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A Linguistic Guide to English Poetry

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Seeks to demonstrate that the study of English poetry is enriched by the insights of modern linguistic analysis, and that linguistic and critical disciplines are not separate but complementary. Examining a wide range of poetry, Professor Leech considers many aspects of poetic style, including the language of past and present, creative language, poetic licence, repetition, Seeks to demonstrate that the study of English poetry is enriched by the insights of modern linguistic analysis, and that linguistic and critical disciplines are not separate but complementary. Examining a wide range of poetry, Professor Leech considers many aspects of poetic style, including the language of past and present, creative language, poetic licence, repetition, sound, metre, context and ambiguity.


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Seeks to demonstrate that the study of English poetry is enriched by the insights of modern linguistic analysis, and that linguistic and critical disciplines are not separate but complementary. Examining a wide range of poetry, Professor Leech considers many aspects of poetic style, including the language of past and present, creative language, poetic licence, repetition, Seeks to demonstrate that the study of English poetry is enriched by the insights of modern linguistic analysis, and that linguistic and critical disciplines are not separate but complementary. Examining a wide range of poetry, Professor Leech considers many aspects of poetic style, including the language of past and present, creative language, poetic licence, repetition, sound, metre, context and ambiguity.

30 review for A Linguistic Guide to English Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rosy

    I took almost 30 years to get to this book, which I have intended or desired to read properly ever since I bought it during my first year of college (the first time around). Why I finally got around to it is another story (or mystery). The book was not what I expected, or had grown to expect, and it was a much more enjoyable experience than I thought it would be. I expected to be introduced to the technicalities of a field, linguistics, unfamiliar to me. Instead, I was taken back to all those te I took almost 30 years to get to this book, which I have intended or desired to read properly ever since I bought it during my first year of college (the first time around). Why I finally got around to it is another story (or mystery). The book was not what I expected, or had grown to expect, and it was a much more enjoyable experience than I thought it would be. I expected to be introduced to the technicalities of a field, linguistics, unfamiliar to me. Instead, I was taken back to all those terms we learned in school and college for the devices of language found in literature, and beyond them to very precise, recognizable and applicable descriptions of those devices/characteristics. The ghostly argument lurked that the book is a technical restatement of the obvious, or common sense, but I don't think it would be fair. To identify and define what we see before us all the time when we read necessitates beginning with entities that we don't notice but know are present. Leech is aware of this and occasionally points out that it's hard to distinguish such characteristics. But for me, this was revision (English usage) extraordinaire, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I bought the book on the recommendation of an instructor in 1981, but it was first published in 1969, and a big part of my enjoyment was seeing it in its historical context. The back cover mentions the "new stylistics," but this book is close reading, analysis, technical appreciation--except where it points, perhaps unconsciously (I'd love to know enough to know), to the larger, interpretive approaches that Theory brought (or rode) to the field. I will yet again forget the correct or specific application of many of these terms, but my awareness of all the schemes and tropes for which "there's a word for that" has been pleasantly refreshed. What fun.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sangeeta K

    There's a name for every kind of style of poetry. Great for beginners looking for in depth explanations.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sergiu

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zoya

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kennedy

  6. 5 out of 5

    Poly Bora

  7. 5 out of 5

    Abderrahim Halwi

  8. 5 out of 5

    Reuben Crisp

  9. 4 out of 5

    Navid

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aya Mo'nes

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Hawthorne

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ian

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

  14. 4 out of 5

    Li Xiaohan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Valencia

  16. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad Siddiq

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mariangela Giunta

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barzo Mahmoud

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mahmoud

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hollie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicoletta

  22. 5 out of 5

    Arianna

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roghaye

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Naisbitt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Josefin Holmstrom

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mitsuko

  30. 4 out of 5

    Edward Moran

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