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Walt Whitman And The Birth Of Modern American Poetry

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Explores how Walt Whitman broke with European literary forms to establish a broad new voice for American poetry. His influence on his contemporaries and descendents transends the boundaries of poetry and becomes the story of young America. Discusses the influence of this 19th century American poet not only to poetry but to cultural formation of the United States.


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Explores how Walt Whitman broke with European literary forms to establish a broad new voice for American poetry. His influence on his contemporaries and descendents transends the boundaries of poetry and becomes the story of young America. Discusses the influence of this 19th century American poet not only to poetry but to cultural formation of the United States.

30 review for Walt Whitman And The Birth Of Modern American Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This is a series of class lecture by Professor Karen Karblener for the Modern Scholar. This series is on Walt Whitman 1819 to 1892. According to Karblener Whitman was beginning of American poetry and is often called the “father of free verse”. The teacher goes through Whitman’s life and his poetry. She brings up controversy regarding his sexual orientation, his politics as a liberal democrat, being banned in Boston, and his opposition to slavery. She says Whitman was educated only to elementary This is a series of class lecture by Professor Karen Karblener for the Modern Scholar. This series is on Walt Whitman 1819 to 1892. According to Karblener Whitman was beginning of American poetry and is often called the “father of free verse”. The teacher goes through Whitman’s life and his poetry. She brings up controversy regarding his sexual orientation, his politics as a liberal democrat, being banned in Boston, and his opposition to slavery. She says Whitman was educated only to elementary school but was a printer and a reader. She states he was not considered successful in his lifetime but his poetry became sought after in the 20th century. She reads from some of his poems and discusses them such as “Leaves of Grass”. Overall it is a good introduction to Whitman. I remember little of what we discussed about Whitman in high school so this audio book allowed me to have a good understanding of Whitman and his place in American poetry.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    I'm not much of a poetry reader. It's not that I don't enjoy poetry, but that I just haven't had much exposure to it. I've always been curious about Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass, but feared I would not be sophisticated enough to fully appreciate the poems on my own (especially in audio format). So, I was grateful to this audio lecture to help introduce me to his works and intentions, as well as how his poetry influenced future writers and artists (including modern day pop culture). The profess I'm not much of a poetry reader. It's not that I don't enjoy poetry, but that I just haven't had much exposure to it. I've always been curious about Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass, but feared I would not be sophisticated enough to fully appreciate the poems on my own (especially in audio format). So, I was grateful to this audio lecture to help introduce me to his works and intentions, as well as how his poetry influenced future writers and artists (including modern day pop culture). The professor had a clear passion for the subject matter, which I always appreciate. I wouldn't say it was riveting stuff, but I did learn a lot, and that was my goal in listening to it. 3.5 stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Phillip

    This was very good. I`'ve read Leaves of Grass at least three times over the years and I don't really get it. There will be parts that I like, but they really aren't worth wading through everything else to get to those parts. I keep rereading because I keep expecting I will get it this time. It took multiple readings for me to appreciate Tolkien, Moby Dick, and William Burroughs. Now I am a fan of all of them. So, there is always hope. I've been listening to a lot of lectures and snapped at the ch This was very good. I`'ve read Leaves of Grass at least three times over the years and I don't really get it. There will be parts that I like, but they really aren't worth wading through everything else to get to those parts. I keep rereading because I keep expecting I will get it this time. It took multiple readings for me to appreciate Tolkien, Moby Dick, and William Burroughs. Now I am a fan of all of them. So, there is always hope. I've been listening to a lot of lectures and snapped at the chance when I found out about this book. The Professor does a great job of giving the listener a second season of what Whiteman's project was and a sense of his significance to American letters and to world literature. It makes me want to return to the 1855 edition and give it another try.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    It’s a lecture series or class, not a book. The first half is a good summary of Whitman which I liked (but also found too similar to David Reynolds’s book), but I thought the second half about modern poets and musicians influenced by Whitman was ungrounded and rarely made a clear or focused point.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anabela Vardy

    A really insightful journey into the life and work of a true master.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    4/5 I enjoyed Professor Karbeiner’s review of Walt Whitman’s writing. She is a joyful expert and her enthusiasm of this writing is palpable.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Edwin B

    Karen Karbiener fired up enough of my interest in Walt Whitman such that yesterday I actually bought a book of his selected poems (second hand, as usual). Now I'm settling myself down to enjoy his most renowned work, the epic poem "Song of Myself," which was included in his book "Leaves of Grass". Whitman was the ordinary man's poet, and the first unique American voice in literature. He brought to life the experiences of young 19th century America, democratic, full of promise for the common man, Karen Karbiener fired up enough of my interest in Walt Whitman such that yesterday I actually bought a book of his selected poems (second hand, as usual). Now I'm settling myself down to enjoy his most renowned work, the epic poem "Song of Myself," which was included in his book "Leaves of Grass". Whitman was the ordinary man's poet, and the first unique American voice in literature. He brought to life the experiences of young 19th century America, democratic, full of promise for the common man, and his words spoke in behalf of the disenfranchised of his time - gay men, women, and African-Americans who were enslaved. Whitman's poetry spoke directly to the generations after him, inspiring the likes of African American poet Langston Hughes, leftist folk musician Woody Guthrie, and beat founder Allen Ginsberg. That's the way he would've liked it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brad

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lance Eaton

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathejo

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anya Horman

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eeman Ahmed

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

  17. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad Ahmad

  18. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Beary

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jim Noel

  21. 5 out of 5

    David

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike Mike

  24. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    I rather enjoyed listening to these lectures.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

  26. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Gordon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael The Audio Book Master

  28. 5 out of 5

    Igor Tkachenko

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul Mannino

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ronica

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