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Anti-Bias Education for young children and ourselves

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What if someone told you that you could contribute ina small but significant way to making the world a better place? That is what this book offers: A chance to make the world fairer and more humane for everybody from a place where you have already chosen to be-working with children and families. --from the foreword by Carol Brunson Day


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What if someone told you that you could contribute ina small but significant way to making the world a better place? That is what this book offers: A chance to make the world fairer and more humane for everybody from a place where you have already chosen to be-working with children and families. --from the foreword by Carol Brunson Day

30 review for Anti-Bias Education for young children and ourselves

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dar

    I read The Anti-Bias Curriculum (1989) early in my career and it was life-changing. It was the start of my anti-oppression training and it led me down the path of being an ally. I checked to see if the book was still available, and found this newer edition (2010). Anti-Bias Education is a workbook for early childhood educators to help them create an early childhood philosophy and classroom environment: anti-racist, anti-sexist, anti-ableist, anti-classist and more. It gives concrete examples of I read The Anti-Bias Curriculum (1989) early in my career and it was life-changing. It was the start of my anti-oppression training and it led me down the path of being an ally. I checked to see if the book was still available, and found this newer edition (2010). Anti-Bias Education is a workbook for early childhood educators to help them create an early childhood philosophy and classroom environment: anti-racist, anti-sexist, anti-ableist, anti-classist and more. It gives concrete examples of how young children express their thoughts and feelings about differences and how ECE professionals can respond, as well as how they must be proactive. While doing so, they must work with and show respect for families' values. This was a tremendous influence not only on my library work but on my parenting. Here are a couple of quotes from the book. How would you respond? A group of 4-year-olds is making books "About Me." Their teacher asks them to describe their skin color. The African American and Latino children respond with "black," "brown" and "tan-ish." Several of the White children respond, "My skin is regular," "Ordinary" and "You know, it's skin color ." "How come we got a new car and Arlae's mommy brings her on the bus?" asks Karen on the way to school. "Your daddy and I worked hard to buy this car," her mother replies a little defensively. "Oh, I didn't know," Karen says quietly. "I'll tell her mommy to work harder."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is the most helpful book I've read so far for ages 3-7 or so (really 3-5 but I think it can apply up a bit). - Clear ideas and themes - Practical ideas for the classroom - Lots of quick model conversations with children inserted into the text Any recs for a similar book for late elementary?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kimber

    For a textbook, it was a pretty interesting read, not dry like some textbooks.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lorie Barber

    More geared toward early childhood but still some good takeaways, especially on language and problem solving.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    370.11709 D435 2010

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christa

    It is rare that I actually enjoy reading a textbook, so take note. Although probably not super interesting to people who aren't trying to educate or raise children, this is a great text for those who are. It focuses on the importance of equality and understanding others, examining your own ideas of the world and how you came to them, and then reaches outward to explain how children perceive things adults often have (conscious or unconscious) biases about (race, people with disabilities, gender, It is rare that I actually enjoy reading a textbook, so take note. Although probably not super interesting to people who aren't trying to educate or raise children, this is a great text for those who are. It focuses on the importance of equality and understanding others, examining your own ideas of the world and how you came to them, and then reaches outward to explain how children perceive things adults often have (conscious or unconscious) biases about (race, people with disabilities, gender, class, etc.). It comes from a perspective of respect and has heartening and insightful quotes like, "When educators treat children as if they are strong, intelligent, and kind, children are far more likely to behave in strong, intelligent, and kind ways," (p. 1), and "It's not human differences that undermine children's development but rather unfair, hurtful treatment based upon these differences," (p. 3). It was a very valuable read and it helped me to think critically about what impact we can have on children even when we're avoiding discussing a subject with them.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    It seems to me that each of us is raised with bias for our own culture and it takes a conscious effort to work with young children and build a program based on being anti-bias. This is not a judgmental statement but just an observation of being a human. I found Anti-Bias Education for Young Children and Ourselves to be an excellent classroom resource to make me more aware to the differences in cultures of the children in my classrooms and how I could make them part of a new school community that It seems to me that each of us is raised with bias for our own culture and it takes a conscious effort to work with young children and build a program based on being anti-bias. This is not a judgmental statement but just an observation of being a human. I found Anti-Bias Education for Young Children and Ourselves to be an excellent classroom resource to make me more aware to the differences in cultures of the children in my classrooms and how I could make them part of a new school community that accepts them and their home culture.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lin Lin

    I like this book for its clear goals, strategies, and examples with the voices of teachers and parents. Fairness along the lines of race, gender, class, culture, disability, family structure, age, etc. is never going to be achieved if we are not conscious of our own bias and the bias of other people. As I read the book, my heart sank because our current education program does not really seem to be using such an anti-bias education approach as a central focus.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    I had to read this book for an Anti-Bias class that I am taking this fall, and though I would get a head start. Well, I think everyone in the world should study this book and topic no matter even if it not mandatory. I know that I learnt a lot and hope I can remember what I have leant to be a better citizen to society!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Korri

    This book offers basic tips on how to respond to prejudice and discriminatory behavior and shares activities to foster learning about others in respectful, inclusive ways.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Sent to Connie Griego on 8/12/10

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kate Johnson

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bee

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Zuiderveen

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christine Persson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  17. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mahi Wasfy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Heather Barnett

  22. 4 out of 5

    Denise Tafen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susan Sturm

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Peterson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Seema

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tanzil Khan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

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