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Eidi: The Children of Crow Cove

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Some years have passed since the Crow-Girl set off on a journey, met Eidi and her mother, Foula, along with a few others, and persuaded them to come live near the little cove where a brook runs out to the sea. But when Foula has another baby, Eidi feels there's no longer room for her in the settlement. So she leaves Crow Cove to make her own way in the world, hoping to hel Some years have passed since the Crow-Girl set off on a journey, met Eidi and her mother, Foula, along with a few others, and persuaded them to come live near the little cove where a brook runs out to the sea. But when Foula has another baby, Eidi feels there's no longer room for her in the settlement. So she leaves Crow Cove to make her own way in the world, hoping to help her old friend Rossan with his wool out on the heath. Fate, however, brings her to a harbor town where she must find work, and she takes a position as a weaver in the household of a wealthy merchant. In town, Eidi faces disturbing reminders of her past. She also meets a neglected boy named Tink and soon makes a decision that changes the course of both of their futures. The second book in the Children of Crow Cove series is beautifully written in Bodil Bredsdorff's spare style and will deeply satisfy fans of The Crow-Girl and new readers alike.


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Some years have passed since the Crow-Girl set off on a journey, met Eidi and her mother, Foula, along with a few others, and persuaded them to come live near the little cove where a brook runs out to the sea. But when Foula has another baby, Eidi feels there's no longer room for her in the settlement. So she leaves Crow Cove to make her own way in the world, hoping to hel Some years have passed since the Crow-Girl set off on a journey, met Eidi and her mother, Foula, along with a few others, and persuaded them to come live near the little cove where a brook runs out to the sea. But when Foula has another baby, Eidi feels there's no longer room for her in the settlement. So she leaves Crow Cove to make her own way in the world, hoping to help her old friend Rossan with his wool out on the heath. Fate, however, brings her to a harbor town where she must find work, and she takes a position as a weaver in the household of a wealthy merchant. In town, Eidi faces disturbing reminders of her past. She also meets a neglected boy named Tink and soon makes a decision that changes the course of both of their futures. The second book in the Children of Crow Cove series is beautifully written in Bodil Bredsdorff's spare style and will deeply satisfy fans of The Crow-Girl and new readers alike.

30 review for Eidi: The Children of Crow Cove

  1. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Danish children's author Bodil Bredsdorff does it again in Eidi, the second book in her Children of Crow Cove series. Every bit as powerful as the first installment, The Crow-Girl , it follows the story of the eponymous Eidi, who, having come to Crow Cove in the first book, as part of Myna's improvised family, begins to think of leaving, and making her own way in the world. Setting out with little but her fantastically worked scarf - a advertisement, in those times, of a young woman's work, a Danish children's author Bodil Bredsdorff does it again in Eidi, the second book in her Children of Crow Cove series. Every bit as powerful as the first installment, The Crow-Girl , it follows the story of the eponymous Eidi, who, having come to Crow Cove in the first book, as part of Myna's improvised family, begins to think of leaving, and making her own way in the world. Setting out with little but her fantastically worked scarf - a advertisement, in those times, of a young woman's work, and a signal that she was open to employment - she eventually finds herself in a far town, taking an abused young orphan under her wing, and by so doing, discovering something surprising about herself. With such a similar storyline - in both books, the heroine leaves Crow Cove, driven forth by a change in family circumstance (the death of Crow Girl's grandmother, the birth of Eidi's young half-brother), and finds herself "adopting" the stray(s) she encounters - this could very easily have felt like a formulaic reworking of the original. But though there are undeniable parallels, both structurally and stylistically, Eidi felt as fresh and true as the first, giving a nuanced portrait of a young person's conflicted dealings with home and family. Eidi's love for her mother, her feeling of being supplanted by her infant brother, her longing to be out on her own, and doing, all felt so achingly real to me! And the conclusion, in which she (like Myna) comes full circle, was deeply satisfying! Bredsdorff really seems to respect both her characters and her readers, never assuming that, because they are young, they are incapable of appreciating complexity, or need to have reality sugar-coated for them. Given my overwhelmingly positive response to these first two novels, I'm excited to learn that the third, Tink , will be available in English this coming May!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    Sequel to The Crow Girl, this story is about Eidi, another inhabitant of Crow Cove. On a journey with her friend Rossan to take the yarn that she has spun from his wool to market, she encounters a mistreated orphan boy whom she determines to rescue. Little does she know that this adventure will ultimately reveal something about her own past. I enjoyed Bredsdorff's descriptions of the countryside and seaside, and of the villagers' hardworking, simple way of life. I could almost smell the salt sea Sequel to The Crow Girl, this story is about Eidi, another inhabitant of Crow Cove. On a journey with her friend Rossan to take the yarn that she has spun from his wool to market, she encounters a mistreated orphan boy whom she determines to rescue. Little does she know that this adventure will ultimately reveal something about her own past. I enjoyed Bredsdorff's descriptions of the countryside and seaside, and of the villagers' hardworking, simple way of life. I could almost smell the salt sea air and feel the chill wind and see the gray, scudding clouds as I read. This book surely deserved the Mildred L. Batchelder honor book award that it received in 2010. Highly recommended--and no need to read the first book, even though this one makes a few references to events in The Crow Girl.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    This book could be read by a girl or boy in the grade 4 to 7. This book is about Eidi and her mother, Foula, along with a few others, that come to live in Crow Cove. When Eidi's mother has another baby, Eidi feels there's no longer room for her in the settlement. So she leaves Crow Cove to make her own way in the world. She is hoping to help her old friend, Rossan, with his wool out on the hearth. But fate, however, brings Eidi to a harbor town where she must find work and takes a job as a weave This book could be read by a girl or boy in the grade 4 to 7. This book is about Eidi and her mother, Foula, along with a few others, that come to live in Crow Cove. When Eidi's mother has another baby, Eidi feels there's no longer room for her in the settlement. So she leaves Crow Cove to make her own way in the world. She is hoping to help her old friend, Rossan, with his wool out on the hearth. But fate, however, brings Eidi to a harbor town where she must find work and takes a job as a weaver in a household of a wealthy merchant. In this town, Eidi faces disturbing reminders of her past. She also meets a neglected boy named Tink and soon makes a decision that changes the course of bother of their futures. Batchelder Award winners 2010

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    Audience: I think this book would be best for older kids. It is translated into English which some might find interesting. I would say it was best for 4-6th graders. Appeal: I believe the appeal for this book is the cover it looks very inviting and the story might appeal to those that have read the first one. 2010 Batchelder Award Honor

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Second in the Children of Crow Cove series. Just as sweet as the first. I don't usually like series, but these books could be read independently of the others and they all seem to wrap up nicely. Second in the Children of Crow Cove series. Just as sweet as the first. I don't usually like series, but these books could be read independently of the others and they all seem to wrap up nicely.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Stevens

    "Eidi" is the second book in the Children of the Crow Cove Series, and it is the winner of The Batchelder Award. This old, Danish, folktale-like book is about a young girl named, Eidi, who after her mother and new step-father have a baby, she no longer feels that there is room for her in the house, so she sets out to work as a sewer with a family friend very far away in the mountains. After impressing an important man in the small town that she and her family friend sell their wool, she begins t "Eidi" is the second book in the Children of the Crow Cove Series, and it is the winner of The Batchelder Award. This old, Danish, folktale-like book is about a young girl named, Eidi, who after her mother and new step-father have a baby, she no longer feels that there is room for her in the house, so she sets out to work as a sewer with a family friend very far away in the mountains. After impressing an important man in the small town that she and her family friend sell their wool, she begins to sew scarves for him at his mansion. However, Eidi discovers that he has a neglected son that she immediately bonds with. Still a child herself, Eidi realizes she and Tink must make some difficult decisions that could alter the course of their lives, and they decide to run away together to keep Bandon from abusing Tink any longer. However, along the rugged mountain terrain, the two run into Eidi former alcoholic step-father that her mother eventually escaped from, and as she and Tink work to get away from him, Eidi realizes what it means to have good character and to face your fears. This folk-talk draws the reader in and captures you with the pure honesty and sense of adventure. This novel could be used in a book club. It includes a lot of vivid imagery and is described in much detail, so students would be able to discuss the surroundings and what is happening in the book. This book also focuses on character and growing up, so having students read this as a book club could allow them to ask difficult questions and challenge one another with open discussions. This could also be done during guided reading. This book would also be great to read a little bit each day as a read aloud during a unit about character or a writing unit on imagery.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jane G Meyer

    The second book translated into English from the Crow Cove series. I'm not sure I liked it quite as well as the original title, The Crow-Girl, but overall the writing is so refreshing--simple, easy, clean. It's a nice introduction into rural life long ago for a young reader--the work ethic is very strong and inspiring and the theme of listening to the good in your heart, following a path that cherishes and fosters healthy relationships is also refreshing... I was thinking of these two books in co The second book translated into English from the Crow Cove series. I'm not sure I liked it quite as well as the original title, The Crow-Girl, but overall the writing is so refreshing--simple, easy, clean. It's a nice introduction into rural life long ago for a young reader--the work ethic is very strong and inspiring and the theme of listening to the good in your heart, following a path that cherishes and fosters healthy relationships is also refreshing... I was thinking of these two books in comparison with some of our American writers and if I were to translate them into a fine art setting they are much more like watercolors, painting a wash of feelings and characters where the lines sort of blur into each other. Not much is terribly detailed, but there's a soothing feel to the stories, despite the conflict. (The recent Newberry, Higher Power of Lucky, would be described in an opposite style, with strongly defined ink lines, lots of description and detail and power, color and force in the narration and dialogue... very ink and marker :))

  8. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Mustread

    Translated from the Danish, Bredsdorff's storyline and language reflect the simple yet demanding lifestyle which requires hard work and many hands. Eidi, a secondary character in The Crow-Girl: The Children of Crow Cove, leaves her mother and stepfather in Crow Cove to earn some money and find her own life. Her empathy for the much younger Tink leads her to rescue him from the abusive man he has been living with. Although this title could stand alone, would be preferable to read The Crow-Girl: T Translated from the Danish, Bredsdorff's storyline and language reflect the simple yet demanding lifestyle which requires hard work and many hands. Eidi, a secondary character in The Crow-Girl: The Children of Crow Cove, leaves her mother and stepfather in Crow Cove to earn some money and find her own life. Her empathy for the much younger Tink leads her to rescue him from the abusive man he has been living with. Although this title could stand alone, would be preferable to read The Crow-Girl: The Children of Crow Cove first to get the background on the extended "family" living at Crow Cove. In both books the strongest characters are plucky young girls defending and sometimes rescuing abused women and children.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe

    If you haven't read the marvelous Crow Girl, read it first, then pick this one up. Eidi feels unwanted and left out when her mother has a baby, so she heads off to help Rossan prepare his wool. When Rossan travels to sell wool at the market at Eastern Harbor, Eidi goes along to help. Finding work at a rich merchant's house brings the plight of a little boy to her attention, and pretty soon Eidi takes matters into her own hands to right a great wrong. Gentle, spare storytelling and my favorite ba If you haven't read the marvelous Crow Girl, read it first, then pick this one up. Eidi feels unwanted and left out when her mother has a baby, so she heads off to help Rossan prepare his wool. When Rossan travels to sell wool at the market at Eastern Harbor, Eidi goes along to help. Finding work at a rich merchant's house brings the plight of a little boy to her attention, and pretty soon Eidi takes matters into her own hands to right a great wrong. Gentle, spare storytelling and my favorite backdrop, the ocean, make these books a treat. 5th grade and older. Honor for the 2010 Batchelder.

  10. 4 out of 5

    April Helms

    The sequel to "The Crow-Girl." Those who haven't read "The Crow-Girl" (or who haven't read it in a while) may find the first chapter or two a bit hard to follow. Not a lot of background is covered in "Eidi." But after that, the story finds its own path as Eidi journeys from Crow Cove to make her own way into the world. Her mother has just had a baby, and Eidi fears there is no place for her. This is a good coming-of-age story, and Eidi not only gets to spin wool and knit -- something she's alrea The sequel to "The Crow-Girl." Those who haven't read "The Crow-Girl" (or who haven't read it in a while) may find the first chapter or two a bit hard to follow. Not a lot of background is covered in "Eidi." But after that, the story finds its own path as Eidi journeys from Crow Cove to make her own way into the world. Her mother has just had a baby, and Eidi fears there is no place for her. This is a good coming-of-age story, and Eidi not only gets to spin wool and knit -- something she's already competent at -- but she learns to bargain and to think on her feet. She learns to take a stand as she helps and nurtures Tink, a boy who has been abused by his adoptive father.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    I really liked this book. It's got a lot in common with The Crow-Girl: The Children of Crow Cove, as it's the story of a young woman who wrestles the world into submission, more or less. But it's a lovely, lyrical journey. I love the way children change hands in these books, and how it all works out for the best. I also adore the way Bredsdorff has the (good) adults talk with the kids- they are free to make their own mistakes, free to wander off into the world, clearly valued and respected and m I really liked this book. It's got a lot in common with The Crow-Girl: The Children of Crow Cove, as it's the story of a young woman who wrestles the world into submission, more or less. But it's a lovely, lyrical journey. I love the way children change hands in these books, and how it all works out for the best. I also adore the way Bredsdorff has the (good) adults talk with the kids- they are free to make their own mistakes, free to wander off into the world, clearly valued and respected and missed, but free agents from an early age.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    The second of the Children of the Cove series, translated from the Danish. Like the first, this is a story of discovery and journey, but the heroine here is the girl the Crow Girl befriended in the first book, Eidi. Prompted by the birth of her half-brother, Eidi seeks her fortune in the wider world and learns to trust her instincts and her kind heart, which leads to discovery about her origins. As skillfully woven as one of the shawls Eidi makes, and shrewd about the way even villians aren't al The second of the Children of the Cove series, translated from the Danish. Like the first, this is a story of discovery and journey, but the heroine here is the girl the Crow Girl befriended in the first book, Eidi. Prompted by the birth of her half-brother, Eidi seeks her fortune in the wider world and learns to trust her instincts and her kind heart, which leads to discovery about her origins. As skillfully woven as one of the shawls Eidi makes, and shrewd about the way even villians aren't always what they seem.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Hubbard

    2010 Batchelder award (Best children's book published in foreign language) This is a story with beautiful language, simply written, and engaging story. I kept wondering if our kids would 'get' it or not. At first I thought it might be a fantasy like Tuck Everlasting , but it is a story of girl (set in 1800's?) moving away from home to get away from stepfather and the adventures she has. The book was written in Denmark, so some things that might make us do a double take(childbirth for one) were p 2010 Batchelder award (Best children's book published in foreign language) This is a story with beautiful language, simply written, and engaging story. I kept wondering if our kids would 'get' it or not. At first I thought it might be a fantasy like Tuck Everlasting , but it is a story of girl (set in 1800's?) moving away from home to get away from stepfather and the adventures she has. The book was written in Denmark, so some things that might make us do a double take(childbirth for one) were perhaps not as common to find in a story in the USA.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Linnae

    Eidi feels a bit pushed out, once her mother has another baby, so she sets off from Crow Cove to get a job. She does find work, but it's in the house of a man that she despises for the way he treats his adopted son, Tink. When things come to a head, Eidi must decide what to do, where to go, and who's coming with her. I enjoyed this second book in the Crow Cove series. I like the idea of a cozy place where strays of all sorts are welcomed, which seems to be an underlying theme to the series. Eidi Eidi feels a bit pushed out, once her mother has another baby, so she sets off from Crow Cove to get a job. She does find work, but it's in the house of a man that she despises for the way he treats his adopted son, Tink. When things come to a head, Eidi must decide what to do, where to go, and who's coming with her. I enjoyed this second book in the Crow Cove series. I like the idea of a cozy place where strays of all sorts are welcomed, which seems to be an underlying theme to the series. Eidi proves to true to herself and true to her friends.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Now I remember, when I read Children of Crow Cove (or whatever it was called), I thought it was nice, but a bit strange, and very quiet, and I wasn't sure who would ever read it. Also, very Not American. I don't mean that in a bad way, in fact, that's why I read the Batchelders. But I don't know who to give this to. The child abuse makes it a tough sell for younger children, it's light on plot, and has a real folktale feeling to it. Now I remember, when I read Children of Crow Cove (or whatever it was called), I thought it was nice, but a bit strange, and very quiet, and I wasn't sure who would ever read it. Also, very Not American. I don't mean that in a bad way, in fact, that's why I read the Batchelders. But I don't know who to give this to. The child abuse makes it a tough sell for younger children, it's light on plot, and has a real folktale feeling to it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ling Fang Ye

    This is a clean story. There are many children in Eidi's family, in one day, Eidi's mother Foula gave a birth to a new baby, Cam. Gradually,she felt there is no enough room to live, so she told her mother her determination and her own way to the world. She leaves Crow Cove. The shepherd Rossan help her a lot, they sell the wool to earn the money and they also got to know some friends. For Eidi, she already leaving a big footprint in her way to world. This is a clean story. There are many children in Eidi's family, in one day, Eidi's mother Foula gave a birth to a new baby, Cam. Gradually,she felt there is no enough room to live, so she told her mother her determination and her own way to the world. She leaves Crow Cove. The shepherd Rossan help her a lot, they sell the wool to earn the money and they also got to know some friends. For Eidi, she already leaving a big footprint in her way to world.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Interesting book about life in ancient Denmark, the second in the Crow Girl series. These books are beautifully written with a concentration on natural beauty and interesting details of daily life in that time period. Girls would especially like these quiet books about girls setting off to determine their own future.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    As with Crow Girl, this book is poignant and quiet. So far in these first two books there is such a gathering of people in need of a family. In each case, the main character leaves home only to return with another wayward soul to their cozy cove and cluster of chosen family. Quite lovely really.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    2010 Batcheldor Honor Book. Danish translation. Told in a folk tale style, Eidi, decides to go on a long journey pursuing her weaving talent, befriends an orphan, rescues him from a violent stepfather, who she later discovers is her father after she returns home.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Like The Crow Girl, this book is a lovely find. The author has such a way with imagery, observations of human nature, and a quiet treatment of some of the darker moments of human life. So many of her images are like jewels--they stick with you long after the reading.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    A nice little story. It is a sequel and I think I would have enjoyed it more if I had read the first. Originally published in Denmark, so it was a little different.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    I read this book to my 5 year old son. We BOTH thoroughly enjoyed it. What a great find!

  23. 4 out of 5

    S. H.

    This is a very beautiful book! I recomend this book to all of my friends.

  24. 5 out of 5

    B

    I should have read the first in the series as I would have been able to sort the characters out earlier.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Eidi, a character introduced in The Crow-Girl, leaves the cove. She becomes independent and learns that where she wants to be is with her friends and family in the cove.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kay Farmer

    I have enjoyed this series, The Children of Crow Cove, they are character driven, quiet adventures,empowering and touching. What more can a reader want?

  27. 4 out of 5

    lin

    Less satisfying than The Crow Girl somehow, but still a sweet little read. Bad things do happen, although I found this one less grim.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This was a nice book with some really beautiful writing. I did have trouble going back to it after I had put it down. It was a very slow book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    The second in the Danish "Children of Crow Cove" series, this book is also about the self-discovery of a young girl in harsh circumstances. Simple yet powerful prose. The second in the Danish "Children of Crow Cove" series, this book is also about the self-discovery of a young girl in harsh circumstances. Simple yet powerful prose.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hayli Wrigley

    This book wasn't too bad, but it wsasn't my favorite book by any means. This book would be good for students who enjoyed reading The Crow Girl or a student interested in a series. This book wasn't too bad, but it wsasn't my favorite book by any means. This book would be good for students who enjoyed reading The Crow Girl or a student interested in a series.

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