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Our Sister, Again

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On a small island off the Scottish coast, Isla and her family are grieving the loss of her older sister Flora, who died three years ago. Then they're offered the chance to be part of a top-secret trial, which revives loved ones as fully lifelike AI robots using their digital footprint. Isla has her doubts about Second Chances, but they evaporate the moment the 'new' Flora a On a small island off the Scottish coast, Isla and her family are grieving the loss of her older sister Flora, who died three years ago. Then they're offered the chance to be part of a top-secret trial, which revives loved ones as fully lifelike AI robots using their digital footprint. Isla has her doubts about Second Chances, but they evaporate the moment the 'new' Flora arrives. This girl is not some uncanny close likeness; she is Flora - a perfect replica. But not everyone on their island feels the same. And as the threats to Flora mount, she grows distant and more secretive. Will Isla be able to protect the new Flora and bring the community back together?


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On a small island off the Scottish coast, Isla and her family are grieving the loss of her older sister Flora, who died three years ago. Then they're offered the chance to be part of a top-secret trial, which revives loved ones as fully lifelike AI robots using their digital footprint. Isla has her doubts about Second Chances, but they evaporate the moment the 'new' Flora a On a small island off the Scottish coast, Isla and her family are grieving the loss of her older sister Flora, who died three years ago. Then they're offered the chance to be part of a top-secret trial, which revives loved ones as fully lifelike AI robots using their digital footprint. Isla has her doubts about Second Chances, but they evaporate the moment the 'new' Flora arrives. This girl is not some uncanny close likeness; she is Flora - a perfect replica. But not everyone on their island feels the same. And as the threats to Flora mount, she grows distant and more secretive. Will Isla be able to protect the new Flora and bring the community back together?

30 review for Our Sister, Again

  1. 5 out of 5

    charlotte,

    Rep: sapphic mc & li

  2. 4 out of 5

    Schizanthus Nerd

    Well, that was all kinds of lovely and heartbreaking and thought provoking. If you’ve been alive long enough, then you know the pain of losing someone you love. You know how it feels to wish you could have just one more moment, hug, conversation, lifetime with that person. What if you were given a second chance? Nothing has been the same since Isla’s sister died. When Flora died, it was like someone had drawn a line straight through our lives. Everything was divided into Before and After; the ti Well, that was all kinds of lovely and heartbreaking and thought provoking. If you’ve been alive long enough, then you know the pain of losing someone you love. You know how it feels to wish you could have just one more moment, hug, conversation, lifetime with that person. What if you were given a second chance? Nothing has been the same since Isla’s sister died. When Flora died, it was like someone had drawn a line straight through our lives. Everything was divided into Before and After; the time our family was whole and the time that it wasn’t. Now, three years later, Flora is back. An AI version of her is, anyway, but she seems so real. She looks like Flora, down to the smallest scar. She has Flora’s memories. She even laughs like her. But not everyone is happy that this family has been reunited. “Who’s behind this? What do they want? And what might they do next?” This is a story about holding on and letting go, and how the people we love never truly leave us. It also raises some big questions. What makes us who we are? Is it our memories, our relationships, the way the people in our lives perceive us? “Can anyone ever describe someone as they actually are, not just how we see them?” Can robots ever truly experience emotion? Can technology ever replicate what makes us human and, if it can, what rights should AI humans be afforded? The ability Flora had to comprehend her situation, including its limitations, and the exploration of the rights of AI reminded me of Mia and the other synths in Humans. I didn’t entirely buy Marisa’s actions towards the end of the book and I wanted more information about the person who was behind the threats to Flora. Neither prevented me from powering through this book, though. I also may have teared up slightly at the end. I really enjoyed the bond between Isla and Ùna, her younger sister. I loved Flora’s complexity and ways she both integrated herself into the family and became her own being as the story progressed. My favourite robot, though, was Stephen; his role was small but his attitude was big. “I really believe that what we’re doing with Project Homecoming will change the world.” Thank you so much to NetGalley and Stripes Publishing, an imprint of Little Tiger Group, for the opportunity to read this book. Blog - https://schizanthusnerd.com

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lauren James

    [Gifted] A heart-warming and bittersweet examination of personhood, familial bonds and healing from loss.

  4. 4 out of 5

    drew

    4.5* i cried oh wow

  5. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Thank you to Little Tiger for the ARC to review. This was a fascinating and deeply thought provoking story about love, loss and family. I feel like we would all instantly jump at the chance to be able to see our lost loved ones again, perhaps without thinking about the reality and long term ramifications… This book explores the many situations, good and bad, that could arise from welcoming a robot replica family member into your life. It’s entertaining and funny but also heartbreaking, and will d Thank you to Little Tiger for the ARC to review. This was a fascinating and deeply thought provoking story about love, loss and family. I feel like we would all instantly jump at the chance to be able to see our lost loved ones again, perhaps without thinking about the reality and long term ramifications… This book explores the many situations, good and bad, that could arise from welcoming a robot replica family member into your life. It’s entertaining and funny but also heartbreaking, and will definitely be added to my school library shelves.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joey Susan

    Thank you so much to Little Tiger Group /Stripes Publishing and Netgalley for the ebook to read and review. Wow this book hits you with so many emotions throughout the whole thing. I didn’t expect this story would be so deep and so hard hitting, but I suppose I should have figured that it would be. When Isla’s sister Flora died her family did too, but then an opportunity no one has ever had before occurs in the form of a high tech AI robot replica. Flora is Flora again only she’s a robot and not Thank you so much to Little Tiger Group /Stripes Publishing and Netgalley for the ebook to read and review. Wow this book hits you with so many emotions throughout the whole thing. I didn’t expect this story would be so deep and so hard hitting, but I suppose I should have figured that it would be. When Isla’s sister Flora died her family did too, but then an opportunity no one has ever had before occurs in the form of a high tech AI robot replica. Flora is Flora again only she’s a robot and not everyone on their small island likes having her there. This bring so many thoughts to mind and makes you seriously consider everything, from the whole AI robot being so lifelike, so real, to grief and how others deal with everything so different to even adjusting to having someone back from the dead again. It’s such an odd thought, what is humanity and can a robot actually understand it? Do they feel emotions if they are a robot? It’s such a deep intense story. I loved that the book answers some if these questions, that we see what it’s like for the returned robots. I have loved reading this the characters are all amazing I love the connections they all have and I love that they were written so realistically, so naturally. I love that Isla is the one trying to figure everything out, the one that’s really questioning everything. It’s sweet that Úna is so close with Flora again so quickly and doesn’t view her any different. I also found having her dad be so against it made it work more as you saw her in a different view and perspective through his eyes. I adore the relationship we got with Holly and Isla it was adorable reading her first crush through this strange and unusual time in her life. It was adorable and so cute, a perfect additional situation within the story. Wow the whole story is so incredible and I just honestly have no idea how the author came up with this beautiful story, or how she captured it so perfectly in writing it up. It really is so hard hitting and deep, your emotions run constantly and you heart tugs. You have so much to solve and to understand all with the characters doing the same. It had twists in the storyline that capture you and shock you and you really are absorbed into it all. I loved this book and I connected to the family so deeply to their strong grief, to this life like robot that you are made to feel is so real, though was still a robot at heart. I couldn’t fault this book, it was all so cleverly created and it’s stunning a total must read for everyone. I’m not usually a robot person literally at all I’m terrified of them but this book drew me in and showed me such a beauty, a different side to it and it’s mesmerising and wow. I honestly think this book will stay with me for a long while it was so beautiful, so unique to anything I’d ever read before and it offered so many different elements, so many different characters and so many different perspectives of everything that was going on. It was truly a sensational book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eilidh

    Our Sister, Again by Sophie Cameron is a book that explorers grief in a really interesting way. Originally I just wanted to read it because of it's setting but the more I looked into it, the more I wanted to read it. Our Sister, Again us set in Scotland, more specifically in the Outer Hebrides - a stunning location, and the descriptions in this book were stunning. They really reflected that part of Scotland, that I love and you could tell the author does too. The other key thing that appealed to Our Sister, Again by Sophie Cameron is a book that explorers grief in a really interesting way. Originally I just wanted to read it because of it's setting but the more I looked into it, the more I wanted to read it. Our Sister, Again us set in Scotland, more specifically in the Outer Hebrides - a stunning location, and the descriptions in this book were stunning. They really reflected that part of Scotland, that I love and you could tell the author does too. The other key thing that appealed to me about this book was the fact that it is set around three sisters, something again I am really interested by seeing as I am the oldest of three girls. The way that the sisters were portrayed along with their relationship, felt real to me and I could see my sisters in that dynamic and the way they acted around each other. It wasn't exact but then again no relationship and family are the same. Acting off of the sisters relationships, you then had the sisters themselves. The main character, Isla (a great Scottish name), was someone I could truly see myself in. I may be the oldest instead of the middle child but I could relate to her in ways that only people with two sisters can. There were definitely times that I couldn't completly relate to her as I have never lost a close family member - especially not one of my sisters, bit I could sympathise with her and understand her actions. Úna was probably the sister I related to and understood least but possibly my favourite. She felt so mature for her age and just made everything seem that bit better. I could also see parts of my relationships with my sisters in her relationship with Isla. There is a similar age gap between Úna and Isla, that is between me and my youngest sister, so I could clearly see parts of our relationship but there were difference's, that I really liked and found intriguing. Then I could see parts of mine and my other sisters relationship as we are almost as close as Isla and Úna are, and I think if anything that big was to happen to us we would end up being that close. I think seeing my really life relationships in this book was definitely my favourite part. Then we have Flora, and to be fair I don't have much to say about her. I may be the oldest like her, and again have seen parts of me in her but not enough for me to connect or have any serious feelings about her. There were many times though I forgot she wasn't human, which is now weird to think about. Isla I related to most, Úna least and Flora I don't know. Things I liked (as I've lost track) - • All the Scottish names and places mentioned - my name among that, I didn't know how weird it is to read about a character with the same name as me until this book. • The descriptions of the setting and landscape • The relationships between the sisters • How much I could relate to the characters and find similarities between us (I have loads to say about that) Do I recommend this book? Definitely, for sisters, Scots and those who just want to find a character to see themselves in.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    I actually don't understand why I don't see more readers enjoying Sophie Cameron's books. I discovered her book Out of the Blue, a wlw sci-fi novel, through Book Box Club and bought The Last Bus to Everland myself. Both of those books were amazing and the latter was even heartbreaking and made me cry loads of ugly tears. I was therefore quite excited when I saw that she had a new book releasing and even more when I saw it was a sci-fi novel again! It's hard to explain this book, to explain what i I actually don't understand why I don't see more readers enjoying Sophie Cameron's books. I discovered her book Out of the Blue, a wlw sci-fi novel, through Book Box Club and bought The Last Bus to Everland myself. Both of those books were amazing and the latter was even heartbreaking and made me cry loads of ugly tears. I was therefore quite excited when I saw that she had a new book releasing and even more when I saw it was a sci-fi novel again! It's hard to explain this book, to explain what it's about. It's about a lot of things. It's about personality and what makes you uniquely you and if it is possible for someone else to simply program a new version of you. It's about grief and letting go and what it means to get a second chance with someone who has died too soon and what it means if that second chance might not turn out as expected. It's mostly about love and all the different ways to express love. And along the way, while showing us about personalities and grief and love, we meet a few truly amazing people, all dealing with their emotions and situations in their own and unique way. I love how this book doesn't tell anyone how to feel, how to grieve or how to love. The author never tells us what to think ourselves, which characters in the story are right and which are wrong. They all have their own reasons and they all in their own way are right. I also enjoyed the way Cameron dealt with the technological specifics of the story. I think a lot of the techniques Cameron describes in her book are already there. I also believe that sooner or later this is something people will try. And if it all eventually ends like this book does I think it's an amazing outcome. The lines between human and machine will blur and yet I do believe, just like this book, that making a carbon copy of someone else will always be impossible. If you have never read anything by Sophie Cameron: Please give her a chance! Especially this book and Out of the Blue are also amazing books to gift to younger kids to just see wlw love as it should be: as love.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hobson

    Our Sister Again by Sophie Cameron Sad, evocative, and disturbingly believable, Our Sister Again took me by surprise from the first chapter. Cameron’s approach lends an unexpected present-day feel to the story, as did the interactions between the characters, particularly Isla and Una. There is a near-almost-now future feeling here and at the same time Cameron masters something I associate with Bradbury or Ishiguro, the ability to take something not quite yet possible and make it absolutely credibl Our Sister Again by Sophie Cameron Sad, evocative, and disturbingly believable, Our Sister Again took me by surprise from the first chapter. Cameron’s approach lends an unexpected present-day feel to the story, as did the interactions between the characters, particularly Isla and Una. There is a near-almost-now future feeling here and at the same time Cameron masters something I associate with Bradbury or Ishiguro, the ability to take something not quite yet possible and make it absolutely credible. I won’t spoil the way this book plays out, but it’s magnificent. At its heart, there is loss – the loss of a sister that starts the story, but also the range of smaller losses we all encounter. I loved the way Cameron took Isla and made the story hers, seeing Flora – before and after – and Una, her parents, her home, all with layers peeling back as the story unrolls itself. I loved everything about this book, and was mesmerized, reading it in one sitting with no clue that I was going to do so. When it ended there was a startling feeling like waking up in the backseat of your parents’ car at the end of a long drive and climbing out all pins and needles into a dark familiar driveway that suddenly looks strange, that feels unreal. I value a book that gives me such a jolt. This book is worth every minute of your time: there’s mystery, there’s love and warmth, there’s heart and barbed wire and cold winter sun, it’s breathtaking and sad and I will be forcing it into the hands of friends as soon as I can buy a copy. I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. i love spotting motifs across an author’s books; for cameron, it’s emotionally gut-ripping twists, remarkably touching and detailed relationships with parents who feel like real characters, and always ending with a departure. i adored the recurring scottish cultural elements, but i’m already a huge cameron fan so i expected as much! always nice to see a slice of home on the page. however, not my favourite cameron book. due to the younger demographic, a higher suspension of disbelief is naturally i love spotting motifs across an author’s books; for cameron, it’s emotionally gut-ripping twists, remarkably touching and detailed relationships with parents who feel like real characters, and always ending with a departure. i adored the recurring scottish cultural elements, but i’m already a huge cameron fan so i expected as much! always nice to see a slice of home on the page. however, not my favourite cameron book. due to the younger demographic, a higher suspension of disbelief is naturally expected, but it was just a little too much for myself, personally. and the later quarter of the book took on a bit of a high-dystopian twist, which i personally wasn’t crazy about. plus there was a lot of philosophical material that wasn’t able to be fully explored, again likely considering the demographic; i genuinely can’t count the amount of times i wrote ‘what makes a human?’ in the margins. still, a damn work of art.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    I think this is an important book, a book written for children but that can be appreciated by adult too. It deals with serious topics like grief and loss but also with the possibility of AI and how it could impact us. The characters, the world building, and the plot are well developed and emotionally charged. A poignant, emotionally charged, and riveting story. Highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aria Harlow

    This was such a good read and such an important book with an important message for children. It was well written with a compelling sotryline and well developed characters that would be relatable for children and that I fell in love with. It explores the issues within the book masterfully with family drama, sci fi and loss all wrapped up in a beautiful bow. This book is a triumph. I will definitely be looking for more from this author.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    Well, that was all kinds of brilliance. Artificial intelligence, family and being given a second chance. I really enjoyed the mystery element of this and all the chat about what it means to be human. This whole ‘bringing someone back’ thing is a moral dilemma and a half - I think this book explores the complexities and the emotions attached to it brilliantly. Isla is such an amazing character and I loved all of the twists and turns in this.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ailsa

    "I wonder if she can remember any of those days, if they sometimes emerge like stars on an overcast night, or if her mind is all clouds now" A beautiful tale of grief, loss, family and first love, set on a remote Scottish island. After Isla's sister dies, a tech company brings her back - as a machine. Is Flora really her sister again, or is what makes someone human more than just their memories? "I wonder if she can remember any of those days, if they sometimes emerge like stars on an overcast night, or if her mind is all clouds now" A beautiful tale of grief, loss, family and first love, set on a remote Scottish island. After Isla's sister dies, a tech company brings her back - as a machine. Is Flora really her sister again, or is what makes someone human more than just their memories?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michaela Turner

    One of the best books I have read this year. It is refreshing to read a book with LGBTQ+ element that doesn't portray it as a secret but rather as a normal element of a YA life. Great story that covers family, growing up, loss, community and how connected we are in the world now even if you are on a tiny island of the coast of Scotland. One of the best books I have read this year. It is refreshing to read a book with LGBTQ+ element that doesn't portray it as a secret but rather as a normal element of a YA life. Great story that covers family, growing up, loss, community and how connected we are in the world now even if you are on a tiny island of the coast of Scotland.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shelly Cantrell

    I just found this book ehh. I didn't hate it but I didn't love it either. The beginning is rough. I am glad I hung in there to keep going. I enjoyed the middle and the end of the book. I am glad this didn't turn into a machine trying to take over the world and kill everyone as I expected lol. When her eyes started turning red I was like uttohh Skynet has landed lol. I just found this book ehh. I didn't hate it but I didn't love it either. The beginning is rough. I am glad I hung in there to keep going. I enjoyed the middle and the end of the book. I am glad this didn't turn into a machine trying to take over the world and kill everyone as I expected lol. When her eyes started turning red I was like uttohh Skynet has landed lol.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    Fantastic story that brings up so many ethical discussions and explores what grief does to peoples emotions and perceptions.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    4.5 Read & reviewed for The Bookbag http://www.thebookbag.co.uk/reviews/O... 4.5 Read & reviewed for The Bookbag http://www.thebookbag.co.uk/reviews/O...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bri

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gabriela Pop

  21. 4 out of 5

    Grace K

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leyre

  23. 4 out of 5

    Polina

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sophias Bookplanet

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Hagger-Holt

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy (Golden Books Girl)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Lowe

  28. 5 out of 5

    Louise Forshaw

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Millgate

  30. 4 out of 5

    Donna

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