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How to Raise a Feminist Son: A Memoir & Manifesto

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A beautifully written and deeply personal story of struggling, failing, and eventually succeeding at raising a feminist son, this empowering book offers much-needed insight and actionable advice. From teaching consent to counteracting problematic messages from the media, well-meaning family, and the culture at large, we have big work to do when it comes to boys. Informed b A beautifully written and deeply personal story of struggling, failing, and eventually succeeding at raising a feminist son, this empowering book offers much-needed insight and actionable advice. From teaching consent to counteracting problematic messages from the media, well-meaning family, and the culture at large, we have big work to do when it comes to boys. Informed by the author's work as a professor of journalism specializing in social justice movements and social media, as well as by conversations with psychologists, experts, and other parents and boys, this book follows one mother's journey to raise a feminist son as a single immigrant woman of color in America. Through stories from her own life and wide-ranging research, Sonora Jha shows us how to be better feminists and better teachers of the next generation of men in this electrifying tour de force.


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A beautifully written and deeply personal story of struggling, failing, and eventually succeeding at raising a feminist son, this empowering book offers much-needed insight and actionable advice. From teaching consent to counteracting problematic messages from the media, well-meaning family, and the culture at large, we have big work to do when it comes to boys. Informed b A beautifully written and deeply personal story of struggling, failing, and eventually succeeding at raising a feminist son, this empowering book offers much-needed insight and actionable advice. From teaching consent to counteracting problematic messages from the media, well-meaning family, and the culture at large, we have big work to do when it comes to boys. Informed by the author's work as a professor of journalism specializing in social justice movements and social media, as well as by conversations with psychologists, experts, and other parents and boys, this book follows one mother's journey to raise a feminist son as a single immigrant woman of color in America. Through stories from her own life and wide-ranging research, Sonora Jha shows us how to be better feminists and better teachers of the next generation of men in this electrifying tour de force.

30 review for How to Raise a Feminist Son: A Memoir & Manifesto

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    If you're like me, you may be a bit anxious about raising a boy in modern society. I have two boys of my own and I want to raise them to be good humans. With the #metoo movement, rape culture, and more, what does it take to raise a boy into a good man? How does one parent a child to make him a feminist son? someone who will respect women and others. Sonora Jha offers up her personal experiences raising her (Now adult) son. Jha was a single mom living in the US, having moved from Asia after her m If you're like me, you may be a bit anxious about raising a boy in modern society. I have two boys of my own and I want to raise them to be good humans. With the #metoo movement, rape culture, and more, what does it take to raise a boy into a good man? How does one parent a child to make him a feminist son? someone who will respect women and others. Sonora Jha offers up her personal experiences raising her (Now adult) son. Jha was a single mom living in the US, having moved from Asia after her marriage ended. Jha considered herself a feminist and was conscious about raising her son as a feminist. In How to Raise a Feminist Son, she shares her personal experiences and offers up some advice. The book is part memoir and part parenting guide. This is an important read for any parent!! Jha's personal anecdotes are relatable and she admits where she made mistakes. Her advice is also approachable and not overwhelming. The books is clearly well researched as she references lots of other books on the subjects of parenting, feminism, behavior and more. There are chapters on things such as "the sex talk", video games and movie, male role models and building your village. Each chapter is topped off with a To Do list of a handful of items. I also loved that there was a list of suggest books and films at the end of the book, with suggestions for both kids and parents. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS ONE!! Thank you to the publisher for the review copy!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Somia

    Part memoir and part guide this is an engaging read I wish I had picked up sooner. I liked how much the author shares of herself and her experiences in this book and it never feels like she is preaching. Well written and paced. Every chapter in this has a to-do list at the end, with things you can do to raise your feminist child. The resource section (with books, films and tv shows) will be something that I will utilise for teaching and more broadly.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rae

    In “How to Raise a Feminist Son,” Sonora Jha weaves recollections from various stages of her life with discussions about teaching and modeling gender equality and equity when parenting. My own son was a toddler when the #MeToo movement gained steam, so for the last several years I’ve thought about how I should raise him to not only be respectful and kind to women, but also an empathetic ally. Part-memoir and part-manifesto, I found this book to be a well-written and thought-provoking read. I must In “How to Raise a Feminist Son,” Sonora Jha weaves recollections from various stages of her life with discussions about teaching and modeling gender equality and equity when parenting. My own son was a toddler when the #MeToo movement gained steam, so for the last several years I’ve thought about how I should raise him to not only be respectful and kind to women, but also an empathetic ally. Part-memoir and part-manifesto, I found this book to be a well-written and thought-provoking read. I must point out that this is less of a how-to guide for raising feminists and more like a series of autobiographical essays that encourages personal reflection and informed action in the reader. It may be more helpful to some than others. Because the author’s sociopolitical stances so closely align with my own and because of my social sciences background, this book was less educating and more value-affirming to me. Therefore, a few sections dragged a little for me—“preaching to the choir” came to mind a handful of times—but the chapters toward the end of the book that explored sex & sexuality, race, and being a “good” feminist were the strongest and most stimulating in my opinion. Overall, I think this would be a good addition to someone’s parenting library. Thank you to NetGalley and Sasquatch Books for an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeida K. Storey

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. HOW TO RAISE A FEMINIST SON is part memoir, part manifesto that provides insight, research, and practical advice on resisting patriarchal parenting. Sonora Jha uses her lived experiences growing up in Mumbai and later living as a single mother in America to frame the necessity of raising feminist sons. From navigating conversations around sex and consent to power dynamics and social media, Jha offers helpful tips and resources to help parents. Each chapter ends with a list of actionable items fo HOW TO RAISE A FEMINIST SON is part memoir, part manifesto that provides insight, research, and practical advice on resisting patriarchal parenting. Sonora Jha uses her lived experiences growing up in Mumbai and later living as a single mother in America to frame the necessity of raising feminist sons. From navigating conversations around sex and consent to power dynamics and social media, Jha offers helpful tips and resources to help parents. Each chapter ends with a list of actionable items for practice/reflection. This book couldn’t have come at a more perfect time. As a millennial mother of a young son, many of my discussions with my friends center the idea of raising feminist and socially conscious children. This intentional way of child rearing is a form of active resistance against patriarchy, misogyny/misogynoir, racism, capitalism, homophobia, transphobia, and every other oppressive societal norm upon which empire sits. I particularly appreciated learning more about Jha’s culture, especially the gods and goddesses from which she’s drawn motivation on her parenting journey. It was especially moving reading how Black Lives Matter impacted Jha’s perspective on race and anti-Blackness in America, that such racial realities play a significant role in the way Black and brown folks must navigate parenting our children. Jha gives hope of a better future for us all. This is the book for you, if you love: 🎞 Feminist film, TV, and books 🗣 #OwnVoices narratives 🗯 Practical advice 📝 Thoughtful journal reflections Whether you read this alone or grab a few of your parent friends to join... this book should find a spot on your shelf. Special thanks to Sasquatch Books and NetGalley for the ARC!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I love a good parenting book, but I often approach them with a bit of apprehension that all I’ll gain is how much I’m doing wrong. Luckily, this book excelled at providing practical advice and action steps and glimmers of hope that I am raising my boys in a way that is forward-thinking and progressive. I think this is largely due in part to the author sharing so much of herself, including painful stories from her past, mistakes she made, and the real and honest conversations she had with her own I love a good parenting book, but I often approach them with a bit of apprehension that all I’ll gain is how much I’m doing wrong. Luckily, this book excelled at providing practical advice and action steps and glimmers of hope that I am raising my boys in a way that is forward-thinking and progressive. I think this is largely due in part to the author sharing so much of herself, including painful stories from her past, mistakes she made, and the real and honest conversations she had with her own son. I really appreciate this book and it’s inspired me to keep doing my best.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Blythe

    Brilliant, compassionate, gentle, and extremely helpful. Easily the best parenting book I’ve ever read. The author approaches the idea of raising feminists with gentleness and humility, answering all my doubts and fears. Coming from a patriarchal faith and culture, I’ve been deconstructing how this system has impacted me for several years, and this book gives me the permission I need to raise my son (and daughter) outside of the patriarchy to be empathetic, compassionate, generous people, rather Brilliant, compassionate, gentle, and extremely helpful. Easily the best parenting book I’ve ever read. The author approaches the idea of raising feminists with gentleness and humility, answering all my doubts and fears. Coming from a patriarchal faith and culture, I’ve been deconstructing how this system has impacted me for several years, and this book gives me the permission I need to raise my son (and daughter) outside of the patriarchy to be empathetic, compassionate, generous people, rather than people who mindlessly submit to the patriarchy (and its demands of power and rank), like their mama did for years. I wish I could give this book to all my friends who have sons.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Joseph

    This book is wonderful, convicting, and intensely personal. It is as much about the ways that masculinity has been warped to perpetuate the need for Feminism as it is about Feminism itself,  yet without ever being judgmental. She always invites the men reading it to be what she knows they can, not holding their manhood against them, but rather calling them (and me) UP to it instead. She details the ways in which we are taught even as young boys to suppress emotion, to be the alpha, to be the pro This book is wonderful, convicting, and intensely personal. It is as much about the ways that masculinity has been warped to perpetuate the need for Feminism as it is about Feminism itself,  yet without ever being judgmental. She always invites the men reading it to be what she knows they can, not holding their manhood against them, but rather calling them (and me) UP to it instead. She details the ways in which we are taught even as young boys to suppress emotion, to be the alpha, to be the provider, to be the "head of the household" and to not say sorry (thankfully my own father modeled quite the opposite, for which I'm grateful, but society still twisted me in many ways).  The lessons on Feminism here are spot on, and her personal stories about how she herself was molded by the toxic masculinity of others make her instructions both helpful and urgent.  Her perspective on Indian culture and the ways that misogyny shows up there are eye-opening without being simplistic or generalizing, but she also translates well for American readers with examples from American culture that I personally identify with.  She makes a strong case for how Feminism empowers everyone of all genders (including men) and she convinced me in the way she presented that. When men can shake toxic masculinity, it not only enables them to treat women like humans, but enables themselves to be fully functioning emotional beings not tethered to a strict standard of maleness. She does a phenomenal job of also showing how Feminism needs to be intersectional, disability-affirming, and racially-conscious. Hearing someone's thoughts on Feminism from a non-white voice in such a comprehensive way that is both intensely personal and sweepingly applicable is such a necessary voice to listen to. The book in some ways digresses towards the end and where she loses me at points is when she gets into the descriptions of her more general parenting style separate from the explicitly feminist lessons, like when she gets into the ways she interacts with her son and her own parenting or mental health struggles. She majorly struggles with letting go, letting him be his own person as an adult and letting him transition when the boy she's raising becomes the man she taught him to be, and learning to just let him take ownership of his life and the lessons she taught him after a certain point, without comment. In one chapter she ends her (awesome) thesis on allowing our kids to talk about our feelings and our sexuality with a statement about wishing her son would confide in her about his (adult) sex life more. I personally don't feel that is an entirely appropriate expectation, but that's just me. In another chapter she talks about how she took a day off from work to wait for her son's college admissions letter to come and then called the college's admissions office and had them track down her son when he first arrived and didn't answer her calls from home. I hate to use the term helicopter parent, but the shoe fits here. She also uncritically describes a game she liked to play with her son where she would hold him and he would have to kiss her over and over in order for her to let him out of her trap. She discusses how she stopped playing when he got older because he didn't seem excited about it, but she never voices how the game itself reinforces the kind of forced physicality that she had just talked about staying away from, ending the chapter by saying that the next time she sees him (he's an adult now) that she will try to play it with him again. Nobody's perfect, and everyone has different styles of parenting, it just distracted me at times from the bigger picture points she was making.  Again, her thesis is absolutely fantastic, her stories are engaging and at points heart-breaking and eye-opening, and I learned ALOT of things that I will implement in my own relationships and ethics lessons for my sons, but I also learned ways I don't want to interact with my kids as well, on a general parenting level, which is fine, not everyone parents the same way, but I absolutely think we all could take some pointers from her on how to raise feminist men. I already have implemented some of her ideas. Lastly, there's a huge library of great references in the back of the book, some of which I plan to purchase as my sons grow into them. Great book! Will likely read again as a refresher when my sons get older.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I really enjoyed this book. There are a lot of good ideas on how to teach sons to treat women with dignity and respect, and not in the patriarchal "ladies first" kind of thing. I really liked her chapter on consuming media; I feel like she has given me better tools to equip my kids to view media in a healthy way, mostly by talking about the media that your child is consuming and consuming it with him (or her; I think this approach would be good for girls, too). I thought it would be especially g I really enjoyed this book. There are a lot of good ideas on how to teach sons to treat women with dignity and respect, and not in the patriarchal "ladies first" kind of thing. I really liked her chapter on consuming media; I feel like she has given me better tools to equip my kids to view media in a healthy way, mostly by talking about the media that your child is consuming and consuming it with him (or her; I think this approach would be good for girls, too). I thought it would be especially good to point out things that I appreciate about what the characters are doing. One thing that I've thought about before, but really came home to me as I was reading this, is have your son treat you (if you're his mother) or his mother as you would like him to treat his future wife. Some quotes that I liked: "This is mommy's body, and you have to ask" - Danielle Holland 165 (especially good when they're wanting to wrestle. Yes I have all boys) "Perhaps a woman's most feminist act is to forgive herself" p. 214

  9. 4 out of 5

    Caitlinleah

    other than the classic advice of watch tv and movies WITH your kids and talk about it, This was not the self-help book I was expecting. It was much more of a memoir and I really appreciated it for that. I appreciated the story without feeling like I've been doing it wrong. other than the classic advice of watch tv and movies WITH your kids and talk about it, This was not the self-help book I was expecting. It was much more of a memoir and I really appreciated it for that. I appreciated the story without feeling like I've been doing it wrong.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Helena#bookdreamer

    Thank you netgalley for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review. This was a very well written book that speaks to complex ideas and experiences of feminism. The author recounts her experience as a single mother trying to raise her son to embody feminist ideals through film and conversation. She explores her own views on feminism and the cultural expectations as a feminist woman in a conservative Indian society. Enjoyed it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McPhedran

    Part memoir, part guide; this book was a great "how to" guide in how to raise a feminist-from consent, to body image to questioning problematic societal expectations, this book really covers it all. I loved her voice, her own personal experiences, and her huge amount of research. The resource section (with movies, books, and television shows) will be something that I will definitely look back at as time goes on. SO much to think about, and question within my own life. So good, and so worth the r Part memoir, part guide; this book was a great "how to" guide in how to raise a feminist-from consent, to body image to questioning problematic societal expectations, this book really covers it all. I loved her voice, her own personal experiences, and her huge amount of research. The resource section (with movies, books, and television shows) will be something that I will definitely look back at as time goes on. SO much to think about, and question within my own life. So good, and so worth the read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    Thanks to NetGalley and Sasquatch Books for providing an ARC!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gill

    How to Raise a Feminist Son by Sonora Jha should be required reading for everyone. A beautifully written book that is part memoir, part personal guide and an academic study on raising boys. As Jha says right from the beginning this book will focus on raising cisgender boys, but there is so much intersectional discussion throughout the book. It also isn’t just a book for mother’s. Anyone could benefit from this informative and empathetic look at how boys are raised. I loved this book. It was so ea How to Raise a Feminist Son by Sonora Jha should be required reading for everyone. A beautifully written book that is part memoir, part personal guide and an academic study on raising boys. As Jha says right from the beginning this book will focus on raising cisgender boys, but there is so much intersectional discussion throughout the book. It also isn’t just a book for mother’s. Anyone could benefit from this informative and empathetic look at how boys are raised. I loved this book. It was so easy and accessible to read. Jha weaves memory and knowledge so masterfully. We look back at Jha life, her work and how she raised her son. A single mother from India raising her son in America. I felt sometimes as if I was sitting in on one of Jha’s classes or a fly in the wall watching her life unfold. I love the influence of film in Jha’s life. There is an in depth look at social media, media, racism and so much more. The book is filled with interviews and references. I loved at the end there are lists of films and shows to watch with your boys. And of course books to read! There are actionable to-do’s at the end of each chapter. There is so much to learn within the pages of this book. I highly recommend it. Thank you to #netgalley for the advanced reader copy in exchange for a review. #SonoraJha #HowtoRaiseaFeministSon #NetGalley

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nidhi Shrivastava

    One of the most anticipated memoirs of the year, Sonora Jha invites her readers to think about how feminism plays a role in our day to day life. As a single mother, she shares how she integrates the tenants of feminist theory into her daily life. As we continue to grapple with the #MeToo movement, Jha’s advice to share one own’s metoo story with their sons was the most touching to me because this advice meant that a family reckons with sexual violence that is often silenced in a domestic setting One of the most anticipated memoirs of the year, Sonora Jha invites her readers to think about how feminism plays a role in our day to day life. As a single mother, she shares how she integrates the tenants of feminist theory into her daily life. As we continue to grapple with the #MeToo movement, Jha’s advice to share one own’s metoo story with their sons was the most touching to me because this advice meant that a family reckons with sexual violence that is often silenced in a domestic setting. Her book, too, comes as a response to the patriarchal cultural systems that have always been a part of the Indian society. When I began this memoir, I was thinking of Elisabeth Bumiller’s controversial book, May You Be the Mother of a Hundred Sons and to me, Sonora’s part memoir/part feminist manifesto offered a re-envisioning of this future where one not only encouraged the girl/young women to be decision makers but that we needed to think of how men/boys/sons could also learn to respect and advocate for gender equality.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gavriella

    This book was a breathtaking read. I finished it in 24 hours and quite literally could not put it down. I’m not raising children currently and I don’t intend to in the future... but I interact with people’s sons on a daily basis - in dating, in friendship, in work. And now I feel like I can go back to those relationships with a new lens. Most compelling for me were the pieces of memoir woven into the book. Sonora has lived an incredible life, and she has achieved and overcome so much. This book w This book was a breathtaking read. I finished it in 24 hours and quite literally could not put it down. I’m not raising children currently and I don’t intend to in the future... but I interact with people’s sons on a daily basis - in dating, in friendship, in work. And now I feel like I can go back to those relationships with a new lens. Most compelling for me were the pieces of memoir woven into the book. Sonora has lived an incredible life, and she has achieved and overcome so much. This book was inspiring and motivating and thought provoking and I’m so grateful to have had the privilege of reading it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Derya

    I absolutely fell in love with this book. It was so warm and funny, at times sad, but overall a very lovely account of a feminist mother’s attempts over the years to raise a feminist son. It’s a memoir, a feminist theory book, a how-to-guide at the same time. 10/10 would recommend, even if you (like me) don’t have a son to raise. Longer review to come on my blog with a friend in the next weeks!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chandler O'Leary

    Beautifully written memoir and both a strident and humane look at feminist childrearing. I have so much hope (for myself, for my son, for all of us) after reading this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Piyali Kundu

    Book Name- How to raise a Feminist son (A memoir and manifesto) Author- Sonora Jha -Well I have so many thoughts running through my mind and I possibly will put them down here, if not all but most of it. Firstly, “Feminism” is itself a term that’s so well misunderstood especially in our Indian context. The first thing that comes to your mind is- Feminism is all about women and hating men, isn’t it? I mean I might be overgeneralizing, but this is kind of the general illogical concept that goes arou Book Name- How to raise a Feminist son (A memoir and manifesto) Author- Sonora Jha -Well I have so many thoughts running through my mind and I possibly will put them down here, if not all but most of it. Firstly, “Feminism” is itself a term that’s so well misunderstood especially in our Indian context. The first thing that comes to your mind is- Feminism is all about women and hating men, isn’t it? I mean I might be overgeneralizing, but this is kind of the general illogical concept that goes around. Nonetheless, I have some amazing feminist friends and people in my life. -Enough of blabbering I guess, let’s get back to the book. This book is a memoir of the author and a Feminist manifesto stemming from the fact that she wanted to raise her son Gibran as a Feminist, which is not quite a popular concept. Why? Because, people often think that “Feminism isn’t a man’s cup of tea”. Well, read this book and you will know why Feminism should be everyone’s cup of tea. -Each and every part and chapter of this book is so informative with scientific and researched data along with findings and observations that we often tend to ignore. The author’s note at the beginning suggests that though the central theme revolves around “sons/boys” i.e. raising cisgender boys, this book plays a major role in addressing other intersectional identities too. -Initially the prologue amazed me and I quite anticipated that this book was going to blow my mind and it did. It did live up to the expectations (even more). -The author talks about her journey, her struggles and how she raised a feminist son. The book talks about various aspects of Feminism, be it intersectional feminism which is so well demonstrated in this book or the interconnectivity of feminism with everyday life. -She has been hardcore honest in this book, citing experiences and emotions of love, guilt, anger, and what not (even those that she didn’t share with others). I fell in love with that honesty, that rawness, and that vulnerability. -She has so well defined the concepts of body-positivity, white supremacy, brahminical supremacy through facts and real-life examples. Each and every chapter will give you a new perspective and a reason to dismantle this patriarchal structure. -Apart from the vast concept of feminism, this book so well established a new parenting structure that I think should be absorbed by new-age parents. The bittersweet relationship between the author and her son really moved me. -Moreover, apart from raising a “son”, this book talks about how children can be raised with a “gender-neutral” approach who consequently focuses on the concept of gender fluidity. -Each and every chapter is so well structured with a TO-DO list at the end of each of them, directly calling for an action to bring a change. Also, at the end you will get a portion of notes from each chapter and a list of resources (books and movies- names and descriptions) for children and adults which is so unique and helpful. -I am so lucky that I picked up this book (I don’t know why there wasn’t any hype around this book when it was released back in 2021). I can certainly say that I am a better feminist and a better human being now, after reading this book. -To sum up, I just totally loved this book (a 5-star read for sure) and I recommend it to all of you (not to absolute beginners though). For absolute beginners, you can start with “We should all be Feminists” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and then pick this up.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hanneke (Asta)

    [A free copy was provided by NetGalley in exchange for a honest review] How To Raise a Feminist Son is a beautiful love letter to the author’s son, and a journey through navigating a non-feminist world while raising him. Sonora Jha was born in India, a country that has a prevalent rape culture and expect women to have babies and take care of the family. When Sonora is pregnant with a boy, she cries - she’s afraid that her son will grow up to be like het abusive father and brother. So she vows to [A free copy was provided by NetGalley in exchange for a honest review] How To Raise a Feminist Son is a beautiful love letter to the author’s son, and a journey through navigating a non-feminist world while raising him. Sonora Jha was born in India, a country that has a prevalent rape culture and expect women to have babies and take care of the family. When Sonora is pregnant with a boy, she cries - she’s afraid that her son will grow up to be like het abusive father and brother. So she vows to raise him as a feminist, something she continues as she eventually moves to America with him. Sonora’s journey is a strong one. She survived and goes through so much, while raising her son as a single mother, and stíll wondering with every step she takes wether or not she is raising him right. Most mothers would focus on survival at that point, but Sonora is surviving ánd raising her son as feminist as she can. Every chapter has a to do list at the end, with things you can do to raise your children feminist. Talk with them about certain things, watch the things they’re watching (together!), ask them questions, that sort of thing. As a mother of a two year old boy, the title of this book immediately caught my eye. I’m worried about the world my kid is growing up in, and I definitely want him to be a feminist. The to do lists in this book will help me with that, and Sonora’s journey reminds me that you can always try to raise your kid right, despite the circumstances. I would highly recommend How To Raise a Feminist Son to any young parent, and I’m glad I got to meet Sonora and Gibran in this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    This book was part-memoir and part-guide on how to raise a feminist son, specifically. She does take a fairly intersectional approach, understanding that people will be coming from various social locations, but draws on her own experience as an Indian single mother raising a brown, South Asian boy in the US. I feel like she does a good job of talking about all the ways she both failed and succeeded at instilling feminist values in her child, and how her experience of growing up in India affected This book was part-memoir and part-guide on how to raise a feminist son, specifically. She does take a fairly intersectional approach, understanding that people will be coming from various social locations, but draws on her own experience as an Indian single mother raising a brown, South Asian boy in the US. I feel like she does a good job of talking about all the ways she both failed and succeeded at instilling feminist values in her child, and how her experience of growing up in India affected her as well. Be warned, there is discussion of some significant sexual assault/sexual violence as she tells her story. It felt a tiny bit preachy at times, but overall was warm and encouraging about trying to raise boys that aren't steeped in a culture of toxic masculinity but who see power differentials and champion those around them.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Arielle Diaz

    Wow! This was good, I am always attracted to "parenting" books but can never really get through them because it always feels like the rules are set. This was not like that at ALL. This was more a memoir with supporting information. I felt like I was at a parent meet up and we were all discussing the topic of feminism. It was personal, and the questions after each chapter made it even more so. A great read for any parents of boys. A large reminder that we do our best, we continue growing and chan Wow! This was good, I am always attracted to "parenting" books but can never really get through them because it always feels like the rules are set. This was not like that at ALL. This was more a memoir with supporting information. I felt like I was at a parent meet up and we were all discussing the topic of feminism. It was personal, and the questions after each chapter made it even more so. A great read for any parents of boys. A large reminder that we do our best, we continue growing and changing which is the biggest teacher for our children. At the end of the day, they will take some of it and we will all feel guilty anyway 😅 but at least I'm not alone.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Mellen

    Thanks to Netgalley and Sasquatch books for the ARC of this! I switched back and forth between the ebook and the audio from my library. This was a lovely look at raising a feminist child, especially one who has the privilege of being viewed as male by society. Jha points out multiple times that society lets down boys too, how you can try your hardest to be a good ally and still mess up sometimes, and how fraught parenting can be with doubt about whether you are doing it “right”. Definitely recom Thanks to Netgalley and Sasquatch books for the ARC of this! I switched back and forth between the ebook and the audio from my library. This was a lovely look at raising a feminist child, especially one who has the privilege of being viewed as male by society. Jha points out multiple times that society lets down boys too, how you can try your hardest to be a good ally and still mess up sometimes, and how fraught parenting can be with doubt about whether you are doing it “right”. Definitely recommend to anyone who wants their son(s) to treat women as equals and with respect but is worried about where to start.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    The first few chapters were heavily memoir, which didn’t connect with me. Not because I didn’t like it, but more that I was not feeling memoirs, especially concerning parenting. Jha has an engaging style. But by chapter 7, the strength of the author’s research took over and I was thinking of all the parents I wanted to recommend it to. Coupled with Peggy Ornstein’s Boys and Sex, this will make a huge impact on a new generation of boys. Amazing book with tons of important points. If you (or someon The first few chapters were heavily memoir, which didn’t connect with me. Not because I didn’t like it, but more that I was not feeling memoirs, especially concerning parenting. Jha has an engaging style. But by chapter 7, the strength of the author’s research took over and I was thinking of all the parents I wanted to recommend it to. Coupled with Peggy Ornstein’s Boys and Sex, this will make a huge impact on a new generation of boys. Amazing book with tons of important points. If you (or someone you can about is uncomfortable with the term feminist, it’s really just about teaching boys how to be compassionate— to women, to people of color, and most importantly to themselves.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    This is absolutely excellent. I love the mix of memoir and manifesto. I love that each section gives a to-do list. I loved recognizing some of the things I already do with my kid, and some of the things that I could be better about. Really, truly great. I think this could be read by almost anyone who has a young person (of any gender or identity) in their life.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ines Relvas

    A great memoir / reflection on crucial topics to think / discuss/ educate our boys, complemented with scientific data. Really appreciated it and highly recommend it to any parent.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jacqui☕️

    Really opens your eyes to what we actually take in as a child and how it shapes us into adults. I found this to be a great resource and invaluable for my parenting.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    A must read for parents raising sons. So breathtakingly beautiful. May we raise our sons to be empathetic and loving and be able to live their lives in full humanity alongside all people.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brett

    A must read for anyone raising boys and/or interested in the wide concept of feminism.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris Hess

    I really enjoyed this book. My wife read it and suggested I would benefit from it as well and it was thought-provoking. The stories resonate and the lessons will be with me constantly as I work on raising my own nine year old son in a way that champions diversity on all fronts, including feminism.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I read a lot, but this book has sat with me in a way none other has for years. The author’s candid and vivid storytelling was a perfect match for this hugely important, often controversial topic. Dr. Jha somehow crafted an accessible roadmap for parents, teachers and the like, to follow as we seek to nurture our boys and create a more accepting, empathetic community, and undo a lot of the problematic lessons they have likely already learned from our patriarchal society. I originally purchased th I read a lot, but this book has sat with me in a way none other has for years. The author’s candid and vivid storytelling was a perfect match for this hugely important, often controversial topic. Dr. Jha somehow crafted an accessible roadmap for parents, teachers and the like, to follow as we seek to nurture our boys and create a more accepting, empathetic community, and undo a lot of the problematic lessons they have likely already learned from our patriarchal society. I originally purchased the book on audio, but after finishing it, I’m also going to pick this up in hard copy, so I can easily refer back again and again (and also share with other adults in my sons’ circle). Yes, it is that good. Yes, it is that important.

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