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Mañana: Latinx Comics from the 25th Century

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Mañana: Latinx Comics from the 25th Century is the first sci-fi comics anthology from P&M Press, featuring 27 stories by Latinx creators from across the hemisphere. Set throughout Latin America in the 2490s and beyond Mañana presents readers with a radical array of futures, ranging from post-apocalypse, to liberationist utopia, to slice-of-life magical realism.


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Mañana: Latinx Comics from the 25th Century is the first sci-fi comics anthology from P&M Press, featuring 27 stories by Latinx creators from across the hemisphere. Set throughout Latin America in the 2490s and beyond Mañana presents readers with a radical array of futures, ranging from post-apocalypse, to liberationist utopia, to slice-of-life magical realism.

30 review for Mañana: Latinx Comics from the 25th Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Anderson

    Starships, aliens, folklore and new worlds--this comix anthology has it all. There are 27 strikingly illustrated stories from over 40 Latinx writers and artists, all pointed towards the future. The art work is fabulous, and the protagonists come in all body sizes, sexualities and genders. My only criticism: the space is too short to develop some of the many intriguing story lines. As editor, Joamette de Regla Gil writes: "Manana presents dozens of possible futures, with one thing in common: we're Starships, aliens, folklore and new worlds--this comix anthology has it all. There are 27 strikingly illustrated stories from over 40 Latinx writers and artists, all pointed towards the future. The art work is fabulous, and the protagonists come in all body sizes, sexualities and genders. My only criticism: the space is too short to develop some of the many intriguing story lines. As editor, Joamette de Regla Gil writes: "Manana presents dozens of possible futures, with one thing in common: we're still here. El futuro es nuestro." Available en espanol or English. Cover art by Mirelle Ortega.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Helena

    Mañana: Latinx Comics from the 25th Century is a fun sci-fi anthology! This book features 27 comics by Latinx creators who acknowledge the past and imagine the future for Latin America and the world. This book has something for everyone and a lot of themes are covered. Some comics focus on conservation and environmentalism, while others focus on space exploration and scientific advancements, and a few stories incorporate folklore and traditions. Many stories are rooted in love, family, and dream Mañana: Latinx Comics from the 25th Century is a fun sci-fi anthology! This book features 27 comics by Latinx creators who acknowledge the past and imagine the future for Latin America and the world. This book has something for everyone and a lot of themes are covered. Some comics focus on conservation and environmentalism, while others focus on space exploration and scientific advancements, and a few stories incorporate folklore and traditions. Many stories are rooted in love, family, and dreams, and overall the anthology presents a lot of hope for the future. It’s full of heart, and there’s a good balance between comics that are fun vs. comics that are more serious or emotional. My favourite stories were: Puerto Roboto, The Alpha Decision, A Little Esperanza, Children of the Sea, Belén and Nulpi, Emisaria, Lake Hapunda, A Dream of a Thousand Stars, and Día de la Vida. I enjoyed this anthology and you should check it out for some great comics that center Latinx creators and characters!

  3. 4 out of 5

    G

    What a wonderful concept: trying to envision what life would look like 500 years from now. Some of the tales were more serious and heavy in the messages they were trying to convey while others were more light and just a glimpse into what life may be like that far away from present day. I felt like a lot of the stories could be built into longer comics outside of this anthology just because they were so wonderfully built and crafted. The art was absolutely fantastic. It makes me wonder what it wo What a wonderful concept: trying to envision what life would look like 500 years from now. Some of the tales were more serious and heavy in the messages they were trying to convey while others were more light and just a glimpse into what life may be like that far away from present day. I felt like a lot of the stories could be built into longer comics outside of this anthology just because they were so wonderfully built and crafted. The art was absolutely fantastic. It makes me wonder what it would have looked like in full color. A couple of the tales had a bit of a rough start in that it was hard to determine what was going on; I had to read a few of them a couple of times to really understand what was being shown. Not a negative, since many other sci-fi narratives just drop you right into the story with little context, but just something to keep in mind when moving from one story to the next.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Lombardi

    Thoroughly enjoyed all of the comics in this collection. Each writer—as well as each artist—has their own style; they incorporate experiences and influences from their upbringings, families, cultures, etc. So even though these are comics created by Latinx writers and artists, it still is diverse. Everyone lives separate lives, and their connections are vital, but their individuality shines in these pieces. Many had sci-fi elements but were grounded in genuine emotions and aspirations. It was har Thoroughly enjoyed all of the comics in this collection. Each writer—as well as each artist—has their own style; they incorporate experiences and influences from their upbringings, families, cultures, etc. So even though these are comics created by Latinx writers and artists, it still is diverse. Everyone lives separate lives, and their connections are vital, but their individuality shines in these pieces. Many had sci-fi elements but were grounded in genuine emotions and aspirations. It was hard to put this book down when you had to go focus on your adult responsibilities. It’s a large anthology—definitely for the better.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Hemmann

    Along with its gorgeous artwork, intriguing characters, and nuanced meditations on identity and diaspora, what I love about this comic anthology is that it treats the reality of drastic climate change seriously. What will rising sea levels mean to people who live in cultural centers like Havana, Miami, and Rio de Janeiro, for example? Many of the stories in this anthology focus on the ties between cultural heritage and ecological heritage, and they're all beautiful and brilliant. Along with its gorgeous artwork, intriguing characters, and nuanced meditations on identity and diaspora, what I love about this comic anthology is that it treats the reality of drastic climate change seriously. What will rising sea levels mean to people who live in cultural centers like Havana, Miami, and Rio de Janeiro, for example? Many of the stories in this anthology focus on the ties between cultural heritage and ecological heritage, and they're all beautiful and brilliant.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    So I really loved the Worldbuilders story the most. The other stories were good but many seemed somehow unfinished or as if I was missing something. The art was generally really good, the cast of characters diverse and the stories imaginative. I guess some stories would have benefitted from stronger or more world building, but this being an anthology, there are always going to be stories that are more or less my thing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Weizenbaum

    I hate to say it, but Mañana was not great. There were a couple jewels tucked away, but also some real stinkers, and the average quality was low. Some stories were difficult to follow or understanding, leaving so much about the setting implicit that basic narrative beats became obscure. Others made egregiously simplistic moral points without any characterization to hang it on. It's a bummer, because I really loved the first Power & Magic anthology, but since then I feel a bit let down. I hate to say it, but Mañana was not great. There were a couple jewels tucked away, but also some real stinkers, and the average quality was low. Some stories were difficult to follow or understanding, leaving so much about the setting implicit that basic narrative beats became obscure. Others made egregiously simplistic moral points without any characterization to hang it on. It's a bummer, because I really loved the first Power & Magic anthology, but since then I feel a bit let down.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Esther O. Lee

    Fave: Terry Blas and Andres Rosales’ Emisaria

  9. 5 out of 5

    Z

    Had a nice time rereading this today.

  10. 5 out of 5

    MFCOMMAND

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elias Rosner

  12. 4 out of 5

    HFEpro

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marcela

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brenna

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Glass

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kit

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

  18. 5 out of 5

    ketall

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lex Ophiuchus

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey B

  21. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eva

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elyse

  25. 4 out of 5

    Yessenia Sanchez

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Bex

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andreana

  28. 4 out of 5

    Reader of Books

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alyson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jessica S

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