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Pure Pleasure: Why Do Christians Feel So Bad about Feeling Good?

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Gary Thomas, one of this generation's most trusted writers about the spiritual life, explores what it means to build a life of true pleasure - one that will liberate your spiritual life, marriage, family, community, and outreach. Many Christians assume "pleasure" and "sin" are synonymous. Others define godly pleasure so narrowly that they drastically minimize the powerful a Gary Thomas, one of this generation's most trusted writers about the spiritual life, explores what it means to build a life of true pleasure - one that will liberate your spiritual life, marriage, family, community, and outreach. Many Christians assume "pleasure" and "sin" are synonymous. Others define godly pleasure so narrowly that they drastically minimize the powerful and holy role that pleasure can play in their lives. Still others feel guilty even thinking about how to build a life of pleasure. For all of them, Pure Pleasure provides an entirely new paradigm. It invites Christians to embrace a life of true pleasure as a pathway to obedience, worship, and service. Building on his bestselling books Sacred Pathways, Sacred Marriage, and the ECPA Gold Medallion-winning Authentic Faith, Gary Thomas takes readers to a new level of faith by providing a theological and inspirational framework to help them cultivate the kind of life that pleases God. Abounding with spiritual insights and practical exercises, this book invites you to shake off the shackles of misunderstanding about sin, provides the freedom to approach life in Christ with new wonder and joy, and challenges you to experience life as God meant it to be: overflowing with pleasure. Also available: Pure Pleasure small group video study and study guide, Spanish edition, and more.


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Gary Thomas, one of this generation's most trusted writers about the spiritual life, explores what it means to build a life of true pleasure - one that will liberate your spiritual life, marriage, family, community, and outreach. Many Christians assume "pleasure" and "sin" are synonymous. Others define godly pleasure so narrowly that they drastically minimize the powerful a Gary Thomas, one of this generation's most trusted writers about the spiritual life, explores what it means to build a life of true pleasure - one that will liberate your spiritual life, marriage, family, community, and outreach. Many Christians assume "pleasure" and "sin" are synonymous. Others define godly pleasure so narrowly that they drastically minimize the powerful and holy role that pleasure can play in their lives. Still others feel guilty even thinking about how to build a life of pleasure. For all of them, Pure Pleasure provides an entirely new paradigm. It invites Christians to embrace a life of true pleasure as a pathway to obedience, worship, and service. Building on his bestselling books Sacred Pathways, Sacred Marriage, and the ECPA Gold Medallion-winning Authentic Faith, Gary Thomas takes readers to a new level of faith by providing a theological and inspirational framework to help them cultivate the kind of life that pleases God. Abounding with spiritual insights and practical exercises, this book invites you to shake off the shackles of misunderstanding about sin, provides the freedom to approach life in Christ with new wonder and joy, and challenges you to experience life as God meant it to be: overflowing with pleasure. Also available: Pure Pleasure small group video study and study guide, Spanish edition, and more.

30 review for Pure Pleasure: Why Do Christians Feel So Bad about Feeling Good?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    Awesome book right to the end. So many good points, read it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Olga

    Simply written and very relatable. Learn to enjoy the pleasure God gives you. Would recommend this book, especially those who take life too seriously and frown upon laughter and joy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amydeanne

    Can we as Christians have pleasure? I think some of us get so caught up with all the bad stuff that we think God doesn’t want us to enjoy life. It is really far from the truth isn’t it? I mean we don’t have to be stifled in our pleasures to love the Lord more do we? Pure Pleasure by Gary Thomas talks exactly about that. He presents issues about God that we struggle with. How to have a healthy pleasure, and what they are. I was delightfully surprised when I started reading this. Gary has his feet f Can we as Christians have pleasure? I think some of us get so caught up with all the bad stuff that we think God doesn’t want us to enjoy life. It is really far from the truth isn’t it? I mean we don’t have to be stifled in our pleasures to love the Lord more do we? Pure Pleasure by Gary Thomas talks exactly about that. He presents issues about God that we struggle with. How to have a healthy pleasure, and what they are. I was delightfully surprised when I started reading this. Gary has his feet firmly planted in the Lord’s Word, and I loved his attitude about it. He challenged me to check off my internal pleasure list and how off or on track I was. It also reminded me of some of the reasons why I am attracted to my husband, and other people who have authentic Christian lives. I mean do you ever notice those who really are different — that special glimmer in their eyes? I know with my husband he has such a pleasure and sheer joy in the Lord Jesus that I can’t help but be attracted to him. I think Gary basically sums it up nicely on page 25 when he says “Satan will trap some with compulsions toward illicit pleasures. These traps are well known and preached against every week. But other believers tend toward prideful, work-oriented compulsions in which any rest or any enjoyment is seen as weakness or “giving in.” Since God didn’t make us to live in sin or without pleasure, either way of life will eventually destroy us.” He further goes on to ask how can we honor our Lord if we deny everything he created that he called good? It got me thinking how many times I ignore what God said was good. On the other side, it sure made me reconsider my reasoning behind “little sins” of over indulgent and how it affects my joy. (He got me on the potato chips! lol and if you’re wondering what I’m jabbering about you’ll have to get the book!) I would gladly suggest this book to friends who are feeling guilty about feeling good (in the Lord) and really think Gary makes some great points in his book! He’ll be on my quoteable list for sure! ** review copy provided

  4. 5 out of 5

    Garland Vance

    Gary Thomas tackles the questions that surround the role of pleasure in a Christian's life. Should Christians spend money and time and energy on the things that they enjoy. More personally, should I spend time and money on good coffee and racquetball and novels? I appreciate that this book is nuanced. Thomas doesn't offer simple answers, but he pushes Christians to learn how to delight in God through his gifts without making those gifts into idols. I found this book to be engaging and incredible Gary Thomas tackles the questions that surround the role of pleasure in a Christian's life. Should Christians spend money and time and energy on the things that they enjoy. More personally, should I spend time and money on good coffee and racquetball and novels? I appreciate that this book is nuanced. Thomas doesn't offer simple answers, but he pushes Christians to learn how to delight in God through his gifts without making those gifts into idols. I found this book to be engaging and incredible. Thomas takes profound and complex insights and makes them easily accessible. I HIGHLY recommend this book for both those who think they should avoid all pleasure and those who think they should indulge every pleasure. God has created us to delight in him, and his gifts (like a great cup of coffee) give us an ability to do this!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elaina Swanson

    I believe very honestly that this book is so important for MOTHERS to read. I am not a mother, but I have one. I’m also a Nanny so I work with a lot of moms, but really it seems to be a generational thing. Women my mothers age seemed to give up their sense of self somewhere, and forgot how to have fun or to delight themselves. They find pleasure and purpose in mothering, but then when they’re older and their children are grown they have no hobbies and no sense of adventure. If you feel, even as I believe very honestly that this book is so important for MOTHERS to read. I am not a mother, but I have one. I’m also a Nanny so I work with a lot of moms, but really it seems to be a generational thing. Women my mothers age seemed to give up their sense of self somewhere, and forgot how to have fun or to delight themselves. They find pleasure and purpose in mothering, but then when they’re older and their children are grown they have no hobbies and no sense of adventure. If you feel, even as I do sometimes, that you must be miserable to be “good” please give this a read. Thomas also hit me right in the heart when he wrote about the fear of being good at and loving something only to always live in fear that God will take it away to teach you some sort of lesson or something, and that that is not in His character. This book gave me great comfort about the loving nature of God, but it is also full of conviction about trading this line carefully and with purpose

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marty Bedwell

    The kind of book I’d like to read yearly. To remember the importance of smiling and laughter. To remember that God is so much more than just sitting down with a Bible and a journal to take notes in. That He’s a living, breathing King that we delight in. “All good things are from Heaven above”

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marella Mylet

    Every Christian needs to read. I shrieked with joy through the whole thing!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Snyder

    Good reminder that God gives us simple and exquisite pleasures to renew us along the way.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Morton

    This book gave me so much to think about. I love his attitude of abundance and seeking things that give us real and lasting joy. Highly recommend!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

    Very good book on a rarely discussed topic.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Gromer

    helpful for those of us who struggle to enjoy the good things God gives us.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Patton

    This was good, but some of the arguments were not very robust. I feel like John Piper probably has materials which deal with this issue more comprehensively in the context of Christian hedonism.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Schmitt

    Thought provoking and eye-opening. Reminding me that it's okay to be okay. I don't have to find the dark cloud behind every silver lining. And no matter what dark time I go through, or what I've lost, I am never, EVER, more than a silent prayer away from God Thought provoking and eye-opening. Reminding me that it's okay to be okay. I don't have to find the dark cloud behind every silver lining. And no matter what dark time I go through, or what I've lost, I am never, EVER, more than a silent prayer away from God

  14. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    I truly enjoyed this book because it makes you think about and even question your imposed standards and convictions. The author definitely doesn't tell you what he thinks you should be doing or not doing. He brings to light what the Bible does say about personal holiness and about Jesus' personal testimony on earth. I appreciated this book maybe even more than the "average joe" because of my personal family and church background. The author explains why certain thinking is prevalent in certain d I truly enjoyed this book because it makes you think about and even question your imposed standards and convictions. The author definitely doesn't tell you what he thinks you should be doing or not doing. He brings to light what the Bible does say about personal holiness and about Jesus' personal testimony on earth. I appreciated this book maybe even more than the "average joe" because of my personal family and church background. The author explains why certain thinking is prevalent in certain denominations. I put this in my "to read again" booklist here on Goodreads because I thought the ideas and information was poignant and relevant (to my life specifically) enough to be reminded of again. I would say that everyone should read this to either understand someone you know to whom this is applicable or to understand yourself or your background. It was written in an easy manner and simple to understand.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Molly Henderson

    A very good, well-reasoned, insightful work by an excellent author. Worth a read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

    I think a Christian must have first said the words "guilty pleasure"--- because sometimes we seem to be incapable of separating the two. Our understanding of the importance of fleeing sin, dying to ourselves, & focusing on God has often confused us of the place of pleasure in the life of a follower of Christ. We seem to swing between the two extremes of rejecting any "earthly" thing that feels good or else embracing anything and everything under the justification that God loves us and wants us t I think a Christian must have first said the words "guilty pleasure"--- because sometimes we seem to be incapable of separating the two. Our understanding of the importance of fleeing sin, dying to ourselves, & focusing on God has often confused us of the place of pleasure in the life of a follower of Christ. We seem to swing between the two extremes of rejecting any "earthly" thing that feels good or else embracing anything and everything under the justification that God loves us and wants us to be happy. It seems that legitimate pleasure is a ground so tricky and full of land mines that few pastors or teachers will walk deeply into its territory. At most they seem to skim around it with some humorous quotes or iron clad rules. Gary Thomas, however, does neither, plunging into the heart of the place of pleasure in the life of a Christian with a deep, thoughtful book filled with wisdom. Well known as a thinker and writer who draws upon centuries of ancient and classic theology and philosophy throughout his books, Gary does the same here, carefully considering the topic from a variety of angles, from the place of pleasure in God's creation and plan, its dangers and delights, how it fits into our love & devotion to God, and how it truly can be purely enjoyed in a holy life. He speaks to Christians who have tipped too far in both directions: to those who reject pleasure, he calls them to enjoy what God has given for them to enjoy as a way of strengthening their souls and their love for God. To those who have put pleasure above all else in their life, he calls them back to remember the Giver more than the gifts, and shows them a better way. As with all of Thomas' books, it is chock full of quotable insights. Here are a just a few of my favorites: Nonbelievers are supernaturally thirsty because they do not know God, whom they were created to enjoy. Many believers are thirsty because they do not know how to enjoy God and the life He has given them. It would be the height of folly, the triumph of arrogance, for me to assume I can do without what God has laid at my feet and blessed as good gifts from his gracious hand. I walk with Christ because a life with Christ is a beautiful life, the most incredible journey I can imagine. To the child of God, pleasure becomes the destination we reach when we walk the path of obedience. All we can do is walk the road God lays out for us. If you've ever wondered or ever struggled with the right way to feel pleasure in your life, you will love reading this book. (Just don't feel guilty about enjoying it!)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    If you feel guilty about enjoying the blessings God has given you, doing something nice for yourself, or taking a day off when there's so much need out there, then this is the book for you. But it's also for those who realize they're being tempted by pleasures that are condemned in the Bible. It shows how appropriate pleasure done in the God-ordained context will help prevent a Christian from being tempted by inappropriate behavior. Chapter one gave the premise of the book. Chapters two through f If you feel guilty about enjoying the blessings God has given you, doing something nice for yourself, or taking a day off when there's so much need out there, then this is the book for you. But it's also for those who realize they're being tempted by pleasures that are condemned in the Bible. It shows how appropriate pleasure done in the God-ordained context will help prevent a Christian from being tempted by inappropriate behavior. Chapter one gave the premise of the book. Chapters two through five explained exactly what he meant when he said Christians should enjoy themselves and why he thought God wanted us to enjoy life. Chapters six through fourteen dug deeper into how appropriate enjoyment of pleasure would play out in a Christian's life, and he included examples from his life. The book was Bible-based, and he quoted Scripture to support his main points. I agreed with the points he made. However, especially in the first chapters, his tone came across as defensive--as if he assumed all of his readers would attack his premise and he wanted to reassure and calm them down before moving on. So some parts were repetitious, like he wanted to make really, really sure we didn't misunderstand what he was saying. I think I would have been more deeply engaged by chapters two through five if he'd presented his case more succinctly. In any case, the rest of the book was excellent. The entire book was easy to understand and made good points. I'd recommend it to anyone who "feels bad about feeling good" or otherwise wonders if they really have a Biblical view of pleasure. I received this review copy from the publisher.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    "We consider 'pleasure' a synonym for 'sin.' If it feels good, we think, it must be the devil's handmaiden." Christians can have the false dilemma of seeking pleasure OR doing what's right. Gary Thomas sets the record straight and carefully lays out the premise that seeking pleasure IS doing right. Christians need to get their minds right and begin to believe that the community of God is a party. Rather than living 'not to sin,' Christians need to begin living for pleasure. It doesn't even sound r "We consider 'pleasure' a synonym for 'sin.' If it feels good, we think, it must be the devil's handmaiden." Christians can have the false dilemma of seeking pleasure OR doing what's right. Gary Thomas sets the record straight and carefully lays out the premise that seeking pleasure IS doing right. Christians need to get their minds right and begin to believe that the community of God is a party. Rather than living 'not to sin,' Christians need to begin living for pleasure. It doesn't even sound right to say such a thing does it? Gary Thomas lays out the case for leaving off obsessing over our sin and beginning to delight in the pleasures that God has given us to enjoy. "Let us learn to fill our souls with beauty, art, noble achievement, fine meals, rich relationships, and soul-cleansing laughter. And... let us be wary of a faith that denies these blessings as 'worldly' and unfit, as though Satan rather than God designed them." In this age of constantly seeking the pleasures of the world, it is easy to look at pleasure as worldly and evil and that the anecdote is a sober, dull life. Thomas thankfully reassures the serious Christian that God absolutely delights in our seeking pleasure and in fact God invented pleasure. Of course, seeking pleasure must begin with a heart filled by the Holy Spirit. Thomas makes straight the path to pleasure and dares you to live with feasting and joy. The one detraction is the somewhat pedantic writing which is probably a result of trying to make a concise message long enough to be a book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pastoralmusings

    Pure Pleasure by Gary Thomas I've known that Gary Thomas was out there writing books, but this is the first book of his that I have read. That being said, I enjoyed Pure Pleasure. Thomas has a way of writing that is easy on the reader. His writing is simple and down-to-earth. I like that. He is also a transparent writer. We are not left wondering what he thinks, nor whether he struggles as we do: he speaks openly and honestly on these subjects. Thomas deals with the question that has plagued many C Pure Pleasure by Gary Thomas I've known that Gary Thomas was out there writing books, but this is the first book of his that I have read. That being said, I enjoyed Pure Pleasure. Thomas has a way of writing that is easy on the reader. His writing is simple and down-to-earth. I like that. He is also a transparent writer. We are not left wondering what he thinks, nor whether he struggles as we do: he speaks openly and honestly on these subjects. Thomas deals with the question that has plagued many Christians for centuries- the issue of pleasure. Many have declared pleasure to be sinful. Others have become antinomians and declared that nothing is off limits. Thomas declares both ideas to be wrong and unbiblical. In fact, in the same vein of thought as Desiring God, Thomas declares pleasure to be good, and to be our duty. We do NOT have to feel guilty because we enjoy something. Why, then, do many Christians feel bad when they feel good? Simply because we have misunderstood our Bibles and what they say about pleasure. Not only does Thomas show us that things we naturally enjoy (sex, food, family,etc) can be enjoyed in a way that pleases God, he also shows us how that misplaced pleasure is dangerous. What is just as necessary to us is his chapter on finding pleasure even when things are difficult. All in all, Pure Pleasure is a message that we need to hear today.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    The premise of this book is that Christians often feel guilty about taking pleasure in life. I wasn't too sure that I agreed; I was frankly surprised at his suggestion coming from a fairly materialistic culture. But he makes some good points. We can spend so much time trying to avoid doing wrong that we forget to take pleasure in what is good - in the abundance of what God has created. He suggests that sometimes we fall into temptation because of boredom, or because something is wrong in our liv The premise of this book is that Christians often feel guilty about taking pleasure in life. I wasn't too sure that I agreed; I was frankly surprised at his suggestion coming from a fairly materialistic culture. But he makes some good points. We can spend so much time trying to avoid doing wrong that we forget to take pleasure in what is good - in the abundance of what God has created. He suggests that sometimes we fall into temptation because of boredom, or because something is wrong in our lives which may often be solved by relaxation, intimacy or a good hobby. There are chapters focussing on different themes within the overall idea of Christians taking pleasure in their lives. Chapman points out that Jesus enjoyed many good things - he was accused of being a glutton and drunkard by his enemies, which suggests that he loved to relax over a good meal and a glass of wine. He asks the reader to consider what they enjoy, and to make time to do whatever it is - we are not created for continual work or suffering. A balance is needed, of course, and we're also warned about too much pleasure, about the dangers of materialism, and about apparently 'safe' pleasures that can lead us into serious problems. I don't know that I found this life-changing, but it was reassuring and encouraging in a low-key kind of way, and very readable. Recommended.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mad Russian the Traveller

    I am beginning this review shortly before reading the book; I have purchased the book for my wife but I was provoked by the thesis to start debunking what may be the wrong thing to say to many in the Church. I am going into this with a highly skeptical attitude because here in America, we have the problem of too much pleasure. I will change this review after I have read the book. From the bits that my wife has read to me already and the cover blurbs and the other reviews, I have to say that only I am beginning this review shortly before reading the book; I have purchased the book for my wife but I was provoked by the thesis to start debunking what may be the wrong thing to say to many in the Church. I am going into this with a highly skeptical attitude because here in America, we have the problem of too much pleasure. I will change this review after I have read the book. From the bits that my wife has read to me already and the cover blurbs and the other reviews, I have to say that only in America can someone write a book justifying materialism. And the author is praised for this. If what he is saying is that we should have balance and moderation in all things, then the book will be valuable. However one must be wary of subjective standards, because a four dollar a day Starbucks habit might seem normal to a middle class American, but it is an impossible luxury for most of the Christians on earth (outside of America). Only in Ahmurrika!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Gillespie

    In his book Pure Pleasure: Why Do Christians Feel So Bad about Feeling Good? Gary Thomas looks at how taking enjoyment and pleasure in legitimate, God-given ways keeps you from being tempted toward destructive attempts to fill that need. Thomas exposes a lot of the “respectable sins” Christians turn to for an outlet while they are busy avoiding more visible sins (like gluttony, or making an idol out of frugality at the expense of your family), making the point again that if we accept pleasure and In his book Pure Pleasure: Why Do Christians Feel So Bad about Feeling Good? Gary Thomas looks at how taking enjoyment and pleasure in legitimate, God-given ways keeps you from being tempted toward destructive attempts to fill that need. Thomas exposes a lot of the “respectable sins” Christians turn to for an outlet while they are busy avoiding more visible sins (like gluttony, or making an idol out of frugality at the expense of your family), making the point again that if we accept pleasure and good things from God without guilt, we can avoid overdoing and overindulging in all of its forms. He isn’t sanctimonious about pointing these tendencies out, but it might be convicting if you’re used to a subculture that encourages respectable sinning as long as you aren’t doing “major sins.” {Read the rest of my review on A Spirited Mind}

  23. 4 out of 5

    Richard Duncan

    Gary Thomas shows how Jesus sets free the do-more, try-harder, type A, high D, guilt-ridden, holier-than-thou joyless believer. After reading The Happy Christian by David Murray, this well written book has helped me more fully embrace the fact that pleasure, rightly pursued, can be an act of worship. I was convicted about how my duty–driven life has failed to be as Wynsum as it could have been had I embraced the good gifts of laughter, fun, and pleasure that God has so graciously made available. Gary Thomas shows how Jesus sets free the do-more, try-harder, type A, high D, guilt-ridden, holier-than-thou joyless believer. After reading The Happy Christian by David Murray, this well written book has helped me more fully embrace the fact that pleasure, rightly pursued, can be an act of worship. I was convicted about how my duty–driven life has failed to be as Wynsum as it could have been had I embraced the good gifts of laughter, fun, and pleasure that God has so graciously made available. Sober living is a good thing as long as it does not negate the gracious seasons of riotous laughter and enjoyment in life. I wish I had read this book 30 years ago as a young husband and father. I believe I would have blessed my family more. Still, it's not too late for me and all of the readers of this book to learn the art of holy laughter.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adam Shields

    Full review at http://bookwi.se/pure-pleasure-why-do... Short review: This is the second book I have read by Gary Thomas and I again am very impressed. Christians often think that pleasure must be bad because so much pleasure can be taken too far and become sin. But Thomas makes a good case that pleasure was created by God and part of being human. The rejection of pleasure is a rejection of God. He is clear all pleasure is not good, but it is worse to reject pleasure out of hand. I think it was a Full review at http://bookwi.se/pure-pleasure-why-do... Short review: This is the second book I have read by Gary Thomas and I again am very impressed. Christians often think that pleasure must be bad because so much pleasure can be taken too far and become sin. But Thomas makes a good case that pleasure was created by God and part of being human. The rejection of pleasure is a rejection of God. He is clear all pleasure is not good, but it is worse to reject pleasure out of hand. I think it was a great introduction to the idea of humans worshiping through the participation in God created pleasure.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jim Jim

    This book packed in the amount of material I expected it would take 10 books to cover. Absolutely annihilates the misconception that pleasure/fun/laughter/enjoyment/silliness/hobbies/killing time/relaxing interfere with the life of God in the soul of man. Rather, Thomas demonstrates again and again, legitimate pleasures serve as a much-needed bastion against temptation to illegitimate pleasures. Can't recommend enough to those who, like me, grew up too distracted by "duty" to notice delight. This book packed in the amount of material I expected it would take 10 books to cover. Absolutely annihilates the misconception that pleasure/fun/laughter/enjoyment/silliness/hobbies/killing time/relaxing interfere with the life of God in the soul of man. Rather, Thomas demonstrates again and again, legitimate pleasures serve as a much-needed bastion against temptation to illegitimate pleasures. Can't recommend enough to those who, like me, grew up too distracted by "duty" to notice delight.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    God wants us to enjoy the Christian life and our relationship with Him. He came that we might have LIFE and have it ABUNDANTLY! That is not simply a promise of what we will have in heaven as we come into His presence. It also includes joy and fullness in life today. God wants us to enjoy life as we enjoy Him. We can glorify God as we enjoy Him and the life that He gives to us.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paige Gordon

    This book is awesome! Mr Thomas does a splendid job reminding Christians that it is healthy to enjoy the pleasures that God put on this earth if we do so in the way that He intended. This book goes straight to the point and is a great wake-up call and warning about how we should change our approach to enjoying this life. Definitely on my recommended reading list!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Butch

    Very good book about a precious gift given by God but often mis-trusted by Christians. If you've been guilty of being suspicious of anything that feels good, you need to read this book. Would be great in combination with Worldliness by C J Mahaney. Very good book about a precious gift given by God but often mis-trusted by Christians. If you've been guilty of being suspicious of anything that feels good, you need to read this book. Would be great in combination with Worldliness by C J Mahaney.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    I downloaded this (legally :)) from Gary Thomas' website. I've read and liked several of his other books, but this is by far the best! I needed the reminder that Godly pleasure is crucial to a healthy Christian life and honoring to God. Very encouraging. I downloaded this (legally :)) from Gary Thomas' website. I've read and liked several of his other books, but this is by far the best! I needed the reminder that Godly pleasure is crucial to a healthy Christian life and honoring to God. Very encouraging.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Walburg

    Other than that I found this book to be very repetitive, there were some very insightful points that I needed to hear. Loved the idea/topic of the book. Thomas is a fantastic writer that speaks in a manner that anyone can understand.

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