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Children of the Dust Bowl: The True Story of the School at Weedpatch Camp

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Illus. with photographs from the Dust Bowl era. This true story took place at the emergency farm-labor camp immortalized in Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath. Ostracized as "dumb Okies," the children of Dust Bowl migrant laborers went without school--until Superintendent Leo Hart and 50 Okie kids built their own school in a nearby field.


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Illus. with photographs from the Dust Bowl era. This true story took place at the emergency farm-labor camp immortalized in Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath. Ostracized as "dumb Okies," the children of Dust Bowl migrant laborers went without school--until Superintendent Leo Hart and 50 Okie kids built their own school in a nearby field.

30 review for Children of the Dust Bowl: The True Story of the School at Weedpatch Camp

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    I was surprised at how this book affected me. I thought it would just be a nice, quick lesson in the Dust Bowl migration. It turned out to be a lesson in humanity. Children of the Dust Bowl: The True Story of the School at Weedpatch Camp is very short. The first half gives the historic background and reasons for the great migration of midwesterners to California. The second half goes into specific details of a school that was started to help the children of these migrants. It's quite enjoyable an I was surprised at how this book affected me. I thought it would just be a nice, quick lesson in the Dust Bowl migration. It turned out to be a lesson in humanity. Children of the Dust Bowl: The True Story of the School at Weedpatch Camp is very short. The first half gives the historic background and reasons for the great migration of midwesterners to California. The second half goes into specific details of a school that was started to help the children of these migrants. It's quite enjoyable and over too soon. I knew "Okie" was a slur, but I didn't realize the people using it were so heartless, ignorant and hateful as to view an "Okie" as less than human. The depth of their lack of understanding seemed to go hand in hand with a contempt that lacked all compassion. These were fellow Americans (never mind humans!) and yet they still treated them like scum and, in some cases, wished them dead. I read this book because much of what's told within it happened in the area where I bought a house a few years back. I thought a little local history would be interesting. Instead, it made me sick. Perhaps I'm especially sensitive to such things these days in particular. The world and this country specifically is rife with hatred right now. I never would've thought 2017 would feel so much like the 1930s-40s.

  2. 5 out of 5

    booklady

    Given the legend status of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, many today may not realize the mayhem caused when the book was originally published in 1939. Farmers in California denounced it, calling it one-sided in favor of the “dumb Okies”. Others thought the book obscene. It was removed from libraries and others refused to buy it. All the while this was happening, another man, Leo Hart, the Kern County Superintendent of Education was quietly trying to find ways to help the children of those Given the legend status of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, many today may not realize the mayhem caused when the book was originally published in 1939. Farmers in California denounced it, calling it one-sided in favor of the “dumb Okies”. Others thought the book obscene. It was removed from libraries and others refused to buy it. All the while this was happening, another man, Leo Hart, the Kern County Superintendent of Education was quietly trying to find ways to help the children of those displaced by the drought and dust storms of the Dirty Thirties who had moved to California in hopes of a better life. Because of local hostility, Hart couldn’t use or do anything in an official capacity to help the Okie children. And integrating them in the area schools had proved a bitter failure. With little or no work for their parents, the children came to school poorly dressed and usually barefoot and were teased and harassed unmercifully. Hart decided a school of their own was the only way to go. So, Leo began to beg, borrow and buy (with whatever money he could lay his hands on) materials necessary to begin building a school within his district, on the land allowed the Okies, known as Weedpatch. A school, by the same name was born. The story of the building of this school is one of the most uplifting I have read in a long time. That the prejudice here is white American v. white American may be why this story is not better known. It was a poor v. rich struggle and nothing to do with color, race, immigration, or the hot button issues of today, so ho-hum. Still, it was a battle over resources, which the people living at the time turned into something else. Fortunately, there was one man with a dream: to help the children have a school of their own, where they could pull themselves out of poverty and enter society as successful adults—something the author traces for us at the end. It is a beautiful story about the power of love, initiative and handwork to overcome hatred and bigotry. And best of all it is TRUE; fully documented with engaging black and white photos. Go Okies! By the way, the term Okies originated as an opprobrium, “dumb Okies”, which they were taunted with for their poverty, but somewhere along the line, they decided to appropriate the name and own it with pride, as I proudly do. It is great to be an Okie! Also, Okies back then were from Texas, Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico, as well as Oklahoma. EXCELLENT book! MOST highly recommended!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wayne Barrett

    This is a short picture book that focuses on a migrant camp that was mentioned in Steinbecks, Grapes of Wrath. I am familiar with the camp, having grown up and gone to school right next to it. My grandparents were part of the Dustbowl exodus (one of them, my grandmother, Viola White, is still living. She is 94) and even though I wasn't born until the 60's, I was still called an 'Okie' when I was growing up. We are in the 21st century now, and that camp is still there, and it's still up and runn This is a short picture book that focuses on a migrant camp that was mentioned in Steinbecks, Grapes of Wrath. I am familiar with the camp, having grown up and gone to school right next to it. My grandparents were part of the Dustbowl exodus (one of them, my grandmother, Viola White, is still living. She is 94) and even though I wasn't born until the 60's, I was still called an 'Okie' when I was growing up. We are in the 21st century now, and that camp is still there, and it's still up and running and full of immigrants. Only now, instead of being called 'Okies' they are being called 'Wetbacks'. Hmm, sounds like us humans have a lot to learn besides reading riting and rithmatic. (That's my Okie simplification of the 3 r's)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    This is non-fiction. It's short in length and deep in content. Many of the people- especially those as Mr. Hart, central to the beginnings of the school in 1940, are photographed and documented people who were essential in origination and operation of the Weedpatch Camp schooling throughout its existence. This schooling was in practical base survival skills. Literacy was a goal, yes. But mechanical, trades, manufacturing, farming skills like butchery- all of these were central at Weedpatch. It w This is non-fiction. It's short in length and deep in content. Many of the people- especially those as Mr. Hart, central to the beginnings of the school in 1940, are photographed and documented people who were essential in origination and operation of the Weedpatch Camp schooling throughout its existence. This schooling was in practical base survival skills. Literacy was a goal, yes. But mechanical, trades, manufacturing, farming skills like butchery- all of these were central at Weedpatch. It wasn't just about learning how to read and write and cipher at all. These Oakies were rejected by CA school systems entirely. The meals were provided for very little charge, and sometimes were free. Most of the physical property and essential structure and needed materials (like typewriters and a hot water heater boiler) were donated. Literally dumped into a field or street in front of the Hart's house or another of the group (Mrs. Hart trudged around begging for inputs tirelessly) who he had gathered for teaching and for construction. There were 10 or 12 people who cemented the teaching ends of this unusual, unusual entity. It was learning by doing. Most of the place was built by the kids and their teachers themselves. It seems most was on volunteering basis for the adult end at the beginnings. This is a book for youth, and as such has some asides and an Introduction that explains what Oakie meant (and oftentimes now means in PC interpretation sense)then- as opposed to now. Also that the Oakies were proud of their industry and heritage and still today never take that term as a pejorative. Oakies were strong, survivors, had a morality of discipline and honor. What is absolutely OUTSTANDING are the maps of origin (the fields they left behind)and the Route #66 journey posts of pause and dire occupation alone the way. Plus dozens of photographs for all of those. Each page is more photograph than copy. But the copy is highly, highly detailed. The Weedpatch Camp School was not long lived- but its students became advanced in many different fields. And despite the condition or numbers, there were no crimes of violence or no thefts associated or within Weedpatch Camp. No police in association or presence either. These people (kids of vastly different ages and most held no instruction for any literacy in their pasts) held a self imposed morality and amidst terrible, terrible conditions of lack, no policing was ever necessary. Overall, the last impression of this on me? What VAST difference there is in the world where a child was proud and honored (and super assured for himself/herself and a future) to learn plumbing, carpentry, hog stockade care, and how to butcher and clean an animal for all the uses possible. What a vast difference from one in which children are seldom taught the huge varieties of hands on skills of work or most issues of biologic physical reality. Not associated within a game or sport. The photographs are 5 star. Everyone should look at these.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Excellent introduction to the Dust Bowl and the exiting of Oklahoma residents to California. Very readable, non-fiction account that would hold most tween's attention. I think it could also encourage young readers to search out author John Steinbeck, who is mentioned. Age 10 and up recommendation.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erica T

    Having never read The Grapes of Wrath I was not familiar with the plight of the "Okies". What an eye-opener this was! It is a short non-fiction account of the people who moved from Oklahoma to California during the Dust Bowl time in the 1930s, and how education helped the children rise above their circumstances. I've put Grapes of Wrath on hold to read soon.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    "Okies" — and the trip along Route 66 to the San Joaquin valley where the new arrivals are anything but welcome. This is a peek into a moment in history, with a focus on prejudice and the difference one person can make. Somehow, the teachers who offered to work at the school also knew how to concoct lotions and cosmetics, build the school, wire it, add plumbing, raise hogs, put in a swimming pool, repair farm equipment, make dress patterns, fly a plane, ... Now I need to find my copy of Grapes of "Okies" — and the trip along Route 66 to the San Joaquin valley where the new arrivals are anything but welcome. This is a peek into a moment in history, with a focus on prejudice and the difference one person can make. Somehow, the teachers who offered to work at the school also knew how to concoct lotions and cosmetics, build the school, wire it, add plumbing, raise hogs, put in a swimming pool, repair farm equipment, make dress patterns, fly a plane, ... Now I need to find my copy of Grapes of Wrath.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Reason for Reading: Read aloud to my son for our history curriculum. This is the story of a group of people who called themselves "Okies", having come from the Oklahoma region, who migrated to California from the Dust Bowl area during the Depression of the 1930's. Through extensive photographs and quotes from those who were youngsters at the time we get an insider's look at the Dust Bowl and what it was like to live there at the time. We are taken along for the ride as jalopies laden down with a Reason for Reading: Read aloud to my son for our history curriculum. This is the story of a group of people who called themselves "Okies", having come from the Oklahoma region, who migrated to California from the Dust Bowl area during the Depression of the 1930's. Through extensive photographs and quotes from those who were youngsters at the time we get an insider's look at the Dust Bowl and what it was like to live there at the time. We are taken along for the ride as jalopies laden down with a family's worldly goods headed west for migrant farm work in the San Joaquin Valley area of California. Then the book focuses on life there for the "Okies" They met terrible opposition from the people already living there and prejudice became rampant. The "Okies" lived a bedraggled life in tents, with rags for clothing and children who were not wanted in the schools. Children would taunt them and teachers would ignore them. The prejudice they faced was almost unbelievable that it resembled racism. One person is quoted as comparing them to "white folks". How are people from Oklahoma less white than those from California?!?! My son and I were amazed and shook our heads at how little it can take for prejudice and racism to rise from the smallest of differences between people. Then comes along Leo Hart, a high school counselor who saw the need for these children to be educated and through sheer determination and wits he began to build a school for them. He easily raised money from the Californians when they learnt the money was to build a separate school for the "Okie" children and he scoured the universities looking for like-minded graduate teachers to come teach at his school. Together, Leo, the children, staff and parents built the school and as soon as possible classes started taking place. There were two rotations where half the school would work on academics in the am and work on building in the pm and then they'd switch at lunchtime. Little did they know that the Weedpatch School would become such a success. Leo was ahead of his times in wanting to create a diverse education for his students which not only included the academics but also included animal husbandry, carpentry, plumbing, agriculture (growing their own food for their cafeteria), kitchen skills, (the cafeteria meal was prepared by teachers and students together). One of the teachers who taught typing and stenography was also the chemistry teacher and she taught the girls how to make their own face cream and cosmetics! The school also had its own C-46 where they were taught aircraft mechanics and any students earning marks over 90% in math were allowed to drive the plane up and down the runway! This book is suitable for middle grade to young teen readers and as a read aloud to younger students. The writing isn't exactly the most compelling narrative, but the story itself is so interesting that with the photographs and quotes from the surviving children make it a powerful read despite any dryness in the writing. A great book for getting a feel for the Dust Bowl, and the resulting migrant workers and their hardships. The story has ties to Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath which are discussed in the text and the two would make a good read together for older students.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aidan Wycoff

    While I usually don't read nonfiction, Children of the Dust Bowl really nails it out of the park for nonfiction books. It's entertaining and keeps you hooked on what happened during the Dust Bowl and how Weedpatch School is and all the stuff it features. It tells a true story of hardship and discrimination, and in the end, Jerry Stanley does very well and achieves the big picture with this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    A short story highlighting the "Okies" and the Weedpatch School, it is a wonderful story of self-reliance and the caring of a man for Dust Bowl era children and their education.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    The summer I read GRAPES OF WRATH, I also found a little gem called HARVEST GYPSIES, a nonfiction piece. A collection of essays about Steinbeck's visits to migrant workers' camps in CA. This book tell sthe story of one of those camps. Weedpatch...the name alone conveys the value others held for the workers and their families. Weedpatch. Kids were barred from attending schools in the neighboring towns, told they were dirty, ignorant, unworthy. So, one courageous man with a vision, Leo Hart, decid The summer I read GRAPES OF WRATH, I also found a little gem called HARVEST GYPSIES, a nonfiction piece. A collection of essays about Steinbeck's visits to migrant workers' camps in CA. This book tell sthe story of one of those camps. Weedpatch...the name alone conveys the value others held for the workers and their families. Weedpatch. Kids were barred from attending schools in the neighboring towns, told they were dirty, ignorant, unworthy. So, one courageous man with a vision, Leo Hart, decides to build a school AT Weedpatch. Kids help in the construction. They frame it, they build it. Even when it was burned, they kept building. They created their OWN school, with academics and vocational training. They thrived, they felt ownership. Other educators joined and a school was born. This is an inspiring story of leadership, vision, determination. This is a story about saving children with education and a sense of worth. The local school district who initially spurned the school and its students, eventually merged with it, and townie kiddos attended Weedpatch School. Education can save lives.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Overall, Children of the Dust Bowl is an excellent book to use when teaching students about the life of Great Plains farm laborers during the Great Depression and the long drought that plagued residents west of the Mississippi River in the 1930’s and early 1940’s. While the text is compelling, the black and white photographs of the people, their homes and modes of transportation add a level of depth that no words can describe. The photos almost let you see into the souls of these children and th Overall, Children of the Dust Bowl is an excellent book to use when teaching students about the life of Great Plains farm laborers during the Great Depression and the long drought that plagued residents west of the Mississippi River in the 1930’s and early 1940’s. While the text is compelling, the black and white photographs of the people, their homes and modes of transportation add a level of depth that no words can describe. The photos almost let you see into the souls of these children and their families and a reader can begin to empathize with the hardships they faced. By focusing in on one community in particular, the author enables the students to study the effects of the Dust Bowl on a micro level. By taking a closer look at the way of life of the people, children can make a stronger connection and take away more pertinent information than a plain, old textbook could ever provide. The combination of the language and images make this nonfiction book ideal for the elementary classroom.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    I love some of the old educational movements where students participated fully in the entire process of the educational system: upkeep of the building, growing and raising of the food--learning by doing. Another testament proving that everybody learns more and better when there is personal buy-in and investment, which, in many ways, is completely opposite of what we have today.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I loved this book! Goes to show what a lot of hard work and even more determination can do!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brooklyne H

    The Okie Children were Children who participated in the dust bowl and migration to California. In California the children were told they were unable to go to school because they were "Okies and unable to even talk and imagine them in school" some said. Then after hearing this a man and his wife Mr and Mrs Hart became the only Californians to become friends with the Okies or even start to except them. The harts and the Okie children next began to build up a school that was not even imagine able f The Okie Children were Children who participated in the dust bowl and migration to California. In California the children were told they were unable to go to school because they were "Okies and unable to even talk and imagine them in school" some said. Then after hearing this a man and his wife Mr and Mrs Hart became the only Californians to become friends with the Okies or even start to except them. The harts and the Okie children next began to build up a school that was not even imagine able for anyone but them. The harts became friends with the Okies and gained strong love for each other. The affect to this brought a school and better learning skills to the kids. The children wanting to work and get going made an affect to make their school a school for all Okie children and not just those who could pay. The whole book has cause and effect;s all over in it. The dust bowl making the Children and their family's immigrate would not have happen unless cause and effect. This book was not my favorite. The writing told it as as story and that was defiantly good, but the way the words were put into order made it hard to understand and read. I didn't like how it didn't actually talk about the dust bowl and more about California. It would be good for people who are super interested in this kind of history, but for the others it might just turn out to be a real big boring book not worth reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sara Burnah

    In Oklahoma there where tons of giant dust storms ruining crops and lives. There were many farmers called Oakies who couldn't take care of there crops because of them being in the dust storms. They moved to California hearing there were jobs, just to find that there were not very many openings. This book shows there experiences and how rude people were to them. First wind started to blow, then it lifted up dirt. Next the dirt ruined crops, and homes. After that the Oakies heard there were jobs In Oklahoma there where tons of giant dust storms ruining crops and lives. There were many farmers called Oakies who couldn't take care of there crops because of them being in the dust storms. They moved to California hearing there were jobs, just to find that there were not very many openings. This book shows there experiences and how rude people were to them. First wind started to blow, then it lifted up dirt. Next the dirt ruined crops, and homes. After that the Oakies heard there were jobs in California, which caused them to move there. The people in California didn't like the oakies, So they wouldn't feed them. Then the people started to starve and die. Non-fiction is not my favorite subject, but for this being a non-fiction book it was one of the best I've read. It made me feel bad for the Oakies and told the story of the great depression from a different point of view.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dawney Underwood

    For a nonfictional book, it was very interesting. Did you know Okies was a negative term?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Learning to appreciate what you have by reading about those that didn’t. They made the best out of what was given them and more. A pleasurable reading experience.

  19. 5 out of 5

    KIMBERLY JEAN

    Text-to-Text-Connection The True Story at Weed Patch Camp is a story based on things that happened throughout the lives of children living through the Dust Bowl. A terrific book to compare this story to is the book Out of the Dust Bowl. Both of books tell stories about children living through this horrendous life experience. I can use this in my classroom to teach about this time period. Also, what children their age or a little older live through an experience.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Photina

    Photina Haumschilt Genre: Picture Book Living in the depression era was hard. It was even harder on families from the Dust Bowl area. With the promises of jobs, food, and shelter families packed up what they could and headed for California only to be disappointed when they arrived. Their dreams were dashed when they realized these promises were false. The government set up camps to help get the “Okies” back on their feet. In one such camp, called Weedpatch Camp, the children made a friend by the n Photina Haumschilt Genre: Picture Book Living in the depression era was hard. It was even harder on families from the Dust Bowl area. With the promises of jobs, food, and shelter families packed up what they could and headed for California only to be disappointed when they arrived. Their dreams were dashed when they realized these promises were false. The government set up camps to help get the “Okies” back on their feet. In one such camp, called Weedpatch Camp, the children made a friend by the name of Leo Hart. Hart saw how the children were living and how they were being treated at the local schools. He petitioned to have a school built on the field outside Weedpatch Camp. The children, hart, and other adults worked hard to build their school while also taking classes. They didn't take just traditional classes but also vocational skills classes so they could go out and find jobs. In an era of pain, struggling, femine, and no hope the families at Weedpatch Camp found a bright spot. Skillfully placed on almost every page are pictures that not only accompany the words Stanley wrote but bring them to life. You can see through the pictures the depression, struggles, and hardships as well as the good times the “Okies” went through to get back on to their feet. Children of the Dust Bowl is the perfect combination of pictures and words to bring the story to life to make you really feel what happened. Those who enjoyed this book may also enjoy Dust to Eat: Drought and Depression in the 1930s by Michael Cooper.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Becky R.

    As an educator, I found this book to be inspiring. Even if, however, I was not an educator, the history and information about this little school would still strike a chord in me. This book really does speak to the heart of all learning, that when you can spark in someone the essential kernel of what one needs, you can bring about great personal development. I realized that with cooperation between students and teachers, each student could begin to feel ownership of his or her own education. In m As an educator, I found this book to be inspiring. Even if, however, I was not an educator, the history and information about this little school would still strike a chord in me. This book really does speak to the heart of all learning, that when you can spark in someone the essential kernel of what one needs, you can bring about great personal development. I realized that with cooperation between students and teachers, each student could begin to feel ownership of his or her own education. In much simpler terms, the book showed me how important it is to not think that any one student or group is "unteachable" because of their culture or background. When any one student can be reached through what is important to them, you unlock the box that contains their motivation and joy in their own achievement. I rarely review educational books that I read for work, but felt that this little book was such a great resource for any family or child, that I wanted to share it here on my blog. Whether you are an educator, parent, or individual, this book contains wonderful motivation to be a better person in your community, and if nothing else, is a wonderful resource for history! I would even recommend this for children needing more information about this time period.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    This book shows the emigration of the "Okies" to California during the Great Depression. It's heartbreaking, it's hopeful, it's powerful. The pictures, the songs, the stories all weave together to tell an important story. And as a person not particularly interested in history, you know it has to be good for me to recommend it! Also, as a future teacher, I just really loved the story of Leo Hart and the School at Weedpatch Camp. What an inspiration for what we should do as teachers! As a teacher, This book shows the emigration of the "Okies" to California during the Great Depression. It's heartbreaking, it's hopeful, it's powerful. The pictures, the songs, the stories all weave together to tell an important story. And as a person not particularly interested in history, you know it has to be good for me to recommend it! Also, as a future teacher, I just really loved the story of Leo Hart and the School at Weedpatch Camp. What an inspiration for what we should do as teachers! As a teacher, you could have the students design their own schools and write about the things they would want to teach in their school. If possible, you could use these suggestions in your classroom (if they are feasible, of course).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Janele

    This is one of the best books I've read that takes place during the Dust Bowl years. I was caught up in the awfulness of life for so many. No one can really imagine living in this era that wasn't there. I wasn't there but had no idea of how hard daily living was and how little most people had because of where they lived and nature letting loose on the innocent. I fear I could not have been as brave as these people had to be. And to add to the facts were so many pictures that I had a hard time ta This is one of the best books I've read that takes place during the Dust Bowl years. I was caught up in the awfulness of life for so many. No one can really imagine living in this era that wasn't there. I wasn't there but had no idea of how hard daily living was and how little most people had because of where they lived and nature letting loose on the innocent. I fear I could not have been as brave as these people had to be. And to add to the facts were so many pictures that I had a hard time taking it all in. It put me in these people shoes as both a mother and a child and I wondered if I would have survived at all.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    I thought this was a very good book about the "Okies" who poured into California after being promised jobs but none were to be found. They lived in camps and were vilified and ridiculed. A Superintendent from a school district would come and play with the kids in the Weedpatch Camp and eventually purchased the land next to the camp. He taught them to build, plant, kill their own food and cook. All the things they needed in life. A crew of teachers also signed on and it turned out to be the best I thought this was a very good book about the "Okies" who poured into California after being promised jobs but none were to be found. They lived in camps and were vilified and ridiculed. A Superintendent from a school district would come and play with the kids in the Weedpatch Camp and eventually purchased the land next to the camp. He taught them to build, plant, kill their own food and cook. All the things they needed in life. A crew of teachers also signed on and it turned out to be the best school offered in the area. Very interesting.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jen Scott

    The story of this book was very, very interesting. I had actually never heard of all the trials and challenges the "Okies" had to go through. There were some horrible things that happened to them, but it was encouraging to see them rise from their troubles and make great lives for themselves. The only thing I didn't love about this book was the author made it boring sometimes. It was really hard to get through some of the sections.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Egbert

    I forgot to review this book back when I read it at the beginning of the semester. But that's okay because I am reviewing it today along with a story about the Japanese internment camps and the two together are appropriate. This story is both heartbreaking and heartwarming. By the end I was cheering and if you want to understand what a real school should be, read this book. I don't understand the treatment of the Okies and all I can do is hope that such a thing wouldn't happen today.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aleisa

    Anyone bummed out by Grapes of Wrath and the plight of the displaced "Okies" during the dust bowl and subsequent California migration should pick up this book. Over 60 photos, an unexpected hero, and the satisfaction of a non-fiction happy ending make this book a gem.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    My daughter recommended this book after she had to read it in a college lit. class. Simple, sad, and a true story that inspires us to keep on going when the going gets tough! Motivated me to pull out Grapes of Wrath and read more about the Okies in California.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mama

    Made me want to dust off my copy of Grapes of Wrath. The photos were especially moving. A nice reminder of a day when American children valued and appreciated the opportunity for an education - probably because everything else was taken from them. Love Leo Hart.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Larry Aldridge

    opinion i think someone else should read this book because is tell you what happen in the bust bowl.it also tells you how they took baths and drink water and live. it also tells you how they got to place to place. there are pictures that show you what they look like and what they did.

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