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Little Lit: Strange Stories for Strange Kids

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The second groundbreaking anthology from the "New York Times" best-selling team of Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly is here The everyday world is turned upside down and the ordinary becomes extraordinary in this collection of the strangest tales. From Art Spiegelman's "The Several Lives of Selby Sheldrake" to Maurice Sendak's "Cereal Baby Keller "to Jules Feiffer's "Trap The second groundbreaking anthology from the "New York Times" best-selling team of Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly is here The everyday world is turned upside down and the ordinary becomes extraordinary in this collection of the strangest tales. From Art Spiegelman's "The Several Lives of Selby Sheldrake" to Maurice Sendak's "Cereal Baby Keller "to Jules Feiffer's "Trapped in a Comic Book," these stories are sure to entice any young reader. Also included are comics and features by Ian Falconer and David Sedaris, Paul Auster and Jacques de Loustal, Crockett Johnson, Richard McGuire, and Barbara McClintock, a puzzle by Lewis Trondheim, and make-your-own comic-book endpapers from Kaz. "Little Lit Strange Stories for Strange Kids "continues the tradition of bringing the pleasure of books and reading into the hands and minds of kids.


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The second groundbreaking anthology from the "New York Times" best-selling team of Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly is here The everyday world is turned upside down and the ordinary becomes extraordinary in this collection of the strangest tales. From Art Spiegelman's "The Several Lives of Selby Sheldrake" to Maurice Sendak's "Cereal Baby Keller "to Jules Feiffer's "Trap The second groundbreaking anthology from the "New York Times" best-selling team of Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly is here The everyday world is turned upside down and the ordinary becomes extraordinary in this collection of the strangest tales. From Art Spiegelman's "The Several Lives of Selby Sheldrake" to Maurice Sendak's "Cereal Baby Keller "to Jules Feiffer's "Trapped in a Comic Book," these stories are sure to entice any young reader. Also included are comics and features by Ian Falconer and David Sedaris, Paul Auster and Jacques de Loustal, Crockett Johnson, Richard McGuire, and Barbara McClintock, a puzzle by Lewis Trondheim, and make-your-own comic-book endpapers from Kaz. "Little Lit Strange Stories for Strange Kids "continues the tradition of bringing the pleasure of books and reading into the hands and minds of kids.

30 review for Little Lit: Strange Stories for Strange Kids

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    Another wonderful collection of fun stories, amazingly beautiful illustrations and some search & find pages that I failed to complete. Doh!

  2. 4 out of 5

    RH Walters

    I have a strange kid. She’s fascinated with the story of the monster girl who accidentally freezes her face into a pretty one and makes herself beautiful again by turning her skull inside out. I’m fascinated with the story about a previous superior race of cats.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Callie *Fights Censorship*

    Awesome! Super crazy weird fun. The absolute best of the Little Lit series

  4. 4 out of 5

    J

    A fun little collection that pretends to be a children's collection of illustrated stories -- and is. A fun little collection that pretends to be a children's collection of illustrated stories -- and is.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nick Nguyen

    3.5 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aili

    A lovely anthology of art by lots of really famous folks -- many of them famous for excellent reasons. This book is real purty. It's also neat to see non-comics folks like Paul Auster and David Sedaris try their hand at working with artists and telling a story visually, and to discover the gorgeous work of several underground, foreign (non-U.S.) artists. Unfortunately the book isn't really sure what it is. The stories and activity pages are very narratively and thematically simple (in contrast to A lovely anthology of art by lots of really famous folks -- many of them famous for excellent reasons. This book is real purty. It's also neat to see non-comics folks like Paul Auster and David Sedaris try their hand at working with artists and telling a story visually, and to discover the gorgeous work of several underground, foreign (non-U.S.) artists. Unfortunately the book isn't really sure what it is. The stories and activity pages are very narratively and thematically simple (in contrast to the very polished art) and thus are designed to appeal more to kids than to adults. But (and of course I am an adult) though I was gently amused by the stories, I wasn't enthralled enough by any individual story to want to read it over and over. (The story that most stuck with me is Paul Auster's -- it's about a man who dissociates -- and it was truly creepy and dealt with very adult themes. More of that, please!) But the book isn't really for kids either -- the classy printing and binding and high price tag ($20) mean that parents may want to keep this high up on the shelf where it can't be scribbled in. I can't really see someone handing this to their child, with a magic marker, and saying "OK, find all the hidden objects!" I had lots of Tintin and Asterix and Donald Duck comics when I was a kid, and my brother and I read them so many times they were physically destroyed (we are still finding loose pages of Tintin and the Shooting Star in the attic). This book is too goshdarn nice, by too many nice famous adults, to let a kid destroy. If Art Spiegelman really wants to make this project work, he could invite swanky famous non-comics people to write short stories for adults and collect those; OR he could invite swanky famous people to write stories for children on a monthly basis, print them on crappy paper, and sell them for $4.95. I suppose he could then collect the best and repackage those for $20. But right now the series is neither here nor there.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Juliana Muñoz

    Este libro tiene varias capas. En la historia de Spiegelman (que además compiló las historias y es el autor de Maus), la primera capa es cómica: a un niño se le salen sus otros yo. Y esta idea del 'doble' es llevada al límite. Son muchos yo, es cómico pero también trágico. Hay yo que no nos imaginamos, como la muerte, como el yo que no es yo, etc. Y la mirada sobre el adulto. El adulto no es perfecto, en su soledad también tiene sus personalidades múltiples, sus dilemas. Por la misma línea de ll Este libro tiene varias capas. En la historia de Spiegelman (que además compiló las historias y es el autor de Maus), la primera capa es cómica: a un niño se le salen sus otros yo. Y esta idea del 'doble' es llevada al límite. Son muchos yo, es cómico pero también trágico. Hay yo que no nos imaginamos, como la muerte, como el yo que no es yo, etc. Y la mirada sobre el adulto. El adulto no es perfecto, en su soledad también tiene sus personalidades múltiples, sus dilemas. Por la misma línea de llevar todo al límite, Sendal crea a un niño glotón. Y el niño se lo come todo, hasta a sus padres. La historia nos engancha porque siempre todo puede ser peor y peor, o el caos puede ser siempre mayor y mayor. Pretty Ugly, de Falconer y Sedaris es el cambio de valores morales. Un mundo donde lo malo es lo bueno, lo feo es lo bonito y lo bonito es lo feo. Donde además se juega con la literaridad de esas frases que siempre nos han dicho: la belleza está en el interior, por tanto saco mis entrañas para ver la belleza. En la pequeña casa que huyó de casa, lo que no pensamos que podría ser personaje, o tener una forma, lo es y la tiene: una casa, los ruidos (un niño besado en la mejilla, la escalera rechinando, la leche vertida en un bowl) y sonidos que dan placer o disgusto. Personajes buenísimos como el cazador de sonidos felices. Otra historia que amé fue la de A-maze-ing adventure, de Lewis Trondheim, en la que nosotros elegimos lo que le puede ir pasando al personaje. Es una historia de aventura interactiva (puesta sobre papel!) que tiene una capa más profunda: el fatídico destino.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    2. Little Lit Strange Stories for Strange Kids comprised by Art Spiegelman & Francoise Mouly No Awards Grade Level: 5+ Strange Stories for Strange Kids is a graphic novel filled with various weird stories for kids to read. There are fifteen different stories for students to read. Each story is weird and funny to keep students interested in learning. Strange Stories for Strange Kids can be slightly difficult to read at times because of the strange font that some of the stories have- particularly “T 2. Little Lit Strange Stories for Strange Kids comprised by Art Spiegelman & Francoise Mouly No Awards Grade Level: 5+ Strange Stories for Strange Kids is a graphic novel filled with various weird stories for kids to read. There are fifteen different stories for students to read. Each story is weird and funny to keep students interested in learning. Strange Stories for Strange Kids can be slightly difficult to read at times because of the strange font that some of the stories have- particularly “Trapped in a Comic Book”. This book is good for introducing students to a variety of stories. This book could be used in classrooms to show students that not all books have to be serious, they can be fun. This book can also get students who may not be interested in the “usual” books to read and even to write. This graphic novel (or a section) could be read and then in writers workshop students could write their own graphic novel.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    Many art styles by many critically-acclaimed 'underground' authors -- Kim Deitsch, Art Speigelman, Jules Feiffer, Crockett Johnson... what, were Robert Crumb and Bill Griffiths unavailable? A few duds, but 90% of the book was an enjoyable page-turner for my kids and I both. Lots of visual inspiration (layout and storytelling) here as well, especially in the story about 'Katropolis.' Nary a work which my 8 y.o. didn't 'get.' As fun to read aloud and cuddle behind as to enjoy silently and independ Many art styles by many critically-acclaimed 'underground' authors -- Kim Deitsch, Art Speigelman, Jules Feiffer, Crockett Johnson... what, were Robert Crumb and Bill Griffiths unavailable? A few duds, but 90% of the book was an enjoyable page-turner for my kids and I both. Lots of visual inspiration (layout and storytelling) here as well, especially in the story about 'Katropolis.' Nary a work which my 8 y.o. didn't 'get.' As fun to read aloud and cuddle behind as to enjoy silently and independently. Terrific, fun book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Josephus FromPlacitas

    Beautiful comics, amazing art, kid or grown-up you can lose yourself completely in the huge, ornate images by brilliant artists. One thing to review before giving it to a little kid might be to decide whether some of the more intense and grotesque images will jive well with your little brain-voyager's personality. Not that kids can't or shouldn't handle weirdness, but it's worth feeling out beforehand. Beautiful comics, amazing art, kid or grown-up you can lose yourself completely in the huge, ornate images by brilliant artists. One thing to review before giving it to a little kid might be to decide whether some of the more intense and grotesque images will jive well with your little brain-voyager's personality. Not that kids can't or shouldn't handle weirdness, but it's worth feeling out beforehand.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I read this because I recognized a couple of the names attached to it. I'm sure some people would appreciate it, but I didn't. There are 15 comics in this anthology all with different authors/illustrators. Some are better/more clever than others. I read this because I recognized a couple of the names attached to it. I'm sure some people would appreciate it, but I didn't. There are 15 comics in this anthology all with different authors/illustrators. Some are better/more clever than others.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Salsabrarian

    16 comic strip stories by various artists such as Maurice Sendak (Cereal Baby Keller), Martin Handford (Roody Hooster), Crockett Johnson (Barnaby), Jules Feiffer (Trapped in a Comic Book). Sublime to whimsical to weird!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    Bought this for my three year old and seven year old as their Father's Day present from me. Fantastic entree for the under-ten set to graphic novels and some surprising appearances by some authors and illustrators familiar to that crowd. Bought this for my three year old and seven year old as their Father's Day present from me. Fantastic entree for the under-ten set to graphic novels and some surprising appearances by some authors and illustrators familiar to that crowd.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emelia

    My favorite Little Lit book EVER!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Moe

    This was the best one out of the three books.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Thrasher

    Love this series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh

    Funky stories by graphic novel artists. awesome.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    Ok, strange, not my favorite, but interesting and quirky

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I love this book. It has some offbeat stories and the illustrations are great. I still find my kids reading it sometimes even though they are older. Comic book fans will enjoy this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tamar

  21. 4 out of 5

    Fatimah Iqbal

  22. 5 out of 5

    Craig Brownlie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Allison Taylor

  24. 4 out of 5

    Blake

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joel Farkas

  26. 5 out of 5

    Monica

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jonathon Griffin

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

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