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Don't Waste Your Sorrows: New Insight Into God's Eternal Purpose for Each Christian in the Midst of Life's Greatest Adversities

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The author points out that it is not the mere presence of suffering but how a Christian reacts to it which determines one's spiritual growth through sorrow and pain. Paul Billheimer warns Christians not to waste their sorrows, but to transform them. The author points out that it is not the mere presence of suffering but how a Christian reacts to it which determines one's spiritual growth through sorrow and pain. Paul Billheimer warns Christians not to waste their sorrows, but to transform them.


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The author points out that it is not the mere presence of suffering but how a Christian reacts to it which determines one's spiritual growth through sorrow and pain. Paul Billheimer warns Christians not to waste their sorrows, but to transform them. The author points out that it is not the mere presence of suffering but how a Christian reacts to it which determines one's spiritual growth through sorrow and pain. Paul Billheimer warns Christians not to waste their sorrows, but to transform them.

30 review for Don't Waste Your Sorrows: New Insight Into God's Eternal Purpose for Each Christian in the Midst of Life's Greatest Adversities

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    An amazing book, first published in 1977, which addresses the most vexing issue of modern Christians, “Why do good people suffer?” Billheimer’s answer, simply, is that "suffering is inherent in God's economy." That’s how people grow spiritually. Not seeking the easy path. Not awards or riches, but perseverance through sorrow and suffering grows character. "There is no such thing as a saint who has not suffered." "All life is intended to be a pathway to God," Alexander Maclaren. He offers support An amazing book, first published in 1977, which addresses the most vexing issue of modern Christians, “Why do good people suffer?” Billheimer’s answer, simply, is that "suffering is inherent in God's economy." That’s how people grow spiritually. Not seeking the easy path. Not awards or riches, but perseverance through sorrow and suffering grows character. "There is no such thing as a saint who has not suffered." "All life is intended to be a pathway to God," Alexander Maclaren. He offers support from the Bible and historic and contemporary (for his time) Christian sources. (Billy Graham is cited. His place in the American Christian community much the same forty years ago as today.) Most of Billheimer’s exposition is logical, straight-forward and easy to follow. Slightly repetitive, but that fits with the teaching character of the book. Those of other faith or non-faith communities will find it opaque. More a teaching than a devotional reading, but worthwhile for Christians. (Gets better with every subsequent reading. For one thing his opaque style and vocabulary become clearer.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marcia Hamm

    The main thesis of this book was compelling and beautiful. The author's explanation of it was redundant and unpredictable. I found the digression into his views on mental health and marriages problematic, over-simplified, and potentially destructive depending on the reader's experiences. There were some fascinating principles I will continue to process and think about, but I would not recommend anyone read this without a thorough disclaimer. The main thesis of this book was compelling and beautiful. The author's explanation of it was redundant and unpredictable. I found the digression into his views on mental health and marriages problematic, over-simplified, and potentially destructive depending on the reader's experiences. There were some fascinating principles I will continue to process and think about, but I would not recommend anyone read this without a thorough disclaimer.

  3. 4 out of 5

    T.E. George

    Been a long time since I read this little jewel, but the fact a quote from it popped in my head today is a testament to its value. A different take on trouble and suffering in one's life. Been a long time since I read this little jewel, but the fact a quote from it popped in my head today is a testament to its value. A different take on trouble and suffering in one's life.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Norah

    Read it years ago when my husband Chris was ill with leukaemia and subsequently died. I found it helpful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Lewis Kozoriz

    "Life is for learning love, not for sensual pleasure, nor for accumulating riches, nor fame; not for building great manufacturing, commercial, or military empires, nor political power. It is not for exploration, travel, or conquest of out space. It is not for learning science, history, economics, philosophy, or even theology; not for delivering great orations, preaching great sermons, or holding immense religious campaigns, not for building of great institutions such as hospitals, churches, scho "Life is for learning love, not for sensual pleasure, nor for accumulating riches, nor fame; not for building great manufacturing, commercial, or military empires, nor political power. It is not for exploration, travel, or conquest of out space. It is not for learning science, history, economics, philosophy, or even theology; not for delivering great orations, preaching great sermons, or holding immense religious campaigns, not for building of great institutions such as hospitals, churches, schools and colleges; nor for publishing books, magazines, or other periodicals. All of these are of value only as they grow out of or contribute to the learning or expression of love. (Paul E. Billheimer, Don't Waste Your Sorrows, Page 118-119) God uses sorrows in our life; that is what this book is about. He uses them to produce love in our life and get us, the church, ready as The Bride of Christ...having no spot, wrinkle or shame. Sorrow produces in us "an eternal weight of glory" (See 2 Corinthians 4:17-18). The author seeks to explain that just because you are a Christian does not mean you will never have sorrows. The opposite is actually true. The good news is Jesus took our sorrows and pain on the cross. However, sometimes God uses these sorrows to help us to grow into the image of the Christ, the head of the Church. God's plan is grow us in love and "decentralize self". Sorrow can sometimes be the tool He uses to do this.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristie Kercheval

    There are few things I liked about this book, mainly that the thesis is that God uses our pain and suffering to become more loving people. God's goal is for the church to be characterized by Agape love. And in this current climate of Christian Nationalism, that is a lost narrative. God is love, who knew? It was almost like, "wait, I've never heard this before!" Certainly it has been a long time since I have heard a sermon on God's love, or the transformation of our character individually and col There are few things I liked about this book, mainly that the thesis is that God uses our pain and suffering to become more loving people. God's goal is for the church to be characterized by Agape love. And in this current climate of Christian Nationalism, that is a lost narrative. God is love, who knew? It was almost like, "wait, I've never heard this before!" Certainly it has been a long time since I have heard a sermon on God's love, or the transformation of our character individually and collectively as believers. This book was written in 1977, and in that sense it has not aged well. Billheimer has a section in which he berates psychology and Freudianism. (Remember him?) Since the 1970s, there have been so many advances in the field of psychology and neuroscience, that it is hard to keep demonizing psychology as if it has nothing to offer. This book is pre-Prozac and it shows. Also conspicuous in this book is the classic Baby Boomer "just suck it up" ideology. He doesn't say it that way exactly, but he asserts that there is no place for whining for the suffering Christian. As my favorite boomer Marge Simpson said, "just push all your feelings down to your toes, and then the boys will like you." That's what Billheimer sounds like at times. I didn't finish the book, but decided to take the message on love and cut my losses.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Rucker

    Had some great points and poems. Had a few things I disagreed with.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This little book has precious insights about allowing tragedies and disappointments to mold your character to be more Christ-like and loving. There are some mid-century pentecostal oddities, but they only add to the book's uniqueness. This little book has precious insights about allowing tragedies and disappointments to mold your character to be more Christ-like and loving. There are some mid-century pentecostal oddities, but they only add to the book's uniqueness.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    A great book which I read several years ago. We learn so much more about life and ourselves during the hard times then during the 'good' ones. A great book which I read several years ago. We learn so much more about life and ourselves during the hard times then during the 'good' ones.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Daws

    This is definitely not an easy read -- not because it was emotional or draining, but because much of it required some thought and processing. Ultimately, the book puts forth that Christians are meant to rule with Christ, and as such, we must become like Christ. As others have said, this tends to happen best through pain, trauma, and sorrow. It is only when we learn these lessons and grow in our ability to agape love others will we not waste the sorrow God has allowed in our lives. While this is This is definitely not an easy read -- not because it was emotional or draining, but because much of it required some thought and processing. Ultimately, the book puts forth that Christians are meant to rule with Christ, and as such, we must become like Christ. As others have said, this tends to happen best through pain, trauma, and sorrow. It is only when we learn these lessons and grow in our ability to agape love others will we not waste the sorrow God has allowed in our lives. While this is a book I would recommend, I caution that you do not try to speed through it, but save it for a time when you can read slowly.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kymberly

    Although this is not my favorite book; it has brought me great peace and joy. My journal is now full of quotes from known and unknown authors as well as suggestions for other books to read. This book one goal is for you to seek the face of God. That I am and will, as I will not waste my sorrow. Thank you Mr. Billheimer! God bless you!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book was lent to me by a friend. While I had trouble with his jargon and repetitiveness, the essential truth is important. That there is sometimes temporal and always eternal/spiritual value in suffering. And not just to "get through it", but to view it as an opportunity for growth. This book was lent to me by a friend. While I had trouble with his jargon and repetitiveness, the essential truth is important. That there is sometimes temporal and always eternal/spiritual value in suffering. And not just to "get through it", but to view it as an opportunity for growth.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben Andrews

    The one great contribution that this book makes is in reminding all believers that suffering and adversity have a purpose in the Christian life. It offers meaning in the face of tragedy, persecution, and trials.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Peter O'brien

    A Christian classic, that has stayed with me throughtout the years. It has some profound insights into the purpose of suffering in the mysterious plans of God in our lives.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Rose

    I appreciate getting this book as a gift from someone I would have never expected.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    Two words: agape love.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marly Lemanski

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Wong

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shrimati

  20. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Manton

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mark Judy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Linda Sarna

  23. 4 out of 5

    Danny Posada

  24. 4 out of 5

    Germain Loiseau

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Adolph

  26. 4 out of 5

    Drew Castel

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Carlson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aissha Marrie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dave Davenport

  30. 4 out of 5

    Debi Frese

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