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Lord Peter

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An alternate cover edition can be found here. Lord Peter Wimsey, eccentric amateur sleuth. I Lord Peter Views the Body (1928) 12 stories: The .. 1 Abominable History of the Man with Copper Fingers 2 Entertaining Episode of the Article in Question 3 Fascinating Problem of Uncle Meleager's Will 4 Fantastic Horror of the Cat in the Bag 5 Unprincipled Affair of the Practical Joker 6 An alternate cover edition can be found here. Lord Peter Wimsey, eccentric amateur sleuth. I Lord Peter Views the Body (1928) 12 stories: The .. 1 Abominable History of the Man with Copper Fingers 2 Entertaining Episode of the Article in Question 3 Fascinating Problem of Uncle Meleager's Will 4 Fantastic Horror of the Cat in the Bag 5 Unprincipled Affair of the Practical Joker 6 Undignified Melodrama of the Bone of Contention 7 Vindictive Story of the Footsteps That Ran 8 Bibulous Business of a Matter of Taste 9 Learned Adventure of the Dragon's Head 10 Piscatorial Farce of the Stolen Stomach 11 Unsolved Puzzle of the Man with No Face" 12 Adventurous Exploit of the Cave of Ali Baba" II Hangman's Holiday (1933) 4 stories: The .. 1 Image in the Mirror" 2 Incredible Elopement of Lord Peter Wimsey" 3 Queen's Square" 4 Necklace of Pearls" III In the Teeth of the Evidence (1939) 1 In the Teeth of the Evidence 2 Absolutely Elsewhere" IV Striding Folly (1972) 1 Striding Folly 2 The Haunted Policeman 3 Talboys * Sayers, Lord Peter and God by Carolyn Heilbrun * Greedy Night, A Parody by E. C. Bentley


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An alternate cover edition can be found here. Lord Peter Wimsey, eccentric amateur sleuth. I Lord Peter Views the Body (1928) 12 stories: The .. 1 Abominable History of the Man with Copper Fingers 2 Entertaining Episode of the Article in Question 3 Fascinating Problem of Uncle Meleager's Will 4 Fantastic Horror of the Cat in the Bag 5 Unprincipled Affair of the Practical Joker 6 An alternate cover edition can be found here. Lord Peter Wimsey, eccentric amateur sleuth. I Lord Peter Views the Body (1928) 12 stories: The .. 1 Abominable History of the Man with Copper Fingers 2 Entertaining Episode of the Article in Question 3 Fascinating Problem of Uncle Meleager's Will 4 Fantastic Horror of the Cat in the Bag 5 Unprincipled Affair of the Practical Joker 6 Undignified Melodrama of the Bone of Contention 7 Vindictive Story of the Footsteps That Ran 8 Bibulous Business of a Matter of Taste 9 Learned Adventure of the Dragon's Head 10 Piscatorial Farce of the Stolen Stomach 11 Unsolved Puzzle of the Man with No Face" 12 Adventurous Exploit of the Cave of Ali Baba" II Hangman's Holiday (1933) 4 stories: The .. 1 Image in the Mirror" 2 Incredible Elopement of Lord Peter Wimsey" 3 Queen's Square" 4 Necklace of Pearls" III In the Teeth of the Evidence (1939) 1 In the Teeth of the Evidence 2 Absolutely Elsewhere" IV Striding Folly (1972) 1 Striding Folly 2 The Haunted Policeman 3 Talboys * Sayers, Lord Peter and God by Carolyn Heilbrun * Greedy Night, A Parody by E. C. Bentley

30 review for Lord Peter

  1. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    Since discovering Lord Peter in college, I've resisted the urge to race through all of his mysteries. There are only eleven, and I prefer to read them slowly, one every year or so, so they can last as long as possible. Knowing that I only have four left makes me sad, but this collection was a nice antidote - with twenty-one stories, it felt like at least three or four novels' worth of mysteries. Obviously they aren't all great. "The Vindictive Story of the Footsteps That Ran" is sort of a letdown Since discovering Lord Peter in college, I've resisted the urge to race through all of his mysteries. There are only eleven, and I prefer to read them slowly, one every year or so, so they can last as long as possible. Knowing that I only have four left makes me sad, but this collection was a nice antidote - with twenty-one stories, it felt like at least three or four novels' worth of mysteries. Obviously they aren't all great. "The Vindictive Story of the Footsteps That Ran" is sort of a letdown at the end, and "The Abominable History of the Man With the Copper Fingers", while suspenseful and creepy, has a pretty obvious solution that I saw from a mile away. But most of the stories are delightful - "The Fascinating Problem of Uncle Meleager's Will" rests on the characters having to solve a crossword puzzle, and "The Learned Adventure of the Dragon's Head" features Lord Peter solving a mystery with his nephew, and it's just as adorable and charming as it sounds. Also, in case you haven't guessed, all of the mysteries have delightfully old-school melodramatic titles, which I am always a fan of. And my absolute favorite of the bunch was, of course, Talboys, which involves the entire Wimsey-Vane family and I want someone to make a TV series where Peter, Harriet, and their sons travel the country and solve mysteries. (granted, this story does feature scenes where the Wimseys are super rude to a female houseguest, but since she's the 1930's equivalent of an anti-vaccer hippie mom, their disdain is earned) Also there's a mystery that opens with the birth of Peter and Harriet's first child, which I will proceed to quote almost in its entirety because that's how well it demonstrates why I love these two: "'Good lord!' said his lordship. 'Did I do that?' 'All evidence points that way,' replied his wife. 'Then I can only say I never knew so convincing a body of evidence produce such an inadequate result.' The nurse appeared to take this reflection personally. She said in a tone of rebuke: 'He's a beautiful boy.' 'H'm,' said Peter. He adjusted his eyeglass more carefully. 'Well, you're the expert witness. Hand him over.' The nurse did so with a dubious air. She was relieved to see that this disconcerting parent handled the child competently; as, in a man who was an experienced uncle, was not, after all, so very surprising. Lord Peter sat down gingerly on the edge of the bed. 'Do you feel it's up to standard?' he inquired with some anxiety. 'Of course, your workmanship's always sound - but you never know with these collaborative efforts.' 'I think it'll do,' said Harriet drowsily. 'Good.' He turned abruptly to the nurse. 'All right; we'll keep it. Take it and put it away, and tell 'em to invoice it to me. It's a very interesting addition to you, Harriet; but it would have been a hell of a rotten substitute.'" The book also features an afterword by John Curran, who outlines Sayers' life, and it's pretty cool - she had a baby out of wedlock and successfully kept it a secret! He also goes through the trajectory of the Lord Peter novels, including the Harriet Vane romance: "Sayers introduced Harriet Vane in Strong Poison (1930) and allowed her and Wimsey to embark on a three-book courtship culminating in marriage in Busman's Honeymoon (1937). This is the longest - and, some would argue, the most wearisome and embarrassing - courtship in the annals of detective fiction." *record scratch* Excuse you? No one argues that, Curran. NO ONE. If any detective courtship deserves to be called "embarrassing" and "wearisome," it's Stephen Moffat's take on Sherlock's relationship with Irene Adler (yeah, I went there - fight me, Sherlock fangirls). Don't step to me on the subject of Harriet and Peter. "Detective-fiction purists contend that this type of romantic relationship - between detective and suspect - has no place in a detective story," Curran writes. "Other sleuths have managed to meet, court, marry, and produce children without any of the soul-searching in which Peter and Harriet indulged." You best get out your dueling pistols and choose a second, Curran, because them's fightin' words. (I honestly considered taking off a star for the pure dickishness of the afterword, but then I remembered that it's not Sayers' fault.)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Just fun.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    This was a gift from the heavens received at just the correct juncture. A terrific couple of dozen short stories that fit like puzzle pieces of a man in his time. All hail Dorothy Sayers! For me to give any short stories 5 stars is an absolute first. These just are. Not all are of that level (the one with Peter living for months in the Basque country was 4 at the most)- but at least 75% are pure perfection. Where has the glorious English language proceeded since this master whirled her quip and phr This was a gift from the heavens received at just the correct juncture. A terrific couple of dozen short stories that fit like puzzle pieces of a man in his time. All hail Dorothy Sayers! For me to give any short stories 5 stars is an absolute first. These just are. Not all are of that level (the one with Peter living for months in the Basque country was 4 at the most)- but at least 75% are pure perfection. Where has the glorious English language proceeded since this master whirled her quip and phrasing batons? And most delightful of all was the quirk and pull of Lord Wimsey's personality edging to get himself in those curious cracks of "notice" in nearly infinite numbers of societal situations. I also loved her dynamics for graphics situated "where they fit". Placements drawings, charts, sketchings or crossword boards etc. And the FRESHNESS of plots and contrivance of insinuations! At least 1/2 of these were new to me and never, ever read all together one after the other. And the Talboys (final story) nearly made me fall off the treadmill. Bredon, Bredon. In times of adversity- no better read than such a stolid and brilliant force for justice / good intent served as Lord Peter, Bunter and Parker. Most of these are pre-Harriet days but he does know his goose is cooked there regardless. Just a couple of last over commentary musings. She has dialogue so skillful that the word "said" rarely appears. And characters are not introduced and described. They just ARE and reveal themselves by their words in conversation and their surroundings of particular physical placement. Can some modern writers of acclaim READ her and LEARN. Please! And all of that doesn't always come in the first 2 pages either. Finally I enjoyed the style and scientific levels of that particular era to a 6 star level. Especially the dentistry and lighting/ optics "norm". Heavily, heavily recommend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    I had read the first three Lord Peter novels and fallen in love, not only with the writing and wit (Dorothy Sayers has an incredible vocabulary, rarely seen elsewhere, her Oxford education in languages shows in all sorts of glory) which grew with each new book, but also with the depiction of life and crime-solving in 1920's England, and of course, the goofy and lovably brilliant Lord Peter. This book was sitting on my daughter's bookshelf, and, having borrowed it I was more than delighted to real I had read the first three Lord Peter novels and fallen in love, not only with the writing and wit (Dorothy Sayers has an incredible vocabulary, rarely seen elsewhere, her Oxford education in languages shows in all sorts of glory) which grew with each new book, but also with the depiction of life and crime-solving in 1920's England, and of course, the goofy and lovably brilliant Lord Peter. This book was sitting on my daughter's bookshelf, and, having borrowed it I was more than delighted to realize it included the complete stories in Lord Peter Views the Body- book four in the series (these are the first twelve stories in this edition)....and more. The story Talboys, being recently discovered, written in 1942, appears in this volume in print for the first time, for example. I am not normally a fan of short stories, and while a few of them I could have skipped, I was surprised by how much I hated to lay this volume down! As I said, I do enjoy the novels quite a bit more, but this little gem is a very worthwhile read, and not just for those who enjoy the series. The names of the stories are incredible in themselves-from The Picatorial Farce of the Stolen Stomach to The Entertaining Episode of the Article in Question and The Undignified Melodrama of the Bone of Contention. Of course, while some stories are far more interesting than others-I particularly enjoyed The Bibulous Business of a Matter of Taste-I highly recommend this for the die-hard Wimsey fan as well as anyone who loves to read the English language used in such masterful and playful ways.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bill Tress

    In the world of Lord Peter, murder is jolly good fun! Dorothy Sayer wrote fun and interesting mysteries using the character of Lord Peter to hook her readers, and this reviewer feel right into the trap. The reader immediately identifies with Lord Peter, we all want to be incredibly wealthy with personal man servants waiting on our needs and responsive to our every whim. The character is heroic, devil may care, handsome and eccentric. Who wouldn't want to be him? Beyond the hero of these mysteries In the world of Lord Peter, murder is jolly good fun! Dorothy Sayer wrote fun and interesting mysteries using the character of Lord Peter to hook her readers, and this reviewer feel right into the trap. The reader immediately identifies with Lord Peter, we all want to be incredibly wealthy with personal man servants waiting on our needs and responsive to our every whim. The character is heroic, devil may care, handsome and eccentric. Who wouldn't want to be him? Beyond the hero of these mysteries is an excellent writer who can create intriguing mysteries that for the reader become page turners. This series of mystery's becomes a little less interesting when our perfect man falls in love with another interesting character Harriet Vane, less interesting because we want him to be unencumbered with marriage and children in order to fulfill the readers fantasies. This particular compilation of stories is a bed side book that can sit for a while and than can immediately bring the reader right back into the thick of it! For this reviewer, this genre is an escape from the real world and a chance to live in a fantasy world, another murder... Oh,jolly good fun!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Robin Stevens

    Sayers is a master of the crime genre, and these stories are absolutely wonderful examples of her sharp brain and talent for storytelling. Some of their attitudes are a little dated now, but the plots still shine. (12+) *Please note: this review is meant as a recommendation only. Please do not use it in any marketing material, online or in print, without asking permission from me first. Thank you!*

  7. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Carpenter

    Well, I guess I know what series I'm launching myself headlong into now. Truly - dare I say it - deuced good stuff.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Short stories that get straight to the point. I like it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    writer...

    Read The Unprincipled Practical Joker for October's Suspense Challenge for my first Dorothy Sayer. Will be reading more for November's "Thanksgiving" titles Challenge. Letter "A" - Absolutely Elsewhere Letter "I" - In the Teeth of the Evidence Letter "N" - Necklace of Pearls , a Christmas read completed for the Christmas Spirit Readathon 2016

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read this for an on-line book group called "Reading Wimsey" over on LiveJournal. I've read a lot of rubbish this summer, and it was such a blissful relief to sink back into Sayers's easy, elegant prose. Sayers's short stories are very different from her novels--she really seizes the opportunity to explore different points-of-view, outrageously improbable situational constructions, her various personal fascinations (wine, printed ephemera, crosswords, etc.). (I bought my copy of this book in 19 I read this for an on-line book group called "Reading Wimsey" over on LiveJournal. I've read a lot of rubbish this summer, and it was such a blissful relief to sink back into Sayers's easy, elegant prose. Sayers's short stories are very different from her novels--she really seizes the opportunity to explore different points-of-view, outrageously improbable situational constructions, her various personal fascinations (wine, printed ephemera, crosswords, etc.). (I bought my copy of this book in 1987 and I appear to have managed to struggle successfully through one entire corner of the crossword. My own marginal annotation of several years later says, "How the bloody hell did I even get this far." ALTHOUGH, I am now able to supply the word "QUAGGA" to Bunter's final query, as my children and I are very familiar with a stuffed example of said animal in the Royal Museum in Edinburgh.) There are certain tiny details that I just adore about Sayers's writing. The way the "little pool of crimson fire like a miniature sunset," mentioned so casually in a short story in 1928, turns up again nearly ten years later on Harriet Vane's finger in Busman's Honeymoon. The way Peter is convinced that the Death Coach can't be real because his horse doesn't shy at it but she DOES shy at Dead Man's Post... it's a given that the supernatural does exist, it just doesn't exist in relation to Burdock. (And what a looooong and rambling story that is. There's a MAP. There's the implication that Peter is in the country as a convalscent. I think she's so good at background!) My favorite story is the last in this collection, "Talboys," which I appreciate so much more now that I have children and houseguests and a career than I did as a happy-go-lucky 22-year-old grad student: "You may, by taking your husband into your own room and accommodating the two elder boys in his dressing-room, squeeze in an extra person who, like Miss Quirk, has been wished upon you; but it is scarcely possible to run after her all day to see that she is not getting into mischief. This is more particularly the case if you are a novelist by profession, and if, moreover, your idea of a hppy holiday is to dispose as completely and briskly as possible of children, book, servants, and visitor, so as to snatch all the available moments for playing the fool with a congenial, but admittedly distracting, husband." I also find that I am mind-melding Harriet Vane with Anne Morrow Lindbergh in this story, which amuses me, since AML has replaced HV as my role model over the last ten years (most of my role models have been fictional).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Abbey

    ***This massive collection of Sayers' complete output of Wimsey short stories is well-worth the investment of money and time. All the stories are strongly plotted and superbly crafted, with many of her usual characters but each has an edge to them and a sharply succinct quality that makes the reading fly along. Includes my all-time favorite Sayers story, “The adventurous exploit of the cave of Ali Baba”, and several others are quite stunning, especially the superbly paced “The unsolved puzzle of ***This massive collection of Sayers' complete output of Wimsey short stories is well-worth the investment of money and time. All the stories are strongly plotted and superbly crafted, with many of her usual characters but each has an edge to them and a sharply succinct quality that makes the reading fly along. Includes my all-time favorite Sayers story, “The adventurous exploit of the cave of Ali Baba”, and several others are quite stunning, especially the superbly paced “The unsolved puzzle of the man with no face”. The abominable history of the man with copper fingers — a tale told by a man in a club, after dinner, one of her best The fantastic horror of the cat in the bag — sleight of hand, mistaken identities, gory doings The unprincipled affair of the practical joker — refined blackmail leads to cheating at cards, and vice versa The undignified melodrama of the bone of contention — lovely lost will story, wrapped in village myths and cliches The vindictive story of the footsteps that ran — love can certainly be murder The bibulous business of a matter of taste — winetasting with a vengence, a mite “precious”, but fun The piscatorial farce of the stolen stomach — an odd old man, some diamonds, and a very peculiar bequest The unsolved puzzle of the man with no face — splendidly twisted tale of murder for an unusual reason, a zinger at the end The adventurous exploit of the cave of Ali Baba. — Wimsey as a “regular guy” burglar, one of the best stories note: on checking my notes I find there should be 21 stories listed here, and I need to reread several ofthem and add them to the above list.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Telyn

    I met Lord Peter Wimsey in the "Abominable Affair of the Copper Fingers." I was, I think, 12, and the story scared me stiff. It was a treat to reread this collection of all of the Wimsey short stories, including "Copper Fingers," which is still intensely creepy. The quality is somewhat uneven but even the lesser stories are wonderfully inventive, and there are several gems here. The collection covers a wide range of themes, ranging from puzzlings wills and apparent supernatural manifestations, t I met Lord Peter Wimsey in the "Abominable Affair of the Copper Fingers." I was, I think, 12, and the story scared me stiff. It was a treat to reread this collection of all of the Wimsey short stories, including "Copper Fingers," which is still intensely creepy. The quality is somewhat uneven but even the lesser stories are wonderfully inventive, and there are several gems here. The collection covers a wide range of themes, ranging from puzzlings wills and apparent supernatural manifestations, to murder, espionage, jewel thieves, and even a damsel in distress. As an extra treat, this collection contains Lord Peter's last documented appearance in "Talboys," which gives the reader a sweetly humorous glimpse at the detective's life after his creator retired him. Fun stuff.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Brantly

    3.5 just don't love the short stories like the novels (mysteries)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    A fat volume of detective stories from the masterful hand of Dorthy L. Sayers. These range from the very slight couple of pages to some that run 20-30 pages. All are constructed with intelligence, some very highbrow indeed. One involves a crossword puzzle with esoteric clues in rhymed couplets, another hinges on a mistake in French grammar. Most are rather more down to earth--a couple can even be anticipated by the reader. All feature the dapper Lord Peter Wimsey, a member of the British aristoc A fat volume of detective stories from the masterful hand of Dorthy L. Sayers. These range from the very slight couple of pages to some that run 20-30 pages. All are constructed with intelligence, some very highbrow indeed. One involves a crossword puzzle with esoteric clues in rhymed couplets, another hinges on a mistake in French grammar. Most are rather more down to earth--a couple can even be anticipated by the reader. All feature the dapper Lord Peter Wimsey, a member of the British aristocracy (often attended by his man Bunter), who never seems to be ruffled by any situation and who always figures out the crime. Harriet Vane, Wimsey's lady love and later wife, appears in a couple of stories. I prefer the novels, but there's a lot of enjoyable reading here. Spread it out a bit so you'll have time to savor each story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cyn Mcdonald

    This one's an old friend, and comfort reading. All the short stories in chronological order. If you haven't met Lord Peter Death Bredon Wimsey before, though, I'd really recommend starting with the first novel, Whose Body?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shalulah

    Apologies to Dorothy Sayers, but this was a great bedtime read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Violinknitter

    I will never not love Lord Peter. That is all.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    I hadn't read these stories in many years so while they seemed familiar, I really didn't remember all of the "who dunnit" or why they did it details so it was almost like getting a bonus dose of Lord Peter. If you like cosy mysteries from the genre's golden age, then you will enjoy these.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Josh Bauder

    The mysteries are fine, but the real draw of these stories is Lord Peter himself, and the lost culture of English manners in which his personality, wit, and humor finds context.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    4.25 The last chapter is probably the best. I laughed so hard at it!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline O.

    This is a collection of all the Lord Peter Whimsey short stories, including those published in Lord Peter Views the Body, and In the Teeth of Evidence. The twenty stories in this collection vary widely, from extremely good to average. However, the novel is a good introduction to the classic crime-solving aristocrat, Lord Peter Whimsey, and it's a great deal of fun to read. Stories that I particularly enjoyed were: "The Fascinating Problem of Uncle Meleager's Will" which revolves around a will with This is a collection of all the Lord Peter Whimsey short stories, including those published in Lord Peter Views the Body, and In the Teeth of Evidence. The twenty stories in this collection vary widely, from extremely good to average. However, the novel is a good introduction to the classic crime-solving aristocrat, Lord Peter Whimsey, and it's a great deal of fun to read. Stories that I particularly enjoyed were: "The Fascinating Problem of Uncle Meleager's Will" which revolves around a will with a very unusual clause, and spooky legends in an English village. "The Piscatorial Farce of the Stolen Stomach" another unusual will and an even more unusual theft. "The Adventurous Exploit of the Cave of Ali Baba" in which Lord Peter fakes his death and goes undercover to catch a notorious ring of thieves and robbers. "The Image in the Mirror" a fascinating story of "Gothic horror" that, in the end, has a perfectly logical explanation anyway. I particularly loved the moody-quality of this story and how Lord Peter figured it out. "Striding Folly" - a story of nightmares and chess. The dream imagery in this one was wonderful, tho' the actual mystery and it's resolution was a bit predictable. And finally "The Haunted Policeman" and "Talboys" which introduce Lord Peter and Harriet's children. Lord Peter is a second son, his older brother is the Duke of Denver. As such, he cannot inherit his father's property (his brother did that). However, as an aristocrat - he cannot work for a living. Having returned from service in "the war" (World War I), Lord Peter desperately needs something to keep him occupied, and he soon discovers he's well-equipped to solve crimes. And not simply murders as in most "murder mysteries", but in this collection, many of the stories have to do with stolen objects (such as a priceless pearl necklace) or missing wills. Lord Peter at times seems to be the perfect "upper-class twit" similar to Bertie Wooster -- but he's actually quite clever, he just at times hides his smarts to fit in with what's expected of his class. Also present in this story is Bunter, Peter's valet, butler and Gentleman's gentleman. Bunter is an expert photographer, and at times seems to be channeling Wodehouse's Jeeves, or to be the ancestor of Bruce Wayne's Alfred. He's competent and level-headed, present to take care of the day-to-day for Lord Peter, as well as providing a needed sounding board. Other characters from the Lord Peter novels make their appearances, including: Parker of Scotland Yard, Harriet Vane (Lord Peter's wife or wife-to-be depending on when in the book series a story takes place), The Duke of Denver (Peter's brother), "Pickled" Gerkins (Peter's nephew and Denver's son), and the Dowager Duchess (Peter & the Duke's mother), among others. The stories span all of Peter's career -- from young "man-about-town" recently returned from service, to married suburbanite with three young children. Again, despite the skips in time... an excellent introduction to the Lord Peter stories. Recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    I'm not a fan of short stories, but I am a fan of Wimsey, obviously, or I wouldn't be reading this. Apparently I've missed the best part of this supposed collection. The edition I grabbed from the library did not include "Tallboys," which is supposed to be a rare gem that shows a zany Wimsey-Vane co-existence. This edition provided a nice slap in the face for a substitute--a Wimsey parody (view spoiler)[that showed Lord Peter shouting heil hitler over the phone and solving the mystery of a dead p I'm not a fan of short stories, but I am a fan of Wimsey, obviously, or I wouldn't be reading this. Apparently I've missed the best part of this supposed collection. The edition I grabbed from the library did not include "Tallboys," which is supposed to be a rare gem that shows a zany Wimsey-Vane co-existence. This edition provided a nice slap in the face for a substitute--a Wimsey parody (view spoiler)[that showed Lord Peter shouting heil hitler over the phone and solving the mystery of a dead parrot (hide spoiler)] . Gawd, that left me disgruntled. The most I saw of Vane during this edition was directly after she gives birth, which was a bit of a shocker to say the least, since the last time I saw that dame, she was fending off Lord Peter with a volley of prim "Certainly nots," real cold and bitchy-like. Ugh. I love to read well-developed characters and relationships. But with Sayers, she gives me just enough to tease and make me irritable. She comes very close to good character development, but not close enough because, after all, the primary focus is the mystery story. But let's say the novel is a buffet. The dinner and side dishes are fantastic. But of course consumers want something sweet afterwards, i.e. romance maybe I dunno? Sayers says, oh here, there's a good piece of fruit and some chewing gum for you.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    Popsugar 2019 Reading Challenge: A reread of a favorite book. I'm not a fan of short stories in general; I can't write them for beans, and I tend to feel frustrated at the end of reading them. But mystery short stories with an established protagonist and world I am all for. With a short story, you get the clever puzzles and satisfying conclusions without that slow middle bit where they get stuck and spin their wheels for a while (unless they're Inspector Rebus, in which case they've probably gone Popsugar 2019 Reading Challenge: A reread of a favorite book. I'm not a fan of short stories in general; I can't write them for beans, and I tend to feel frustrated at the end of reading them. But mystery short stories with an established protagonist and world I am all for. With a short story, you get the clever puzzles and satisfying conclusions without that slow middle bit where they get stuck and spin their wheels for a while (unless they're Inspector Rebus, in which case they've probably gone out and gotten two more beatings). Anyway, this collection of all the Lord Peter Wimsey stories is just delightful. Some of it more than others, of course: I have parts of "Bibulous Business of a Matter of Taste" memorized from prior readings, ditto "Abominable History of the Man With Copper Fingers." I have, in the past, skipped the longer "Bone of Contention," which can drag. The secret society thriller "Cave of Ali Baba" story is also longer, but moves quickly (although it bothers me because of the implication that Lord Peter spent a solid two years undercover: continuity doesn't seem to have been Dorothy Sayers' top concern). Overall, though, the stories are clever and fun and entertaining, and a great sampling of Lord Peter.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    I read the Peter Wimsey novels less for the mysteries --- which are usually very good --- but for the writing, which is uniformly excellent. I found a hardback edition of the stories for a dollar, so I decided to reread them. There was an appreciation of Sayers by another favorite author of mine, Carolyn Heilbrun (by the way, if you aren't familiar with the Kate Fansler mysteries that Heilbrun wrote as "Amanda Cross", stop reading this review right now and go out and get them. You won't be sorry I read the Peter Wimsey novels less for the mysteries --- which are usually very good --- but for the writing, which is uniformly excellent. I found a hardback edition of the stories for a dollar, so I decided to reread them. There was an appreciation of Sayers by another favorite author of mine, Carolyn Heilbrun (by the way, if you aren't familiar with the Kate Fansler mysteries that Heilbrun wrote as "Amanda Cross", stop reading this review right now and go out and get them. You won't be sorry!). The only problem with the appreciation is that Heilbrun wrote it in the 1960s, when very little of Sayers' surprising personal life was known. But because it is Heilbrun, it too is very well written. The stories hold up, especially "Talboys". What does jar is Sayers casual racism/anti-Semitism, which may be her own, or might be an accurate representation of the class of people about whom she is writing. You'll have to judge. It somewhat mars the enjoyment of the stories, but not enough to stop reading Sayers' beautiful prose.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    This book is a collection of 20 of Dorothy L Sayers' short stories featuring Lord Peter Wimsey. I recently finished all 4 of Jill Patton Walsh's Lord Peter books and loved them, and decided it was time to go back to the originals. I am not normally a fan of short mysteries, as they usually are either lacking the characterization that I like, or the solution is too facile, but Ms Sayers was a master at her craft, and these are all really well done. I am inspired to go back to some of the novels, This book is a collection of 20 of Dorothy L Sayers' short stories featuring Lord Peter Wimsey. I recently finished all 4 of Jill Patton Walsh's Lord Peter books and loved them, and decided it was time to go back to the originals. I am not normally a fan of short mysteries, as they usually are either lacking the characterization that I like, or the solution is too facile, but Ms Sayers was a master at her craft, and these are all really well done. I am inspired to go back to some of the novels, though I read a great many of them years ago (when I was in middle school and high school, I think). I'm also hoping that Ms Walsh writes more.

  26. 5 out of 5

    -Me

    The prose is absolutely perfect. And add to that the witty, awkward, and wonderful detective who is blessed with the beak of a hawk - it is a fantastic read. As of yet, I have only read /The Nine Tailors/ from the collection of Lord Peter Wimsey novels, and it was excellent as well. I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys a good mystery or clever prose. Sayers is a genius.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Norman Styers

    This book collects all the short stories featuring Lord Peter Wimsey. The stories individually are fine examples of the craft. The supporting cast, so important in the novels, is almost absent from most of these, except for Parker. Even Bunter appears only occasionally, and sometimes only by allusion, but in a short story, much must be sacrificed for brevity.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Got this as a first edition; sadly, couldn't help re-reading it to the extent that it's far from pristine. On the other hand, it has the look of a long-time friend, which it is.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    2019: 3rd or 4th time through. The first Wimseys I read were short stories; I find it easier to ease myself into a series by reading something short. This collection is nice because it includes all the short stories, including one not published during Sayers' lifetime. So, the end of my reading the Wimsey works in order of internal chronology. "The Haunted Policeman" is nice for completeness, but the solution is ... good grief. And the racial slur that is repeated more than once makes for uncomfo 2019: 3rd or 4th time through. The first Wimseys I read were short stories; I find it easier to ease myself into a series by reading something short. This collection is nice because it includes all the short stories, including one not published during Sayers' lifetime. So, the end of my reading the Wimsey works in order of internal chronology. "The Haunted Policeman" is nice for completeness, but the solution is ... good grief. And the racial slur that is repeated more than once makes for uncomfortable reading. Then I read the Wimsey papers that Sayers wrote in 1939, as the Wimsey family embarks on WWII (available online). If you haven't read them, my advice is ... don't bother. They're mostly little diatribes on aspects of civilian life during the War, including how to cross the street during a blackout without getting killed (always useful information). Also comments on world events. Unfortunately, the pieces come across as a bunch of self-satisfied twits lecturing the peasants on keeping a stiff upper lip in difficult times, and even the delightful Dowager Duchess comes off badly. "Talboys" is rather missable, too, though it points up that not all mysteries need to feature a dead body. But the story is a bit more look-how-charming-we-are-aren't-we-just-the-most-delightful-family-blast-it-haven't-you-noticed-how-charmingly-eccentric-we-are than anything else. Wow, did Sayers like Mr. Puffett, though he seems here more the forelock-tugging dunce than he does in Busman's Honeymoon . If I remember correctly, the story wasn't published during Sayers' lifetime; if so, she may have felt its weaknesses, too. (I seem to be alone among lovers of Wimsey in not liking this story much.) Reading the Wimseys in order of internal chronology has been fun, but I probably will end with Honeymoon if I do it again.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adman

    I've heard several times that Sayers is one of the best mystery writers ever. I thought I was a big mystery fan, but I confess I've only viewed mystery TV shows and movies. That said, I read 4 or 5 of these stories and they really did not grab me. Having to identify with an affluent protagonist who solved mysteries to relieve curiosity borne of bored leisure -- and to be sure, Lord Peter is only exercising his mind, for his manservant is always handy to perform any real labor toward solving the c I've heard several times that Sayers is one of the best mystery writers ever. I thought I was a big mystery fan, but I confess I've only viewed mystery TV shows and movies. That said, I read 4 or 5 of these stories and they really did not grab me. Having to identify with an affluent protagonist who solved mysteries to relieve curiosity borne of bored leisure -- and to be sure, Lord Peter is only exercising his mind, for his manservant is always handy to perform any real labor toward solving the case -- proved off-putting. More importantly, the mysteries just did not feel to me like mysteries. In one story, Peter serendipitously bore witness to a crime, and that was that. A different 'mystery' hinged on French fluency and a momentarily-blurred narrative point of view. The latter artifice reminds me strongly of Harry Potter, which involves mysteries that are really not mysteries at all but simply surprises. To my mind, in a properly constructed mystery the reader is a full participant, challenged to solve the case alongside or even before the sleuth, but when information is withheld then both the secrets and the so-called genius of the person who unraveled them feel fraudulent. A third story recalls itself to me which seemed to fit the proper model of a mystery quite well. The story was unconventional, too, in narrative terms, as it was predominantly composed of a cryptic crossword grid and several pages of clues. I was further enthused by this story because I am an even bigger fan of crosswords than I am of mysteries. Unfortunately, and in this case I direct no blame toward Ms Sayers, my appreciation of the story remained cosmetic. Alas, my odds of solving an 1800s, British crossword are nil (although I want to say, in my defense, that I have solved quite a few contemporary British cryptics). In short, "C'mon, son!"

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