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Still Brave: The Evolution of Black Women's Studies

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Cheryl Clarke, Angela Davis, bell hooks, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, and Alice Walker—from the pioneers of black women’s studies comes Still Brave, the definitive collection of race and gender writings today. Including Alice Walker’s groundbreaking elucidation of the term “womanist,” discussions of women’s rights as human rights, and a piece on the Obama factor, the collecti Cheryl Clarke, Angela Davis, bell hooks, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, and Alice Walker—from the pioneers of black women’s studies comes Still Brave, the definitive collection of race and gender writings today. Including Alice Walker’s groundbreaking elucidation of the term “womanist,” discussions of women’s rights as human rights, and a piece on the Obama factor, the collection speaks to the ways that feminism has evolved and how black women have confronted racism within it. Stanlie M. James is director of the African and African American Studies Program at Arizona State University, where she holds a joint appointment with the Women's and Gender Studies Program. Frances Smith Foster is a professor of English and women's studies, the former director of the Emory Institute for Women's Studies, and current chair of the English Department at Emory University. Beverly Guy-Sheftall is president of the National Women's Studies Association, the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center, and a professor of women's studies at Spelman College.


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Cheryl Clarke, Angela Davis, bell hooks, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, and Alice Walker—from the pioneers of black women’s studies comes Still Brave, the definitive collection of race and gender writings today. Including Alice Walker’s groundbreaking elucidation of the term “womanist,” discussions of women’s rights as human rights, and a piece on the Obama factor, the collecti Cheryl Clarke, Angela Davis, bell hooks, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, and Alice Walker—from the pioneers of black women’s studies comes Still Brave, the definitive collection of race and gender writings today. Including Alice Walker’s groundbreaking elucidation of the term “womanist,” discussions of women’s rights as human rights, and a piece on the Obama factor, the collection speaks to the ways that feminism has evolved and how black women have confronted racism within it. Stanlie M. James is director of the African and African American Studies Program at Arizona State University, where she holds a joint appointment with the Women's and Gender Studies Program. Frances Smith Foster is a professor of English and women's studies, the former director of the Emory Institute for Women's Studies, and current chair of the English Department at Emory University. Beverly Guy-Sheftall is president of the National Women's Studies Association, the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center, and a professor of women's studies at Spelman College.

30 review for Still Brave: The Evolution of Black Women's Studies

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Online

    This definitive collection of writings on race and gender from the past 30 years contains gems from Angela Davis, bell hooks, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, Alice Walker and more.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    A must read for any woman who claims to be an Intersectional Feminist (aka a real feminist). This collection provides the best thought pieces from queens of black literature, from bell hooks to Alice Walker. Allow the prose to show you where we have come from and how far we have to go. Remind yourself that the fight for equality is one that includes every woman and that the fight for women of color has been one against even their own white sisters. This is a collection I bought for a Women's Stu A must read for any woman who claims to be an Intersectional Feminist (aka a real feminist). This collection provides the best thought pieces from queens of black literature, from bell hooks to Alice Walker. Allow the prose to show you where we have come from and how far we have to go. Remind yourself that the fight for equality is one that includes every woman and that the fight for women of color has been one against even their own white sisters. This is a collection I bought for a Women's Studies course that remains on my bookshelf as a touchstone when I feel I've fallen into the easy trap of white feminism.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Misty

    This is a book I certainly think everyone should read, but most importantly: hey white friends, read this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cara Byrne

    This is quite the anthology/edited book. I read _But Some of Us are Brave_ a week before starting this collection, and while I think both are incredibly important in understanding the changing trends and different viewpoints that make up Black feminist studies and criticism, their tones are night and day. _But Some of Us are Brave_ feels much more like the recent _Manifesta_, written by women still trying to figure out how to define their politics and writing from the heart. _Still Brave_ still This is quite the anthology/edited book. I read _But Some of Us are Brave_ a week before starting this collection, and while I think both are incredibly important in understanding the changing trends and different viewpoints that make up Black feminist studies and criticism, their tones are night and day. _But Some of Us are Brave_ feels much more like the recent _Manifesta_, written by women still trying to figure out how to define their politics and writing from the heart. _Still Brave_ still has some of this fire, but it is much more exhaustive in theme and it feels a little less political and more academic than the previous collection. As the editors explain, it was incredibly difficult for them to choose the essays that make up this collection, as they omitted many important essays and conference talks. They included very diverse essays, exploring everything from Black Feminism from a Caribbean woman's perspective to the overwhelming incarceration rate of women of color. The final essay by Cheryl Wall is my favorite in the collection.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Holloway

    This is a pretty lengthy anthology and took me awhile to get through and interesting collection of writing and ideas. Not super heavy on academic language but still a dense read worth taking your time with. My favorites were Michael Awkward's A black Man's Place in Black Feminist Criticism, When Fighting Words Are Not Enough: The Gendered content of Afrocentrism, Phallus(ies) of Interpretation: Toward Engendering the Black Critical "I", AIDS the secret, silent, Suffering Shame, and Olympia's Mai This is a pretty lengthy anthology and took me awhile to get through and interesting collection of writing and ideas. Not super heavy on academic language but still a dense read worth taking your time with. My favorites were Michael Awkward's A black Man's Place in Black Feminist Criticism, When Fighting Words Are Not Enough: The Gendered content of Afrocentrism, Phallus(ies) of Interpretation: Toward Engendering the Black Critical "I", AIDS the secret, silent, Suffering Shame, and Olympia's Maid: Reclaiming Black Female Subjectivity.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Useful collection of writers and it probably would be a good reader to use selectively for a class, but as an anthology it was felt dense and kind of repetitive. Some of the essays are really outstanding (Audre Lorde's "The Uses of Anger," for example), but this is not a good book to read from cover to cover, at least in one go. Useful collection of writers and it probably would be a good reader to use selectively for a class, but as an anthology it was felt dense and kind of repetitive. Some of the essays are really outstanding (Audre Lorde's "The Uses of Anger," for example), but this is not a good book to read from cover to cover, at least in one go.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Madeleine

    A positively definitive collection. These essays show such a broad stretch of perspectives, and are altogether some of the most transformative pieces of feminist criticism out there. Definitely read the Combahee River Collective's statement, in addition to this whole collection. Great basis for understanding the layers of intersectional feminism and black women's studies. A positively definitive collection. These essays show such a broad stretch of perspectives, and are altogether some of the most transformative pieces of feminist criticism out there. Definitely read the Combahee River Collective's statement, in addition to this whole collection. Great basis for understanding the layers of intersectional feminism and black women's studies.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    305.48896 S8571 2009

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kiandra

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anywavewilldo Anywavewilldo

  11. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  12. 5 out of 5

    Casandra

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shahara’Tova

  14. 4 out of 5

    Meg Panichelli

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Lane

  16. 5 out of 5

    Feminist Press

  17. 4 out of 5

    Trina

  18. 4 out of 5

    Keisha Farmer-moore

  19. 5 out of 5

    Craig Werner

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nik

  21. 5 out of 5

    Aron

  22. 4 out of 5

    C R

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Bach

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kay

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Brown

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shawna Garcia

  27. 4 out of 5

    Juan Maefield

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katie McLennan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alok Vaid-Menon

  30. 5 out of 5

    Taida

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