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God's High Calling For Women

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Women are not inferior to men—so why does the church sometimes treat women as less capable or valued than men? Women are told to be bold, assertive, independent, and competitive. They are expected to take leadership, exert authority, be bread-winners, and to single-handedly tackle all of life’s demands. God’s high calling for women in the church—a topic still relevant for to Women are not inferior to men—so why does the church sometimes treat women as less capable or valued than men? Women are told to be bold, assertive, independent, and competitive. They are expected to take leadership, exert authority, be bread-winners, and to single-handedly tackle all of life’s demands. God’s high calling for women in the church—a topic still relevant for today—is outlined in 1 Timothy 2:9-15 If followed, His plan results in blessing, unity, and glory for God. In God’s High Calling for Women, Dr. John MacArthur discusses important concerns for women in the church as outlined by the apostle Paul: their attitude, appearance, testimony, design and contribution. Complete with questions for review and thoughts for reflection at the end of each section, this thorough, insightful, yet concise study on the important and controversial subject of women in the church will serve as an excellent resource for personal or group study.


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Women are not inferior to men—so why does the church sometimes treat women as less capable or valued than men? Women are told to be bold, assertive, independent, and competitive. They are expected to take leadership, exert authority, be bread-winners, and to single-handedly tackle all of life’s demands. God’s high calling for women in the church—a topic still relevant for to Women are not inferior to men—so why does the church sometimes treat women as less capable or valued than men? Women are told to be bold, assertive, independent, and competitive. They are expected to take leadership, exert authority, be bread-winners, and to single-handedly tackle all of life’s demands. God’s high calling for women in the church—a topic still relevant for today—is outlined in 1 Timothy 2:9-15 If followed, His plan results in blessing, unity, and glory for God. In God’s High Calling for Women, Dr. John MacArthur discusses important concerns for women in the church as outlined by the apostle Paul: their attitude, appearance, testimony, design and contribution. Complete with questions for review and thoughts for reflection at the end of each section, this thorough, insightful, yet concise study on the important and controversial subject of women in the church will serve as an excellent resource for personal or group study.

30 review for God's High Calling For Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Vellacott

    Very easy read. Fairly short book. Outlines Biblical views of the different roles of men and women in the church and home and how feminism/fighting for equality/political correctness has damaged this. Calls women to a higher standard of life not based on outward appearance/superficiality but based on the inner life lived in the light of God's Word. Timely reminders. Recommended. Check out my John MacArthur shelf! Very easy read. Fairly short book. Outlines Biblical views of the different roles of men and women in the church and home and how feminism/fighting for equality/political correctness has damaged this. Calls women to a higher standard of life not based on outward appearance/superficiality but based on the inner life lived in the light of God's Word. Timely reminders. Recommended. Check out my John MacArthur shelf!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Katelyn Brown

    I think my expectations from this book were much too high. I do not know about the other readers but what I retrieved from this book were two things: women are equal to men in Gods eyes and woman get to raise children as their service to God - something that has been known (rarely ever practiced) since Christ's time. My issues is that the title of this book was to explain our high calling but John does not mention it at all until the final chapter. Also he never went deeper into the subject. Wha I think my expectations from this book were much too high. I do not know about the other readers but what I retrieved from this book were two things: women are equal to men in Gods eyes and woman get to raise children as their service to God - something that has been known (rarely ever practiced) since Christ's time. My issues is that the title of this book was to explain our high calling but John does not mention it at all until the final chapter. Also he never went deeper into the subject. What about women who have lost their husbands and have to work? What about woman who have careers and their husbands stay home with the kids? My reason for being disappointed is that I was excited to see outside of the obvious-baring and raising children-what MacArthur would have to say about women's role in the church. Sadly this did not do that.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Terrible. I wouldn't recommend that anyone waste their time on such a disappointing book. This book is dire. Lots and lots about women should not do - no dressing like a prostitute at church, ladies, no going to church to find a man, no dressing like a prostitute at church, no authority, no dressing like a prostitute at church... about 25% of the book is spent on this. So what is God's high calling for women, other than not wearing stripper shoes on a Sunday morning? Apparently God's high calling f Terrible. I wouldn't recommend that anyone waste their time on such a disappointing book. This book is dire. Lots and lots about women should not do - no dressing like a prostitute at church, ladies, no going to church to find a man, no dressing like a prostitute at church, no authority, no dressing like a prostitute at church... about 25% of the book is spent on this. So what is God's high calling for women, other than not wearing stripper shoes on a Sunday morning? Apparently God's high calling for women is 'the role of subordination and subjection'. The arguments used by the author are so full of flaws and blatant, deliberate misreadings of Scripture that I find the book highly objectionable. The author claims that 'when Eve stepped out from under the protection of Adam, she wad highly vulnerable and fell'. No. Eve was tempted by Satan and chose to disobey God. Genesis 3 makes it clear that conflict in the relationship between man and woman came as a result of the fall. The argument that women should not prophesy in church begins with mentioning a Scriptural basis and then misinterpreting a whole lot of other Scripture. 'There were loads of women prophetesses in the Bible, but they don't count because they were women and women have never been prophetesses because only men get to do that!' It's not exactly the world's best argument. Why not just discuss the relevant passage in the NT and leave it at that? I'm not a fan of Scripture being twisted to support an argument. Not everything needs to backed up with sixty different irrelevant quotations. I think the author needs to remember the story about the man who decided that he would live his life by the first verse he set eyes on when opening his eyes to a random page, and opened the Bible to 'he went and hanged himself'. I'm also not a fan of 'here is a passage from 1 Corinthians. Odd numbered verses should be considered in light of the cultural traditions of the day, but even numbered verses should be taken literally'. Although there are many parts of the Bible where an understanding of the culture of the day does shed light on the Scripture in question, choosing whether or not to consider this based on whether or not it fits your argument gets you nowhere. In summary, this book says almost nothing about God's high calling for women. It says a lot about what women shouldn't do (REMEMBER, NO PROSTITUTE DRESSES IN CHURCH) but pretty much nothing else (there is a very brief mention of the need for women to be well-educated in Scripture so that they can raise their children to know God's word, but this takes about a fifth of the time devoted to the no stripping in church thing). TL;DR Full of blatant misreadings of Scripture, and about as enlightening as a broken lightbulb. And remember: no dressing like a hooker in church. I should make it clear that I'm not fundamentally opposed to much of what the author tries, and fails, to say. I actually agree that the New Testament teaches that women should not take on public preaching roles in church and that it is a blessing for a woman to be able to raise her children to know God and the Scriptures. I'm also pretty sure that church is not the place for dressing like a prostitute. I just have a really big problem with how MacArthur twists Scripture to the point where some of what he says (i.e. Eve fell because she disobeyed man, not because she disobeyed God) utterly contradicts the word of God.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leya Delray

    I must say I was VERY disappointed in this book. I have heard good things about MacArthur, and believe he is well-meaning. But I was seriously concerned with his method of interpreting scripture. I will admit there were some good points he made (like church is not the place advertise your body, and biblically-grounded women can have great influence over their children, etc) BUT... Although the author at first seemed committed to getting his view straight from the scripture, when I got to his sect I must say I was VERY disappointed in this book. I have heard good things about MacArthur, and believe he is well-meaning. But I was seriously concerned with his method of interpreting scripture. I will admit there were some good points he made (like church is not the place advertise your body, and biblically-grounded women can have great influence over their children, etc) BUT... Although the author at first seemed committed to getting his view straight from the scripture, when I got to his section on women and prophesy, alarms started going off. He attempts to argue that there is "no evidence of an ongoing prophetic ministry" by a woman in the bible. His support for this is to point out that no woman has "more than one" prophesy recorded. While technically true, this is a faulty argument. Especially since, at least in the case of "Hulda the prophetess" (2nd Chronicles 34), it is quite obvious that men of God, including the HIGH PRIEST, specifically sought out a woman to ask for a message from God. Why else would they go to her, if she had never prophesied before? It seems obvious she had a reputation already established as a prophetess. Several of his other assumptions about the various biblical prophetesses also seem unsupported by scripture. Furthermore, he never even mentions the "virgin daughters" who prophesied in the new testament, nor the verses in Joel and Acts that specifically say "your sons and your DAUGHTERS shall prophesy." I was saddened and disappointed to find he was apparently reading his view into scripture in this area instead of getting his view FROM scripture. We should be VERY careful putting limits and restrictions on how people can serve God, and do our utmost NOT to impose human-made rules. The fact that he seemed completely blind to the fact that he was twisting the scripture to get his view out of it in this area, made me rather suspicious of the rest of the book, even though there were parts of it I did agree with.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Tero

    There are some books which I read that are just refreshing. This was one of those. Because I was brought up with Biblical teaching, there wasn’t anything new about Biblical womanhood presented in this book, but I still thoroughly enjoyed hearing the teachings that I know presented yet again, and in such a logical, educational fashion. I listened to this book as an audiobook. It was about two hours, so I’m guessing it’s just a short booklet. The points in this book could be expounded upon, for sur There are some books which I read that are just refreshing. This was one of those. Because I was brought up with Biblical teaching, there wasn’t anything new about Biblical womanhood presented in this book, but I still thoroughly enjoyed hearing the teachings that I know presented yet again, and in such a logical, educational fashion. I listened to this book as an audiobook. It was about two hours, so I’m guessing it’s just a short booklet. The points in this book could be expounded upon, for sure, but as a quick overview of God’s role for that woman, Macarthur covered all of the main points. Because I listened to it, there were a few things brought out that I’m not sure I agree with 100% (mainly, it was the presentation, not the “doctrine”). He used various Bible translations and commentaries. Several times, he would start a point and I would almost hold my breath to see how he expounded on the Scriptures. He very clearly pointed out some modern misconceptions and exegesis of the Scriptures (such as women should be in leadership). He presented the Scriptures as applicable today—which I greatly appreciate. Many women try to say, “That’s what it was for that culture.” MacArthur anticipated these arguments and gave historical background for the letters in the New Testament, and how they applied back then, and how they should apply today. I really liked this book and definitely recommend it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    A short and succinct commentary on 1 Tim. 2:9-15. I went into the book expecting to disagree with MacArthur and ready to rip into the book. As I read on I realized I actually agreed with him and enjoyed his consistent encouragement for women, reminding us of our worth and uniqueness. My two complaints are his lack of candor and gentleness in speaking about mothers (could make a single woman feel like she’s missing out on our “biggest blessing”), and his poignant lack of footnotes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennah

    This book is mostly about the biblical view of a women's role within the church. This book is mostly about the biblical view of a women's role within the church.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brenton

    I think the title says it all!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mariana Chirilov

    Must read👌🏻

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emma Schramm

    While I have a fairly conservative view on the role/calling of women compared to many within the church and world today, I found MacArthur's viewpoint rather narrow. I think he has some good things to say, but often comes off as condescending. The books title is "God's High Calling for Women" but MacArthur spends more time talking about what women should NOT do and how they should dress, than he does actually talking about what God has designed for the role of women and how that calling is beaut While I have a fairly conservative view on the role/calling of women compared to many within the church and world today, I found MacArthur's viewpoint rather narrow. I think he has some good things to say, but often comes off as condescending. The books title is "God's High Calling for Women" but MacArthur spends more time talking about what women should NOT do and how they should dress, than he does actually talking about what God has designed for the role of women and how that calling is beautiful and fulfilling. The book as a whole was repetitive and choppy--a good editor and reformatting would go a long way in making this a better book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laurén

    Concise. Easy to read and use as a reference because the book compiles major passages about women's roles. Could be used as a "primer" because it introduces passages that should be explored more in personal study. Concise. Easy to read and use as a reference because the book compiles major passages about women's roles. Could be used as a "primer" because it introduces passages that should be explored more in personal study.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cassidy Shooltz

    Loved this short book by John MacArthur! I was encouraged afresh to live out Biblical womanhood in a society that considers these important aspects of a woman's life to be a thing of the past. Truth is eternal, and therefore our calling is unchanged from the very time the Holy Spirit carried along Paul to write the book of Titus and every other Scriptural passage that provides us a clear picture of our calling as Christian women. In a post-modern society that does not believe in any substance of Loved this short book by John MacArthur! I was encouraged afresh to live out Biblical womanhood in a society that considers these important aspects of a woman's life to be a thing of the past. Truth is eternal, and therefore our calling is unchanged from the very time the Holy Spirit carried along Paul to write the book of Titus and every other Scriptural passage that provides us a clear picture of our calling as Christian women. In a post-modern society that does not believe in any substance of standard, calling or truth, we need this reminder now more than ever--God's plan and high calling for women is the most excellent destiny possible for the lives of every female believer. MacArthur's tone is both uncompromising and friendly; tender and bold. I felt as though I was seated at Grace Community Church having these words proclaimed to me from the pulpit. MacArthur does well in explaining, particularly at the beginning of the book, how feminism has drastically changed our world in ways we do not even fully grasp because of how deeply etched it is into many parts of our society. He urges us to leave behind such worldly and godless movements and to embrace instead our beautiful calling from God, clearly laid out in scripture. As a college aged woman, I absolutely do not hear this message often enough. I am immensely grateful MacArthur made sure this sermon series was also published in book form. I applaud him for this solid, Biblical and engaging book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    2.5 stars I am sad to say that I was disappointed in this book. I have read a few books by MacArthur before and found them to be educational and inspirational. This one let me down. There were some sections that I felt were very well done, had some good things to say and I had no problems with, but others were built on faulty reasoning and in disregard of those scriptures that could be used to contradict his conclusion. On top of that it basically comes down to single woman and motherless woman h 2.5 stars I am sad to say that I was disappointed in this book. I have read a few books by MacArthur before and found them to be educational and inspirational. This one let me down. There were some sections that I felt were very well done, had some good things to say and I had no problems with, but others were built on faulty reasoning and in disregard of those scriptures that could be used to contradict his conclusion. On top of that it basically comes down to single woman and motherless woman having no calling/ role within the church (unless you count learning as a role). On top of all that, there was a surprising lack of depth on the topic itself. What I mean is he didn't go into what roles we can fill in the church (apart from being mothers), like children's ministry or hospitality or evangelism or cleaning services etc. He primarily focused on what woman are not supposed to do: lead, preach, teach, etc. I am glad that I read this book for some of the research he includes for the background and context of the time 1 Timothy was written in, but can't say that it has done anything else for me. I would not recommend this book for single woman or motherless woman because I fear they will come away feeling discouraged and could perhaps hinder their relationship with God rather than aiding it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lynnae

    I’d be embarrassed to recommend this book to anyone. Especially a woman new to the faith. How demoralizing it would be. Not to point out how off base it is. Scripture twisted to fit the author’s viewpoint for sure. I think the only thing I agreed with is, Yes, absolutely you should not dress like a prostitute when going to church. But if a woman was dressed that way, we should have open arms welcoming her. Isn’t that what the church is for, to bring sinners to Christ? As I was reading this book, I’d be embarrassed to recommend this book to anyone. Especially a woman new to the faith. How demoralizing it would be. Not to point out how off base it is. Scripture twisted to fit the author’s viewpoint for sure. I think the only thing I agreed with is, Yes, absolutely you should not dress like a prostitute when going to church. But if a woman was dressed that way, we should have open arms welcoming her. Isn’t that what the church is for, to bring sinners to Christ? As I was reading this book, all I could think of is the numerous women of faith leaders who have tremendously impacted the kingdom of God through their public teaching and leadership roles. What a disturbing and disappointing read!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chelsia

    This book was so much smaller than what I was expecting, but don’t let that deceive the reader because it is hard hitting and fast. Pay attention or you’ll miss so much good insight. My favorite chapter was probably the last one because it really honed in on an idea I hadn’t thought of before, that which is this. Eve’s fall is mankind’s chance at redemption at a more godly and holier life because of the godly women who raise us. A very quick read, but I say, take your time with the chapters. My This book was so much smaller than what I was expecting, but don’t let that deceive the reader because it is hard hitting and fast. Pay attention or you’ll miss so much good insight. My favorite chapter was probably the last one because it really honed in on an idea I hadn’t thought of before, that which is this. Eve’s fall is mankind’s chance at redemption at a more godly and holier life because of the godly women who raise us. A very quick read, but I say, take your time with the chapters. My only complaint is that I felt it ended abruptly. But that is such a small potato compared to the meat of the book. I imagine I’ll come back to this book even so often to reread it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    I love and distrust concise works like this at the same time. The name (and length) may suggest this as a great work to give to a new believer who is learning about their identity in Christ, but this would be one I would be hesitant to hand out without proper grounding. It is mercifully short, but presumes a bit too much for comfort. Shouldn’t a book geared toward new believers begin in Genesis with God’s unique call to both men and women and work outward from there? Don’t get me wrong, all of w I love and distrust concise works like this at the same time. The name (and length) may suggest this as a great work to give to a new believer who is learning about their identity in Christ, but this would be one I would be hesitant to hand out without proper grounding. It is mercifully short, but presumes a bit too much for comfort. Shouldn’t a book geared toward new believers begin in Genesis with God’s unique call to both men and women and work outward from there? Don’t get me wrong, all of what MacArthur writes is biblical and faithful as he walks simply through 1 Tim 2:9-15, but leaving Genesis until the last two pages made me wonder if it was going to be included at all.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gwendolyn Harmon

    This is a down-to-earth, scriptural explanation of what the Bible has to say about the role of women in the church. I think this may have originated as a sermon series, but it is readable and I appreciate MacArthur’s plain-spoken style that gets right to the point. This is a book that does deal with things the Bible says women shouldn’t do, but MacArthur balances that with repeated reminders of the great worth and purpose that underlie each one. He also underscores the truth that women are in no This is a down-to-earth, scriptural explanation of what the Bible has to say about the role of women in the church. I think this may have originated as a sermon series, but it is readable and I appreciate MacArthur’s plain-spoken style that gets right to the point. This is a book that does deal with things the Bible says women shouldn’t do, but MacArthur balances that with repeated reminders of the great worth and purpose that underlie each one. He also underscores the truth that women are in no way inferior to men, while celebrating God’s design of women and their relationship to their family and the church.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Good book. Thorough exposition of Scripture on calling of women. I do wish his main point (which really hit home for me) wasn't at the end of the book and I wished he would have gone deeper into those main points. But it was an interesting and insightful point that he made about why God's high calling for women is to bear children and how it delivers women from the stigma of the fall. Anyways, to some, it may be controversial points but JMAC sticks to his convictions and guides his readers throu Good book. Thorough exposition of Scripture on calling of women. I do wish his main point (which really hit home for me) wasn't at the end of the book and I wished he would have gone deeper into those main points. But it was an interesting and insightful point that he made about why God's high calling for women is to bear children and how it delivers women from the stigma of the fall. Anyways, to some, it may be controversial points but JMAC sticks to his convictions and guides his readers through scripture in this short book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    We have to keep in mind the symbolic meaning of the Lord creating Eve from a rib of Adam. This means that man and woman are to viewed as equals. When it comes standing before the Lord, both genders are equally precious. It appears though we have examples, when Eve ate of the fruit nothing happened, when Adam ate of the fruit, their eyes were opened, their is a reason. The upper room discourse had women and men, but the Lord’s supper had the eleven. What about the biblical authors.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

    Helpful little book on 1 Tim 2:9-15 and breaking down the context, the Greek language and specific words that Paul uses, cultural, etc. Due to how short it is, I do think it’s lacking in addressing much on singleness or women who aren’t married and/or a mother. Nonetheless, a quick and insightful read that I’d recommend.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ambica Converse

    I did this study 20 years ago with the Elder’s wives in our church. This September we did this study with 14 ladies and it was a great reminder of how much God loves us. For the new believers, it helped them to understand how God have different roles for men and woman, even though women are not inferior to men. I truly recommend this book to all women.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chantel

    Short, easy read dispelling the wrong notions about women in the church. Only 3 stars, however, because he just TOUCHED on the higher calling at the end of a history lesson/myth debunking. I would have liked it more if it expanded on how to press into that higher calling with scripture. I guess the title and summation was misleading for me.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Jones

    Short but thorough This is not a very long book, and it is a very easy read. But it covers all of the necessary topics in a very succinct way, all backed by scripture. This is a book every Christian woman should read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Casey Wood

    So thankful for John MacArthur and his faithfulness to Christ and His word. This book was so encouraging to me as a mother of three you children. "Only a godly mother can rear godly children." Lord, help me to be a godly mother! So thankful for John MacArthur and his faithfulness to Christ and His word. This book was so encouraging to me as a mother of three you children. "Only a godly mother can rear godly children." Lord, help me to be a godly mother!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joy Sanders

    This book really helps to point women to the value God places in being female. Femininity is a gift of God. The way we glorify God as women is by praising him for all that we get to do with our feminine attributes and using those gifts to build His Kingdom.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leanne

    I loved this book. I appreciate the time and dedication JMac takes referencing the Bible and backs up all of his writing with the Bible-God’s words. It’s not just based off his own personal feelings, it’s based on decades of studying Gods word and facts. 🤍

  27. 4 out of 5

    Belinda

    The contents and the title were a mismatch.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shelly Patularu

    An excellent dive into the "controversial" scripture concerning a woman's role in the church. A must read for all Christians. An excellent dive into the "controversial" scripture concerning a woman's role in the church. A must read for all Christians.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Barriger

    Good quick read. There's some gems hidden between the lines. Certainly a great resource for anyone searching out the topic of Women's role in the church. Good quick read. There's some gems hidden between the lines. Certainly a great resource for anyone searching out the topic of Women's role in the church.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    I glad I finally read this book, it explains so much of how our role in the church is vital, necessary and important to the Kingdom of God. A study guide is available on the Grace To You website.

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