Hot Best Seller

Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora

Availability: Ready to download

A vivid ethnography of the global and transnational dimensions of gay identity as lived by Filipino immigrants in New York City, Global Divas challenges beliefs about the progressive development of a gay world and the eventual assimilation of all queer folks into gay modernity. Insisting that gay identity is not teleological but fraught with fissures, Martin Manalansan IV A vivid ethnography of the global and transnational dimensions of gay identity as lived by Filipino immigrants in New York City, Global Divas challenges beliefs about the progressive development of a gay world and the eventual assimilation of all queer folks into gay modernity. Insisting that gay identity is not teleological but fraught with fissures, Martin Manalansan IV describes how Filipino gay immigrants, like many queers of color, are creating alternative paths to queer modernity and citizenship. He makes a compelling argument for the significance of diaspora and immigration as sites for investigating the complexities of gender, race, and sexuality.Manalansan locates diasporic, transnational, and global dimensions of gay and other queer identities within a framework of quotidian struggles ranging from everyday domesticity to public engagements with racialized and gendered images to life-threatening situations involving AIDS. He reveals the gritty, mundane, and often contradictory deeds and utterances of Filipino gay men as key elements of queer globalization and transnationalism. Through careful and sensitive analysis of these men’s lives and rituals, he demonstrates that transnational gay identity is not merely a consumable product or lifestyle, but rather a pivotal element in the multiple, shifting relationships that queer immigrants of color mobilize as they confront the tribulations of a changing world.


Compare

A vivid ethnography of the global and transnational dimensions of gay identity as lived by Filipino immigrants in New York City, Global Divas challenges beliefs about the progressive development of a gay world and the eventual assimilation of all queer folks into gay modernity. Insisting that gay identity is not teleological but fraught with fissures, Martin Manalansan IV A vivid ethnography of the global and transnational dimensions of gay identity as lived by Filipino immigrants in New York City, Global Divas challenges beliefs about the progressive development of a gay world and the eventual assimilation of all queer folks into gay modernity. Insisting that gay identity is not teleological but fraught with fissures, Martin Manalansan IV describes how Filipino gay immigrants, like many queers of color, are creating alternative paths to queer modernity and citizenship. He makes a compelling argument for the significance of diaspora and immigration as sites for investigating the complexities of gender, race, and sexuality.Manalansan locates diasporic, transnational, and global dimensions of gay and other queer identities within a framework of quotidian struggles ranging from everyday domesticity to public engagements with racialized and gendered images to life-threatening situations involving AIDS. He reveals the gritty, mundane, and often contradictory deeds and utterances of Filipino gay men as key elements of queer globalization and transnationalism. Through careful and sensitive analysis of these men’s lives and rituals, he demonstrates that transnational gay identity is not merely a consumable product or lifestyle, but rather a pivotal element in the multiple, shifting relationships that queer immigrants of color mobilize as they confront the tribulations of a changing world.

30 review for Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora

  1. 4 out of 5

    maricar

    (excerpt from a paper critique:) …In recalling my reading of the author’s vignettes, it appears that he has dearth of representative informants—the bulk of his life histories were culled from bakla who have come from urbanized centers of the Philippines, living relatively well-to-do lives. As such, motivations among them for going abroad may be attributed to a longing for a change in lifestyle or social scene, or to assuage an emotional/romantic void. I suppose what I am trying to put across is n (excerpt from a paper critique:) …In recalling my reading of the author’s vignettes, it appears that he has dearth of representative informants—the bulk of his life histories were culled from bakla who have come from urbanized centers of the Philippines, living relatively well-to-do lives. As such, motivations among them for going abroad may be attributed to a longing for a change in lifestyle or social scene, or to assuage an emotional/romantic void. I suppose what I am trying to put across is not hard to guess—is the primary motivation of wanting to a earn higher salary for one’s self and one’s family, which is the driving force among other diasporic Filipinos, not a priority for some of the Filipino bakla? I am aware that my query is very leading, but it is difficult for me not to think about that, since more and more Filipinos nowadays do indeed prefer to go abroad in order to find better jobs (read as higher paying jobs). The possibility of living a chic lifestyle seems to be a reality attainable only after one has had months of earning that high salary (the primary goal). But, really, among the Filipino bakla, what are the immediate as well as deep-seated motivations? Is it just to escape the chokehold of family? Is it to forge a blazing path of biyuti abroad? Or is it a growing disillusionment of what their Inang Bayan is turning out to be? Or perhaps I am simply going too far, and there is really just that one obvious motivation that is universal to all Filipino immigrants: money. If this is so, then there is a marked disjointedness in the author’s narrative; his Global Divas came to New York and, except for a chosen few singled out as the breadwinners of the family back home, these Filipino bakla were portrayed as sometimes single-minded in the pursuit of that white, masculine male lover in the midst of contesting identities with other foreign gays. Furthermore, the heavy focus on the middle-class bakla, signifying a neglect of the ‘inner screaming queens’ from other sectors of Philippine society, makes for a narrative with a somewhat hollow ring to it, as if a vital part has gone missing from deep within the recesses. Understandable, of course, as ethnographies are always value-laden and biased for a certain ‘gaze,’ no matter what the well-meaning agenda might be. But an explicit statement beforehand concerning the demography of one’s unit of analysis could certainly help matters. Just as interesting of note is how Manalansan somehow depreciates notions of race as an issue in the Philippines (56). Though not as prevalent nowadays, other nationalities (and even other ‘native’ ethnolinguistic groups) in the country used to be sources of amusement, if not outright ridicule, among Filipinos: from Indians, Chinese, to Koreans. My point is that racism is not a discourse benignly brushed aside in the Philippines, and saying otherwise precludes providing an adequate explanation for the predilection of Filipino bakla in NY to cater to only certain foreign ‘masculine males.’ Manalansan’s book is rich in giving snippets of racism not just from the white gays but also from among the Filipino bakla. However, the reason for this behavior takes on an ‘out-of-thin-air’ aspect coming from the author’s threadbare mention of any sort of racism rising from the homeland.

  2. 5 out of 5

    sdw

    This book examines the life narratives of Filipino gay men living in New York in the 1980s and 1990s. The book moves between block quotations from informers to blocks of cultural analysis. The author is concerned with cultural citizenship, or a sense of belonging and a right to belong. Performance is a key theme through which he analyzes the lives of the men he interviews. He refutes an understanding of cultural citizenship as a process of assimilating into US or global gay citizenship from a Fi This book examines the life narratives of Filipino gay men living in New York in the 1980s and 1990s. The book moves between block quotations from informers to blocks of cultural analysis. The author is concerned with cultural citizenship, or a sense of belonging and a right to belong. Performance is a key theme through which he analyzes the lives of the men he interviews. He refutes an understanding of cultural citizenship as a process of assimilating into US or global gay citizenship from a Filipino understanding of balka (gender non-normative) traditions. Instead, he sees this as a process of rearticulation, of maneuvering among identities, in performing one’s place in modernity. There is a useful chapter on the ethnography of AIDS in the Filipino queer community. The author does an exquisite job throughout the book in paying attention to geography and the powers vested and negotiated through space and place.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ai Miller

    This was a delightful read that really interrogates ideas about a global gay culture by instead focusing on the ways that Filipino gay men experience their own identities and the world around them. Manalansan delicately uses his informants' interviews to highlight a diverse set of topics like family, relationships with religion (specifically Catholicism) and relationships with friends and lovers, as well as AIDS. Some of it I felt was touched on too fleetingly- I could read an entire book, for e This was a delightful read that really interrogates ideas about a global gay culture by instead focusing on the ways that Filipino gay men experience their own identities and the world around them. Manalansan delicately uses his informants' interviews to highlight a diverse set of topics like family, relationships with religion (specifically Catholicism) and relationships with friends and lovers, as well as AIDS. Some of it I felt was touched on too fleetingly- I could read an entire book, for example, about AIDS- but I think Manalansan does an excellent job of keeping his analysis moving while still driving home his point. It's a great examination that the seeming-monolith of white Euro American gay culture is in fact hyper specific and it's less a question of globalization and more about sliding between and around dominant cultures in specific places.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matt Sautman

    Manalasan’s work here is highly readable and fascinating. While on the surface this work may appear to appeal to only those readers who are interested in the intersections of Filipino and queer identities, Global Divas also interrogates such notions as cultural citizenship and the way space functions as a way to relegate identity. I feel as if Manalasan could have done more with his academic interrogation here regarding how the diaspora reflects the homeland in more detail, but Global Divas is s Manalasan’s work here is highly readable and fascinating. While on the surface this work may appear to appeal to only those readers who are interested in the intersections of Filipino and queer identities, Global Divas also interrogates such notions as cultural citizenship and the way space functions as a way to relegate identity. I feel as if Manalasan could have done more with his academic interrogation here regarding how the diaspora reflects the homeland in more detail, but Global Divas is still an engaging read, especially in regard to the Manalasan’s work on Swardspeak, a language unique to gay Filipino/bakla culture.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lance

    This is a well-done ethnography the shows the complexities of nationality, ethnicity, class, and sexuality and how they intersect in ways that do not match the "grand narratives" of the West or America. Most of all, this book is great for getting a grasp of methodology that can help examine the Transnational perspective. He starts with broad life narratives, then narrows down to daily life and geography, ending on specific rituals and groups. This is a well-done ethnography the shows the complexities of nationality, ethnicity, class, and sexuality and how they intersect in ways that do not match the "grand narratives" of the West or America. Most of all, this book is great for getting a grasp of methodology that can help examine the Transnational perspective. He starts with broad life narratives, then narrows down to daily life and geography, ending on specific rituals and groups.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    305.38966 M2669 2003

  7. 5 out of 5

    Arḡie Boto

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It'll be epic, probably. It'll be epic, probably.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Whitacre

  9. 5 out of 5

    QueerStudies OregonState

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kari Jo

  11. 4 out of 5

    Noah Barth

  12. 4 out of 5

    Barbie Briones

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anita

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sam Grace

  15. 4 out of 5

    Judithbledsoe

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matt Durkin

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alok

  18. 5 out of 5

    daniel dillon

  19. 5 out of 5

    Denise

  20. 5 out of 5

    IT’S LIT BOOKS Nikki Rosenblatt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ion Raditya

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Duque

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sara Brainard

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jayden Roberto

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ruwen Chang

  26. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  29. 4 out of 5

    Juniper

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.