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New X-Men: Childhood's End, Volume 1

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Red-hot X-23 writers Craig Kyle and Chris Yost, and rising star Mark Brooks (Amazing Fantasy), take New X-Men in a bold new direction. Spinning directly out of House of M, the New X-Men deal with the changed world. Will X-23 join the team? Will friendships persevere? Will the kids survive? No one is safe, and not everyone will live through this incredible change in status Red-hot X-23 writers Craig Kyle and Chris Yost, and rising star Mark Brooks (Amazing Fantasy), take New X-Men in a bold new direction. Spinning directly out of House of M, the New X-Men deal with the changed world. Will X-23 join the team? Will friendships persevere? Will the kids survive? No one is safe, and not everyone will live through this incredible change in status quo. The rules have changed, and the safety is off. Collecting: New X-Men 20-23


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Red-hot X-23 writers Craig Kyle and Chris Yost, and rising star Mark Brooks (Amazing Fantasy), take New X-Men in a bold new direction. Spinning directly out of House of M, the New X-Men deal with the changed world. Will X-23 join the team? Will friendships persevere? Will the kids survive? No one is safe, and not everyone will live through this incredible change in status Red-hot X-23 writers Craig Kyle and Chris Yost, and rising star Mark Brooks (Amazing Fantasy), take New X-Men in a bold new direction. Spinning directly out of House of M, the New X-Men deal with the changed world. Will X-23 join the team? Will friendships persevere? Will the kids survive? No one is safe, and not everyone will live through this incredible change in status quo. The rules have changed, and the safety is off. Collecting: New X-Men 20-23

30 review for New X-Men: Childhood's End, Volume 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    Yost and Kyle put together one of the better post House of M series, and this first volume sets an early tone of desperation for the X-Men and the mutant kids, as post House of M, the world has really turned against them, this is the story of the Academy and what happens next... plus there's a big-time new student... X23! A very firm 8 out of 12 from me. Yost and Kyle put together one of the better post House of M series, and this first volume sets an early tone of desperation for the X-Men and the mutant kids, as post House of M, the world has really turned against them, this is the story of the Academy and what happens next... plus there's a big-time new student... X23! A very firm 8 out of 12 from me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    4.5ish stars. I love this Kyle/Yost run and it’s too bad it didn't take off like Young Avengers. I thought these new characters were really interesting and it's obvious that the writers have a lot of compassion and understanding of them. It just gets better through the Limbo storyline which is honestly one of my favorites. I wish there could be a solid high-profile reboot or at least a writer who would pick up some of these characters and incorporate them into another title. 4.5ish stars. I love this Kyle/Yost run and it’s too bad it didn't take off like Young Avengers. I thought these new characters were really interesting and it's obvious that the writers have a lot of compassion and understanding of them. It just gets better through the Limbo storyline which is honestly one of my favorites. I wish there could be a solid high-profile reboot or at least a writer who would pick up some of these characters and incorporate them into another title.

  3. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Man this brought me back. When i was starting High School I tried getting heavy into X-Men comics. I read New X-Men with a passion. However, I never got to Childhood's end. I got to volume 3 of the original but I didn't bother going back. However, when I opened this book I saw characters I right away remembered. Electric robotic arm girl, guy who can turn into steel, Angel light, and many more. In this volume we're introduced to a darker world than I remember. After House of M many mutants are d Man this brought me back. When i was starting High School I tried getting heavy into X-Men comics. I read New X-Men with a passion. However, I never got to Childhood's end. I got to volume 3 of the original but I didn't bother going back. However, when I opened this book I saw characters I right away remembered. Electric robotic arm girl, guy who can turn into steel, Angel light, and many more. In this volume we're introduced to a darker world than I remember. After House of M many mutants are dying, or turning into regular humans, and many are afraid. Enter Laura, Wolverine's clone, and we have Emma who doesn't like her much. So this is like X-Men High School edition but that might not be a bad thing. What I liked: Laura's relationship with everyone is interesting. I really liked the first issue as it shows House of M effecting all different mutants. I also like the kids all interacting with each other and they work well. The art is solid too. What I didn't like: Emma is a collllld bitch. Like more so than usual. I also dislike how everything is a bit over the top than it needs to be. I get this is a serious situation but kids acting extra kiddy isn't really needed. Also the stryker stuff isn't all that interesting till the last shot. Overall this is solid X-Men fun. I remember liking the original series but this darker tone might make me love it in the end. I hear it gets better to. Onward we go!

  4. 5 out of 5

    trufflebooks

    Super interesting! Despite the fact that I was super confused about 30% of the time. Still, I love X-Men and Marvel, and this was a great quick read 😊

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex E

    In the wake of the Decimation event aka No More Mutants moment, the new X-Men team have to deal with the repercussions of some of their fellow classmates, and team mates losing their powers. Being that they are so young and understandably shaken and scared, this causes a ton of tension. To add to the already tense situation, X-23 joins the team as well. Craig Kyle really hits the ground running with this book as he jumps on writing duty with a pretty great team of artists such as Paul Pelletier, In the wake of the Decimation event aka No More Mutants moment, the new X-Men team have to deal with the repercussions of some of their fellow classmates, and team mates losing their powers. Being that they are so young and understandably shaken and scared, this causes a ton of tension. To add to the already tense situation, X-23 joins the team as well. Craig Kyle really hits the ground running with this book as he jumps on writing duty with a pretty great team of artists such as Paul Pelletier, Mark Brooks and Christopher Yost. I really like that Kyle is able to let that "teen" aspect of the team really shine, as the aftermath of decimation shakes the team to the core and you see how young kids would react to this type of situation. Also them reacting to X-23 (or a lot of time not reacting but instead kind of ignoring her), was really true to high school sensibilities. This one pretty much was cleaning house, literally and figuratively, as the kids who no longer have powers leave the mansion... only to get blown up? Hell of a cliffhanger in this one. I think this was a great start to the series, and a good starting point for the creative team. Recommended for fans of this team.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Now we're talking! This is what I want to see! Fights! Bitterness! Death! I have a feeling I am going to enjoy these volumes. Now we're talking! This is what I want to see! Fights! Bitterness! Death! I have a feeling I am going to enjoy these volumes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    a

    You know what you did, Marvel. That's all I have to say on the matter. You know what you did, Marvel. That's all I have to say on the matter.

  8. 5 out of 5

    C

    Continuing the (sometimes) great x-read of 2017... Since I am at the very tail end of 2017 and I haven't updated my reading in quite a while so I am "cheating" and just kind of writing one review for all of the volumes that I have read so that I can get them up by the end of the year. The aftermath of M day has been mixed to say the least. There were a few high points (Cable and Deadpool, the 198, the beginning of the new X-factor series... and more than a fair share of low points (the new Excalib Continuing the (sometimes) great x-read of 2017... Since I am at the very tail end of 2017 and I haven't updated my reading in quite a while so I am "cheating" and just kind of writing one review for all of the volumes that I have read so that I can get them up by the end of the year. The aftermath of M day has been mixed to say the least. There were a few high points (Cable and Deadpool, the 198, the beginning of the new X-factor series... and more than a fair share of low points (the new Excalibur, Colossus, Deadly Genesis...). It certainly has not come across as a well-orchestrated and planned out event at this point. (And the plot armor of the main characters primarily being the ones that retained their powers is a bit ridiculous, but that is to be expected.) At any rate, my x-read of 2017 is going to extend into 2018 since I am still not close to catching up. It may have to slow down in velocity a bit so that I can do a bit more "real" reading but the slog shall continue...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Arturo

    Decimation, X-23 joins. The squads in danger room scenarios playing past xmen storylines. No more squads. Icarus returns to the mansion. And the kids get on the school bus. To follow the kids from the 12 issue New Mutants and Academy X. Things just get better and things get serious.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Mclean

    This is more like it. After never really taking off, New X-men gets a new creative team and they quickly start hitting their stride. This volume is very much setting up the new status quo, post House Of M, which in itself makes for a very interesting time at the Xavier institute. But it's also clear Kyle & co are playing a longer game here, introducing the most interesting version of William Stryker I've seen. A very marked improvement in both writing and art this volume too 4 issues to make me fe This is more like it. After never really taking off, New X-men gets a new creative team and they quickly start hitting their stride. This volume is very much setting up the new status quo, post House Of M, which in itself makes for a very interesting time at the Xavier institute. But it's also clear Kyle & co are playing a longer game here, introducing the most interesting version of William Stryker I've seen. A very marked improvement in both writing and art this volume too 4 issues to make me feel more connected to these characters than I have over the previous 20.

  11. 5 out of 5

    ellis

    - introduction of laura to other students - introduction of the purifiers i liked seeing all the students - don't recognize half of them from future comics sooo that bodes poorly. i don't understand how scott and emma's opinions on the students handling are so different from in schism. scotts all about keeping their childhoods intact; emma is demanding they learn to fight. they each do a 180 by the time schism rolls around. bad writing or does something happen? guess i'll find out. - introduction of laura to other students - introduction of the purifiers i liked seeing all the students - don't recognize half of them from future comics sooo that bodes poorly. i don't understand how scott and emma's opinions on the students handling are so different from in schism. scotts all about keeping their childhoods intact; emma is demanding they learn to fight. they each do a 180 by the time schism rolls around. bad writing or does something happen? guess i'll find out.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Not a huge fan of the art, but it's not horrible. But the use of characters was pretty good. A direct followup to House of M, this is dealing with the aftermath of most mutants losing their powers all at once. And then figuring out what to do next. A pretty good read. Not a huge fan of the art, but it's not horrible. But the use of characters was pretty good. A direct followup to House of M, this is dealing with the aftermath of most mutants losing their powers all at once. And then figuring out what to do next. A pretty good read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Judith Groen

    This volume felt a little all over the place, but I liked the scene they set up. I am very excited to see how it goes further. I am glad none of my favorite X-high schoolers lost their powers. Josh <3

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mickey

    I liked the series up until this point and I was interested to see how it would handle the darker tone of the post M-Day world. I think it carries it off pretty well, but YMMV depending on how much you're into the "grim-dark" proceedings of most Decimation comics (I have a soft spot for them). I liked the series up until this point and I was interested to see how it would handle the darker tone of the post M-Day world. I think it carries it off pretty well, but YMMV depending on how much you're into the "grim-dark" proceedings of most Decimation comics (I have a soft spot for them).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Rose

    This is by far the most effective M-Day has ever been. You can feel the panic and devastation so much better than any other book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emilie

    That was definitely on the grimdark side. I could have understood some angst and such, but it got really bad, added to by the manner in which Emma Frost treated the newly-depowered mutants.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I dug it pretty cool!

  18. 4 out of 5

    matilda grace

    thank god for X23 is all I’m saying

  19. 5 out of 5

    Roman Colombo

    This was the best series to come out of House of M. Kyle and Yost told some of the strongest X-Men stories, and the roots of there direction in the X-Men universe can be seen here. The religious paranoia, the death, the anguish. While the art wasn't great, it was nice reading the start of their work. This was the best series to come out of House of M. Kyle and Yost told some of the strongest X-Men stories, and the roots of there direction in the X-Men universe can be seen here. The religious paranoia, the death, the anguish. While the art wasn't great, it was nice reading the start of their work.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eugene

    Not a bad start to this era of the title.

  21. 5 out of 5

    M

    Craig Kyle and Chris Yost team up to explore the latest generation of mutants - and how their lives changed on a single day. With the words "no more mutants," the Scarlet Witch depowered nearly all of the world's X-gene-carrying population. At the Xavier institute, this event has destabilized the entire school community and sent the kids into a panic. Emma Frost decides to meet with the human students and pack them off to their families once more, fearing they will now be seen as easy targets. S Craig Kyle and Chris Yost team up to explore the latest generation of mutants - and how their lives changed on a single day. With the words "no more mutants," the Scarlet Witch depowered nearly all of the world's X-gene-carrying population. At the Xavier institute, this event has destabilized the entire school community and sent the kids into a panic. Emma Frost decides to meet with the human students and pack them off to their families once more, fearing they will now be seen as easy targets. She even organizes a final exercise for all the current mutants left, in order to select her final squad of New X-Men for the school. Some kids rebel, some revolt, some deny, and others are grateful; all are impacted by the crisis and their teachers' respones to it. In the wings, however, the long-time X-Men foe William Stryker has begun a brand-new crusade against mutantkind and he has even managed to drag young Jay Guthrie into his plans. The students have been rocked and rolled, toyed with and manipulated - but nothing compares to the last page tragedy that will impact their young lives forever. The M-Day event finally proves useful, as the students now have the opportunity to be fleshed out in smaller groups. Standout personalities like Dust, Rockslide, Hellion, and X-23 get to pull away from the student body and develop personality. The alienation from former friends and the social shake-up of the group dynamic feel like scholastic lessons imparted on a fictional world - making the whole thing better. These kids are starting to lose their childhood, and must now be educated on how to become individual adults in a violent world. Well played, gentlemen. Well played.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    The reviews I read of this series while it was coming out were positive but had the major drawback as the reader wasn't able to pick a favorite character because they kept killing people off. This always intrigued me. And having previously liked the New Mutants and Generation X, I was thinking this could be a series for me. Well I had to wade through Nunzio Defilippis' uninspired and boring New Mutants and New X-Men to get to Kyle and Yost's run. But now I am on to one of the runs I was most eag The reviews I read of this series while it was coming out were positive but had the major drawback as the reader wasn't able to pick a favorite character because they kept killing people off. This always intrigued me. And having previously liked the New Mutants and Generation X, I was thinking this could be a series for me. Well I had to wade through Nunzio Defilippis' uninspired and boring New Mutants and New X-Men to get to Kyle and Yost's run. But now I am on to one of the runs I was most eager to read starting out this dreadfully long continuity run. So, how was it? I enjoyed myself well enough. This book shows the House of M effects better than any of the other books except perhaps X-Factor. And as for the character deaths? Well, I don't quite understand the not being able to pick a favorite character, because most of the deaths were people who needed to get written off somehow. But I am enjoying the focus of the book much more. I am also surprised to be enjoying X-23 well enough. She's Craig Kyle's baby, so of course he's gonna focus on her. This is obviously nothing profound. But it is great to be reading characters that are still movable as opposed to the mainstays who can't be moved for fear of losing their popular status quo.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    The first 19 issues of New X-Men were shockingly mediocre. Looking back, they appear muted, like a children's book or a 4-color comic from the '50s. In contrast, Childhood's End offers a dramatic change of pace. It does away with the Potterian ideas of squads of mutants competing and instead constructs a single team that the authors can focus on. It also does away with the teen plotlines of the previous books and instead offers up a new dark and grittier direction. The use of Stryker and the Purif The first 19 issues of New X-Men were shockingly mediocre. Looking back, they appear muted, like a children's book or a 4-color comic from the '50s. In contrast, Childhood's End offers a dramatic change of pace. It does away with the Potterian ideas of squads of mutants competing and instead constructs a single team that the authors can focus on. It also does away with the teen plotlines of the previous books and instead offers up a new dark and grittier direction. The use of Stryker and the Purifiers is excellent, in this era before the X-bigots became stale. Laura is also a great addition to the cast. You don't get a very good impression of her character here, but it's a clear extension of her story in various X-23 volumes. Finally, this is probably the best use of M-Day and the Decimation in the X-comics. And the cliffhanging finale? Yikes! What a way to rip the rug out from under the last two years of stories. My only complaint about this excellent volume is with the time-displaced narrative, which is a bit confusing at times, before you figure out what's going on. But it's also another sign of the comic's new maturity.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Beaugan Gama

    Childhoods End is the struggle that defell the students of the Xavier School for Gifted children it's starts off here post House of M/M-day and in the remainder of the series, sees the remaining mutant children go through the trials and tribulations of a world that hates and fears them they are put through a gauntlet of villians and emotional strain, its tough and crazy and they overcome most of the obstacles but they are still children and they are hunted down by zealots. it's heart wrenching and Childhoods End is the struggle that defell the students of the Xavier School for Gifted children it's starts off here post House of M/M-day and in the remainder of the series, sees the remaining mutant children go through the trials and tribulations of a world that hates and fears them they are put through a gauntlet of villians and emotional strain, its tough and crazy and they overcome most of the obstacles but they are still children and they are hunted down by zealots. it's heart wrenching and they are really put through their paces it is one of my most favourite runs by the great Kyle and Yost, the plight of the children and their emotional state really pull you in and make you care deeply for the characters for me, childhoods end was the only series that perfectly examined and captured the emotions (fear, depression, trauma) that came with M-day and runs from Decimation (post-House of M/M-day) through to Messiah CompleX read it all and understand why Messiah CompleX mattered, you won't be sorry

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rob McMonigal

    This is the Academy X kids post House of M with X-23 shoe-horned in because the writers also write her book and felt the need to place her in everything, like the person she's cloned after, Wolverine. There's a lot of "Oh God, I lost my powers" angst (Which makes no sense--mutants are hated in the Marvel U, and all of a sudden, 90 of you people got to go rejoin the human race. I can't see this many mutants being unhappy with the change.) and slightly better handling of some of the other characte This is the Academy X kids post House of M with X-23 shoe-horned in because the writers also write her book and felt the need to place her in everything, like the person she's cloned after, Wolverine. There's a lot of "Oh God, I lost my powers" angst (Which makes no sense--mutants are hated in the Marvel U, and all of a sudden, 90 of you people got to go rejoin the human race. I can't see this many mutants being unhappy with the change.) and slightly better handling of some of the other characters, like Hank McCoy. They really do an about-face on Emma Frost, making her the cold and calculating person she used to be. I wonder how the rest of the X-writers felt about that. As the issues go on, there's a lot of "what do we do now?" culminating in of course more death because that's all this series has seemingly been about. The end result is X-Men shojo and I'm afraid it doesn't work for me at all.

  26. 5 out of 5

    TK

    Overall I enjoyed this story, the beginning and ending of these issues were particularly interesting. The initial panic of mutants students waking up without their powers is an awesome concept, and I liked seeing the varied reactions and subtle complexity of those scenes. The end fulfills on the title promise of "Childhood's End" and sets up the gravity of the situation for our heroes. Unfortunately, it's quite a rocky road from the start to the end. I found the constant back and forth in timeli Overall I enjoyed this story, the beginning and ending of these issues were particularly interesting. The initial panic of mutants students waking up without their powers is an awesome concept, and I liked seeing the varied reactions and subtle complexity of those scenes. The end fulfills on the title promise of "Childhood's End" and sets up the gravity of the situation for our heroes. Unfortunately, it's quite a rocky road from the start to the end. I found the constant back and forth in timelines really jarring and in some cases just completely confusing. There was also a rushed feeling to some aspects of the story with not much time spent on the emotional impact of a lot of the characters. I'm hoping this first volume serves as all set up and the next book will bring a little more depth to out mutant heroes.

  27. 5 out of 5

    J.

    On second reading (and in context), this is a good volume in a fairly average series. The trimming of the cast is certainly a good sign, and there's definitely strong, un-ignorable finale (although not an ending in any sense.) But some of the X-Men (Emma Frost in particular) seem to be particularly out-of-character. And, while the idea of Decimation is great, from a possible-plot standpoint, the numbers don't make sense: 90% of mutants lost their power? But there are only 198 left, even though th On second reading (and in context), this is a good volume in a fairly average series. The trimming of the cast is certainly a good sign, and there's definitely strong, un-ignorable finale (although not an ending in any sense.) But some of the X-Men (Emma Frost in particular) seem to be particularly out-of-character. And, while the idea of Decimation is great, from a possible-plot standpoint, the numbers don't make sense: 90% of mutants lost their power? But there are only 198 left, even though there were supposedly millions before? And it definitely seems like at most half of the students lost their powers. Anyway, this is a problem propagated not just in this book, so I won't quibble.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Fizzgig76

    Reprints New X-Men #20-23. The New X-Men are depowered from M-Day, and the teams are divided when Emma Frost decides that non-mutants shouldn't be at the school. Plus an old X-Men villain returns and the carnage begins. The first volume of Childhood's End is enjoyable in the aspect that it reminds me of the orginal New Mutants series. The New Mutants were always the victims of horrible consequences of the X-Men and the New X-Men seem to be falling under that catagory. Later volumes however overd Reprints New X-Men #20-23. The New X-Men are depowered from M-Day, and the teams are divided when Emma Frost decides that non-mutants shouldn't be at the school. Plus an old X-Men villain returns and the carnage begins. The first volume of Childhood's End is enjoyable in the aspect that it reminds me of the orginal New Mutants series. The New Mutants were always the victims of horrible consequences of the X-Men and the New X-Men seem to be falling under that catagory. Later volumes however overdo it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Filip Różanek

    It was okay. It has great moments, but I'm not very found of the cliffhanger at the end, I think it would work better together with next trade in he series, as one 8-issues compilation. New writers stayed true to the characters' personalities estabilished by previous team and take into new, darker direction. And I udnerstand why people might find it controversial, but I enjoyed it, Kyle and Yost have very good sense of setting character drama and when they kick your favorites in the nut, you rea It was okay. It has great moments, but I'm not very found of the cliffhanger at the end, I think it would work better together with next trade in he series, as one 8-issues compilation. New writers stayed true to the characters' personalities estabilished by previous team and take into new, darker direction. And I udnerstand why people might find it controversial, but I enjoyed it, Kyle and Yost have very good sense of setting character drama and when they kick your favorites in the nut, you really feel it (I mean, this book made me feel sorry for Julian. Julian of all people).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Labyrinth Rossiter

    After trudging through the opening teenage soap opera melodramatic sequences of X-Men Academy, this was a HUGE step up. I admit I just skipped the House of M issues to get to Craig Kyle's run, and I feel duly rewarded. Instead the fallout from M-Day is prominently featured here and done pretty well, I think. From this, we get the title and theme, "Childhood's End." In a newer, more dangerous world, class time is over, and it's time for on-the job training as a new New Mutants team is officially After trudging through the opening teenage soap opera melodramatic sequences of X-Men Academy, this was a HUGE step up. I admit I just skipped the House of M issues to get to Craig Kyle's run, and I feel duly rewarded. Instead the fallout from M-Day is prominently featured here and done pretty well, I think. From this, we get the title and theme, "Childhood's End." In a newer, more dangerous world, class time is over, and it's time for on-the job training as a new New Mutants team is officially chosen. Bonus for Me: The Wolvie clone, X-23, joins the team.

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