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The Lost Art of Real Cooking: Rediscovering the Pleasures of Traditional Food One Recipe at a Time

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Read Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger's blogs and view their pictures on the Penguin Community. It's time to take back the kitchen. It's time to unlock the pantry and break free from the shackles of ready-made, industrial food. It's time to cook supper. "The Lost Art of Real Cooking" heralds a new old-fashioned approach to food-laborious and inconvenient, yet extraordinarily Read Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger's blogs and view their pictures on the Penguin Community. It's time to take back the kitchen. It's time to unlock the pantry and break free from the shackles of ready-made, industrial food. It's time to cook supper. "The Lost Art of Real Cooking" heralds a new old-fashioned approach to food-laborious and inconvenient, yet extraordinarily rewarding and worth bragging about. From jam, yogurt, and fresh pasta to salami, smoked meat, and strudel, Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger arm you with the knowledge and skills that let you connect on a deeper level with what goes into your body. Ken and Rosanna celebrate the patience it takes to make your own sauerkraut and pickles. They divulge the mysteries of capturing wild sourdoughs and culturing butter, the beauty of rendering lard, making cheese, and brewing beer, all without the fancy toys that take away from the adventure of truly "experiencing" your food. These foods were once made by the family, in the home, rather than a factory. And they can still be made in the smallest kitchens without expensive equipment, capturing flavors that speak of place and personality. What you won't find here is a collection of rigid rules for the perfect meal. Ken and Rosanna offer a wealth of recipes, history, and techniques that start with the basics and evolve into dishes that are entirely your own.


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Read Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger's blogs and view their pictures on the Penguin Community. It's time to take back the kitchen. It's time to unlock the pantry and break free from the shackles of ready-made, industrial food. It's time to cook supper. "The Lost Art of Real Cooking" heralds a new old-fashioned approach to food-laborious and inconvenient, yet extraordinarily Read Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger's blogs and view their pictures on the Penguin Community. It's time to take back the kitchen. It's time to unlock the pantry and break free from the shackles of ready-made, industrial food. It's time to cook supper. "The Lost Art of Real Cooking" heralds a new old-fashioned approach to food-laborious and inconvenient, yet extraordinarily rewarding and worth bragging about. From jam, yogurt, and fresh pasta to salami, smoked meat, and strudel, Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger arm you with the knowledge and skills that let you connect on a deeper level with what goes into your body. Ken and Rosanna celebrate the patience it takes to make your own sauerkraut and pickles. They divulge the mysteries of capturing wild sourdoughs and culturing butter, the beauty of rendering lard, making cheese, and brewing beer, all without the fancy toys that take away from the adventure of truly "experiencing" your food. These foods were once made by the family, in the home, rather than a factory. And they can still be made in the smallest kitchens without expensive equipment, capturing flavors that speak of place and personality. What you won't find here is a collection of rigid rules for the perfect meal. Ken and Rosanna offer a wealth of recipes, history, and techniques that start with the basics and evolve into dishes that are entirely your own.

30 review for The Lost Art of Real Cooking: Rediscovering the Pleasures of Traditional Food One Recipe at a Time

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    I probably have read too many of these type books because most of this I felt like I had already read before. This would be a good starting ground for someone interested in eating this way though.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    One can tell even from the title, if one is a perceptive reader, that this is the sort of book written by hipsters.  The "real" in the title gives the book away and the snobbery of its authors towards contemporary ways and contemporary technologies.  Like many cookbooks, this is written by "them" and not by "us" [1].  That is not to say that the authors are not frequently amusing, and that their knowledge of historical cookbooks is not interesting, and that they do not have something to offer.  One can tell even from the title, if one is a perceptive reader, that this is the sort of book written by hipsters.  The "real" in the title gives the book away and the snobbery of its authors towards contemporary ways and contemporary technologies.  Like many cookbooks, this is written by "them" and not by "us" [1].  That is not to say that the authors are not frequently amusing, and that their knowledge of historical cookbooks is not interesting, and that they do not have something to offer.  No, this book is certainly a pleasurable read in many ways, and it certainly has something to offer.  It is, rather, the case that the book's beginning with its harshness and stridency put a distance between the writers and the reader that the material as a whole fails to bridge.  This gap between the approach of the writers and this reader was not in any way bridged, in particular, by the way that the authors relished cooking with pork products, a common failing of cookbooks, to give but one example of the disconnect. In terms of its contents, this book does what it promises in looking at traditional ingredients and dishes one recipe at a time.  The authors promise to give "an introduction to the antiquated kitchen, or cookery made difficult and inconvenient being foremost a pleasant discourse on the nature and execution of arcane and dangerous culinary practices especially designed for patient, discerning individuals who appreciate superior homemade food and those who will not balk at devoting many laborious hours to the kitchen," and for the most part, that is what these snobby hipsters give.  After a facetious introduction to the gentle reader, which sounds like something out of the Merchant of Venice, the authors discuss ferments of vegetables and legumes, cooking with fresh vegetables and legumes, fruits and nuts, grains and pasta, bread, meat, fish, poultry, dairy products and cheese, fermented beverages, and pies, pastries, and other confections.  The conventionality of these subjects does little justice to the striking oddness and originality of the recipes included, including buckwheat noodles, rabbit recipes, stuffed conceited chicken (almost as conceited as the authors), and something called psychic love wine, along with dutch baby.  Some of these recipes must be read to be believed. Despite the fact that I find the authors' approach to be off-putting and highly alienating, and the fact that I do not view hipsters or their snobbery in a positive light, I have to give a grudging respect here where respect is due.  Most of the laborious practices here involve patience rather than extreme amounts of labor, so they are not as onerous or dangerous as the author would like to lead the "gentle" reader to believe, for one.  Likewise, the ingredients that are used are generally tasty, and although one can purchase these ingredients at farmer's markets or overpriced "natural" foods stores and the like, a lot of this can be done by the industrious cook for themselves and their families in gardens and wine cellars and the like.  There are at least a few recipes here that I would like to try and would certainly appreciate eating, and anytime a cookbook can provide something of value to me, including laughter at the way the authors approach rabbits the way I approach chicken, even when I have no intent to follow their eating habits, there is at least something to offer here.  If the authors were not so genuinely funny on occasion, or poignant when they discussed the eating disorders that resulted from the faulty preparation of corn, this book would not be nearly so enjoyable to read. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn

    I know some people love reading cookbooks. I am not usually one of them, but this one I read beginning to end. (I may have skimmed the bits about making sausage.) It's not a recipe sort of book; it's only precise where it really needs to be. Otherwise, it's "a handful of this, a handful of that." You might think that approach would cause someone attempting the feats in the book—baking wild yeast bread using your own sourdough starter, growing your own koji mold (for koji pickles, of course), por I know some people love reading cookbooks. I am not usually one of them, but this one I read beginning to end. (I may have skimmed the bits about making sausage.) It's not a recipe sort of book; it's only precise where it really needs to be. Otherwise, it's "a handful of this, a handful of that." You might think that approach would cause someone attempting the feats in the book—baking wild yeast bread using your own sourdough starter, growing your own koji mold (for koji pickles, of course), pork pie and any number of things made with fat you render yourself, jam and preserves, aged cheddar—to feel nervous in the kitchen, but I found the approach to be informative, encouraging, and emboldening. If you love to cook, want to love to cook, are interested in traditional foods, or just like to read about food, this comes highly recommended. If the only cookbooks you are comfortable with have specific ingredients lists in specific quantities followed by specific cooking methods, read this anyway to expand your horizons a little bit. One warning: This cookbook has no hurry in it at all; its main concession to speed is describing how to make a cheese in a few weeks rather than a year. Rosanna Nafziger Henderson Ken Albala

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eve

    I don't usually count cookbooks in my reading tally even though I quite enjoy reading them. However, this book is written entirely in prose, so it felt just like reading a book. There are recipes in the book; they are all just written in prose, generally with very loose measurements. The book is more about techniques that specific recipes. The writing style was reminiscent of Jeff Smith's (a.k.a. The Frugal Gourmet)--more so in Ken Albala's sections--and there was definitely an emphasis on just t I don't usually count cookbooks in my reading tally even though I quite enjoy reading them. However, this book is written entirely in prose, so it felt just like reading a book. There are recipes in the book; they are all just written in prose, generally with very loose measurements. The book is more about techniques that specific recipes. The writing style was reminiscent of Jeff Smith's (a.k.a. The Frugal Gourmet)--more so in Ken Albala's sections--and there was definitely an emphasis on just trying things without worrying about following tedious procedures. I particularly liked the chapters on fermenting veggies and bread. I'm almost feeling brave enough to attempt my own sourdough starter. I borrowed this book from my local library, but I think I'm going to need to have my own copy for my cookbook shelf.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Doris

    Mixed views on this: I enjoyed the fact that this was about doing things the good old-fashioned way, but on the other hand, many of the recipes are a little too vague and touchy-feely. Maybe if I actually try making any of them, I'll find that they aren't as vague as they seem. But there are quite a few instructions that would benefit from better pictures, or better yet, a YouTube video! Mixed views on this: I enjoyed the fact that this was about doing things the good old-fashioned way, but on the other hand, many of the recipes are a little too vague and touchy-feely. Maybe if I actually try making any of them, I'll find that they aren't as vague as they seem. But there are quite a few instructions that would benefit from better pictures, or better yet, a YouTube video!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dameon Manuel

    This is the best cookbook you will ever own. And yes, I'm including 'Joy of Cooking' in that estimate. This is the best cookbook you will ever own. And yes, I'm including 'Joy of Cooking' in that estimate.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Leonard

    Very interesting, but not as...rich...as I would have liked.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Constance Bodensee

    I enjoyed this book. I've listened to his podcast on the history of cooking and this book was in the same vein. I enjoyed little tidbits of historical recipes mixed in with food lore. A fun and easy read. I enjoyed this book. I've listened to his podcast on the history of cooking and this book was in the same vein. I enjoyed little tidbits of historical recipes mixed in with food lore. A fun and easy read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennybeast

    Only read about half of it before I had to return it, but I really enjoyed it — I’m not much of a cook, but I enjoy knowing the history and the why and the how things are made, and this book does a brilliant job of explaining and giving instructions in short bites.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Heller

    Got this as a Christmas present and read it today. This hearkens back to a pre-scientific era of cooking, in which every house and inn had its own style of ale and pies and bread and so forth. It's cooking without recipes, baking with dough that "feels right" rather than relying on particular quantities of ingredients. As such, this will probably look overwhelming to people who aren't used to baking or cooking. But it's also exciting. It's about trying lots of stuff, failing a lot, and not getti Got this as a Christmas present and read it today. This hearkens back to a pre-scientific era of cooking, in which every house and inn had its own style of ale and pies and bread and so forth. It's cooking without recipes, baking with dough that "feels right" rather than relying on particular quantities of ingredients. As such, this will probably look overwhelming to people who aren't used to baking or cooking. But it's also exciting. It's about trying lots of stuff, failing a lot, and not getting the exact same thing twice. Though I suppose if you record everything you will find the combinations that worked the best for you, and then pass those along as recipes! This does, of course, require an extremely liberal attitude to food saftey. I don't think the USDA would be ok with the pickling reccommendations. I tend to feel that pasteurization was actually a pretty good innovation, so I'll stick with it. I also don't anticipte seasoning my cast iron skillet by rendering bear fat. Your mileage may vary.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mandie Lowe

    The funny introduction makes it clear that this book isn't for everyone. It's the hard way to cook, but the rewards, the reader is assured, are worth it. I am not entirely convinced. Growing up in rural South Africa, I have certainly been exposed to many of the techniques in the book, including smoking and drying my own meats and fish. Cooking over hot coals is a cultural tradition that I fully embrace and engage in as often as possible. So it's not the work or time involved that put me off the The funny introduction makes it clear that this book isn't for everyone. It's the hard way to cook, but the rewards, the reader is assured, are worth it. I am not entirely convinced. Growing up in rural South Africa, I have certainly been exposed to many of the techniques in the book, including smoking and drying my own meats and fish. Cooking over hot coals is a cultural tradition that I fully embrace and engage in as often as possible. So it's not the work or time involved that put me off the recipes in the book. It's the recipes themselves. I love trying out new and interesting flavours and ingredients. Most of the recipes here are old fashioned foods that didn't particularly excite me, I'm afraid. Have a look at the index to see how many recipes grab your interest before you buy this book. It's certainly an interesting read with many useful techniques listed. Not suited to the beginner who would like more detailed instructions.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    Aside from having hard-to-spell last name, Ken and Rosanna have in common their interest in food. Food created by hand without a lot of fuss (or with some fuss) that tastes good. The recipes, written in paragraph style, look very delicious, and the writing is sparkling. Take this paragraph: Turks invade Hungary, and the stage is violently set for the remarkable collision of flaky layered pastry (nee phyllo) and apples. Five hundred years later, Julie Andrews is singing about brown paper packages Aside from having hard-to-spell last name, Ken and Rosanna have in common their interest in food. Food created by hand without a lot of fuss (or with some fuss) that tastes good. The recipes, written in paragraph style, look very delicious, and the writing is sparkling. Take this paragraph: Turks invade Hungary, and the stage is violently set for the remarkable collision of flaky layered pastry (nee phyllo) and apples. Five hundred years later, Julie Andrews is singing about brown paper packages and warm apple strudel, under threat of yet another invasion--the Germans. Such a violent past for something so delightful. This book is currently very popular at the library and thus I won't get to spend as much time with it as I would like. I think I will concentrate on their sourdough bread section, return the book, request it again and when it arrives, incorporate something else.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Kelsey

    I think I read "scrape off the layer of mold that forms" or some variation of that line a little too often for my food safety comfort level, so I don't know how many recipes from this book that I will actually try. However, I am definitely holding on to this book just in case there is some kind of apocalypse. It's good to know how to make these things--especially how to make your own beer and cheese! Although, in the event of some global disaster, I guess ordering things like rennet on line will I think I read "scrape off the layer of mold that forms" or some variation of that line a little too often for my food safety comfort level, so I don't know how many recipes from this book that I will actually try. However, I am definitely holding on to this book just in case there is some kind of apocalypse. It's good to know how to make these things--especially how to make your own beer and cheese! Although, in the event of some global disaster, I guess ordering things like rennet on line will be out. It's inspiring and entertaining and if for no other reason, I recommend reading this just to know that it is possible to do lots of things by hand without having to buy a lot of equipment. The recipes are pretty bare bones and seem like they would require a lot of trial and error, but if you're not afraid to have a few pickles explode on you, they may be just the thing for you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jonelle

    What is almost as good as eating? Reading about eating. This book is about doing things the hard way, pickles to sausage. Mindy sent it. I hope she doesn't make Olla Podrida (rotten or putrid pot in translation). It can contain lamb, beef, bacon, pig's feet, testuz (nape), lucanega sausage, pigeons, duck hare, beef tongue, ggarbanzo beans, garlic and turnips according to the old recipe but the author encourages adding marrow, chestnuts, cockscombs, testicles, candied citron, musk and ambergris. I What is almost as good as eating? Reading about eating. This book is about doing things the hard way, pickles to sausage. Mindy sent it. I hope she doesn't make Olla Podrida (rotten or putrid pot in translation). It can contain lamb, beef, bacon, pig's feet, testuz (nape), lucanega sausage, pigeons, duck hare, beef tongue, ggarbanzo beans, garlic and turnips according to the old recipe but the author encourages adding marrow, chestnuts, cockscombs, testicles, candied citron, musk and ambergris. I wonder where you can pick up ambergris?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    I found this book to be more entertaining than useful. Perhaps it's not meant for me, someone who has been experimenting with home-making for a number of years now. The recipes that I had an interest in making, I'm already making; the others are mostly foods that I have consciously chosen not to attempt. Nevertheless, I enjoyed their slightly tongue-in-cheek writing, and this book certainly reminded me of other food projects that I've been putting off. Worth flipping through if you have a modera I found this book to be more entertaining than useful. Perhaps it's not meant for me, someone who has been experimenting with home-making for a number of years now. The recipes that I had an interest in making, I'm already making; the others are mostly foods that I have consciously chosen not to attempt. Nevertheless, I enjoyed their slightly tongue-in-cheek writing, and this book certainly reminded me of other food projects that I've been putting off. Worth flipping through if you have a moderate knowledge of kitchen technique; maybe not welcoming enough for beginners.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Now I'm done and it's time to cook! Who would have thought that one little cookbook would inspire me to make my own pickles, render my own lard, and make my own butter. Someday, I hope to do all of those. In the meantime, the book was great. I found it very readable, mostly because of the recipe format (a simple paragraph rather than a list of ingredients and then the instructions). I would hightly recommend it to anyone who likes to spend way too much time in the kitchen. Now I'm done and it's time to cook! Who would have thought that one little cookbook would inspire me to make my own pickles, render my own lard, and make my own butter. Someday, I hope to do all of those. In the meantime, the book was great. I found it very readable, mostly because of the recipe format (a simple paragraph rather than a list of ingredients and then the instructions). I would hightly recommend it to anyone who likes to spend way too much time in the kitchen.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    This is a cookbook, but not in the way we think of them now... it's more like a cookbook would have been 200 years ago, but taking into account modern kitchen gadgetry. It was an interesting read, but I don't know how helpful it was as a guidebook... I just don't have time to do everything myself - maybe when the kids are older :) The most helpful to me was the section on bread - something that's always been rather intimidating to me. This cookbook made it seem much more doable. This is a cookbook, but not in the way we think of them now... it's more like a cookbook would have been 200 years ago, but taking into account modern kitchen gadgetry. It was an interesting read, but I don't know how helpful it was as a guidebook... I just don't have time to do everything myself - maybe when the kids are older :) The most helpful to me was the section on bread - something that's always been rather intimidating to me. This cookbook made it seem much more doable.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    A perfect book for the fundamentalist foodie. I really enjoyed reading this book. And yes, I'd have to agree with the other reviewers, it's a cookbook to read cover to cover. If you are interested in learning how to pickle, can, preserve, make an amazing tomato sauce or are just looking for an author who has an excellent grasp on the English language and who will have you laughing as you read, then pick up this book. A perfect book for the fundamentalist foodie. I really enjoyed reading this book. And yes, I'd have to agree with the other reviewers, it's a cookbook to read cover to cover. If you are interested in learning how to pickle, can, preserve, make an amazing tomato sauce or are just looking for an author who has an excellent grasp on the English language and who will have you laughing as you read, then pick up this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    sylas

    this book was a lot like wild fermentation, but i felt less interested in the recipes. it was well written and a good read, but nothing really grabbed me and made me excited about cooking. a lot of the recipes were also really similar to those in wild fermentation. if you're in the market for a book about fermentation and eating/cooking simply, i'd recommend wf over this one. still, not a bad book. this book was a lot like wild fermentation, but i felt less interested in the recipes. it was well written and a good read, but nothing really grabbed me and made me excited about cooking. a lot of the recipes were also really similar to those in wild fermentation. if you're in the market for a book about fermentation and eating/cooking simply, i'd recommend wf over this one. still, not a bad book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brandy

    So much more than a cookbook! This book is part history, part grandma's instructions on how to cook pretty much anything from scratch. I will probably not make most of the stuff in this book, just because many of the recipies require such a lot of time. Some i will definelty try out, others maybe just once with the kids so that they can see how it is made. However, It is really interesting to read the original preparations for many of the things i've bought or prepared in shortcut form. So much more than a cookbook! This book is part history, part grandma's instructions on how to cook pretty much anything from scratch. I will probably not make most of the stuff in this book, just because many of the recipies require such a lot of time. Some i will definelty try out, others maybe just once with the kids so that they can see how it is made. However, It is really interesting to read the original preparations for many of the things i've bought or prepared in shortcut form.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Evan Kristiansen

    This book is excellent! Written by Dr. Ken Albala, a food historian and lecturer at the University of the Pacific, this book is an excellent introduction to historical cooking practices. This book is not necessarily for beginners in the kitchen, the absence of lists may serve as a deterrent to some. However, an experienced cook will find delicious and revolutionary old fashioned ideas in these pages. Highly recommended, I make the absolute best bread now!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    For some reason I just love reading cookbooks, particularly those that delve into doing things the old fashioned way. When I first started college in 1969 my major was Home Economics. Go figure. Anyway, this book is well written and I learned all sorts of things, like that ricotta is made from whey and not the curds. I'd always wondered why ricotta was so different from cottage cheese and now I know. For some reason I just love reading cookbooks, particularly those that delve into doing things the old fashioned way. When I first started college in 1969 my major was Home Economics. Go figure. Anyway, this book is well written and I learned all sorts of things, like that ricotta is made from whey and not the curds. I'd always wondered why ricotta was so different from cottage cheese and now I know.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lisa N

    I know this is a little unconventional, but I love to read cookbooks. This cookbook particularly lends itself to being read because it is written in prose. A diverse collection of traditional foods and cooking methods. Everything from making sauerkraut to making cheese. I skipped the meat chapters (yuck), but the homemade butter sounds divine.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    Entertaining and so inspiring! I can't wait to try my hand at making everything (well, almost) in the book. The recipes from back-in-the-day are fascinating and I love the way the book is written like a narrative rather than a cook book. I'd give the book 5 stars if they were a *bit* more specific in the directions. Entertaining and so inspiring! I can't wait to try my hand at making everything (well, almost) in the book. The recipes from back-in-the-day are fascinating and I love the way the book is written like a narrative rather than a cook book. I'd give the book 5 stars if they were a *bit* more specific in the directions.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Angela Boord

    I haven't made anything from this book except yogurt, but it's so refreshing to find a cookbook written in such a freewheeling style. As other reviewers have mentioned, it reads more like a book than a cookbook, so you can literally read it cover to cover and discover how rabbit pie was cooked in medieval times in addition to how to ferment your own pickles or make your own jam. I haven't made anything from this book except yogurt, but it's so refreshing to find a cookbook written in such a freewheeling style. As other reviewers have mentioned, it reads more like a book than a cookbook, so you can literally read it cover to cover and discover how rabbit pie was cooked in medieval times in addition to how to ferment your own pickles or make your own jam.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Outlaw

    I heard about this book a while back on "The Splendid Table" on NPR and put it on my "wish list". I finally got around to buying and reading it. The recipes are all written in narrative form and there are lots of interesting facts and anecdotes associated with them. It's a refreshing take on "historical" cooking and cooking in general, and definitely worth spending time reading. I heard about this book a while back on "The Splendid Table" on NPR and put it on my "wish list". I finally got around to buying and reading it. The recipes are all written in narrative form and there are lots of interesting facts and anecdotes associated with them. It's a refreshing take on "historical" cooking and cooking in general, and definitely worth spending time reading.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    This book kind of rocked my world. As a result I have some chicken stock in the fridge that simmered all night and a bowl of starter started on the counter that I hope to make some awesome bread out of next week.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    We read this one for my bookgroup. and then made some of the recipes fromt he book. The chicken liver pate was awesome, as was the strawberry pie. But some of the recipes took weeks to come to fruition, so that's out for me! The prose was delightful, a step back to a more genteel time. We read this one for my bookgroup. and then made some of the recipes fromt he book. The chicken liver pate was awesome, as was the strawberry pie. But some of the recipes took weeks to come to fruition, so that's out for me! The prose was delightful, a step back to a more genteel time.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    This is one I should have checked out at the library first before I bought it. Most of the stuff in here, this picky eater won't eat (sauerkraut, yuck!) so I don't think this book will get much use from me, unfortunately because I did think it was well written. This is one I should have checked out at the library first before I bought it. Most of the stuff in here, this picky eater won't eat (sauerkraut, yuck!) so I don't think this book will get much use from me, unfortunately because I did think it was well written.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jes Taber

    an incredible guide to the lost of art of cooking w/ antiquated techniques. rosanna & ken's words will enthrall you and rosanna's mother's hand drawings will delight you into foolproof cooking. it's charming, well written & written like an old julia child novel. enjoy. an incredible guide to the lost of art of cooking w/ antiquated techniques. rosanna & ken's words will enthrall you and rosanna's mother's hand drawings will delight you into foolproof cooking. it's charming, well written & written like an old julia child novel. enjoy.

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