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Rachel & Leah

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Leah was so young when her sister Rachel was born that she could not remember a time when Rachel was not the darling of the family- pretty, clever, and cute, whereas Leah plugged along being obedient, hard-working, and responsible. Then one day a good-looking marriageable kinsman named Jacob showed up, looking for a haven from his brother's rage, and Leah fell in love at o Leah was so young when her sister Rachel was born that she could not remember a time when Rachel was not the darling of the family- pretty, clever, and cute, whereas Leah plugged along being obedient, hard-working, and responsible. Then one day a good-looking marriageable kinsman named Jacob showed up, looking for a haven from his brother's rage, and Leah fell in love at once. It didn't surprise her at all that Jacob saw only Rachel. But surely, as the two sisters worked and lived alongside Jacob for seven years, he would come to realize that Leah was the one he ought to marry...


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Leah was so young when her sister Rachel was born that she could not remember a time when Rachel was not the darling of the family- pretty, clever, and cute, whereas Leah plugged along being obedient, hard-working, and responsible. Then one day a good-looking marriageable kinsman named Jacob showed up, looking for a haven from his brother's rage, and Leah fell in love at o Leah was so young when her sister Rachel was born that she could not remember a time when Rachel was not the darling of the family- pretty, clever, and cute, whereas Leah plugged along being obedient, hard-working, and responsible. Then one day a good-looking marriageable kinsman named Jacob showed up, looking for a haven from his brother's rage, and Leah fell in love at once. It didn't surprise her at all that Jacob saw only Rachel. But surely, as the two sisters worked and lived alongside Jacob for seven years, he would come to realize that Leah was the one he ought to marry...

30 review for Rachel & Leah

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I really liked this book, but I couldn't give it a four because it made me angry. The resolution of how Rachel and Leah both became wives of Jacob was upsetting, and the way Jacob is a know-it-all perfect human being until, arguably, the end, was infuriating. It's hard to tell if this or The Red Tent was more accurate. I know many people's dislike of RT - too fairy tale, too perfect, etc. I think if you're interested in the women of Genesis in a historical fiction context, both books are worth y I really liked this book, but I couldn't give it a four because it made me angry. The resolution of how Rachel and Leah both became wives of Jacob was upsetting, and the way Jacob is a know-it-all perfect human being until, arguably, the end, was infuriating. It's hard to tell if this or The Red Tent was more accurate. I know many people's dislike of RT - too fairy tale, too perfect, etc. I think if you're interested in the women of Genesis in a historical fiction context, both books are worth your time. Just try not to take it too seriously. Card's own religious philosophy shone through in a lot of the religious conversations between Jacob and Leah, and that was interesting to me. I also enjoyed reading the Afterword, where he thanks his wife and talks about friends and such. Despite relative doozies like Treasure Box, Card is still near the top of his game :-)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ang

    Out of the three stories Card wrote about the biblical women I didn't like this one the most. Two sisters pitted against each other in a fight over love, children and recognition is a real theme but one I do not wish to visit. Out of the three stories Card wrote about the biblical women I didn't like this one the most. Two sisters pitted against each other in a fight over love, children and recognition is a real theme but one I do not wish to visit.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Book2Dragon

    If you have a sister, you will likely find this book familiar; with rivalries, misunderstandings, drama and resolution. Under all of it there is love. The story of Jacob and Rachel and Leah and Laban is in Genesis in the Holy Bible. This is a fiction account of how events may have transpired. I, personally, did not care much for the ending. I picked up Genesis and read from Abraham on, and was shocked (after all these years of reading the Bible) at how women were treated. I'm not a feminist, and If you have a sister, you will likely find this book familiar; with rivalries, misunderstandings, drama and resolution. Under all of it there is love. The story of Jacob and Rachel and Leah and Laban is in Genesis in the Holy Bible. This is a fiction account of how events may have transpired. I, personally, did not care much for the ending. I picked up Genesis and read from Abraham on, and was shocked (after all these years of reading the Bible) at how women were treated. I'm not a feminist, and certainly times were different then, but the status of women was most definitely different than today. I did enjoy his writing style, however. This is my first Orson Scott Card book, and he mostly writes science fiction, although in the acknowledgments (not so labeled) he mentions a series he has written on women of the Bible. What I learned most from the book is how often we misinterpret what someone is saying and take offense when none was intended, and how much a conscious change of effort to be positive and not take offense will change everything. If that interests you I would highly recommend this book rather than a self-help book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I can't believe how much I disliked this book compared to the first two in this series. I especially loved Rebekah, but this book felt like a middle grade book, focused on children--and very annoying children too. The most interesting things about Jacob's life, in my opinion, is after he leaves Laban's home and when he becomes Israel. If you are interested in those things, don't read this book. This book is about Rachel and Leah as young, petty children. If you are interested in Jacob's life, re I can't believe how much I disliked this book compared to the first two in this series. I especially loved Rebekah, but this book felt like a middle grade book, focused on children--and very annoying children too. The most interesting things about Jacob's life, in my opinion, is after he leaves Laban's home and when he becomes Israel. If you are interested in those things, don't read this book. This book is about Rachel and Leah as young, petty children. If you are interested in Jacob's life, read The Red Tent. I was planning to give this book three stars, but I deducted a star for the author's homophobia.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    "If there is anything virtuous, lovely or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things." (LDS Article of faith 13) Shame on you, Card. There is absolutely nothing virtuous about the manner in which women were portrayed in this novel. I will certainly never be picking up another book by Orson Scott Card again, religious, fantasy or otherwise. I am that deeply disappointed. The idea of an LDS author picking up what little is written about the specific women in the Old Testament and ela "If there is anything virtuous, lovely or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things." (LDS Article of faith 13) Shame on you, Card. There is absolutely nothing virtuous about the manner in which women were portrayed in this novel. I will certainly never be picking up another book by Orson Scott Card again, religious, fantasy or otherwise. I am that deeply disappointed. The idea of an LDS author picking up what little is written about the specific women in the Old Testament and elaborating on their stories with the use of research and imagination has merit. SUCH a shame it was done in this manner, with one dirty sexual reference after another and a heartbreaking theme of how women could only find acceptance and happiness through successful marriages (read = marriage or concubinage with a wealthy man and the accomplishment of producing male heirs). The true church of Jesus Christ restored in these latter days preaches no such theme. We believe family to be central to our Father's plan for us, yes. We believe marriage is sacred, children are a sacred trust, parenthood is a great responsibility and privilege, yes. But plenty of women live righteous lives and never have opportunity for these things - and their lives, their contributions to the world and the Church are still valuable! I refuse to believe that anything less could have been true in any age of the world. The gospel remains the same. God remains the same. He has always loved women of virtue, whatever their opportunities, whenever they lived. He still does.

  6. 4 out of 5

    LemonLinda

    I really loved this book. I stumbled across it because of the author, Orson Scott Card. I had read Ender's Game and thought it to be so cleverly written so I was interested in the three books in this series, Women of Genesis. This is the first that I read in the series even though it is the third and I certainly will be reading the other two. Card gives Rachel, Leah as well as their handmaidens, Bilhah and Zilpah, such distinctive personalities. And he invents such a clear and logical reason for I really loved this book. I stumbled across it because of the author, Orson Scott Card. I had read Ender's Game and thought it to be so cleverly written so I was interested in the three books in this series, Women of Genesis. This is the first that I read in the series even though it is the third and I certainly will be reading the other two. Card gives Rachel, Leah as well as their handmaidens, Bilhah and Zilpah, such distinctive personalities. And he invents such a clear and logical reason for the switch at the altar. I came to love all four of the women as well as Jacob and Laban. Yes, it is fiction, but it is about a story that many of us have grown up with and have never understood what might have happened to bring those events about in that way. Card gives us a good explanation. I would highly recommend it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    April Hochstrasser

    I love the plot in Rachel and Leah. What if Leah's marriage to Jacob wasn't such a surprise? What if it was done because Rachel did not want to marry Jacob at the time? What if Leah and Rachel's father did not mean to fool Jacob but was left with little choice. I love the way Orson Scott Card can go back into the time before Christ and create a believable world and story that we can relate to so well in our time. I can't wait to read the sequel, The Women of Genesis. I love the plot in Rachel and Leah. What if Leah's marriage to Jacob wasn't such a surprise? What if it was done because Rachel did not want to marry Jacob at the time? What if Leah and Rachel's father did not mean to fool Jacob but was left with little choice. I love the way Orson Scott Card can go back into the time before Christ and create a believable world and story that we can relate to so well in our time. I can't wait to read the sequel, The Women of Genesis.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This was a book club choice by Donna Brown. I haven't ready any Old Testament fiction books before, so I was pretty excited to check it out. Orson Scott Card is a pretty good writer. Sometimes things move slowly in the book - but this was set in the deserts afterall and I can't imagine that anything moves too quickly in sheep herds anyhow. It was a good story... but has definitely piqued my interest to find out what the scriptures have to say about Jacob and his wives. This was a book club choice by Donna Brown. I haven't ready any Old Testament fiction books before, so I was pretty excited to check it out. Orson Scott Card is a pretty good writer. Sometimes things move slowly in the book - but this was set in the deserts afterall and I can't imagine that anything moves too quickly in sheep herds anyhow. It was a good story... but has definitely piqued my interest to find out what the scriptures have to say about Jacob and his wives.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Taryn

    I listened to this on a road trip with my mom and a friend. We would get back in the car and they would both be really excited to turn it back on as I groaned. I didn't like the characters and I had a hard time picturing biblical times and stories with modern language and some modern culture mixed in. The bible story does leave a lot up for interpretation , and I don't fill in the blanks the same way Card does. I listened to this on a road trip with my mom and a friend. We would get back in the car and they would both be really excited to turn it back on as I groaned. I didn't like the characters and I had a hard time picturing biblical times and stories with modern language and some modern culture mixed in. The bible story does leave a lot up for interpretation , and I don't fill in the blanks the same way Card does.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Interesting take on the story of Jacob

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pharlap

    I am familiar with biblical Jacob's story. First of all from Joseph and his Brothers, a monumental book by Thomas Mann. Thomas Mann was most interested with complicated relations of Biblical characters with God, women were left as the background. So I welcomed Rachel and Leah as a worthy addition of woman's point of view. I was quite pleased with first few chapters, different characters of two sisters, daughters of Laban, Jacob's uncle. I welcomed addition of Bilhah and Zilpah, two women with unfo I am familiar with biblical Jacob's story. First of all from Joseph and his Brothers, a monumental book by Thomas Mann. Thomas Mann was most interested with complicated relations of Biblical characters with God, women were left as the background. So I welcomed Rachel and Leah as a worthy addition of woman's point of view. I was quite pleased with first few chapters, different characters of two sisters, daughters of Laban, Jacob's uncle. I welcomed addition of Bilhah and Zilpah, two women with unfortunate childhood, but with strong characters. I enjoyed witty dialogues with gentle humor and bits of spite. But there remained few hundred pages to read, will all be just a lighthearted banter? No, author introduced a significant element - reading holy books, the word of God. It looks to me like an author's invention, there is no mention in the Bible of any books passed between Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. Another point is Jacob, the book pictures him as a man of great depth and faith, it rather contradicts the biblical story. Anyway, I do not mind some deviation from the biblical path, but as for me there was too much about influence of holy texts on Leah character. Finally we come to the climax of the story - wedding of Jacob and a daughter(s) of Laban. I was very interested how the author solved this puzzle? Well, again he resorted to God, faith and love. On one hand I do not see any other peaceful solution, on the other it was choosing an easy way out. Summarizing - I read this book with some interest, but I will not read other biblical stories by this author.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    I was so excited when I came across a copy of this book, and it is an amazing read, that takes us through the lives of four incredible young women later to be mothers of the Nation of Israel. First we read about Bilah, a clever young girl, who is taken by a a friend of her late father's to Laban's camp at Padan Aram, after her father's death in a tragic work accident, before we are introduced to 'tender eyed' Leah, the ravishing Rachel and the other handmaiden Zilpah. Rachel and Leah are introduce I was so excited when I came across a copy of this book, and it is an amazing read, that takes us through the lives of four incredible young women later to be mothers of the Nation of Israel. First we read about Bilah, a clever young girl, who is taken by a a friend of her late father's to Laban's camp at Padan Aram, after her father's death in a tragic work accident, before we are introduced to 'tender eyed' Leah, the ravishing Rachel and the other handmaiden Zilpah. Rachel and Leah are introduced to us at the ages of eleven and fourteen respectively. Bilah is a similar age to Rachel and Zilpah a similar age to Leah. As we read of the lives and interactions of four beautiful girls, each with their own unique personalities and characters, I grew to love and care about them all. The entry of Jacob fleeing from his brother Esau's wrath shapes the lives of all four girls who will later bear Jacob's twelve sons. Card departs very little from the Biblical novel while filling in the caps in a most skillful manner. It is an interesting insight into the intricacies of the lives of the characters who shaped the history of the nation of Israel. A very sensitive insightful, and compassionate portrayal that kept the right amount of humour and intrigue. Fascinating insights into the Book of the revelations of Enoch as Enoch, who walked with the people of Zion, is taken up to heaven, as Jacob teaches Leah and Bilah. The only flaw may be that the author seems to downplay the love of Jacob for Rachel who was in fact the center of his attention, and he turns Laban, who is not well though of in Jewish and Christian scripture into a sympathetic character. But we feel as if we are really there in Padan-Aram as we share the lives of Jacob and four fascinating young women. Card shows a deep understanding of women and of men and of their interactions. It is a novel and a work of historical fiction that is at once engaging and enlightening. It really deepened my perspectives of these events and people. I am determined when I am next in Israel to visit Rachel's Tomb between Gilo and Beit Lechem and the Tomb of the Matriarchs in Tiberias where Zilpah and Bilah are buried, having visited the Cave of Machpelah in Hebron where Jacob and Leah are buried.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    It was interesting to read this right after reading The Red Tent. Both authors had completely different interpretations of Rachel, Leah, Jacob, and the surrounding characters. Anita Diamant's book had a very foreign, ancient feel. This book by Orson Scott Card, on the other hand, had scenes and situations that seemed more modern and familiar in comparison. Maybe because I come from his LDS culture, which I presume was his target audience for the Women of Genesis series. I did like that all Laban It was interesting to read this right after reading The Red Tent. Both authors had completely different interpretations of Rachel, Leah, Jacob, and the surrounding characters. Anita Diamant's book had a very foreign, ancient feel. This book by Orson Scott Card, on the other hand, had scenes and situations that seemed more modern and familiar in comparison. Maybe because I come from his LDS culture, which I presume was his target audience for the Women of Genesis series. I did like that all Laban's family had an understanding of God, as opposed to The Red Tent where it seemed only Jacob and possibly Isaac believed in one God. In Rachel and Leah the free interaction between men and women seemed unlikely for the time period, although it would be nice if that's how it really was. Both authors had different takes on the Rachel-Leah wedding switch, so even though I generally knew what was going to happen, I was still on edge to see specifically what would happen in the author's interpretation. Card had some interesting insights and I enjoyed seeing Leah's spiritual growth. The story is heartbreaking! This is the second book I've read by Orson Scott Card. It was very different from Ender's Game but just as thoughtful. I'd like to continue Rachel and Leah's story in the next book (which the Afterward promised, though I can't seem to find it at the moment), and read the Sarah and Rebekah books as well. This deserves more of a 3 1/2 star rating than just 3.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book was a huge disappointment for me. I have read many books by Orson Scott Card and greatly enjoyed them all. I also read Sarah,the first book in the "Women of Genesis" series, back when it came out, and I liked it well enough. What a difference from Rachel and Leah! I disliked most of the characters in this book and found them all to be unrealistic. The main women were too flawed, too petty, too immature, too quick to anger, et cetera, to be believable human personalities. The main men, This book was a huge disappointment for me. I have read many books by Orson Scott Card and greatly enjoyed them all. I also read Sarah,the first book in the "Women of Genesis" series, back when it came out, and I liked it well enough. What a difference from Rachel and Leah! I disliked most of the characters in this book and found them all to be unrealistic. The main women were too flawed, too petty, too immature, too quick to anger, et cetera, to be believable human personalities. The main men, on the other hand, were too perfect, too noble, too kind, too wise, too strong, et cetera. The dialogue was similarly unrealistic and unhuman, plus it sounded much too modern to ever let me forget I was reading something from the 21st century. Similarly, the characters are never shown to be doing anything that's particularly from their time period. They aren't really shown doing work or the activities of daily life, they only talk about doing things. There are no details about their lives that makes it feel like they're living in another time. Consequently, I never got a feel for the time period like one does with good historical fiction. The pacing was also off--sometimes we read about every minute and sometimes years passed from page to page. All in all, although I was sometimes interested in a storyline or a bit of character development that was taking place, it was mostly a drag to keep reading this book. And when I found out that this was only part one of two...I was honestly not sure if I'd even want to try reading the second part.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was very well written and I love that it opened with Bilhah and not Rachel or Leah. I was torn between giving this book 3 or 4 stars. It was very painful for me to read the ending of this book and how sad Leah was. The sentence "Look upon my affliction. Let me bear him a son. Then my husband will love me” has such a deeper meaning after you've read 400 pages about these women, instead of a few pages in the Old Testament. Maybe it shouldn't because the book is fiction based on the bible This book was very well written and I love that it opened with Bilhah and not Rachel or Leah. I was torn between giving this book 3 or 4 stars. It was very painful for me to read the ending of this book and how sad Leah was. The sentence "Look upon my affliction. Let me bear him a son. Then my husband will love me” has such a deeper meaning after you've read 400 pages about these women, instead of a few pages in the Old Testament. Maybe it shouldn't because the book is fiction based on the bible story, but I cried for Leah anyway. I don't know if I can read the second book "The Wives of Israel". How sad for Leah to bear sons to a man who doesn't love her the way a husband should love his wife and sad for Rachel who cannot bear children (until much later) to the man she loves and who was worked for 14 years. We shall see. I probaby will read it because it will bother me forever that I haven't finished all the books in a series. One of my many faults :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    I really liked the 1st book in this series. The next 2 were just okay. I'd have to say this one was my least favorite. Leah was annoying througout most of the book (major emphasis on Leah's character and the two handmaids) and I was very disapointed in how the author portrayed Rachel at the end of the book (very imature). I guess I enjoy when the author is generous to the scriptural women and this book didn't do that for me :). The only woman I really ended up liking in this book was Bilhah. And I really liked the 1st book in this series. The next 2 were just okay. I'd have to say this one was my least favorite. Leah was annoying througout most of the book (major emphasis on Leah's character and the two handmaids) and I was very disapointed in how the author portrayed Rachel at the end of the book (very imature). I guess I enjoy when the author is generous to the scriptural women and this book didn't do that for me :). The only woman I really ended up liking in this book was Bilhah. And, for most of the book I really disliked Zilpah. Lets just say that reading the actual scriptural account was more inspiring to me than this book (which I guess is how it should be :) I was also dispointed that this book will continue, who knows when, in another volume. It is always nice to know that going into a book. But, who knows, maybe I'll still have the desire to read the next volume, "The Wives of Israel" whenever it comes out?!? Doubtful.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shannan

    Yikes! I have heard that Orson Scott Card is a fine author but this book was a stinker! The text is primarily dialouge between young 11-17 year old girls....and Card gets it all wrong. It reads like a snarky screen play rather than an interesting insightful look into how it may have been for these women of the Bible. It was painful getting through and I was relieved when it ended abruptly and not satisfying either. Then it had the NERVE to offer questions for a book club! AS IF! I don't even wan Yikes! I have heard that Orson Scott Card is a fine author but this book was a stinker! The text is primarily dialouge between young 11-17 year old girls....and Card gets it all wrong. It reads like a snarky screen play rather than an interesting insightful look into how it may have been for these women of the Bible. It was painful getting through and I was relieved when it ended abruptly and not satisfying either. Then it had the NERVE to offer questions for a book club! AS IF! I don't even want to remember I ever read this book, let alone sit and discuss it with other women! The book ends with a "cliff hanger" but rather than go out and buy the next installment from Card, I am seriously just going to read it in the Bible. It will be WAY more enjoyable. TOSS IT!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liesel

    I've come to really enjoy fiction based on biblical stories. This is actually the third in a series with a fourth in the works to finish the tribes of Israel story. I really enjoyed "The Red Tent" and was interested in how the same story was depicted by a different author. Whereas "The Red Tent" really focuses on life after the marriage to Rachel and Leah, this deals with the years of servitude that Jacob performs in order to marry Rachel. Though there are similarities in the portrayal of events I've come to really enjoy fiction based on biblical stories. This is actually the third in a series with a fourth in the works to finish the tribes of Israel story. I really enjoyed "The Red Tent" and was interested in how the same story was depicted by a different author. Whereas "The Red Tent" really focuses on life after the marriage to Rachel and Leah, this deals with the years of servitude that Jacob performs in order to marry Rachel. Though there are similarities in the portrayal of events leading up to Jacob's deception, I think that this one is truer to the bible and also much more heartbreaking in a lot of ways. I'm interested to see what the sequel to this book is like.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Guffey

    I liked Sarah, didn't like Rebekah, and am on the fence with this one. I really used to love Orson Scott Card, because his dialogues bring his characters to life in ways that are easy to relate to. But this one had too much bickering, like Rebekah, and it needed to be edited. I wished the story had continued past where it ended. But the premise of Rachel and Leah and how Jacob married them both was believable to me, though I did't like their personalities much. I liked Jacob,though he was more o I liked Sarah, didn't like Rebekah, and am on the fence with this one. I really used to love Orson Scott Card, because his dialogues bring his characters to life in ways that are easy to relate to. But this one had too much bickering, like Rebekah, and it needed to be edited. I wished the story had continued past where it ended. But the premise of Rachel and Leah and how Jacob married them both was believable to me, though I did't like their personalities much. I liked Jacob,though he was more of a hero than a prophet in this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    I loved that in this series Orson Scott Card was able to imagine a relatable world of characters that, until this time, had been completely UNrelatable to me based solely on the limited scriptural accounts of their lives and, to me at least, their often-confounding actions. These books actually helped me to have a greater love and respect for these chosen women (and men) of the Old Testament, simply because I was given a glimpse of how they might have felt, might have lived, might have loved -- I loved that in this series Orson Scott Card was able to imagine a relatable world of characters that, until this time, had been completely UNrelatable to me based solely on the limited scriptural accounts of their lives and, to me at least, their often-confounding actions. These books actually helped me to have a greater love and respect for these chosen women (and men) of the Old Testament, simply because I was given a glimpse of how they might have felt, might have lived, might have loved -- all within a framework of understandable AND believable people and relationships.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Another good book by Orson Scott Card. I liked this one slightly less than Rebekah, but I really liked how each character had a distinct voice and I loved Leah's character arc. She's always been an interesting Biblical character to me. As with the last book, I feel like there are probably some cultural and historical things that are issues, but Card's writing is compelling enough that I am pulled into it and can let the other stuff go. This was a quick, pleasant read. Another good book by Orson Scott Card. I liked this one slightly less than Rebekah, but I really liked how each character had a distinct voice and I loved Leah's character arc. She's always been an interesting Biblical character to me. As with the last book, I feel like there are probably some cultural and historical things that are issues, but Card's writing is compelling enough that I am pulled into it and can let the other stuff go. This was a quick, pleasant read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amber Spencer

    Okay, I keep hearing how great these books are, but I just can't get into them. I think it's because the actual people from the Bible are made into the main characters. I really love historical fiction, but I like it when made up people are put into the scenes: I learn about what happened, but without all the weirdness of made up things that we have no idea that happened. Anyhow, it would take something huge to get me to try again. Okay, I keep hearing how great these books are, but I just can't get into them. I think it's because the actual people from the Bible are made into the main characters. I really love historical fiction, but I like it when made up people are put into the scenes: I learn about what happened, but without all the weirdness of made up things that we have no idea that happened. Anyhow, it would take something huge to get me to try again.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Konnie

    Wow! I've never thought so deeply about these women before. This book is all the more interesting to read because we know the ultimate outcome. I'm not entirely sure Card's rendition of the story is entirely plausible, but then how are we to know what was and wasn't so very long ago. It was certainly sympathetic and intriguing. I find it an especially good read, because I think that each of us is both Rachel and Leah in our marriages. Wow! I've never thought so deeply about these women before. This book is all the more interesting to read because we know the ultimate outcome. I'm not entirely sure Card's rendition of the story is entirely plausible, but then how are we to know what was and wasn't so very long ago. It was certainly sympathetic and intriguing. I find it an especially good read, because I think that each of us is both Rachel and Leah in our marriages.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tracie

    This is the third book in a row that I am giving a 3-star rating. I feel so wishy-washy. The actual writing was certainly a 4 for me, but some of the liberties he took with the characters brings my overall rating down to a 3. I am not sure I buy into his wedding night scenario, either. But hey, its the Old Testament--truth really is stranger than fiction. :)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    We read this one for book club. I think I am done with Orson Scott Card. There were many who thought Card should write the whole Bible. Then there were a few, like me, that thought it wasn't that good. Maybe my bias stems from not really liking the biblical story to start with. Anyway, there was a lot of whining and I didn't like how the women were portrayed. yada yada We read this one for book club. I think I am done with Orson Scott Card. There were many who thought Card should write the whole Bible. Then there were a few, like me, that thought it wasn't that good. Maybe my bias stems from not really liking the biblical story to start with. Anyway, there was a lot of whining and I didn't like how the women were portrayed. yada yada

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maria Ryan

    I LOVED THIS BOOK! Orson Scott Card does an amazing job (how does he know women so well?)! Another "can't put it down". I LOVED THIS BOOK! Orson Scott Card does an amazing job (how does he know women so well?)! Another "can't put it down".

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Wallace

    Interesting look into the life of Rachel and Leah - Mormon aspects to book -need to read with caution.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    It was really good, but I found some parts improbable, like young girls (10 and 12 years old) speaking maturely of serious matters of life. But it gave me more insight to the Bible story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Hi I am Leah and I am 15 years old.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    A novelization of the biblical story, it really made me think, and brought them to life for me.

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