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Streets Of Glory Limited Edition

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At the tail end of a lifetime of violence, Joseph R. Dunn arrives in the little town of Gladback, Montana, in search of one last chance at peace. Soldier, lawman, gunfighter, bounty hunter, he has seen America grow from the wilderness, and done more than his fair share of killing to make it so. Now he meets friends old and new, and finds a long-lost love in whose arms he h At the tail end of a lifetime of violence, Joseph R. Dunn arrives in the little town of Gladback, Montana, in search of one last chance at peace. Soldier, lawman, gunfighter, bounty hunter, he has seen America grow from the wilderness, and done more than his fair share of killing to make it so. Now he meets friends old and new, and finds a long-lost love in whose arms he hopes to end his days. But the worst of the frontier has not quite disappeared. Dunn's past returns to haunt him in the shape of Red Crow, an Apache renegade with a thirst for blood. Hunting down this murderous fiend proves difficult enough, but there are forces at work that bullets cannot harm, and foes lurking in the shadows that cannot be fought with Army Colt of Henry Rifle. A living legend rides out for one last battle, in a tale by Garth Ennis (Preacher).


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At the tail end of a lifetime of violence, Joseph R. Dunn arrives in the little town of Gladback, Montana, in search of one last chance at peace. Soldier, lawman, gunfighter, bounty hunter, he has seen America grow from the wilderness, and done more than his fair share of killing to make it so. Now he meets friends old and new, and finds a long-lost love in whose arms he h At the tail end of a lifetime of violence, Joseph R. Dunn arrives in the little town of Gladback, Montana, in search of one last chance at peace. Soldier, lawman, gunfighter, bounty hunter, he has seen America grow from the wilderness, and done more than his fair share of killing to make it so. Now he meets friends old and new, and finds a long-lost love in whose arms he hopes to end his days. But the worst of the frontier has not quite disappeared. Dunn's past returns to haunt him in the shape of Red Crow, an Apache renegade with a thirst for blood. Hunting down this murderous fiend proves difficult enough, but there are forces at work that bullets cannot harm, and foes lurking in the shadows that cannot be fought with Army Colt of Henry Rifle. A living legend rides out for one last battle, in a tale by Garth Ennis (Preacher).

30 review for Streets Of Glory Limited Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    Wow! Guys, this is why Ennis is awesome. What’s it about? Pete visits his brother in the old west, thinking the visit won’t be too crazy, that is until some bad folks kill that brother. Those bad folks are killed by Joseph R. Dunn, a legendary veteran. They both go into the town of Gladback and s*** gets real. Why it gets 5 stars: The story is interesting and very well written. The art is fantastic. The characters are very well written and interesting. The action scenes are amazing. Very exciting, in Wow! Guys, this is why Ennis is awesome. What’s it about? Pete visits his brother in the old west, thinking the visit won’t be too crazy, that is until some bad folks kill that brother. Those bad folks are killed by Joseph R. Dunn, a legendary veteran. They both go into the town of Gladback and s*** gets real. Why it gets 5 stars: The story is interesting and very well written. The art is fantastic. The characters are very well written and interesting. The action scenes are amazing. Very exciting, intense and of course, this being an Ennis book, gory AF (for those who enjoy gory action this is a must read, this includes some of the best gore in comics). This book is often darkly funny. It’s definitely not a comedy book but if you like bats*** crazy stuff and dark humor, you will definitely appreciate some of the stuff in this. This is a pretty suspenseful book. The villain is intimidating and f***ed in the head. I like vicious villains in stories, the villain in this is one of the most vicious ones out there. There’s some good anti-sexism commentary. I noticed that Ennis is surprisingly good at this. Often social commentary, especially about sexism (as well as racism) is preachy and/or hypocritical but Ennis does it right by making the commentary a part of the story and not harping on about it for half of the d*** book. The ending’s good. Warnings: I figured I should warn this book is FULL of extreme graphic violence, strong language and politically incorrect content... of course this is written by Garth Ennis and published by Avatar Press so if you’re offended by... well, anything you should probably avoid both. Overall: This book is a western masterpiece. It’s a great story with fantastic artwork that is never boring and full of gore. If you’re a fan of westerns and/or Ennis I cannot recommend this enough. Books like this make me consider Garth Ennis to be one of the best authors of all time. This book is one of the best westerns I’ve ever read. 5/5

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Briggs

    Garth Ennis has made quite a lucrative career for himself aiming low. His is a body of work indebted to bodily functions. Sometime during his highly popular runs on "Hellblazer" and "Preacher," he realized he could coast for several issues at a time on juvenile barroom antics, peepee poopoo humor, sophomoric sexuality, profanity and sacrilege. And his subsequent work showed a once-exciting writer growing lazier and lazier and lazier, exploring the same three or four themes in the same three or f Garth Ennis has made quite a lucrative career for himself aiming low. His is a body of work indebted to bodily functions. Sometime during his highly popular runs on "Hellblazer" and "Preacher," he realized he could coast for several issues at a time on juvenile barroom antics, peepee poopoo humor, sophomoric sexuality, profanity and sacrilege. And his subsequent work showed a once-exciting writer growing lazier and lazier and lazier, exploring the same three or four themes in the same three or four crude ways. But every once in a while, a project comes along that piques Ennis' interest enough to prod him into making an honest effort. There's his excellent "War Stories" miniseries. And there's "Streets of Glory." Much like Ennis himself, Pete Lorrimer is fascinated by the myth of the West and travels from Pittsburgh to join his older brother, Frank, in Gladback, Mont. Although the wilderness is a little less wild in 1899 -- the railroad is expanding, and prehistoric cars are on the roads -- the Lorrimer brothers learn the hard way that "it will still kill you." Outside of town, a gang of bandits finds the boys camping, and Frank is murdered. Pete himself is staring down death when he's saved in spectacularly bloody fashion by Col. Joseph Dunn. Dunn, a former soldier, lawman, bounty hunter and Indian fighter, has come to Gladback to live out the remainder of his days in peace. But after the life Dunn has led, peace is a hard thing to come by, and violence never far from his heels. In light of the future headed to Gladback in the form of developer Charles Morrison, Dunn fears that "I fought hard for this country. Only to hand it to fools." The theme of the rugged individual out of step with the rapidly encroaching modern world has been covered pretty well in "Unforgiven" and a number of Sam Peckinpah movies. But for all its familiarity, "Streets of Glory" is a tale very well told. It's obvious that Ennis is passionate about the Western genre, and he hasn't appeared this engaged as a writer in a long time. He's aided ably in his storytelling by Mike Wolfer's clean-lined, if slightly stiff, artwork. Some might gripe that "Streets" is needlessly splattery -- all the dismemberment, intestinal exposure, arterial spray and tallywhacker hacking could make Peckinpah cringe -- but this is an Avatar book, and Avatar has a bloodthirsty audience to cater to.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ill D

    Stupid and dumb. Really disjointed story with equally dismal character development. The Garth Ennis canon is notoriously hit and miss. If Preacher is a grand slam that wins the world series, Streets of Glory is a turd on the stadium's concrete.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Devon Munn

    Pretty decent western but one major problem i had with it was with one of it's main antagonists, Red Crow, basically he's a stereotypical "savage Indian" who viciously kills white folk, plus the characters themselves are quite racist, yeah i get it it was the 1800s, people weren't politcally correct and all but since it wasn't necessarily portrayed in a negative light it rubbed me the wrong way (Also since i have taken a big interest in Indigenous cultures so i can admit I'm probably being a bit Pretty decent western but one major problem i had with it was with one of it's main antagonists, Red Crow, basically he's a stereotypical "savage Indian" who viciously kills white folk, plus the characters themselves are quite racist, yeah i get it it was the 1800s, people weren't politcally correct and all but since it wasn't necessarily portrayed in a negative light it rubbed me the wrong way (Also since i have taken a big interest in Indigenous cultures so i can admit I'm probably being a bit biased here). But it isn't one if the worst things I've ever read

  5. 5 out of 5

    Víctor Segovia

    Realmente, cuando escuché de esta obra obra sabía que tarde o temprano iba a leerla. Es una mezcla que, al menos para mí, es complicado resistir. Western y Garth Ennis ¿Que más podría pedir? Publicada por el sello editorial Avatar, es sin duda la obra san sencilla del autor, con una historia que fluye rápido y cuyos personajes son interesantes y que captan muy bien el rústico paraje donde están, el salvaje oeste.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tyson Adams

    Nothing particularly original or exciting here. The story is the usual western tropes - other reviewers have mentioned Unforgiven and Dr Quinn as clear inspirations - and nothing distinguishes itself. The closest this comes to having an Ennis take on westerns is some of the artwork.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    “Know what I’m afraid of? I fought hard for this country, only to hand it to fools.” Fantastic line but ultimately this was an incredibly boring and rather dull Western story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    What we have here is a case of Garth Ennis getting cranked on Guiness, reading passages from Lonesone Dove, watching the end of Unforgiven and Deadwood season 3 and then shitting out a half-assed comic book script, which Avatar then handed over to one of their 'house' artists who all draw exactly the same. All that said, there ARE some good parts, but Christ is it coming more and more clear that Garth shot his wad on Preacher and Hitman. How do you take the concept of a grizzled Civil War vet cl What we have here is a case of Garth Ennis getting cranked on Guiness, reading passages from Lonesone Dove, watching the end of Unforgiven and Deadwood season 3 and then shitting out a half-assed comic book script, which Avatar then handed over to one of their 'house' artists who all draw exactly the same. All that said, there ARE some good parts, but Christ is it coming more and more clear that Garth shot his wad on Preacher and Hitman. How do you take the concept of a grizzled Civil War vet cleaning up a frontier town and fuck that up? Nnnggg.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Timo

    Pretty damn good end-of-old-west-western Ennis put together. Bloody and tragic. Nice one. But the art again is the weak point. So stiff.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Garth Ennis writes a western set at the end of the 19th century where a small town is menaced by a bloodthirsty Indian killer called Red Crow and a man-with-no-name type called (ok so he has a name) Joe Dunn turns up looking for his lost love. It's not that it's a crap book but there are too many references to archetypes and characters most people have seen before for the book to really stand out as its own work. Parts of it feel like "Unforgiven", the love interest is straight up "Doctor Quinn, Garth Ennis writes a western set at the end of the 19th century where a small town is menaced by a bloodthirsty Indian killer called Red Crow and a man-with-no-name type called (ok so he has a name) Joe Dunn turns up looking for his lost love. It's not that it's a crap book but there are too many references to archetypes and characters most people have seen before for the book to really stand out as its own work. Parts of it feel like "Unforgiven", the love interest is straight up "Doctor Quinn, Medicine Woman", the rich bad guy is straight out of "Deadwood", while Joe Dunn is an amalgam of characters from 2000AD's "Judge Dredd" and "Preacher" to a different "Preacher" series, this time Ennis' own, and the "Saint of Killers" character. There's enough action going on for the story to be entertaining but Ennis doesn't do enough to really make you care about any of the characters and the story doesn't really take off at any point. Mike Wolfer's art is so-so, and is like a cross between Juan Jose Ryp and Rick Geary's styles. Not a bad book by any measure but Ennis has written better westerns. Check out "Preacher: Ancient History" or the "Just a Pilgrim" series for better examples of Ennis' western instincts at play.

  11. 4 out of 5

    East Bay J

    Chronicles Of Wormwood made me an instant Garth Ennis fan and I’ve enjoyed everything of his I’ve read since. Oh, he’s obviously one sick little puppy but his writing’s good and that means so much. There’s so much mediocrity out there! So much bland nonsense masquerading as cool, hip, fresh, whatever. Who cares? Corporations, that’s who. And they’re counting on your dollars! 1899 must have been a crazy year. Protagonist John Dunn was kind of a crazy guy. But totally solid. You end up liking him ( Chronicles Of Wormwood made me an instant Garth Ennis fan and I’ve enjoyed everything of his I’ve read since. Oh, he’s obviously one sick little puppy but his writing’s good and that means so much. There’s so much mediocrity out there! So much bland nonsense masquerading as cool, hip, fresh, whatever. Who cares? Corporations, that’s who. And they’re counting on your dollars! 1899 must have been a crazy year. Protagonist John Dunn was kind of a crazy guy. But totally solid. You end up liking him (or I did, anyway) because he gets done what needs to get done. And that fancy shootin’ don’t hurt, neither. Dunn is the only man who stands in the way of the evil Mr. Morrison and his diabolical plans to ruin the sleepy town of Gladback. That’s a good plot for a western! I wouldn’t say this book is anything revolutionary but Ennis tells a good tale and creates interesting, colorful characters. Wolfer’s art is alright. What do they call this art? Is it photorealism? Hell if I know. He sure draws cut/shot up people real well. One guy gets scalped by a crazy Indian! And lives! It’s nuts!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Liza

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A classic-style western with a twist of extra violence and vivid brutality...the West was a savage place in 1899, and Ennis captures that here. This story also captures the way that easterners romanticized the West, and it touches on the inhumane manner with which the US military dealt with "Injuns". I enjoyed this book, and I felt affection for the anti-hero hero that Joe Dunn is. This story is reminiscent of the classic western Shane...lone horseman rides into town, saves townsfolk in a blaze A classic-style western with a twist of extra violence and vivid brutality...the West was a savage place in 1899, and Ennis captures that here. This story also captures the way that easterners romanticized the West, and it touches on the inhumane manner with which the US military dealt with "Injuns". I enjoyed this book, and I felt affection for the anti-hero hero that Joe Dunn is. This story is reminiscent of the classic western Shane...lone horseman rides into town, saves townsfolk in a blaze of gunfire, and rides away alone without looking back. Of course as a western there are maudlin moments of disappointment and the omni-present pointlessness of rooting for a way of life that has gone the way of the dinosaurs. Altogether an enjoyable story. It's not a big commitment to read this; don't expect anything mind-blowing, but it is worth the read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris Hayes

    I was really looking forward to this book. Garth Ennis has long had Western motifs and images in his books, and finally he was going to write an actual Western. Unfortunately, like a lot of his work lately, this is just a mishmash of movies or books that Ennis has read recently. This book takes the characters from Lonesome Dove, puts them in the plot from Joe Kidd, then just lets the story ride for a hundred pages or so. There is nothing original here. The big mystery is (this can hardly be call I was really looking forward to this book. Garth Ennis has long had Western motifs and images in his books, and finally he was going to write an actual Western. Unfortunately, like a lot of his work lately, this is just a mishmash of movies or books that Ennis has read recently. This book takes the characters from Lonesome Dove, puts them in the plot from Joe Kidd, then just lets the story ride for a hundred pages or so. There is nothing original here. The big mystery is (this can hardly be called a spoiler) about chasing settlers off their land so a rich easterner can buy it up and sell it to the railroad, the same plot that is in practically every bad western ever written. I would recommend reading the Saint of Killers story from Preacher Vol. 4: Ancient History instead.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Milazzo

    Streets of Glory is a perfectly serviceable End of the Old West story. Ennis gives us a grizzled but honorable old man, a fresh young kid, a savage Indian, an ill-fated love and the requisite railroad looming over a small town on the prairie. You can see how it's all going to play out before the story is over. That's the problem with Westerns - we all know that the Old West has gone the way of boom towns and the Pony Express. It takes a great deal of skill to craft a fresh and exiting story in s Streets of Glory is a perfectly serviceable End of the Old West story. Ennis gives us a grizzled but honorable old man, a fresh young kid, a savage Indian, an ill-fated love and the requisite railroad looming over a small town on the prairie. You can see how it's all going to play out before the story is over. That's the problem with Westerns - we all know that the Old West has gone the way of boom towns and the Pony Express. It takes a great deal of skill to craft a fresh and exiting story in such a well worn genre, skill that just isn't present here.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    Garth Ennis knows how to write a Western. This story, on the edge of the 20th century, tells the tale of a legend of the West as the West fades away. A hard-bitten soldier, a sociopathic native, a doctor, a bartender, and a railroad speculator all cross paths in a town and leave it poorly. The violence is not quite over-the-top, but it's right on the edge, with the customary Avatar attention to bloody details. But it all serves the story. Ennis provides a bevy of strong characters and the story Garth Ennis knows how to write a Western. This story, on the edge of the 20th century, tells the tale of a legend of the West as the West fades away. A hard-bitten soldier, a sociopathic native, a doctor, a bartender, and a railroad speculator all cross paths in a town and leave it poorly. The violence is not quite over-the-top, but it's right on the edge, with the customary Avatar attention to bloody details. But it all serves the story. Ennis provides a bevy of strong characters and the story just seems to carve itself out of them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Madeleine Morrison

    A good graphic novel by Garth Ennis, but not great. It felt like I was reading the b-side to the Saint of Killers story from Ennis' Preacher series. American western story, very gorey. He doesn't expand his writing territory or try anything new in this series. Not that this isn't enjoyable - it's good, just not NEW for Ennis.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joe D.

    Garth Ennis is by far the best comic writer I've ever read, and I've been reading them for 40 years. Maybe it's only 3 stars because I was expecting better? Certainly not his best stuff but an interesting story nonetheless.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    An awesome violent western in the tradition of True Grit. Although the story's not Garth Ennis's best work overall, it's better than anything else he's written for Avatar. The Mike Wolfer art is top-notch as he's one of the best artists at the Avatar "Bull-pen."

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    Por la tapa, pareciera que se trata de otro spin-off del Santo de los Asesinos. Sé que no pero igual estaba a buen precio, así que para saca.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sutton Smith

  21. 5 out of 5

    Thaddeus Fortney

  22. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dony Grayman

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mithun Gangopadhyay

  25. 4 out of 5

    Talabglamaro

  26. 5 out of 5

    ΕιζΝιηΕ

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marcin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Larry Mauga

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dries Van der Auwera

  30. 4 out of 5

    Yeshua

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