Hot Best Seller

Lost in the Grooves: Scram's Capricious Guide to the Music You Missed

Availability: Ready to download

Do you remember these great pop stars and their hits? Deerhoof's The Man, The King, The Girl Butch Hancock's West Texas Waltzes and Dust Blown Tractor Tunes, Swamp Dogg's Cuffed, Collared and Tagged, Michael Head's TheMagical World Of The Strands, John Trubee's TheCommunists Are Coming to Kill Us, John Phillips's WolfKing of L.A., and Michel Magne's Moshe MouseCrucifiction Do you remember these great pop stars and their hits? Deerhoof's The Man, The King, The Girl Butch Hancock's West Texas Waltzes and Dust Blown Tractor Tunes, Swamp Dogg's Cuffed, Collared and Tagged, Michael Head's TheMagical World Of The Strands, John Trubee's TheCommunists Are Coming to Kill Us, John Phillips's WolfKing of L.A., and Michel Magne's Moshe MouseCrucifiction?You will when you read Lost in theGrooves, a fascinating guide to the back alleys off the pop music superhighway. Pop music history is full of little-known musicians, whose work stands defiantly alone, too quirky, distinctive, or demented to appeal to a mass audience. This book explores the nooks and crannies of the pop music world, unearthing lost gems from should-have-been major artists (Sugarpie DeSanto, Judee Sill), revisiting lesser known works by established icons (Marvin Gaye's post-divorce kissoff album, Here MyDear; The Ramones' Subterranean Jungle), and spotlighting musicians who simply don't fit into neat categories (k. mccarty, Exuma). The book's encyclopedic alphabetical structure throws off strange sparks as disparate genres and eras rub against each other: folk-psych iconoclasts face louche pop crooners; outsider artists set their odd masterpieces down next to obscurities from the stars; lo-fi garage rock cuddles up with the French avant-garde; and roots rock weirdoes trip over bubblegum. This book will delight any jukebox junkie or pop culture fan.


Compare

Do you remember these great pop stars and their hits? Deerhoof's The Man, The King, The Girl Butch Hancock's West Texas Waltzes and Dust Blown Tractor Tunes, Swamp Dogg's Cuffed, Collared and Tagged, Michael Head's TheMagical World Of The Strands, John Trubee's TheCommunists Are Coming to Kill Us, John Phillips's WolfKing of L.A., and Michel Magne's Moshe MouseCrucifiction Do you remember these great pop stars and their hits? Deerhoof's The Man, The King, The Girl Butch Hancock's West Texas Waltzes and Dust Blown Tractor Tunes, Swamp Dogg's Cuffed, Collared and Tagged, Michael Head's TheMagical World Of The Strands, John Trubee's TheCommunists Are Coming to Kill Us, John Phillips's WolfKing of L.A., and Michel Magne's Moshe MouseCrucifiction?You will when you read Lost in theGrooves, a fascinating guide to the back alleys off the pop music superhighway. Pop music history is full of little-known musicians, whose work stands defiantly alone, too quirky, distinctive, or demented to appeal to a mass audience. This book explores the nooks and crannies of the pop music world, unearthing lost gems from should-have-been major artists (Sugarpie DeSanto, Judee Sill), revisiting lesser known works by established icons (Marvin Gaye's post-divorce kissoff album, Here MyDear; The Ramones' Subterranean Jungle), and spotlighting musicians who simply don't fit into neat categories (k. mccarty, Exuma). The book's encyclopedic alphabetical structure throws off strange sparks as disparate genres and eras rub against each other: folk-psych iconoclasts face louche pop crooners; outsider artists set their odd masterpieces down next to obscurities from the stars; lo-fi garage rock cuddles up with the French avant-garde; and roots rock weirdoes trip over bubblegum. This book will delight any jukebox junkie or pop culture fan.

30 review for Lost in the Grooves: Scram's Capricious Guide to the Music You Missed

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Desrosiers

    This was a great read: a few dozen music geeks (including such noteworthies as Peter Bagge, George Pelecanos, Rick Moody, Richard Meltzer, and GoodReads' own Tosh Berman) write up some overlooked records as if the fate of the rapidly dissipating sonic tempest depended on it. Most of the writers do a convincing job of describing why the record is groovy without overselling it or endeavoring, Chuck-Eddy-style, to pervert a canon. (Canon? what canon?) All of the essential genres are represented This was a great read: a few dozen music geeks (including such noteworthies as Peter Bagge, George Pelecanos, Rick Moody, Richard Meltzer, and GoodReads' own Tosh Berman) write up some overlooked records as if the fate of the rapidly dissipating sonic tempest depended on it. Most of the writers do a convincing job of describing why the record is groovy without overselling it or endeavoring, Chuck-Eddy-style, to pervert a canon. (Canon? what canon?) All of the essential genres are represented: disco (Sylvester, Klymaxx), metal (Megadeth, Boys from Nowhere), Beatles (McCartney II, Klaatu), bubblegum (Aaron Carter, the Partridge Family), hip-hop (Tim Dog, Schoolly D.), prog (King Crimson, Spirit), country (Butch Hancock, David Allan Coe) etc. etc. I'm sure some of this stuff actually sucks, but damn it's fun to read about. Here, you can learn about the odd blues-ragtime hybrid of Bad Rice by Exorcist soundscapist Ron Nagle ("today, he's better known in the world of ceramics"). Or the grimmest, most "street" Sesame Street album ever ( The Year of Roosevelt Franklin ). Or Peter Bagge's unusual choice of Aaron Carter (alongside his other reveries to the Raspberries, 10cc, Hollies), where he takes a moment to wish that the whole world would "phase out this 'rapper thing'". Here are some memorable descriptions... Andy Kim's How'd We Ever Get this Way: "A six-string friendly place for folks who would dig Scott Walker recordings if they weren't so damned Scott Walker." Be-Bop Deluxe's Futurama: "If you can imagine all of your Bowie, Queen, and ELO records playing simultaneously, then you have some idea what this album's about." Dogbowl's "gorgeous pop" album Flan: "Something vaguely apocalyptic has happened, transforming [Dogbowl's] world into a living hell of corpses, cannibals, and rats: also a human-headed dog, a floating eyeball, testicles that walk and a talking fish with the musical name Ginger Kang Kang." Sleep Chamber's Symphony Sexualis: "Sleep Chamber is essentially John Zewizz (née [sic] McSweeney), an engineer on the railways in Massachusetts. For twenty years he's made scads of music, done a lot of heroin and fucked a lot of shmokin' hot women." In addition to all this, you get reprints of vintage rock-rag reviews of rekkids such as Martin Mull's debut and Elvis Sings the Wonderful World of Christmas. Plus some interesting lists such as "10 Non-Goth Albums Goths Listen To" or "Five Great Songs from Dunedin, New Zealand". I loved it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    I noticed our local library has this in - in no hurry but i'll get it out soon-ish ..Champions obscure or overlooked music from pre- 60s until now (well mid noughties), including works from the well known (like McCartney and the Beach Boys) to the lesser known – Michel Magne anyone? It’s utterly fab. Brilliant to dip into, of course first you see how much you’ve already got (a fair bit with me – Billy Nicholls, Denis Wilson, the Honeycombs, Neutral Milk Hotel etc), but then you get on to the ones I noticed our local library has this in - in no hurry but i'll get it out soon-ish ..Champions obscure or overlooked music from pre- 60s until now (well mid noughties), including works from the well known (like McCartney and the Beach Boys) to the lesser known – Michel Magne anyone? It’s utterly fab. Brilliant to dip into, of course first you see how much you’ve already got (a fair bit with me – Billy Nicholls, Denis Wilson, the Honeycombs, Neutral Milk Hotel etc), but then you get on to the ones who are completely new. And then you start downloading. I got this book out on Saturday, and already I’ve downloaded Joe Bataan, White Noise, The Raspberries and The Go-Betweens. I love Joe Bataan, kind of latin funk, The White Noise are scary and fun. Mad. I’m going to spend a lot of money now.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tosh

    Besides writing two little essays for the book (on Sparks and The Honeycombs) I also love the premise of the book - which is a series of writers writing about their favorite band or artist's album that went under the radar for some reason. Always argumentive and always fun, with passionate insights why they love a certain type of music by a certain type of artist... Besides writing two little essays for the book (on Sparks and The Honeycombs) I also love the premise of the book - which is a series of writers writing about their favorite band or artist's album that went under the radar for some reason. Always argumentive and always fun, with passionate insights why they love a certain type of music by a certain type of artist...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    Often I find it easy to rag on hipsters, among whom these authors would definitely be included, for the way that they tend to be more focused on what to be against than what to be for. This book, though, takes up the question of what a hipster approach to music would be in terms of what is liked and not only what is disliked. There is certainly plenty of material to be criticized in what the hipster authors find to be worth appreciating. The authors appreciate music that is so obscure that it ha Often I find it easy to rag on hipsters, among whom these authors would definitely be included, for the way that they tend to be more focused on what to be against than what to be for. This book, though, takes up the question of what a hipster approach to music would be in terms of what is liked and not only what is disliked. There is certainly plenty of material to be criticized in what the hipster authors find to be worth appreciating. The authors appreciate music that is so obscure that it has never been legally released, and where various bootlegs must be obtained in order to listen to them. The music can be considered one of two kinds, one of them is music that is so obscure that it is nearly impossible or sometimes even less than legal to obtain, and the other is music that was at least a little bit popular but which is not appreciated to the extent that it can be. The authors appear to appreciate music that can be enjoyed ironically but which is itself made sincerely, and that is a striking point that is worth considering. This book is rather straightforwardly organized. The book begins with a short introduction which explains the approach of the authors and then the body of the work then consists of an alphabetically organized (by artist/band) account of music that the authors and contributors feel has been unjustly ignored and neglected. My own thoughts about this are mixed. I should note, for the record, that I greatly appreciate the authors wishing to highlight good music that was unfortunately ignored. I also appreciate the praise that the authors give to commercials that often bring neglected indie music to the attention of general audiences (which is how I have found some of the music discussed in this book). If the authors' feelings are ultimately subjective and my own sympathies with the worldview of the authors is limited, there is still a lot to appreciate. It is also nice, as a change of pace, to see hipsters praising the obscure rather than simply bashing on the familiar. This is probably the best hipster book I have read on music, and it is hard to imagine one I would like more. One of the aspects of this book that I found particularly notable is the way that the authors and various contributors approached music. The authors appear to be most interested in giving credit to artists who have not received a lot of attention. It should be noted, though, that while the authors give plenty of credit to artists who others may not take seriously (The Tijuana Brass and Jackson 5 come to mind, for example), most of the groups discussed here are deliberately obscure. Some of them, I must admit, I have listened to on the advice of friends, such as Captain Beefheart and The Neutral Milk Hotel. Most of this music is unfamiliar to me and likely to most of the book's readers as well. It is also worth noting, a bit unfortunately, that this book gives a great deal of praise to authors mainly based on how candid and how disordered their lives were. The authors appear to deliberately relish various types of disorder, and if that is something that does not appeal to you, this book is not going to be as enjoyable to read as the authors would intend. Also, if you tend to prefer order and decency, you are probably not a good candidate to be a hipster anyway.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Roland

    A fun guide to extremely rare albums. Even as a fan of the obscure, I was unfamiliar with damn near every album profiled in this book. The contributors vary, and some suggestions seem like they were picked on a whim, but overall there's enough interesting picks here to keep rock snobs interested. A fun guide to extremely rare albums. Even as a fan of the obscure, I was unfamiliar with damn near every album profiled in this book. The contributors vary, and some suggestions seem like they were picked on a whim, but overall there's enough interesting picks here to keep rock snobs interested.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Scram's Recommends Curt Boettcher - There's an Innocent Face Blue Ash - No More No Less Brick self titled album Cardinal “Big Mink” self title album The Chills - Brave Words, “the Verlains and the Bats came close to their genius” Brian Doherty Look Blue Go Purple, “Cactus Cat;” Frantic Jangly Guitar + Killer Female Harmonies = Smiling Music Fan Colours - Colours/Atmoshere Graffiti self title 1968 Hackamore Brick - One Kiss Leads to Another Hearts & Flowers - Now is the Time for.../Of Horses-Kids-and Forgo Scram's Recommends Curt Boettcher - There's an Innocent Face Blue Ash - No More No Less Brick self titled album Cardinal “Big Mink” self title album The Chills - Brave Words, “the Verlains and the Bats came close to their genius” Brian Doherty Look Blue Go Purple, “Cactus Cat;” Frantic Jangly Guitar + Killer Female Harmonies = Smiling Music Fan Colours - Colours/Atmoshere Graffiti self title 1968 Hackamore Brick - One Kiss Leads to Another Hearts & Flowers - Now is the Time for.../Of Horses-Kids-and Forgotten Women The Honeycombs self titled album Incredible Moses Leroy - Electric Pocket Radio The Individuals - Fields The Orgone Box self titled album Surprised and happy that Pink Floyd's, "Final Cut" is listed here, thanks again Brian. There is plenty more to discover in this book and am checking their blogs too.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Estey

    This book just gets better and better. Should have given it five stars in the first place. I could set up a reissues company and just take titles out of here to put back out!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ken!

    tons of great recs in this book. i have read it before but i keep returning to it and finding more stuff i want to check out.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matt Kudlacz

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ted

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wes Brown

  12. 5 out of 5

    John

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

  14. 5 out of 5

    W Davidson

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sheikh Tajamul

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Kellogg

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Leerburger

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Soltes

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sam Kinison

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jimi

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hadley

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abraham

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chad

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sean Smith

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dale

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.