Hot Best Seller

The Rise of Iskander by Benjamin Disraeli, Fiction, Historical

Availability: Ready to download

The sun had set behind the mountains, and the rich plain of Athens was suffused with the violet glow of a Grecian eye. A light breeze rose; the olive-groves awoke from their noonday trance, and rustled with returning animation, and the pennons of the Turkish squadron, that lay at anchor in the harbor of Piraeus, twinkled in the lively air. From one gate of the city the wom The sun had set behind the mountains, and the rich plain of Athens was suffused with the violet glow of a Grecian eye. A light breeze rose; the olive-groves awoke from their noonday trance, and rustled with returning animation, and the pennons of the Turkish squadron, that lay at anchor in the harbor of Piraeus, twinkled in the lively air. From one gate of the city the women came forth in procession to the fountain; from another, a band of sumptuous horsemen sallied out, and threw their wanton javelins in the invigorating sky, as they galloped over the plain. The voice of birds, the buzz of beauteous insects, the breath of fragrant flowers, the quivering note of the nightingale, the pattering call of the grasshopper, and the perfume of the violet, shrinking from the embrace of the twilight breeze, filled the purple air with music and with odor.


Compare

The sun had set behind the mountains, and the rich plain of Athens was suffused with the violet glow of a Grecian eye. A light breeze rose; the olive-groves awoke from their noonday trance, and rustled with returning animation, and the pennons of the Turkish squadron, that lay at anchor in the harbor of Piraeus, twinkled in the lively air. From one gate of the city the wom The sun had set behind the mountains, and the rich plain of Athens was suffused with the violet glow of a Grecian eye. A light breeze rose; the olive-groves awoke from their noonday trance, and rustled with returning animation, and the pennons of the Turkish squadron, that lay at anchor in the harbor of Piraeus, twinkled in the lively air. From one gate of the city the women came forth in procession to the fountain; from another, a band of sumptuous horsemen sallied out, and threw their wanton javelins in the invigorating sky, as they galloped over the plain. The voice of birds, the buzz of beauteous insects, the breath of fragrant flowers, the quivering note of the nightingale, the pattering call of the grasshopper, and the perfume of the violet, shrinking from the embrace of the twilight breeze, filled the purple air with music and with odor.

27 review for The Rise of Iskander by Benjamin Disraeli, Fiction, Historical

  1. 4 out of 5

    Pat Schakelvoort

    Pretty generic story. Probably could appeal more to Albanian readers if Skanderbeg wasn't described as an Grecian prince of Epirus. Pretty generic story. Probably could appeal more to Albanian readers if Skanderbeg wasn't described as an Grecian prince of Epirus.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Whereas Winston Churchill was both an accomplished artist and also a brilliant politician, Disraeli, who was a renowned politician. was not an enthralling writer. His verbose and rather dull story about George Katrioti (Skanderbeg) does little justice to the exploits of Albania's national hero who did much to stop the Ottomans from invading western Europe. I would give this short novel a miss. Whereas Winston Churchill was both an accomplished artist and also a brilliant politician, Disraeli, who was a renowned politician. was not an enthralling writer. His verbose and rather dull story about George Katrioti (Skanderbeg) does little justice to the exploits of Albania's national hero who did much to stop the Ottomans from invading western Europe. I would give this short novel a miss.

  3. 5 out of 5

    chris roeder

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joey

  5. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  8. 5 out of 5

    George

  9. 5 out of 5

    J

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gerti Dajci

  11. 4 out of 5

    Petrit

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  13. 4 out of 5

    Remi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mal Berisha

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ermir Shabani

  16. 5 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  17. 4 out of 5

    Trisolaris

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robert Maguire

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ostenfanse Lexuese Shkrimtare Austenfan Reader Writer

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nikos

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rosa Poetschke

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro Perez

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hazel

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alva

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paula Lazar

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.