, it is apparent that Lovecraft improved upon both his writing abilities and his cosmological mythos, which is not to say that some of his early stories, in their simplicity, don't hit home just as powerfully. The tales gradually grow longer as one reads through the book, with Lovecraft's three novellas appearing in the middle and end of the book. It was these tales that I found to be the most enjoyable, the most thorough in their ability to draw me in and engage me in the alternate universe that Lovecraft structured. It is also these three short novels that one can use to divide Lovecraft's entire collection of fiction into three categories of theme: men stumbling through the realm of dreams, men meddling in necromancy and dark arts, and men confronting the godless, Darwinian truths of the universe, hints of which lie hidden in obscure corners of the earth. The first of these novels, "The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath", acts as a lynchpin for the portion of Lovecraft's tales that take place in or otherwise have to do with the world of dream that we glimpse in our sleep, a selection of stories also known as Lovecraft's Dream Cycle. The Dream-Quest unfolds like a classic questing tale in which the protagonist, Randolph Carter, traverses a variety of realms and escapes one fantastic danger only to confront another. Although Lovecraft himself apparently dismissed this work as mere practice unfit for publishing, I found it to be richly picturesque; throughout my reading of the tale I wanted nothing more than to become ten times better a painter than I am so that I could put the amazing images the story gave me onto canvas. Many of Lovecraft's shorter stories from the first half of his career belong in the Dream Cycle and bring additional depth and definition to the dream realms traversed in The Dream-Quest, some of these shorter stories being "The White Ship", "The Doom That Came To Sarnath", "Celephaïs", and "The Silver Key". It should be noted that many of these stories appear to deal with gods or deities in the realms beyond the physical, something that Lovecraft sought to undue or amend in his later fiction. The second novella, "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward", is by far the most fascinating of Lovecraft's necromancy stories, containing both a rich false history of antique New England locales and characters and a frighteningly evocative pastiche of one man's experiments in the complex necromantic arts. It is this tale that gives Lovecraft's infamous Necronomicon the bulk of its infamy. Unlike "The Dream-Quest", it reads like a historical journal, being the written account of one of Marinus Willet, a family doctor, as he records certain events that he found himself confronting, events that he at first did not understand, and which suggested truths that he could not fully accept. The dark arts and supernatural happenings involved are rarely written of in any sort of objective, descriptive manner, being instead always slightly obscured by both the character's purely scientific assessment of events and his lack of direct dealings with the acts themselves. Thus what the reader receives are impressions, glimpses, hints of horrifying deeds and soul-wrenching beings, which are never fully described or explained by the story's end; all the reader knows and, indeed, all Willett knows is that some vague yet monstrous evil has been done away with. There are many stories which fit into this "necromancy cycle" after a fashion, but they all share a lot with the Cthulhu Mythos cycle as well, as Lovecraft attempted to weave a cohesive universe behind all of his fiction, with the Necronomicon acting as somewhat of a common thread through all of it. The final novella is often regarded as Lovecraft's best and most devastating tale, and is one of the primary stories of the third category of his work, the Cthulhu Mythos. "At The Mountains Of Madness" follows a scientific expedition to Antarctica that meets disaster and uncovers evidence of a fully sentient, advanced, societal race of beings that inhabited earth before and during the genesis of the scientifically accepted chain of evolutionary life on Earth. It is this, more than any of the other Cthulhu tales, that references and amends the mythology of all of Lovecraft's previous work, Dream Cycle and necromancy cycle included, recasting everything not as supernatural but as part of a vast, multi-faceted, and purely natural universe in which the "gods" of humanity's religions are merely ancient and powerful creatures from far reaches of our universe, mischaracterized and largely indifferent to us. And again, this novella most of all was most like the sort of sci-fi thrillers we read today, with very competent writing depicting the harsh Antarctic wild and the piece-by-piece revelation of ancient knowledge and terror by human scientists who are only following their instincts and their desire to discover and understand. I found myself surprised by the ultimately sympathetic view the story gives to the Elder Things, the aliens that came before all known earth life, since nearly all other instances of alien encounters in Lovecraft's world casts them as amoral animals to be feared and avoided, at best. Other notable stories in the Cthulhu Mythos cycle are "The Dunwich Horror", "The Whisperer in Darkness", "The Shadow Over Innsmouth", "The Shadow Out Of Time", and, of course, "The Call of Cthulhu". Note that many of the earlier Cthulhu Mythos tales put a supernatural/deity spin on the alien beings encountered, prior to Lovecraft's "retcon" in this novella. Finally, at the end of the book, we readers are treated to Lovecraft's well-regarded treatise on weird fiction, "Supernatural Horror in Literature". Lovecraft describes his understanding of horror and the place that fear has in humans, and then proceeds to trace the evolution of horror in writing from ancient times right up to his contemporaries in the pulp magazines of the Twenties and Thirties, from elements of classical mythology cycles through old folklore, Gothic literature, and the weird fiction of the early 20th Century. I don't know how the essay holds up to modern examinations of the subject, but I'll certainly use it as a reference in my own survey of the genre. There is not much more I'll say about the fiction of H.P. Lovecraft. It may take some getting used to because of the dated writing style, but when you get into the proper frame of mind Lovecraft was quite competent when it came to helping the reader suspend disbelief. I found myself annoyed from time to time by Lovecraft writing a competent story that evoked true creepiness but ruining it at the very end with an unneeded final revelation or exclamation that shoved the tale firmly into the realm of pulp-rag camp. "The Statement of Randolph Carter" is the clearest example of this, with everything going well until the last sentence. Readers should also note that there is no question that Lovecraft was a racist; a significant handful of these stories contain insulting stereotypes of immigrants and minorities, especially people of African or Asian descent. I hope that readers can look past these "intrusions of Lovecraft's personal character" because, frankly, they were never the point of his fiction. He wrote to partake in exciting storytelling. He wrote to make what I think is an important point no matter what you may believe about mankind's ultimate destiny: that it is a huge, unknown universe and that we are very, very small and very, very finite in our knowledge. And, above all, he wrote to cultivate a robust and healthy emotion within his readers, what he believed to be the oldest and most primal of mankind's emotions: fear.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dion Smith

    After reading this Lovecraft has cemented himself as one of my favourite authors. This complete fiction is in chronological order with stories as short as a few pages up to a few full-length novels, each story has its own introduction which was good, and it was interesting to see how his writing style progressed over time. Being a compete fiction, this is a big book (almost 1100 pages) but because it is made up of different stories, it’s easy to read some stories, and then sit it aside, and have After reading this Lovecraft has cemented himself as one of my favourite authors. This complete fiction is in chronological order with stories as short as a few pages up to a few full-length novels, each story has its own introduction which was good, and it was interesting to see how his writing style progressed over time. Being a compete fiction, this is a big book (almost 1100 pages) but because it is made up of different stories, it’s easy to read some stories, and then sit it aside, and have a break and read something if you like, which I did a few times. I was also expecting to come across a few duds (stories that were just not well done), but all the stories were very well written, there was a few that I didn’t like as much as the others, but that is to be expected. There are also some special features like a Discarded draft of “The Shadow over Innsmouth” and a Juvenilia section. There is also an essay written by Lovecraft on Supernatural Horror in Literature, which was excellent, it clearly showed just how knowledgeable and passionate he was about supernatural literature, reading almost like a who’s who of supernatural Horror leading up to and including his time, which gave me a few more names to add to my ‘to read’ pile. The book itself was beautifully made, excellent quality and was a pleasure to read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo

    "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us a little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us a little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age." This opening paragraph from Lovecraft's Call of Cthulhu pretty much sums up that ever nebulous "Lovecraftian" adjective used to describe everything from the first season of True Detective, to the wonky haunted hell house in space film, Event Horizon. I am a huge fan of this philosophy of a dark, impenetrable, and uncaring universe more than I am of the actual stories I read in this collection. I thought many of the stories just suffered from too much diarrhea of the mouth and not enough actually happening. Thank Cthulhu for the HP Podcast in helping me crawl through these stories and give me far more entertainment than I would have experienced just reading this alone on a creepy rock somewhere. I think these stories would've blown my socks off if I were back in the 1920s, but by now I feel others have done the Lovecraftian thing better and more entertaining than....well...Lovecraft. I did not read the entire book's contents, but instead read only the following. I'm still interested enough in his fiction that I will probably slowly dip into other stories of his I haven't read. The Tomb Dagon Polaris Beyond the Wall of Sleep The Transition of Juan Romero The White Ship The Doom that Came to Sarnath The Statement of Randolph Carter The Terrible Old Man The Tree & The Cats of Uther The Street Poetry of the Gods & Celaphais From Beyond The Picture in the House Nyarlathotep The Crawling Chaos Ex Oblivione The Nameless City The Quest of Iranon The Moon-Bog The Outsider The Other Gods The Music of Erich Zann Herbert West Hypnos What the Moon Brings Azathoth The Horror at Martin's Beach The Hound The Lurking Fear The Rats in the Walls The Unnamable The Festival The Horror at Red Hook The Call of Cthulhu The Colour Out of Space At the Mountains of Madness (first 2 parts only)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Asha Bays

    Was excited to find this hardbound edition of The Complete Fiction of H.P. Lovecraft at Barnes & Noble - a B&N exclusive edition - for the reasonable price of $20. Over the last 20+ years I've read and re-read almost all of the short stories and novellas contained within, but it is quite nice to have them all compiled into one large volume, and I'm enjoying re-reading them yet again. This "collector's edition" styled volume is quite large, but well-bound and visually appealing. I like the little t Was excited to find this hardbound edition of The Complete Fiction of H.P. Lovecraft at Barnes & Noble - a B&N exclusive edition - for the reasonable price of $20. Over the last 20+ years I've read and re-read almost all of the short stories and novellas contained within, but it is quite nice to have them all compiled into one large volume, and I'm enjoying re-reading them yet again. This "collector's edition" styled volume is quite large, but well-bound and visually appealing. I like the little touches - silvered edges on the outside of the pages, a bookmark-ribbon bound into the volume, (I love how convenient built-in bookmarks are!) and short introductions by the editor of this compilation before each short story, poem or novella. All these things really have little to do with actually reviewing the written content within, but I feel that is unnecessary here. Save it for smaller compilations. If you are already an established fan of Lovecraft, this volume is wonderful, because of just how much of his work is compiled within. If you are new to the works of Lovecraft, this may be a bit overwhelming, but may also be a sound choice for the same reason. It contains just about all of his works of fiction. Either way, enjoy!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vasiliki Kentrou

    Always 5 brilliant stars for the eternal Lovecraft!! Always 5 brilliant stars for the eternal Lovecraft!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael Kress

    I finally finished this collection; I’ve been reading it for several years. By far, I’ve gotten more mileage out of this than any book I’ve ever owned. I’m now close to being a Lovecraft completist, since I’ve read this along with some of his essays. It would be quite a task to write a review of each story; I’ve written reviews of only a few of them. Dagon p. 23 I've read Dagon several times, even though that doesn't mean much, considering its length. Some stories I enjoyed more the second time ar I finally finished this collection; I’ve been reading it for several years. By far, I’ve gotten more mileage out of this than any book I’ve ever owned. I’m now close to being a Lovecraft completist, since I’ve read this along with some of his essays. It would be quite a task to write a review of each story; I’ve written reviews of only a few of them. Dagon p. 23 I've read Dagon several times, even though that doesn't mean much, considering its length. Some stories I enjoyed more the second time around, although Dagon wasn't really that amazing the third or fourth time around. I believe he covered a lot of the same ideas in different stories in an attempt to improve and write the perfect story. Some are better than others. Dagon was one of his earliest writings, and it's a good introduction to the philosophy behind the Cthulhu mythos. Since I've become so familiar with his work, I have a deeper understanding and appreciation of it. Dagon is more important as a supplement than as a stand-alone. I wouldn't have enjoyed the other Cthulhu stories as much without it. It gives you a taste of what's to come, like deep time and space, the dream world, fish gods, and unimaginable horror. The Statement of Randolph Carter p. 76 I've read this super-short story a few times now and enjoyed it quite well. It contains the great horror/sci-fi elements that you can expect from Lovecraft. In this story, the protagonist, Randolph Carter, was Harley Warren's assistant. He's writing a letter telling the authorities why he can't really explain what happened to him; it must've been the boogeyman that got him! Carter's experience reminded me of some work experiences I've had (except cooler and creepier). Since he's the assistant, he doesn't know anything about the work; he's more like Warren's go-for. When they get to the spot where they're going to explore, Warren won't let Carter go down in the hole with him. This upsets Carter, because he wants to feel useful, like he's doing something besides just being a spectator. Then Warren goes down in the hole and Carter must wait for a long time without hearing a response or knowing what's going on. He keeps calling for him and can't decide if he should go down and look for him or just wait like he was told, so there's a lot of tension. Finally, he realizes Warren is dead. Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family p. 102 This is about a guy's quest to discover the mystery of his ancestry. The story describes his grandfathers going back several generations. A lot of them were deformed and messed-up mentally so there was supposed to be some kind of mystery to what caused these abnormalities. I found the descriptions of these ancestors uninteresting. Lovecraft's writing can sometimes be "dry" (for lack of a better term), but most of the time I find the dryness charming. This was a case where it didn't work at all. Also, I had trouble distinguishing where each grandfather fell in the line-of-ancestry. That was especially annoying. The idea of a man mating with an ape is just a bad idea for a work of fiction. I prefer actual science when it comes to this topic. Anybody who understands speciation knows that these types of things occur in nature. Homo sapiens bred with Neanderthals before we finally broke off. This story reeks of social-Darwinism. Anybody who believes in that garbage can go straight to Hell. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. I give it one star. Celephaïs p. 110 The dream-world is something I’m fascinated by and want to learn and read more about. It's a common theme in Lovecraft's writing, with my introduction being Beyond the Wall of Sleep. It's one of my favorite short stories ever, and Celephaïs is also amazing. Beyond the Wall of Sleep entertains the idea that the dream-world is our primary world, with the waking world being secondary. This principle can also apply to this story, especially since the protagonist tries to spend most of his time asleep in order to achieve his mission in the dream-world. He is trying to find the city of Celephais, which he visited in his youth but cannot find back. I too have had the sensation of permanent fixtures in my dreams. There is a house in my dream-world that has always been there; I visit it from time to time, and its location and structure remain constant. I'm also in the middle of The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud. It's more psychological and scientific than Lovecraft's fiction. Because of my obsession with this topic, I must have the best of both worlds. I'll grab anything I can get my hands on. These books make me think about and remember my own dream-world a lot more during my waking hours, and how bizarre it really is. Nyarlathotep p. 121 After having read and become familiar with the Cthulhu mythos, this story just seemed like a super-condensed version of that, without adding anything. Perhaps this might serve as an introduction to Cthulhu for somebody who is unfamiliar, but I doubt it. I had to immerse myself in Lovecraft's world to understand it. I've been reading him consistently for years now and appreciate it more than I did before. Ironically, this story reminded me of Zen and the cyclical nature of reality. The universe moves in cycles with seasons, birth/death, etc. Knowledge of this can bring a peaceful contentment, but with Lovecraft, it's horrific. Nyarlathotep returns after 2700 years, bringing humanity back to the darkness that existed before. "We sware to one another that the city was exactly the same, and still alive; and when the electric lights began to fade we cursed the company over and over again, and laughed at the queer faces we made." It sounds here like they're going crazy, but it's a primal crazy, unknowingly returning to their roots. Through the Gates of the Silver Key p. 889 This story has been given some bad reviews and even Lovecraft himself was not entirely happy with it, but I don't see why. I thought it was great. It's a sequel to The Silver Key, which I don't really remember, but it doesn't matter. It still has a good flow to it. Randolph Carter is the main character in the story. Carter was also in The Statement of Randolph Carter, which, as I indicated in my review, was good, but not as good as this! He is Lovecraft's alter ego, so it was cool to envision Lovecraft himself floating around in all the different dimensions that the story depicts. Carter has a silver key that allows him to pass through gates that go to different time periods and also outside of Earth's realm. As a grown man, he goes through one of the gates and travels back several decades to when he was a boy. Then he passes through another gate that leads to outer dimensions, and things get pretty bizarre from there. The author's vivid descriptions of these worlds can really stimulate the imagination. I see how he could have influenced contemporary fantasy authors. Finally, he’s struggling to get back to Earth and to the time-period where he left off. One of Lovecraft's greatest skills is that he can write an epic ending, and this one does not disappoint. I won't spoil it for you here though. The Thing on the Doorstep p. 919 What I really liked about this story were the friendships and relationships in it; two friends growing up together and one going off and getting married. Then there's the confusion of the souls switching bodies. Relationships were not a big part of Lovecraft's writing, probably because he was such a recluse. And this story was one of the few to have a strong female character. I think he rarely talked to women in real life. Now that I think about it, Stephen King may have gotten his idea for Christine from this story. In Christine, the protagonist's body is invaded by the soul of his car's previous owner. The Shadow out of Time p. 948 This is Lovecraft's last major work, and I can see how several of his ideas, especially about deep-time, came together to help him hone his craft and create something great. I'm not sure, but I believe this was the second time I read this story. The first time around, I really didn't like or get it at all; I probably would have given it one star. But this time, because I understood his ideas, I thought it was amazing. (I am quite familiar with the elder Gods at this point.) Part of the tale takes place in Australia, where the protagonist and his comrades travel to do their research and make their discoveries of the ancient ones. I thought this was interesting because I am unaware of any horror story settings on that continent. This is another one where he knocks it out of the ballpark with his one-liner ending. Other authors can bring a story around and surprise you with an ending, but nobody can do it as abruptly as Lovecraft. I anticipated it leading up to something great as I neared the end. "They were, instead, the letters of our familiar alphabet, spelling out the words of the English language in my own handwriting." The Haunter of the Dark p. 999 The coolest thing about this story is that it's about a real church in Providence, RI that was torn down in 1992. The idea was that it was a haunted church. I love the idea of the protagonist looking out from his apartment over the city's skyline and wondering what was up with that building, then feeling the need to go check it out. I have that same kind of curiosity and fascination. Lovecraft's tales were set in many different locations all around the globe, but his home was Providence, and it held a special place in his heart. I believe it's an important city for the horror genre and I want to visit it one day. In the story, the evil creature that haunts the church can't function except in complete darkness (hence the story's title), so it kind of reminded me of the vampire novels I've been reading recently. I'm unaware of Lovecraft ever writing about vampires, so I guess this is as close as it gets. It follows his common theme of deep time and elder gods, with a little bit of a twist that most of his stories have. Conclusion: Sadly, because I didn’t cover some of his best stories, I feel this review doesn’t do Lovecraft justice. My favorite stories of his that I didn’t review are Beyond the Wall of Sleep, The White Ship, The Picture in the House, The Outsider (another great ending), and At the Mountains of Madness.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nick Black

    this piss-stinking craptank came godawful close to a single star, and i'm convinced anyone who calls themselves a lovecraft fan is either mentally deficient or simply lying. either way, one oughtn't further tolerate their presence; call them on their shit and make a swift exit. i read this because robert anton wilson used the illoigor and Old Ones and such to great effect in The Illuminatus Trilogy, and the scene therein where robert putney drake meets h.p. lovecraft is one of the book's finest, this piss-stinking craptank came godawful close to a single star, and i'm convinced anyone who calls themselves a lovecraft fan is either mentally deficient or simply lying. either way, one oughtn't further tolerate their presence; call them on their shit and make a swift exit. i read this because robert anton wilson used the illoigor and Old Ones and such to great effect in The Illuminatus Trilogy, and the scene therein where robert putney drake meets h.p. lovecraft is one of the book's finest, and RAW clearly thought the man deeply talented. i mean, there was no real point in dragging ol' Ctulu and Kadath in the cold wastes and all that into the Illuminatus! Trilogy, but it was all wonderful. when Fission Chips was getting dragged through the deadlights of Tsathoggua... well, RAW does it best, after all: A damned huge ugly brute of a spider. Black gods, Saint Toads, rats, mysterious and heathenish capitalized Gates, that nasty-looking shoggoth character, and now spiders. A buggering tarantula it looked like, in fact. Next, Count Dracula, he thought grimly, testing the vestry door. It slid open smoothly and he stepped back out of visible range, waiting a moment. They were either not home or cool enough to allow him the next move. He stepped through the door and flashed his light around. "Oh, God, no," he said. "No. God, no." "Good-bye, Mr. Chips," said Saint Toad. Did you ever take the underground from Charing Cross to one of the suburbs? You know, that long ride without stops when you're totally in the dark and everything seems to be rushing by outside in the opposite direction? Relativity, the laboratory-smock people call it. In fact, it was even more like going up a chimney than going forward in a tunnel, but it was like both at the same time, if you follow me. Relativity. A bitter-looking old man went by, dressed in turn-of-the-century Yankee clothing, muttering something about "Carcosa." An antique Pontiac car followed him, with four Italians in it looking confused- it was slow enough for me to spot the year, definitely 1936, and even to read the license plates, Rhode Island AW-1472. Then a black man, not a Negro or a wog, but a really truly black man, without a face and I'd hate to tell you what he had where the face should have been. All the while, there was this bleating or squealing that seemed to say "Tekeli-li! Tekeli-li!" Another man, English-looking but in early 19th-century clothing; he looked my way, surprised, and said, "I only walked around the horses!" I could sympathize: I only opened a bleeding door. A giant beetle, who looked at me more intelligently than any bug I ever saw before- he seemed to be going in a different direction, if there was direction in this place. A white-haired old man with startling blue eyes, who shouted "Roderick Usher!" as he flew by. Then a whole parade of pentagons and other mathematical shapes that seemed to be talking to each other in some language of the past or the future or wherever they called home. And by now it wasn't so much like a tunnel or even a chimney but a kind of roller coaster with dips and loops but not the sort you find in a place like Brighton- I think I saw this land of curve once, on a blackboard, when a class in non-Euclidean geometry had used the room before my own class in Eng Lit Pope to Swinb. and Neo-Raph. Then I passed a shoggoth or it passed me, and let me say that their pictures simply do not do them justice: I am ready to go anywhere and confront any peril on H.M. Service but I pray to the Lord Harry I never have to get that close to one of those chaps again. Next came a jerk, or cusp is probably the word: I recognized something: Ingolstadt, the middle of the university. Then we were off again, but not for long, another cusp: Stonehenge. A bunch of hooded people, right out of a Yank movie about the KKK, were busy with some gruesome mummery right in the center of the stones, yelling ferociously about some ruddy goat with a thousand young, and the stars were all wrong overhead. Well, you pick up your education where you can- now I know, even if I can't tell any bloody academic how I know, that Stonehenge is much older than we think. Whizz, bang, we're off again, and now ships are floating by- everything from old Yankee clippers to modern luxury liners, all of them signaling the old S.O.S. semaphore desperately- and a bunch of airplanes following in their wake. I realized that part must be the Bermuda Triangle, and about then it dawned that the turn-of-the-century Yank with the bitter face might be Ambrose Bierce. I still hadn't the foggiest who all those other chaps were. Then along came a girl, a dog, a lion, a tin man and a scarecrow. A real puzzler, that: was I visiting real places or just places in people's minds? Or was there a difference? When the mock turtle, the walrus, the carpenter and another little girl came along, my faith in the difference began to crumble. Or did some of those writer blokes know how to tap into this alternate world or fifth dimension or whatever it was? The shoggoth came by again (or was it his twin brother?) and shouted, or I should say, gibbered, "Yog Sothoth Neblod Zin," and I could tell that was something perfectly filthy by the tone of his voice. I mean, after all, I can take a queer proposition without butting the offender on the nose- one must be cosmopolitan, you know- but I would vastly prefer to have such offers coming out of human mouths, or at the very least out of mouths rather than orifices that shouldn't properly be talking at all. But you would have to see a shoggoth yourself, God forbid, to appreciate what I mean. The next stop was quite a refrigerator, miles and miles of it, and that's where the creature who kept up that howling of "Tekeli-li! Tekeli-li!" hung his hat. Or its hat. I shan't attempt to do him, or it, justice. That Necronomicon said about Yog Sothoth that "Kadath in the cold waste hath known him," and now I realized that "known" was used there in the Biblical sense. I just hope he, or it, stays in the cold waste. You wouldn't want to meet him, or it, on the Strand at midday, believe me. His habits were even worse than his ancestry, and why he couldn't scrape off some of the seaweed and barnacles is beyond me; he was rather like Saint Toad in his notions of sartorial splendor and table etiquette, if you take my meaning. But I was off again, the curvature was getting sharper and the cusps more frequent. There was no mistaking the Heads where I arrived next: Easter Island. I had a moment to reflect on how those Heads resembled Tla-loc and the lloigor of Fernando Poo and then this kink's version of a Cook's Tour moved on, and there I was at the last stop. everything in that paragraph is infinitely better than anything in this douchecanoe swirler of a collection of garbage. i could go into great depths, but you know what? i sum it up thus: (1) one of the most highly-recommended stories, "the dunwich horror, used dialect, which is generally unforgivable, and certainly so here. (2) his "at the mountains of madness", origin of the shoggoths, centers around a geological impossibility (extremely high mountains in a low-deposition, high-erosion environment) read up on eolian processes. (3) the shoggoths? they were bubbles. lots of bubbles. though probably not so many bubbles as in Breakfast of Champions, in the Sacred Miracle Cave. doesn't matter. motherfucking bubbles. pretty terrible all around. lots of 5 star reviews of this book. like i said, you're either retarded or lying, or both.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Greg Kerestan

    Reading the complete Lovecraft is a mixed bag. His prose is notoriously dense, gratuitously purple, but one warms to it eventually- indeed, it possesses a strange charm. And the quality of his work varies from disposable to masterful. However, unlike Poe (whose complete fiction I just reviewed last week), when Lovecraft figured out what he was good at, he kept at it, rather than moving into dilettante territory experimenting with genre and form and style. Most complaints about Lovecraft- his rac Reading the complete Lovecraft is a mixed bag. His prose is notoriously dense, gratuitously purple, but one warms to it eventually- indeed, it possesses a strange charm. And the quality of his work varies from disposable to masterful. However, unlike Poe (whose complete fiction I just reviewed last week), when Lovecraft figured out what he was good at, he kept at it, rather than moving into dilettante territory experimenting with genre and form and style. Most complaints about Lovecraft- his racism and xenophobia, his snobbery, his overly pulpy, pretentious language- vanish about midway through his work. Towards the end, he switched from short stories to longer novellas, and moved from the nebulous Cthulhu Mythos into a much more interconnected set of works, in which Nyarlathotep, a humanoid agent of chaos. and the mindless forces of destruction the Shoggoths, move the plot forward. Perhaps the stories towards the middle third of his career are the most memorable, but it was only at the end that he truly got cooking.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kent Woods

    This is an excellent edition of mediocre work. Like many authors whose primary works are short stories, Lovecraft is better sipped than gulped. Most every story is exactly the same: a scientist discovers something dark and mysterious, chases it down, is horrified, and then everything fades to black. It's deeply unsatisfying from a narrative perspective, and the prose is so purple it bleeds. I've never seen the word "Cyclopean" used so many times, nor will I ever. Pass on this book, or else just This is an excellent edition of mediocre work. Like many authors whose primary works are short stories, Lovecraft is better sipped than gulped. Most every story is exactly the same: a scientist discovers something dark and mysterious, chases it down, is horrified, and then everything fades to black. It's deeply unsatisfying from a narrative perspective, and the prose is so purple it bleeds. I've never seen the word "Cyclopean" used so many times, nor will I ever. Pass on this book, or else just let it sit on your shelf to look pretty, and occasionally flip it open and read a story or two. Under no circumstance should you attempt to read this book straight through. I would recommend the edition titled "Necronomicon" for a more approachable "greatest hits," if you're interested in Lovecraft.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ian Casey

    I am going to gush here, so be forewarned. First of all, yes Lovecraft was a horrendous racist even by the standards of his day and the wrongfulness of that should be acknowledged. Having said that, those sentiments manifested more strongly in his letters than his fiction. It’s rarely a central feature of the narrative (as it is in The Street, He, The Horror at Red Hook and Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and his Family – which have hints of the autobiographical), more often revealing its I am going to gush here, so be forewarned. First of all, yes Lovecraft was a horrendous racist even by the standards of his day and the wrongfulness of that should be acknowledged. Having said that, those sentiments manifested more strongly in his letters than his fiction. It’s rarely a central feature of the narrative (as it is in The Street, He, The Horror at Red Hook and Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and his Family – which have hints of the autobiographical), more often revealing itself in glancing mentions with little or no impact on the story. And yes, there’s a whole bunch of criticisms to be made of Lovecraft’s writing style, a number of which I’m sure hold some academic weight. He was after all published in pulp and mostly self-taught, aspiring to the level of social, scholarly and artistic respect owed to an M.R. James but having no means of achieving it in his lifetime. Whether any of his work counts as ‘literature’ is a debate which could go on indefinitely. All that being said, Lovecraft achieved something immense with his brand of ‘cosmicism’ which was original for his time and unsurpassed since. Leaving aside its influence on film, music, games etc. and considering only the particular literary niche of weird fiction, he possessed a perfect storm of style, substance, skill, erudition and being in the right place at the right time to tie it all together. To those of a certain disposition which I share, his work exemplifies the adage that ‘genius hits a target no-one else can see’. Truthfully there are precious few works here I don’t love to a greater or lesser degree and even in his supposedly lesser efforts I find much to admire. This is especially so with his later material such as The Haunter of the Dark, The Thing on the Doorstep and The Dreams in the Witch House which are little celebrated but favourites of mine. Perhaps my favourite of all is The Music of Erich Zann – hardly a conventional choice – although depending on mood I may have to give the nod to The Call of Cthulhu. The charms of the poster-child of weird fiction are not easily resisted. Then there’s the helpful inclusion of the essay ‘Supernatural Horror in Literature’ to close out the collection. Apart from the value of its literary criticism, it is at the least a solid reading list of two centuries worth of gothic novels and weird fiction, plus an insight into the authors who inspired Lovecraft. I’m some way into collecting and reading the many works mentioned. The editor S.T. Joshi is a man who divides opinions, having set himself up as the world’s most prolific scholar of supernatural horror and weird fiction. Judging solely by this book though, his introductions to the collection and each individual work are short and informative, giving the impression of commendably thorough research without insisting on overbearing opinions and grandstanding. The book itself – mine being the 2011 Barnes & Noble edition – is an artwork in its own right and one of the most beautiful objects I own. There’s an aesthetic and tactual synergy with the content, from the iridescent depiction on the front cover to the silver-edged pages and purple satin bookmark. I would want a copy of this volume if it had nothing but microwave user manuals in it. The Complete Fiction to me is more than merely a book I immensely enjoyed. It’s a gateway to a veritable rabbit-hole of written word and other artworks before, during and after Lovecraft’s lifetime. The influences are now so extensive that to be ‘Lovecraftian’ is almost a lifestyle. One would not soon run out of material by reading his influences such as Bierce and Chambers, his contemporaries such as James, Machen and Blackwood, his circle of correspondents such as Howard, Smith, Bloch and Long, his followers and preservers from August Derleth onwards, later Cthulhu mythos writers such as Campbell, Klein and Lumley, and then of course the modern authors experimenting from the foundation of his influences, such as Barron, Ligotti and Kiernan. With the benefit of hindsight, authors like these are precisely what I always pined for in my youth but without the means of learning about them. In the days of dial-up internet it would have taken more dumb luck than I possessed for a kid in a small country town to find this material, so I’m overjoyed to now be delving into the kind of writings I would gladly have devoured as a teenager if only I’d known it. All the legitimate criticisms notwithstanding, for me personally I give this five star-spawns of Cthulhu out of five. p.s. For more Lovecraft, there’s also his collaborations, many of which are collected in ‘The Horror in the Museum’, and his poetry collected in ‘The Ancient Track’.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Missy (myweereads)

    “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.” I completed my first ever read of Lovecraft’s Complete Fiction earlier this month. I have always known of his works however I had not picked up a single book. This volume includes his lesser and well known stories and poems. Some of his more well known stories I was familiar with due to how popular they are and the others which are less well known and important to his career we “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.” I completed my first ever read of Lovecraft’s Complete Fiction earlier this month. I have always known of his works however I had not picked up a single book. This volume includes his lesser and well known stories and poems. Some of his more well known stories I was familiar with due to how popular they are and the others which are less well known and important to his career were interesting to come by. Below is a list of a few stand out ones for me. The Festival The Shunned House In The Vault The Call Of Cthulhu The Dunwich Horror At The Mountains Of Madness The Shadow Over Innsmouth The Dreams In The Witch House The Thing On The Doorstep The Evil Clergyman The Haunter Of The Dark The Secret Cave The Alchemist The Beast In The Cave The Tomb The Lurking Fear The Nameless City The Statement Of Randolph Carter I think it’s easy to say I have become a fan of his. It was interesting to read the descriptions before each story giving the reader a little background on them. I learnt so many interesting facts about Lovecraft and can see through is writing who influenced him eg Edgar Allan Poe who’s work I enjoy and the authors who Lovecraft has influenced over the years too.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I first encountered H.P. Lovecraft's work as a teenager. My entry point was the same as it was for most people -- the Cthulhu stories, which Del Rey had published in a series of paperbacks with appropriately gruesome covers. After a while, my interest waned and I sold my copies. Recently, though, a friend's interest prompted me to revisit Lovecraft, this time undertaking his entire opus. And I'm glad I did. Reading a compendium of Lovecraft's work revealed to me both that his work consists of mor I first encountered H.P. Lovecraft's work as a teenager. My entry point was the same as it was for most people -- the Cthulhu stories, which Del Rey had published in a series of paperbacks with appropriately gruesome covers. After a while, my interest waned and I sold my copies. Recently, though, a friend's interest prompted me to revisit Lovecraft, this time undertaking his entire opus. And I'm glad I did. Reading a compendium of Lovecraft's work revealed to me both that his work consists of more than the Cthulhu mythos tales and that the Cthulhu tales embody the essence of his perspective. Taken together, the reflect the world-view of a old-line American WASP terrified by a world shaped by forces beyond his comprehension. This really comes across in stories like "The Street" and "Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family," which reflect a fear of immigrants and Africans every bit as deeply expressed as that of the old gods and other supernatural beings. While it was shocking to read those stores today, they really helped me to better understand Lovecraft as a writer, and for that I will always value the perspective they offer.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Just bought this, and a really beautiful book it is too.

  25. 5 out of 5

    N

    Amazing volume. Correction to some reviews. I think this corrects the previous reviews talking about missing stories and pages, and so I say 10 out of 10! Firstly, the corrected 2011 edition is a beautiful leather-bound hardback with ridged spine, with beautiful cloth page marker bound into it. Silver edged pages are a nice addition. As for the Amazon.co.uk reviews stating it is 'incomplete' - I have gone through all of the other reviews that mention some works of fiction that are missing from this Amazing volume. Correction to some reviews. I think this corrects the previous reviews talking about missing stories and pages, and so I say 10 out of 10! Firstly, the corrected 2011 edition is a beautiful leather-bound hardback with ridged spine, with beautiful cloth page marker bound into it. Silver edged pages are a nice addition. As for the Amazon.co.uk reviews stating it is 'incomplete' - I have gone through all of the other reviews that mention some works of fiction that are missing from this volume so in effect doesn't make it 'complete' in regards to Lovecraft's fiction. See below: Wentworth's Day (1957), The Gable Window (1957), and The Horror From The Middle Span (1967) are mentioned as missing but these are not included on the bibliography list on Wikipedia, but are actually written by August Derleth anyway. The Thing In The Moonlight, Horror in the Museum, Poetry and the Gods, and In the Walls of Eryx are mentioned as missing, but these are collaborations with notes on the Wikipedia bibliography. The Fungi from Yuggoth is mentioned as missing, but this is poetry anyway according to the Wikipedia bibliography. The Loved Dead is mentioned as missing but is not listed in the bibliography on Wikipedia and was actually written by C.M. Eddy, Jr. The Evil Clergyman is not missing, it is in the contents and features on page 941. I have just compared (Dec 27, 2013) the 'fiction' section of the Wikipedia bibliography with all of the stories featured in this volume. All of the fiction is included in this volume. It does, however, include Through the Gates of the Silver Key which was in fact a collaboration with E. Hoffman Price, and Under the Pyramids which was a collaboration with Harry Houdini. In the volume it says under Juvenilia that The Little Glass Bottle, The Secret Cave, The Mystery of the Grave-Yard, The Mysterious Ship (short and long version), and a discarded draft of The Shadow Over Innsmouth are included. They are. In the Juvenilia section of the Wikipedia bibliography it also lists The Alchemist and The Beast in the Cave - these are actually listed under main fiction section in the volume. The only thing I have noticed is that under the Juvenilia section of the Wikipedia bibliography is that it lists The Haunted House, John, the Detective, The Noble Eavesdropper, and The Picture. These are not in the volume under main fiction or the Juvenilia appendix - but on Wikipedia is says these are unpublished anyway. Reviews have said that 1099 is an 'About the Author' but it only goes up to 1098. Mine only goes up to 1098 but the Index doesn't mention this section anyway and ends as it should to on the last page of Supernatural Horror In Literature. Again, I repeat, I think this corrects the previous reviews talking about missing stories and pages, and so I say 10 out of 10!

  26. 5 out of 5

    René

    Well, what can I say, I have been a big fan of Lovecraft for years now, but I've never really gotten to read many of his works yet, which has been long overdue. I can say that in general I enjoy Lovecrafts writing, since it is quite fitting for the types of stories he writes. He uses a wide range of vocabulary and often tends to use more antiquated words than simple ones. This is often fitting, due to his characters often being educated man, students of philosophy or similar characters. Still tho Well, what can I say, I have been a big fan of Lovecraft for years now, but I've never really gotten to read many of his works yet, which has been long overdue. I can say that in general I enjoy Lovecrafts writing, since it is quite fitting for the types of stories he writes. He uses a wide range of vocabulary and often tends to use more antiquated words than simple ones. This is often fitting, due to his characters often being educated man, students of philosophy or similar characters. Still though, at times even I have to say that his lengthy descriptions and his lingering on certain unimportant details can be annoying. As for the stories I liked most of them. Many of his earlier works that were not yet of his typical cosmic horror genre were still quite enjoyable as short scares or twisted tales. One part of his writings though, that I didn't enjoy were many his dream cycle stories. Most of the time they seem to be nothing more than shot glimpses into a dream world narrating forgettable stories if stories at all. The longest of these works 'The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath' was one of the most tedious things I read in my life. The story was (apart from a few parts and the ending) boring, repetitive and forgettable and the work consisted mostly of descriptions of fabulous places with strange names that had no importance of the story. I'd honestly say that Lovecraft's Dream Cycle works are not worth the read at all and can simply be skipped. The works I enjoyed the most were his longer stories and novellas he wrote later in his life, which are also his most iconic works and part of his Cthulhu Mythos as well as I said before, some of his earlier works. A short list of works that one should read of Lovecraft should in my opinion include the following stories and novellas: - The Outsider - The Rats in the Walls - The Music of Erich Zann - The Lurking Fear - The Whisperer in Darkness - At the Mountains of Madness - The Shadow Out of Time - The Dunwich Horror - The Call of Cthulhu - The Colour Out of Space As a last point I also have to mention that Lovecraft's works can at times be quite racist (The Street, The Horror at Red Hook). The fear of so called 'lower races' and their influence is often a key feature in many of his works. In the end though, I think one should not let these things drive one away from one of the most influential horror writers of all time.

  27. 5 out of 5

    neko cam

    It may have taken me ~10 months, but I consider it a worthwhile investment of my reading time. Below I've included (mostly for my own reference) my 1-5 rating of each story. You will notice a general trend whereby the later works have a propensity for earning a greater rating. This being the case despite my general preference for Lovecraft's stories in short format, as opposed to longer novella pieces, I believe is illustrative of his increased storytelling skill over time and his refinement of It may have taken me ~10 months, but I consider it a worthwhile investment of my reading time. Below I've included (mostly for my own reference) my 1-5 rating of each story. You will notice a general trend whereby the later works have a propensity for earning a greater rating. This being the case despite my general preference for Lovecraft's stories in short format, as opposed to longer novella pieces, I believe is illustrative of his increased storytelling skill over time and his refinement of those elements which make a story 'Lovecraftian'. 3 The Tomb 3 Dagon 2 Polaris 4 Beyond the Wall of Sleep 1 Memory 1 Old Bugs 1 The Transition of Juan Romero 1 The White Ship 2 The Doom That Came to Sarnath 3 The Statement of Randolph Carter 1 The Terrible Old Man 1 The Tree 2 The Cats of Ulthar 3 The Temple 2 Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family 1 The Street 2 Celephais 3 From Beyond 3 Nyarlethotep 2 The Picture in the House 1 Ex Oblivione 3 The Nameless City 2 The Quest of Iranon 2 The Moon-Bog 4 The Outsider 2 The Other Gods 4 Herbert West - Reanimator 2 Hypnos 2 What the Moon Brings 1 Azathoth 2 The Hound 3 The Lurking Fear 3 The Rats in the Walls 2 The Unnamable 2 The Festival 2 The Shunned House 2 The Horror at Red Hook 1 He 2 In the Vault 2 The Descendant 3 Cool Air 4 The Call of Cthulhu 4 Pickman's Model 2 The Silver Key 1 The Strange High House in the Mist 4 The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath 1 The Case of Charles Dexter Ward 2 The Colour Out of Space 1 The Very Old Folk 2 The Thing in the Moonlight 1 The History of the Necronomicon 1 Ibid 3 The Dunwich Horror 4 The Whisperer in Darkness 4 At the Mountains of Madness 3 The Shadow Over Innsmouth 2 The Dreams in the Witch House 5 The Thing on the Doorstep 1 The Evil Clergyman 2 The Book 5 The Shadow Out of Time 4 The Haunter of the Dark

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I had been looking for a decent collected volume of H.P. Lovecraft's work for some time now without luck. Every collection I found either suffered from obvious holes in the collected fiction, shoddy construction, or both. I found this edition at Barnes and Noble (It's one of their "library" editions) and was immediately impressed. This edition is leather bound with ribbon bookmark. The cover art is relatively tasteful, and the inside cover illustration is downright gorgeous (if you're into Dagon I had been looking for a decent collected volume of H.P. Lovecraft's work for some time now without luck. Every collection I found either suffered from obvious holes in the collected fiction, shoddy construction, or both. I found this edition at Barnes and Noble (It's one of their "library" editions) and was immediately impressed. This edition is leather bound with ribbon bookmark. The cover art is relatively tasteful, and the inside cover illustration is downright gorgeous (if you're into Dagonite cultists opening a gateway to eldritch horrors). In terms of the collect, this is about as complete as possible. All published works, several early stories and even a discarded draft of The Shadow of Innsmouth are included along with a biography and well done introduction. Despite all of his work being available for free online, at $20 this one is a steal. Thank you Barnes and Noble for finally putting together a worthwhile and definitive H.P Lovecraft collection!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Just finished this book. It was honestly one of the best collections of short stories and fiction that I have ever read. I absolutely love Lovecraft. Anyone who is a fan of Edgar Allan Poe would certainly love this collection as it focuses more on the psychological aspect of horror rather than jumpscares and gore. There's always a creeping sense of dread and the characters' emotions are extremely palpable in the story. If anyone calls themselves a fan of horror, then they absolutely should read t Just finished this book. It was honestly one of the best collections of short stories and fiction that I have ever read. I absolutely love Lovecraft. Anyone who is a fan of Edgar Allan Poe would certainly love this collection as it focuses more on the psychological aspect of horror rather than jumpscares and gore. There's always a creeping sense of dread and the characters' emotions are extremely palpable in the story. If anyone calls themselves a fan of horror, then they absolutely should read this.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sumant

    This is complete collection of Lovecraft which you can read from start to finish, some stories are really good, and some are complete miss. But Lovecraft did inspire many authors afterwards, especially the guys who are into weird fiction, still take many themes from Lovecraft and expand on that. The stories which I specifically liked from this collection are 1. Herbert West Re-Animator 2. Color Out Of space 3. Case Of Charles Dexter Ward 4. Whisperer in Darkness 5. Shadow over Innsmouth 6. Shunned Hous This is complete collection of Lovecraft which you can read from start to finish, some stories are really good, and some are complete miss. But Lovecraft did inspire many authors afterwards, especially the guys who are into weird fiction, still take many themes from Lovecraft and expand on that. The stories which I specifically liked from this collection are 1. Herbert West Re-Animator 2. Color Out Of space 3. Case Of Charles Dexter Ward 4. Whisperer in Darkness 5. Shadow over Innsmouth 6. Shunned House 7. Call of Cthulu 8. Dreams in a witch house These were some of my favorite stories from this collection, and with Lovecraft you don't get some evil spirits or vampires or demons who are chasing humans, but you get cosmic horror like elder races which came before human beings on planet, and now some humans have formed cults which are worshiping these beings. These beings are also alive in some secret places and dimensions which are not accessible to humans, and only a few with some special qualities are able to feel them. This firms a basic crux of almost all the stories, where people are trying to gain some forbidden knowledge or exploring some forbidden places, and what they encounter some cosmic horror which shocks their existence and transforms them completely. All in all you can't go wrong with Lovecraft, but don't expect vampires and ghosts to creep out of some doors in his stories, but prepared to expand your horizons. I give it 5/5 stars.

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