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The Best American Comics

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Now in its fourth year, "Best American Comics" showcases the work of both established and up-and-coming contributers. Editor Charles Burns--cartoonist, illustrator, and official cover artist of the "Believer--"has culled the best stories from graphic novels, pamphlet comics, newspapers, magazines, mini-comics, and the web to create this cutting-edge collection. Featuring t Now in its fourth year, "Best American Comics" showcases the work of both established and up-and-coming contributers. Editor Charles Burns--cartoonist, illustrator, and official cover artist of the "Believer--"has culled the best stories from graphic novels, pamphlet comics, newspapers, magazines, mini-comics, and the web to create this cutting-edge collection. Featuring the work of such luminaries as Chris Ware, KAZ, and Robert Crumb, this volume is "a genuine salute to comics" ("Houston Chronicle)."


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Now in its fourth year, "Best American Comics" showcases the work of both established and up-and-coming contributers. Editor Charles Burns--cartoonist, illustrator, and official cover artist of the "Believer--"has culled the best stories from graphic novels, pamphlet comics, newspapers, magazines, mini-comics, and the web to create this cutting-edge collection. Featuring t Now in its fourth year, "Best American Comics" showcases the work of both established and up-and-coming contributers. Editor Charles Burns--cartoonist, illustrator, and official cover artist of the "Believer--"has culled the best stories from graphic novels, pamphlet comics, newspapers, magazines, mini-comics, and the web to create this cutting-edge collection. Featuring the work of such luminaries as Chris Ware, KAZ, and Robert Crumb, this volume is "a genuine salute to comics" ("Houston Chronicle)."

30 review for The Best American Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dave-O

    The usual mixed bag. The usual anthology players are in here, as well they should be for the most part. The intro makes the point that comics are not read on subjective reasons so that they become more matters of taste, but I don't think that its any more or less than other art forms. With that in mind, here are my two bits: -For all their excellent craftsmanship, Adrian Tomine and Chris Ware are treading a thin line between being interesting and being derivative. -Ben Katchor's comic was reprod The usual mixed bag. The usual anthology players are in here, as well they should be for the most part. The intro makes the point that comics are not read on subjective reasons so that they become more matters of taste, but I don't think that its any more or less than other art forms. With that in mind, here are my two bits: -For all their excellent craftsmanship, Adrian Tomine and Chris Ware are treading a thin line between being interesting and being derivative. -Ben Katchor's comic was reproduced so small that it was unreadable. -I admire the Crumbs' ability to tell a straightforward story (that in itself, is somewhat avant-garde), including an aside on the making of the comic. -Dan Zettwoch's has a very inventive entry in this volume. -Dash Shaw has the only very exceptional work in the book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Pretty much everything in here is well-done, but somehow this Charles Burns guest-edited edition, along with the Harvey Pekar-edited volume from 2006, remains for me the weakest of the series I've read thus far (with just the brand new 2010 tome left to bring me up to date). The book lacks the cohesion that Chris Ware and Lynda Barry brought to the 2007 and 2008 collections, respectively. I can see the merit in all the stories here, but little truly inspired or excited me; somehow it all remaine Pretty much everything in here is well-done, but somehow this Charles Burns guest-edited edition, along with the Harvey Pekar-edited volume from 2006, remains for me the weakest of the series I've read thus far (with just the brand new 2010 tome left to bring me up to date). The book lacks the cohesion that Chris Ware and Lynda Barry brought to the 2007 and 2008 collections, respectively. I can see the merit in all the stories here, but little truly inspired or excited me; somehow it all remained just a mostly pleasant reading experience. As per the preface by series editors Jessica Abel and Matt Madden, comics, like all art forms, are a hugely subjective experience, so everyone will have their personal huzzahs and brickbats on the selections and the artists chosen. Some of mine, starting with the huzzahs: Laura Park's art ("Freaks") is really beautiful in this story. She's a breakout new star in the alt-comics world for good reason. Based on the excerpt included here, I would like to read the complete graphic novel Skim by the Tamaki sisters. Lovely. It's always a pleasure to read Kaz's "Underworld" comic strips. Jerry Moriarty's recent return to print is very welcome: truly the Edward Hopper of cartoonists. Al Columbia's piece is macabre & gorgeous. Dash Shaw's "The Galactic Funnels" is very interesting and innovative (Dash Shaw is pretty much always interesting and innovative). I read it 3x. Michael Kupperman is just flat-out funny. Jason Lutes: just pure respect for his BERLIN. Magnum Opus, in spades. Negatory: Even though I understand that he's very talented, I've never gotten the big love for Adrian Tomine: always found his art uninteresting and I'm sorry but derivative (of Daniel Clowes) and his writing one-note, and the fact that this piece from his graphic novel Shortcomings mines the wearisome I'm-a-Twentysomething-Asshole-Het-Guy trope (reminiscent of Joe Matt) doesn't change my lack of regard for his work one iota. So sorry, sue me. Ron Rege's adaptation of a chapter of Lynda Barry's Cruddy illuminates nothing of Barry's brilliant text. I love Ted Stearn's Fuzz and Pluck, but don't think this excerpt works so great. Some stuff just excerpts better than others - he's a wonderful cartoonist's cartoonist, irregardless. Peter Bagge and Doug Allen's stories, respectively: Meh. Really, these were among the BEST comics of the year? I figure they are included as pals of Burns's and per their past individual bodies of work, and that's okay, but both guys have done much, much better than these trifles. Onward. Looking forward to the 2010 edition, edited by Neil Gaiman, in which he selected a story by Steve MacIsaac & Todd Brower, "Ex-Communication," which originally appeared in the anthology I edited, The Book of Boy Trouble Volume 2 (Green Candy Press). That selection alone is gratifying, for obvious reasons.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Imogen

    Man, either these are all excerpts from longer comics, or Charles Burns hates comics with resolutions. About five times I had to crinkle the last page of a comic to be like, 'that's it?' Which is fine, if that's where comics are going right now, I can get with that. When it works- like in Adrian Tomine's piece here- it can totally knock you over and be awesome. And when it doesn't work, I'm usually still like 'that was nice.' I could have done without... um, I don't remember his name, the mod gu Man, either these are all excerpts from longer comics, or Charles Burns hates comics with resolutions. About five times I had to crinkle the last page of a comic to be like, 'that's it?' Which is fine, if that's where comics are going right now, I can get with that. When it works- like in Adrian Tomine's piece here- it can totally knock you over and be awesome. And when it doesn't work, I'm usually still like 'that was nice.' I could have done without... um, I don't remember his name, the mod guy who has I think four pieces spread out across the book. But I could have done without the comic reprinted here that ends in 'father beats up daughter and then incest, ahaha!' but otherwise this was totally awesome. I laid in Alex's bed all morning and read it while my dog flipped out because she had flea medicine all over her back.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    I always enjoy the Best American Comics series, but 2009 was a bit of a disappointment. I suppose I'm just not of the same mindset as Charles Burns, the series editor. He seems to go for more dark, male-oriented, "dumb" jokes type of comics. There are some good choices that I enjoyed, such as Skim by Jillian and Mariko Tamaki, Freaks by Laura Park, and the comics by Dash Shaw and Ben Katchor. The rest, however, seemed fairly mundane and didn't grab me on an intellectual level. But, I think the p I always enjoy the Best American Comics series, but 2009 was a bit of a disappointment. I suppose I'm just not of the same mindset as Charles Burns, the series editor. He seems to go for more dark, male-oriented, "dumb" jokes type of comics. There are some good choices that I enjoyed, such as Skim by Jillian and Mariko Tamaki, Freaks by Laura Park, and the comics by Dash Shaw and Ben Katchor. The rest, however, seemed fairly mundane and didn't grab me on an intellectual level. But, I think the point of the series is to highlight a variety of comics. You will gravitate towards some and quickly forget others. I wish I liked a few more in this series, but it was a fun read nonetheless.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Regan

    OK. So Charles Burns and I don't appear to see eye to eye on "what's good" (per Burns' introduction). I like Charles Burns. I like some of the artists represented in the 2009 collection. However, overall I really did NOT like what Burns determined to be the "best" of 2009. Some of it is clearly his preferred style. He really has a soft spot for what reads to me as "old school" comics. Tim Hensley's "Archie" style art - which receives four coveted spots in the collection - is not interesting to loo OK. So Charles Burns and I don't appear to see eye to eye on "what's good" (per Burns' introduction). I like Charles Burns. I like some of the artists represented in the 2009 collection. However, overall I really did NOT like what Burns determined to be the "best" of 2009. Some of it is clearly his preferred style. He really has a soft spot for what reads to me as "old school" comics. Tim Hensley's "Archie" style art - which receives four coveted spots in the collection - is not interesting to look at, not interesting to read, and often just leaves me feeling bewildered. I have no CLUE why this would be a "best" of anything, much less worthy of FOUR spots when every other artist receives only one. There's also a lot of "small" art which I just find irksome. If the drawing AND the lettering is too small to see without a magnifying glass I don't care if it's the best thing ever in the history of man, it's going to be really hard to get me invested in it. Burns also seems very attracted to the "just stop" method of comic closure. Or else there's been a paradigm shift and stories no longer need any sort of ending but just a final panel and I missed the memo. Either way, it's not my favorite approach to the medium. Sometimes I found myself wondering where the rest of the pages were and actually LOOKING for them. On the flip side, the things I liked I REALLY liked. Adrian Tomine (even with the "just stop" finale), Mimi Pond, Gabrielle Bell, Jerry Moriarty (no words, which I liked more than I expected to), Laura Park, Kevin Huizenga, and especially Jillian and Mariko Tamaki all really worked for me and I will seek out more of each of their work. I wish the Gilbert Hernandez piece had spoken to me more. I've always found Gilbert's work the least interesting of Los Bros Hernandez, but this was just a non-starter for me. Overall it was a tepid experience. I even skipped a few that I just could NOT get through. While I may like Charles Burns as an artist and writer, we clearly don't share tastes when he's a collector and editor. Alas.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    I'm not a huge fan of the large comic-book universe, and I mainly picked up this book to see more of Mimi Pond's work (Over Easy, which is excerpted here). I found Gabrielle Bell's piece "When I Was Eleven," and I really enjoyed the story. Graphic novels or memoirs provide such a unique spatial aspect to reading, where traditional novels or memoirs are very linear. I also was interested in Jerry Moriarty's pieces, and Laura Park's "Freaks." Unfortunately, the rest of the selections were not that I'm not a huge fan of the large comic-book universe, and I mainly picked up this book to see more of Mimi Pond's work (Over Easy, which is excerpted here). I found Gabrielle Bell's piece "When I Was Eleven," and I really enjoyed the story. Graphic novels or memoirs provide such a unique spatial aspect to reading, where traditional novels or memoirs are very linear. I also was interested in Jerry Moriarty's pieces, and Laura Park's "Freaks." Unfortunately, the rest of the selections were not that appealing, but for comic-book fans, this would likely be a book of interest.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kat Hulu

    Fully half (18 of 36, by my count) of the works excerpted in this collection were also represented in one of the prior two years’ collections—the excerpts are different, but the work does not vary significantly. Most of the double-dips are from 2007, so I’m not sure how they can count for both years (were they serials?). It’s still a pretty good collection, but it was confusing to flip through immediately after digesting the prior two volumes, and discover that every other page was familiar.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    More of what you'd expect from this series. Happy to see more CF, Sammy Harkham, and even an Al Columbia feature! More of what you'd expect from this series. Happy to see more CF, Sammy Harkham, and even an Al Columbia feature!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jon Hewelt

    Great collection! Skip the Preface!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pip

    A bestseller by the most popular postwar writer for children of all ages.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tristy

    I love the eclectic mixes of these anthologies. I also love how they always reflect the editor's style and taste. I'm not the biggest fan of Charles Burns's comics, because he runs a bit too dark for me and this anthology reflects that darkness (but not as much as you would expect!). I discovered some new (to me) artists, which was really a treat. I also really loved Charles Burns's introduction, especially his ode to Tintin comics! My favorite artists/pieces in this anthology are: the collabora I love the eclectic mixes of these anthologies. I also love how they always reflect the editor's style and taste. I'm not the biggest fan of Charles Burns's comics, because he runs a bit too dark for me and this anthology reflects that darkness (but not as much as you would expect!). I discovered some new (to me) artists, which was really a treat. I also really loved Charles Burns's introduction, especially his ode to Tintin comics! My favorite artists/pieces in this anthology are: the collaborative comic by Robert Crumb & Aline Kominsky-Crumb and the pieces by Dan Zettwoch, Mimi Pond, Gabrielle Bell, CF, Tony Millionaire, Ted Stearn, and Jillian Mariko Tamaki.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andres

    I really like the Best American series (even the knockoffs) and I enjoyed this one a lot, even though some of the comics were out and out strange, or left you wanting more since they were just snippets of a larger whole. This is an enjoyable peek at the wide variety of comics that are out there, and certainly a great starting point in finding what suits your individual tastes. Like with other anthologies, I'll list what caught my attention the most (but without my usual one-sentence summary). Jus I really like the Best American series (even the knockoffs) and I enjoyed this one a lot, even though some of the comics were out and out strange, or left you wanting more since they were just snippets of a larger whole. This is an enjoyable peek at the wide variety of comics that are out there, and certainly a great starting point in finding what suits your individual tastes. Like with other anthologies, I'll list what caught my attention the most (but without my usual one-sentence summary). Justin M. Damiano by Daniel Clowes Our Beloved Tape Dispenser by Robert Crumb and Aline Kominsky-Crumb Shortcomings (Excerpt) by Adrian Tomine I did end up seeking out, reading, and enjoying the whole of this one. When I Was Eleven by Gabrielle Bell Berlin (Excerpt) by Jason Lutes Jordan W. Lint by Chris Wares Freaks by Laura Park Skim (Excerpt) by Jillian and Mariko Tamaki Antoinette by Koren Shadmi Glenn Ganges in Pulverize by Kevin Huizenga 5:45 A.M. by Al Columbia

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sundry

    I've decided that the new edition in this series is my annual winter treat. I always enjoy it, and always find a couple of new graphic novelists or memoirists whose work I want to spend more time with. This year, it's Kevin Huizinga, Tony Millionaire and Jillian & Mariko Tamaki who sent me running to the library database to put titles on hold. I didn't give this a terribly high numerical ranking because I agree less with the guest editor Mr. Burns than I have with other guest editors about what c I've decided that the new edition in this series is my annual winter treat. I always enjoy it, and always find a couple of new graphic novelists or memoirists whose work I want to spend more time with. This year, it's Kevin Huizinga, Tony Millionaire and Jillian & Mariko Tamaki who sent me running to the library database to put titles on hold. I didn't give this a terribly high numerical ranking because I agree less with the guest editor Mr. Burns than I have with other guest editors about what constitutes a good comic. While I love good, weird, quirky, or accomplished graphics, the best stuff has a good narrative, for me. Charles Burns' needs are different from mine. Think I'll check out some of the stuff that the series editors Jessica Abel and Matt Madden put on their honorable mention list. What a great job, huh? Reading comics and graphic novels!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    A vast majority of this collection is sub-par. Perhaps, it is because it is framed as "best" that I feel that they fall short. I was appreciative of the variety of styles, but I found many of the comics lacking actual substance. However, I do recommend that you pick up this volume and read Laura Park's (in my copy it's page 217), as well as Jillian and Mariko Tamaki's section. I found both comics to be wonderfully (and differently) styled, and their subject matters to be compelling. Koren Shadmi' A vast majority of this collection is sub-par. Perhaps, it is because it is framed as "best" that I feel that they fall short. I was appreciative of the variety of styles, but I found many of the comics lacking actual substance. However, I do recommend that you pick up this volume and read Laura Park's (in my copy it's page 217), as well as Jillian and Mariko Tamaki's section. I found both comics to be wonderfully (and differently) styled, and their subject matters to be compelling. Koren Shadmi'a Antoinette was funny, and Kevin Huizenga's Glenn Ganges that followed was also very good. But after that, it's all down hill again. The section that I thoroughly enjoyed didn't even last for 100 pages. I was hopeful because I had greatly enjoyed The Best American Comics 2010. Although, I was mostly drawn to that one dues to Neil Gaiman's name.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I'm only two stories in so far, but Daniel Clowes' entry about an online movie reviewer was a spot on critique of juggling the self-importance of judging other peoples work with the self-awareness of how your life impacts your outlook. UPDATE: Overall this was a great selection of comics. I feel like I've been missing out on not reading Jason Lutes' Berlin, which is gritty and violent, but strewn with intriguing characters. I also think I need to check out more of Matt Broersma. Of course I love I'm only two stories in so far, but Daniel Clowes' entry about an online movie reviewer was a spot on critique of juggling the self-importance of judging other peoples work with the self-awareness of how your life impacts your outlook. UPDATE: Overall this was a great selection of comics. I feel like I've been missing out on not reading Jason Lutes' Berlin, which is gritty and violent, but strewn with intriguing characters. I also think I need to check out more of Matt Broersma. Of course I love the comics from Art Spiegelman, R. Crumb, Chris Ware, Adrian Tomine, Peter Bagge. Overall, I love collections like this. They remind of the glory days of RAW. If you want to venture outside the safe havens of superheroes, this is a great starting point for what is happening now.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Penelope

    Not a bad collection, but also not a great collection. I just finished this a week or so ago, and I can only remember a few strips off the top of my head...the rest were forgettable. Glancing back through the table of contents, here are some highlights from the collection and some strips I think it could have done without: Highlights: "Skim" by Jillian and Mariko Tamaki (excerpt) "The Galactic Funnels" by Dash Shaw "Antoinette" by Koren Shadmi Not a fan: "Gropius" by Tim Hensley (multiple strips scatte Not a bad collection, but also not a great collection. I just finished this a week or so ago, and I can only remember a few strips off the top of my head...the rest were forgettable. Glancing back through the table of contents, here are some highlights from the collection and some strips I think it could have done without: Highlights: "Skim" by Jillian and Mariko Tamaki (excerpt) "The Galactic Funnels" by Dash Shaw "Antoinette" by Koren Shadmi Not a fan: "Gropius" by Tim Hensley (multiple strips scattered throughout) "Fuzz & Pluck In Splitsville" by Ted Stearn (excerpt) "Dal Tokyo" Gary Panter

  17. 5 out of 5

    Raina

    Well, I liked Black Hole, but I don't have the same taste as Charles Burns. Or maybe I just have a very accessible, non-sophisticated graphic novel-enthusiast taste. There were five or six selections in this that I really liked, out of a very long collection of excerpts of graphic novels. Nonetheless, I enjoyed seeing the wide variety of material and discovered a couple of new authors. Well, I liked Black Hole, but I don't have the same taste as Charles Burns. Or maybe I just have a very accessible, non-sophisticated graphic novel-enthusiast taste. There were five or six selections in this that I really liked, out of a very long collection of excerpts of graphic novels. Nonetheless, I enjoyed seeing the wide variety of material and discovered a couple of new authors.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    A disjointed review ™: The editors must be getting lazy! Best American Comics includes entries from graphic novels that were published in the previous edition. (Do we really need more yuppie ennui from Shortcomings?) However, I was overjoyed to find reprints of “Maakies” in this one. I think I should take a break from graphic novels for awhile. They’re giving me weird dreams.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kyla

    What I love about comic anthologies is the almost visceral sense you get the minute you turn the page - ugh, I'm going to hate this one or hmm, this looks interesting. And I will freely admit that if it looks not to my taste - I skip it. With no guilt. For new to me artists, I really liked Michael Kupperman and some Tim Hensley and the Dan Zettwoch. Oldies like Peter Bagge and Dan Clowes had some of their better stuff that I've seen lately. Could always use more women, and that's just a fact. What I love about comic anthologies is the almost visceral sense you get the minute you turn the page - ugh, I'm going to hate this one or hmm, this looks interesting. And I will freely admit that if it looks not to my taste - I skip it. With no guilt. For new to me artists, I really liked Michael Kupperman and some Tim Hensley and the Dan Zettwoch. Oldies like Peter Bagge and Dan Clowes had some of their better stuff that I've seen lately. Could always use more women, and that's just a fact.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shaunterria

    I really felt like I should have enjoyed it more than I did... I read a pretty wide variety of comics, but I just couldn't get into the mix that was presented here. It could have been the format, which consisted of excerpts of some comics, that kept me from fully engaging with the storytelling. As pure art, I did appreciate the quality of many of the strips as shown in the book, but I was pretty disappointed in most of the narratives. I really felt like I should have enjoyed it more than I did... I read a pretty wide variety of comics, but I just couldn't get into the mix that was presented here. It could have been the format, which consisted of excerpts of some comics, that kept me from fully engaging with the storytelling. As pure art, I did appreciate the quality of many of the strips as shown in the book, but I was pretty disappointed in most of the narratives.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Edwin Arnaudin

    It's impossible for me not to love these annual anthologies. They feature wonderfully delicious snippets of one of my favorite forms and frequently turn me on to larger collections or graphic novels. I look forward to this issue each year and already feel a bit cheated that my current dose is used up. It's impossible for me not to love these annual anthologies. They feature wonderfully delicious snippets of one of my favorite forms and frequently turn me on to larger collections or graphic novels. I look forward to this issue each year and already feel a bit cheated that my current dose is used up.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Budha

    You're not gonna see any superman or batman (although they tried for batman and dc pussed out) it's an all around good book that had me thinking about lots of differnt comics and wanting to head down to the shop and go looking around. You're not gonna see any superman or batman (although they tried for batman and dc pussed out) it's an all around good book that had me thinking about lots of differnt comics and wanting to head down to the shop and go looking around.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wayne

    I found this tedious and very uneven. The stuff I liked , I really liked, but overall I was disappointed by this years selections. Tomine, Lutz and Ware deliver as always, and the standard big name guys like Crumb and Spiegelman are fine, but some of the new entries left me cold.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This year's collection of the best comics was compiled by Charles Burns and as with editors of past editions his own work looms large over the selections. Similarly, many of Burns' picks are pale imitations of his masterful work. There are some good nuggets here but overall a so-so experience. This year's collection of the best comics was compiled by Charles Burns and as with editors of past editions his own work looms large over the selections. Similarly, many of Burns' picks are pale imitations of his masterful work. There are some good nuggets here but overall a so-so experience.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    should have been called "Best American Surreal/Abstract Comics that Charles Burns Likes, plus Obligatory Inclusion of Works by Tomine, Ware, Clowes, and Spiegelman"...still, there are a few gems in here which I had never seen that do qualify for the actual title should have been called "Best American Surreal/Abstract Comics that Charles Burns Likes, plus Obligatory Inclusion of Works by Tomine, Ware, Clowes, and Spiegelman"...still, there are a few gems in here which I had never seen that do qualify for the actual title

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    The best in this series so far, I think. A fantastic overview of narrative, humor, and avant garde. Illustration styles cartoon, photo-real, and crude. And most importantly, a mix of the big names and new comers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Lots of good comics in this, found only one incomprehensible, but was somewhat disappointed to see many familiar names -- I would think this is the sort of collection where you stuff as many unknowns in it to get greater exposure. Not yet another outing from R. Crumb or Tony Millionaire.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    This is a pretty solid collection of stuff, showing a lot more variety than the last one I read (2007) and some truly excellent art in many instances. It's hard to evaluate the overall quality of some stuff based on the excerpts, but overall this is an impressive collection with only a few duds. This is a pretty solid collection of stuff, showing a lot more variety than the last one I read (2007) and some truly excellent art in many instances. It's hard to evaluate the overall quality of some stuff based on the excerpts, but overall this is an impressive collection with only a few duds.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Definitely not my taste in comics at all. Only liked the comics Freaks, Galactic Funnels, and Glenn Ganges in Pulverize. The rest were either a different kind of dark than my preference, or a type of silly humor of which I am not a fan.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jinny Chung

    Just got the galley. Good collection -- notable is the five-page coverage of Michael Kupperman's "Tales Designed to Thrizzle"! Just got the galley. Good collection -- notable is the five-page coverage of Michael Kupperman's "Tales Designed to Thrizzle"!

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