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Boo-Hoo Moo

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Hilda Mae Heifer is once again ready to sing her glorious mi-mi-moo! So why does Hilda look so down in the dumps? Even Hilda's moo is sounding more like a boo-hoo. Perhaps Hilda needs a little doodle-do to accompany her moo-moo-moo? Hilda's friends on the farm decide it's high time to find their blue bovine the perfect singing partner. Let the auditions begin! This boisterous Hilda Mae Heifer is once again ready to sing her glorious mi-mi-moo! So why does Hilda look so down in the dumps? Even Hilda's moo is sounding more like a boo-hoo. Perhaps Hilda needs a little doodle-do to accompany her moo-moo-moo? Hilda's friends on the farm decide it's high time to find their blue bovine the perfect singing partner. Let the auditions begin! This boisterous follow-up to Moo Who? continues the hilarious antics of a moosic-making cow.


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Hilda Mae Heifer is once again ready to sing her glorious mi-mi-moo! So why does Hilda look so down in the dumps? Even Hilda's moo is sounding more like a boo-hoo. Perhaps Hilda needs a little doodle-do to accompany her moo-moo-moo? Hilda's friends on the farm decide it's high time to find their blue bovine the perfect singing partner. Let the auditions begin! This boisterous Hilda Mae Heifer is once again ready to sing her glorious mi-mi-moo! So why does Hilda look so down in the dumps? Even Hilda's moo is sounding more like a boo-hoo. Perhaps Hilda needs a little doodle-do to accompany her moo-moo-moo? Hilda's friends on the farm decide it's high time to find their blue bovine the perfect singing partner. Let the auditions begin! This boisterous follow-up to Moo Who? continues the hilarious antics of a moosic-making cow.

30 review for Boo-Hoo Moo

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Fox

    Fun pictures, but kinda falls flat at the end without truly giving a moral (which is where I thought this was going).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shel

    Palatini, M. (2009). Boo-Hoo Moo. New York: Katherine Tegen Books. 9780061143762 Poor Hilda Mae Heifer (a cow, in case you culdn’t tell by her last name) is sad. She has a case of the boo-hoo-moo blues, wishing she had someone to sing with. Some of the other animals on the farm decide to try and help her find a singing partner and friend. However, the audition process becomes complicated when the farm animals begin to fight over who would be the perfect partner to do a duet. Before the argument Palatini, M. (2009). Boo-Hoo Moo. New York: Katherine Tegen Books. 9780061143762 Poor Hilda Mae Heifer (a cow, in case you culdn’t tell by her last name) is sad. She has a case of the boo-hoo-moo blues, wishing she had someone to sing with. Some of the other animals on the farm decide to try and help her find a singing partner and friend. However, the audition process becomes complicated when the farm animals begin to fight over who would be the perfect partner to do a duet. Before the argument can continue for too long, the farm animals come up with an even better plan to help Hilda Mae musically. Activities to Do with the Book: Boo-Hoo Moo could be used in many different ways. It could introduce young students to farm animals and the sounds they make. It could be used to trigger a lesson on music (including terms like baritone, soprano, downbeat etc.) and the blues, or simply to discuss feelings of loneliness. Young students could also act out the book, doing the motions and sound of the various animals included. They could consider what it’s like to try-out or be a judge (and how to give positive feedback instead of negative). Students could also consider how to find their own individual talents. Favorite Quotes: “Hilda Mae Heifer was down in the dumps. Feeling low. Sounding like it too. Even her moo was blue.” “I believe Hilda is lonely,” said the cat. “I don’t think she likes singing solo.” “Uh, just a minute there, fuzz face. If any of us is going to have a sing-along with the cow…it’s yours truly.” “My honking is legendary.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    J-Lynn Van Pelt

    A cute book where the barn animals decide that they can't take the cow's depressed singing ("Boo-hoo-moooo") anymore so they hold barnyard auditions for a choir to help the cow sing. This book is funny, but I am not quite sure of the target audience. Young children who would certainly love making the farm animal sounds will lose some of the book to the complicated vocabulary and extended plot. But, older students who would get the American Idol references and split narrative on the middle pages m A cute book where the barn animals decide that they can't take the cow's depressed singing ("Boo-hoo-moooo") anymore so they hold barnyard auditions for a choir to help the cow sing. This book is funny, but I am not quite sure of the target audience. Young children who would certainly love making the farm animal sounds will lose some of the book to the complicated vocabulary and extended plot. But, older students who would get the American Idol references and split narrative on the middle pages might find all of the barnyard animal sounds a little babyish. But, it is a fun book with several early to mid 21st century pop culture parallels. The illustrations are painted cartoon representations of the animals with sponged details. They are in bright colors and show a lot of humor.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liza Gilbert

    Hilda, a cow with a TRULY impressive red pompadour, is sad. The other animals in the barnyard try and help her out by forming a singing group to sing with her. The story is weak, but the illustrations are divine (and bovine, for that matter). Without resorting to clothes or props, the cat looks like a mustached professor, the head chicken looks like Freud, one scene has the most startled looking rabbit I've ever seen, and the duck looks like Jimmy Durante. Sometimes the grass is purple, one of t Hilda, a cow with a TRULY impressive red pompadour, is sad. The other animals in the barnyard try and help her out by forming a singing group to sing with her. The story is weak, but the illustrations are divine (and bovine, for that matter). Without resorting to clothes or props, the cat looks like a mustached professor, the head chicken looks like Freud, one scene has the most startled looking rabbit I've ever seen, and the duck looks like Jimmy Durante. Sometimes the grass is purple, one of the ducks is blue, and sometimes the sky is pink. I look forward to seeing more by Keith Graves, the illustrator.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    I didn’t really like this book. It took me two tries just to read through it and it is very short. Throughout the book, the characters behave badly. They complain about how a friend’s mooing bothers them. Then, when they devise a plan to try and help her, they squabble and fight and are generally annoying. Reading the book with all of the animal sounds might be fun, but I think we can definitely find a better book that also includes fun animal sounds. Also, I didn’t think the pictures were that cut I didn’t really like this book. It took me two tries just to read through it and it is very short. Throughout the book, the characters behave badly. They complain about how a friend’s mooing bothers them. Then, when they devise a plan to try and help her, they squabble and fight and are generally annoying. Reading the book with all of the animal sounds might be fun, but I think we can definitely find a better book that also includes fun animal sounds. Also, I didn’t think the pictures were that cute. The book ended with someone complaining. So. That’s a big fat NO. My Favorite Picture: The sheep auditioning.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    You could teach inference with this book (at the end, why does the cow need an ice pack? It doesn't tell us directly, but we can infer she injured herself dancing.) This has very challenging vocab for ELLs. The book uses metaphors that would be hard for ELLs to understand without a lot of preteaching (especially 1st graders who are such concrete thinkers) "down in the dumps" "feeling blue" etc. I could use this to teach animals and the sounds they make. Also I could use this to talk about what a c You could teach inference with this book (at the end, why does the cow need an ice pack? It doesn't tell us directly, but we can infer she injured herself dancing.) This has very challenging vocab for ELLs. The book uses metaphors that would be hard for ELLs to understand without a lot of preteaching (especially 1st graders who are such concrete thinkers) "down in the dumps" "feeling blue" etc. I could use this to teach animals and the sounds they make. Also I could use this to talk about what a chorus is and imagine the different ways animals might dance for a motor break.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Another hit from Margie Palatini that begs for a theatrical read-aloud. Heifer Hilda Mae sings so off-key and sadly (a boo-hoo moo) that the other barnyard animals hold auditions for a chorus to both lift her mood and drown her out. Adults will enjoy the American Idol style of the judges' table. Zany illustrations include Hilda's shock of red hair, and the Pig's giant nose. Would be really fun for a BASH.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alexandria Hiam

    Hilda the cow has long been singing a sad song, "mi mi moo, boo hoo, moo." The other farm animals think she might be sad and lonely. They come up with a plan to create a chorus of other animals to sing along with Hilda. First they must all audition. When Hilda hears them all sing, she comes out and tells them that she has given up singing for dancing! Lots of animal sounds. Listen to a funny audio recording at www.harpercollinschildrens.com Hilda the cow has long been singing a sad song, "mi mi moo, boo hoo, moo." The other farm animals think she might be sad and lonely. They come up with a plan to create a chorus of other animals to sing along with Hilda. First they must all audition. When Hilda hears them all sing, she comes out and tells them that she has given up singing for dancing! Lots of animal sounds. Listen to a funny audio recording at www.harpercollinschildrens.com

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    HIlda Mae Heiffer is so blue her moo is way off. The other barnyard animals can't take the caterwauling anymore. So they get together and decide that Hilda Mae needs a singing partner or two or three... Cat and goose and chicken and pig all think they should be the ones to sing with the cow. However, the finally decide to hold auditions with a panel of judges. During the auditions, though, Hilda Mae comes back and decides she's no longer a singer. She's a....dancer!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Hilda's moos are blue, not to mention slightly off key. The barn yard animals are tired of Hilda's singing and decide to form a chorus so she doesn't have to sing alone, plus they can drown her out. There are some missing details, like where did the cows come from at the end of the story? If you don't think about it too much this is a silly little book that would make a fantastic puppet show or act along for kids.

  11. 4 out of 5

    A

    Hilda the cow has long been singing a sad song, "mi mi moo, boo hoo, moo." The other farm animals think she might be sad and lonely. They come up with a plan to create a chorus of other animals to sing along with Hilda. First they must all audition. When Hilda hears them all sing, she comes out and tells them that she has given up singing for dancing! Lots of animal sounds. Listen to a funny audio recording at www.harpercollinschildrens.com Hilda the cow has long been singing a sad song, "mi mi moo, boo hoo, moo." The other farm animals think she might be sad and lonely. They come up with a plan to create a chorus of other animals to sing along with Hilda. First they must all audition. When Hilda hears them all sing, she comes out and tells them that she has given up singing for dancing! Lots of animal sounds. Listen to a funny audio recording at www.harpercollinschildrens.com

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Hilda Mae Heifer had the Boo-Hoo Blues. She was down in the dumps, she was lonely, she needed some singing partners. She boo-hoo-mooed as she sang. Auditions were held, hopes were high, melodies were practiced. But, just when the chorus was chosen, Hilda Mae had a change of heart and decided on a new carerr.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jenne

    This book is great because it allows the whole class to be involved and participate in the reading of the book. The illustrations are engaging and I think this book would be good to get the students talking. It emphasizes group cohesiveness and how important it is to work together to help others who may be struggling.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Edna

    Hilda's mooing sounds miserable and her friends decide it's probably because she's singing alone and needs a full chorus to cheer her up. Good read aloud book especially if the reader sings and plays up the animals sounds. Funny character illustrations.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Hilda Mae Heifer's moo is even more horrible sounding than ever because she is so blue. Her friends the pig, goose, hen, and cat think she's blue because she's singing solo and decide to find the perfect singing group to cheer her up.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    water damaged- ordered replacement

  17. 5 out of 5

    Auttumn C

    silly little story that has a funny audio recording! could be used as a prediction story or about friendship and honesty!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sandybear76

    silly story the kids seemed to like.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine Turner

    When Hilda Mae Heifer's trademark "moo" starts sounding even worse, the other animals decide she is lonely and hold auditions to find her some singing partners. www.hcpl.net When Hilda Mae Heifer's trademark "moo" starts sounding even worse, the other animals decide she is lonely and hold auditions to find her some singing partners. www.hcpl.net

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tina B

    "sequel to moo who, farm animals, talents, American idol, complicated, jerky plot"

  21. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Johnson

    Great book to read aloud

  22. 5 out of 5

    Annie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Not very impressed. Again, I liked the illustrations, but this storyline was even worse than the first.

  24. 5 out of 5

    The Library Lady

    The "American Idol" allusions will date as rapidly as most of the performers who appear on the real show. Funny, but Palatini is capable of far, far more when she is really on her game.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    American Idol, move over!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I love Palatini! This is a funny sort of America Idol for farm animals trying to help a very blue friend have a back up band. Good read aloud for a family. Ages 4+

  27. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    American Idol comes to the farm when Cat, Pig, Duck and Goose try to find a singing partner for Hilda Mae Heifer, whose Moo has gotten rather blue.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  30. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Vermillion

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