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Amongst Our Weapons

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Now in hardcover, the ninth book of the bestselling Rivers of London urban fantasy series returns to the adventures of Peter Grant, detective and apprentice wizard, as he solves magical crimes in the city of London. This next book in the bestselling UK series follows Peter Grant, an ordinary constable turned magician's apprentice, as he solves crimes across London in a sens Now in hardcover, the ninth book of the bestselling Rivers of London urban fantasy series returns to the adventures of Peter Grant, detective and apprentice wizard, as he solves magical crimes in the city of London. This next book in the bestselling UK series follows Peter Grant, an ordinary constable turned magician's apprentice, as he solves crimes across London in a sensational blend of inventive urban fantasy, gripping mystery thriller, and hilarious fantasy caper.


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Now in hardcover, the ninth book of the bestselling Rivers of London urban fantasy series returns to the adventures of Peter Grant, detective and apprentice wizard, as he solves magical crimes in the city of London. This next book in the bestselling UK series follows Peter Grant, an ordinary constable turned magician's apprentice, as he solves crimes across London in a sens Now in hardcover, the ninth book of the bestselling Rivers of London urban fantasy series returns to the adventures of Peter Grant, detective and apprentice wizard, as he solves magical crimes in the city of London. This next book in the bestselling UK series follows Peter Grant, an ordinary constable turned magician's apprentice, as he solves crimes across London in a sensational blend of inventive urban fantasy, gripping mystery thriller, and hilarious fantasy caper.

30 review for Amongst Our Weapons

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nataliya

    By book 9 of the series the world of it is cozily familiar. We know the basic outlines of what we are getting — familiar characters pop in and out, a running architectural commentary, a bit of police procedural and a barrage of excellent one-liners. Everything you’d expect from a Peter Grant book — and by this time, if you got to book 9, you know you like all that. (And if you are for some weird reason starting the series with this book, stop and go back to book 1 because - seriously?). “Most By book 9 of the series the world of it is cozily familiar. We know the basic outlines of what we are getting — familiar characters pop in and out, a running architectural commentary, a bit of police procedural and a barrage of excellent one-liners. Everything you’d expect from a Peter Grant book — and by this time, if you got to book 9, you know you like all that. (And if you are for some weird reason starting the series with this book, stop and go back to book 1 because - seriously?). “Most plain clothes officers don’t routinely carry their ASP with them, but then most plain clothes officers aren’t called upon to face down unicorns, sentient mold, and the occasional carnivorous tree.” I was comfortable with this book, and that’s alright. I got what I expected and spent a pleasant few days in the company of Peter Grant, an apprentice to London magical detective Thomas Nightingale in the Folly, “the Special Assessment Unit, famed throughout the Met as purveyors of weird bollocks, sudden violent upsets and, worse, poor detection rates” and a decent copper with a penchant for scientific approach to magical experimentation. There’s a supernatural murder to solve while Peter’s twins with Beverley the river goddess are about to be born, and a few old friends or perhaps foes make an appearance, and Peter comes up with an interesting theory about magic. “This is what’s known as operational flexibility, and definitely not making it up as you go along.” Was this my favorite book of the series? Hardly (that would be book 7, actually). Some of it may be my fault because I haven’t done a series reread prior to diving into this one, and it’s been years since I’ve read the first few books. Inevitably some of the memories of events a few books ago got a bit foggy, and seeing some characters from books past did not bring back all the warm fuzzies that more recent memories of them would have, and a few details from back then felt just a bit fuzzy. (Plus I haven’t read the extended set of connected novellas and short stories set in this universe, so that probably also affects my levels of attachment to some characters - sorry, foxes, I just don’t care *that much* about you). “[…] You can’t show weakness to posh people or they’ll mercilessly take advantage. I think it’s something they learn at school in between conversational French and practical condescension.” I wish Nightingale got to play a larger part in this story. I used to love the relationship between him and Peter (sensei and student, wonderfully done), but here he’s mostly in the background while a new trainee for whom I don’t quite care gets more page time than him. And the plot — despite many plot threads continuing and converging, the main story felt a bit thin. Some important plot points - those damn rings - never really get proper closure (unless that’s for the future books?), making it feel almost like Aaronovitch got distracted and never really closed the loop here. “Then you check for paraphernalia, always bearing in mind that the line between cosplay, magic practice, and niche sex play can get pretty blurry.” But in the end, despite some gripes, the narrative voice and tone remain good, and there are promises of interesting things still to come, and maybe Peter and Lesley will eventually come to some sort of understanding, and I will probably check out the tenth book in a few years, so I guess Peter Grant and I are still alright. 3.5 stars. ————— Buddy read with Allie and Carol. —————— Also posted on my blog.

  2. 4 out of 5

    carol.

    Here’s what you need to know: while I generally am unable to be an audio book listener, audio is absolutely the best way to consume the Peter Grant series. Although I haven’t encountered a story about how reader Kobna Holdbrook Smith was chosen, I can tell you that he and author Ben Aaronovitch have since formed a fantastic artistic collaboration. The series is set in London and fully embraces the regional and immigrant diversity with recurring characters from Scotland, early 20th century upper- Here’s what you need to know: while I generally am unable to be an audio book listener, audio is absolutely the best way to consume the Peter Grant series. Although I haven’t encountered a story about how reader Kobna Holdbrook Smith was chosen, I can tell you that he and author Ben Aaronovitch have since formed a fantastic artistic collaboration. The series is set in London and fully embraces the regional and immigrant diversity with recurring characters from Scotland, early 20th century upper-class Brit, a Fula from Sierra Leone (Peter’s mum), a Somali (Guleed). Note I’m saying ‘recurring,’ and nothing about the regular but intermittent appearances from my own favorites, the sarcastic Welsh pathologist, the Cockney Zachary Palmer and the hail-from-working-class-Manchester, Seawoll. This affiliation is evidenced even way back in 2012, when Ben writes on his blog: “Kobna Holbrook-Smith, acting god, will be narrating the book again and because he did such a good job with the multitude of accents in the last book(1) I’ve thrown in a couple of new ones just to stretch him a bit. (1) His rendition of the Irregulars out for a night on the tiles had me in stitches.” It’s occurred to me that a strange sort of synergy can develop like this, perhaps much like the writers of a long-running television show and the equally long-running cast. At times, it can even a case of mutual craft, as Ben states during an interview promoting The Hanging Tree: “I like listening – his Nightingale’s very good, I’ve started to think, when I write Nightingale, I’ve started to think with Kobna’s version of Nightingale, which is quite funny.” Thinking more about this relationship between author and the reader in this case has me considering Ben’s history as a writer in television seriels (Dr. Who and Jupiter Moon) and musing on the Peter Grant series as being perhaps more akin to television episodes than a traditional ‘book’ series. Perhaps that’s why it can be challenging for some readers who are looking for a consistant and overarcing plot that connects books together. It’s worth noting that Ben continues this thought further in the interview: I: – and also what is the biggest change in the audio editions, since Kobna started? KHS: Well, the audio editions is just the books, aren’t they? BA: Yes, the audio editions is just the books. But, but, I do actually now write a little bit with one ear on the audio sometimes, you know, I think “How will this sound when Kobna reads it?”, and I think “It’ll sound even better with a really obscure accent from somewhere.” Or “How many alliterations can I get into one sentence?” And, actually – sometimes I go back and I think – I can’t leave that in, Kobna won’t be able to say that. You see, Peter has this tendency to run sentences into sentences into sentences, with lots of subordinate clauses, and I just think – and every time I try and change it I drop out of Peter’s voice. As long as he – I just feel really sorry for Kobna sometimes, going “Is there a full stop in the house?” I’m convinced this synergy and playfulness is all to the good for listeners. In fact, knowing how the two have worked together, I haven’t even read this book yet. Eventually, I will–I did, after all, order my signed Waterstones copy (one of my last remaining autobuy series). But I might just listen to Kobna again before then. Reference links to be found on my blog: https://clsiewert.wordpress.com/2022/...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Trin

    Nightingale has become the most criminally underutilized character in these books; it drives me insane.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Any book which contains the line "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition" has to be good in my opinion. I grew up with Monty Python and remain very attached to the series. There are many funny comments in this book but that one pleased me in particular . Amongst Our Weapons is, I suppose, standard 'Rivers of London' fare, but there is nothing wrong with that. We get Nightingale, Peter, Beverley, Lesley and all the rest with an excellent story, lots of magic, foxes, the birth of twin girls and, if Any book which contains the line "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition" has to be good in my opinion. I grew up with Monty Python and remain very attached to the series. There are many funny comments in this book but that one pleased me in particular . Amongst Our Weapons is, I suppose, standard 'Rivers of London' fare, but there is nothing wrong with that. We get Nightingale, Peter, Beverley, Lesley and all the rest with an excellent story, lots of magic, foxes, the birth of twin girls and, if you listen to the audio, it is all read to you by a really brilliant narrator. I must admit I would like more Nightingale. He is a superb character and does not get enough chance to shine. Peter is great and is developing into a whole new kind of magician. Lesley intrigues me. I always liked her in the early books and she was quite a sympathetic character in this one. I enjoy this series very much and look forward to each instalment. Just don't retire Nightingale yet!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Siria

    Readable but rote. The plot is a bit of a retread of some previous books, and I never found myself at all invested in what happened to the characters at the centre of it—there was a lack of tension to it all that I found reminiscent of False Value, the previous installment in the series. I appreciate the clear work that Ben Aaronovitch is putting into broadening the scope of his magical world and having Peter learn new things about how it works and the possibilities of magic, but I did get the f Readable but rote. The plot is a bit of a retread of some previous books, and I never found myself at all invested in what happened to the characters at the centre of it—there was a lack of tension to it all that I found reminiscent of False Value, the previous installment in the series. I appreciate the clear work that Ben Aaronovitch is putting into broadening the scope of his magical world and having Peter learn new things about how it works and the possibilities of magic, but I did get the feeling while reading that Aaronovitch doesn't feel very driven to write the series anymore and is simply going through the motions because it's been so successful. Mostly, though, I'm just a bit sad that Peter and Nightingale don't even seem like friends anymore, when their partnership/mentorship was one of the things I enjoyed most about the first few RoL books.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    A mysterious death in the silver vaults leads Peter on a merry chase that even leads outside of London where we finally learn more about the freaky secret magical societies in England from WW2 (the Sons of Weyland and the Society of the Wise) - though the Society of the Rose, a parallel group women established after the men kicked them out to secure royal patronage (and to protect their bruised egos), was most noteworthy. Originally, the reason why the death is treated as a murder that is the Fo A mysterious death in the silver vaults leads Peter on a merry chase that even leads outside of London where we finally learn more about the freaky secret magical societies in England from WW2 (the Sons of Weyland and the Society of the Wise) - though the Society of the Rose, a parallel group women established after the men kicked them out to secure royal patronage (and to protect their bruised egos), was most noteworthy. Originally, the reason why the death is treated as a murder that is the Folly's case is that the victim was desperate to get a ring back from a jeweler (as if his life depended on it) - well, and how the victim was killed. The ring in question had an outlandish inscription. Yep, definite LOTR vibe. But there is something else afoot (yes, more than potential LOTR-like jewelry) because not only is Lesley back and teasing Peter with messages that even the talking foxes deliver, but there are also Bible study groups and we either have an Angel of Death involved or there are actual aliens. What that could have to do with LOTR-like rings though … Bev is still pregnant, by the way. Though the twins should be born any day now. It was really nice to see Peter and his family life. Not least because it had some seriously funny moments that had nothing to do with the fact that Peter's other half is a river goddess. What I also very much enjoyed seeing is that more cops are being trained now. Not trained properly like Peter or his cousin, Abigail. But at least enough in order to be able to handle the initial stages of any given investigation once Peter is too taken up by three river deities in his home. I mean, Old Man Nightingale can't do everything by himself and Abigail is still too young (or so the adults keep insisting). I was also very pleasantly surprised how well Seawoll fit into the magical realm. He even said the words "magic" and "wizards" this time (without suffering a total breakdown)! *lol* (view spoiler)[Finding out about Francisca and who/what she really was, only to then also find out how she ended up doing/being that, was really fascinating and actually heartbreaking. Not that I support(ed) what she did but it was definitely understandable! Not to mention the seriously cool stint of Peter entering that other realm! (hide spoiler)] From the first sentence on, it was like putting on my favorite sweater. The world is that cozy despite the stakes being quite high. Meeting certain characters again was nothing short of heart-warming and the continuing education of not only Peter and Abigail but also the reader(s) is wonderful. Not to mention the situation humour that often ends in bizarrely hilarious moments. I'm still hoping that the Folly will soon start branching out - not just with "mundane" colleagues, but with actual apprentices and lots thereof. Maybe the cooperation with the Society of the Rose will help with that. Cooperation with the magical institutions in other countries will. We'll see. I'm definitely still hooked.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    No doubt about it, these Rivers of London books are something special. Low-key nerdy, competently police procedural, and very magical, it's the modern-day London and deep worldbuilding (and by deep I mean, chock full of tiny details that add up to something great) that makes this a must-read every time a new one comes out. This one was no different and this particular plot got me all revved up. Angels? Different agencies? A mystery bordered on the fantastic? Yep, it was all there and I was all fo No doubt about it, these Rivers of London books are something special. Low-key nerdy, competently police procedural, and very magical, it's the modern-day London and deep worldbuilding (and by deep I mean, chock full of tiny details that add up to something great) that makes this a must-read every time a new one comes out. This one was no different and this particular plot got me all revved up. Angels? Different agencies? A mystery bordered on the fantastic? Yep, it was all there and I was all for it. No spoilers, but I loved seeing a recurring character and getting more details about all the other magical traditions. Our main plot and main characters were great, of course, but all together, I was thrilled.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    I love the little details of these urban fantasy novels, like the shelter for cat-women or the talking fox/messengers. And of course, there are the river gods. The plot of this book was sort of convoluted. It involved The Inquisition, an avenging angel, ghosts, a prayer group and some mysterious rings. Fortunately, there was a handy recap of all of the clues in the middle of the book. As usual, the most wonderful thing about this book was the narrator of the audiobook, Kobna Holdbrook-Smith. He I love the little details of these urban fantasy novels, like the shelter for cat-women or the talking fox/messengers. And of course, there are the river gods. The plot of this book was sort of convoluted. It involved The Inquisition, an avenging angel, ghosts, a prayer group and some mysterious rings. Fortunately, there was a handy recap of all of the clues in the middle of the book. As usual, the most wonderful thing about this book was the narrator of the audiobook, Kobna Holdbrook-Smith. He is perfection. Although this is the ninth book in the series, it can be read as a standalone.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    Proper police procedural, puns and pop culture references, stellar audiobook narration by Kobna Holdbrook-Smith. The Sons of Weyland make another appearance. The mystery plot is decent, but left me pretty lukewarm. Although it did developed in a great direction towards the end. The history excursion was very informative, entertaining and quite heartbreaking. Great action scenes. I also love the architectural excursions. Peter‘s homelife is the most entertaining part, with Beverly heavily pregnant Proper police procedural, puns and pop culture references, stellar audiobook narration by Kobna Holdbrook-Smith. The Sons of Weyland make another appearance. The mystery plot is decent, but left me pretty lukewarm. Although it did developed in a great direction towards the end. The history excursion was very informative, entertaining and quite heartbreaking. Great action scenes. I also love the architectural excursions. Peter‘s homelife is the most entertaining part, with Beverly heavily pregnant and foxes running amok around his home and extended family. Love the foxes and the diggy thing. And I wish Peter‘s mum had a catering service. All we need then would be a teleporter. Bonus points for mentions of Star Trek. I am looking forward to what Peter is going to set in motion regarding the procedures for weird bollocks, training, collaborations with other agencies and countries… Come to think of it, the teamwork and development of all the additional characters besides Nightingale and Peter is one of the nicest elements. Seawoll is really growing on me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    3.0⭐ A shaggy dog of a book. The whole thing riffs off a classic Monty Python sketch. Detective Constable Peter Grant of London's magic police aka the Folly investigates a series of supernatural murders linked to medieval persecution and relics. It's got everything fans of the series want, from sarcastic banter to talking foxes; loads of nerd nods referencing everything from Star Trek, to Lord of the Rings, Dr. Who, the aforementioned Monty Python. By now the series is formulaic, with repeating plot 3.0⭐ A shaggy dog of a book. The whole thing riffs off a classic Monty Python sketch. Detective Constable Peter Grant of London's magic police aka the Folly investigates a series of supernatural murders linked to medieval persecution and relics. It's got everything fans of the series want, from sarcastic banter to talking foxes; loads of nerd nods referencing everything from Star Trek, to Lord of the Rings, Dr. Who, the aforementioned Monty Python. By now the series is formulaic, with repeating plot points and dialogue. Who cares? It's light entertainment, happy ending guaranteed. A better than average urban fantasy, for those who like the genre.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I loved being back in this world but I found the story itself a bit of a damp squib- very underwhelming.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2022/05/10/... Every time I come to a Rivers of London book, it’s like putting on a cozy sweater or snuggling under a warm blanket. Part of it is the comfort of returning to a series I love, and another part of it is knowing that I’m pretty much guaranteed a good story. That’s because Detective Constable and wizard apprentice Peter Grant is always on an interesting case. Amongst Our Weapons is the ninth volume of the series by Ben Aaronov 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2022/05/10/... Every time I come to a Rivers of London book, it’s like putting on a cozy sweater or snuggling under a warm blanket. Part of it is the comfort of returning to a series I love, and another part of it is knowing that I’m pretty much guaranteed a good story. That’s because Detective Constable and wizard apprentice Peter Grant is always on an interesting case. Amongst Our Weapons is the ninth volume of the series by Ben Aaronovitch, and picks up not long after the previous book. Peter is about to be a father to twins, with Beverly’s due date coming up fast. The hidden world of magic isn’t going to rest though, and as the story opens, our protagonist is investigating a murder at the London Silver Vaults with his partner Sahra Guleed. As usual, nothing is as it seems. The victim, who had been in the middle of trying to rob the place, was apparently interrupted by a flash of blinding light. The next moment, he was dead on the floor with a hole in his chest. All witnesses to the scene have also seemed to develop memory loss, unable to provide the police with anything useful. Gradually, Peter works out some of the details. The dead man had been after a ring—and it’s a very special ring by the sounds of it. Peter has no doubt it was magical, based on the descriptions of its markings and symbols. The problem though, is that no record of it exists at the Vaults, and that’s not the strangest part. Peter is finding it difficult to read the vestigia surrounding the entire crime scene, and not even his mentor DCI Thomas Nightingale can make much sense of it. Traveling around London and beyond, Amongst Our Weapons takes us on another whirlwind paranormal journey that should be a real treat to fans of the author and series. Is it the best book of the bunch? Probably not, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t have fun. In fact, this is probably one of the better installments, with a solid mystery at its core. The plot is well-paced and entertaining, introducing even more new elements into the world of Rivers of London, which is impressive and pretty damn cool considering we’re nine books deep at this point. There’s still absolutely plenty to keep longtime readers entertained, and as always, there’s something to learn at every turn—especially if those little nuggets of architectural history are something you enjoy. The evolution of Peter Grant is also amazing to witness. He’s come a long way since the first book, becoming a skilled wizard in his own right, even though Nightingale is still the magical heavyweight. As Peter’s career continues to flourish though, so too does his personal life. I like that Beverly has become a steady presence in his inner circle, and that they are now a family. Guleed is also a great supporting character and I’m happy to be seeing more of her with each book. As for the negatives, I feel the fact that Aaronovitch keeps bringing back elements from earlier on can be a sticking point for some. Don’t get me wrong, I generally don’t mind when subsequent books build on what came before, because that’s how great series are made, especially in the urban fantasy genre. Plus, there are certain things that I’m glad have stuck around, like the foxes. That said though, as much as I understand the need for an arch nemesis for Peter, it still bugs me a little that Lesley is like a canker sore that keeps coming back. I suppose it’d help if I found her more interesting, but I don’t. A completely fresh story arc with a new villain—new everything—might be something this series needs in the near future, but on the positive side, at least we’ve mostly moved on from the Faceless Man which is a huge relief. On the whole, Amongst Our Weapons might not have been the best book of the series, but it was still a strong entry. Having read all the previous books in print, this was also my first experience with a Rivers of London audiobook, and holy crap guys, the hype is real. Kobna Holdbrook-Smith is a fantastic narrator and now I understand why his Peter Grant has so many fans. For the next book, I’m definitely coming back to the audio.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Advance copy from NetGalley. I liked seeing Peter, Nightingale, and the gang, but the plot this time around didn’t really grab me. It felt like there was more exposition than usual, and I found myself wishing I had waited for the audiobook and the dulcet tones of Kobna Holbrook-Smith. I’m a little weary of Leslie’s appearances at this stage too. Not to be missed, of course, but it wasn’t my favorite of the series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    I really enjoyed this latest book in the Rivers of London series: magic rings, an angel of death, talking foxes, and (of course) interference from Lesley May. The plot didn’t lag at all and I could have happily read it all in one sitting if I’d had the chance. A nod to Monty Python gave me a chuckle. I don’t miss the over arching faceless man plot - it’s great that the series is going in a new direction. I have to say though - more Nightingale, not less Nightingale!!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Juliano Dutra

    I was hoping this book would bring back the graceful passages and innovative plots of the first books, but, in my opinion, it was the final disappointment in the series. There is no more elegant, witty, funny commentaries/references. All encounters have a little boring action and the same results (everyone escapes). There is no more detective work - the discoveries only come with someone doing a full exposition of the case. The characters are getting more and more uninteresting (Leslie appearances h I was hoping this book would bring back the graceful passages and innovative plots of the first books, but, in my opinion, it was the final disappointment in the series. There is no more elegant, witty, funny commentaries/references. All encounters have a little boring action and the same results (everyone escapes). There is no more detective work - the discoveries only come with someone doing a full exposition of the case. The characters are getting more and more uninteresting (Leslie appearances have no more sense) and the only one that remains interesting - Nightingale - is shamefully underused. This one is probably my last book on the series. And how sad is to say this - i can still remember the excitement when i discovered this series' innovations in the urban fantasy genre as if it were today!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Well, another fabulous book in the Rivers of London series, the Waterstones edition has another short story as an extra dealing with Nightingale's experiences pre war and in World War 2. Both the novel and short are once again, full of action, humour and wonder. As I try to avoid spoilers I will only say that Mr Aaronovitch has put in a few pointers as to where he intends to take the series in the future and I cannot wait. The only complaint I would make about these books is I cannot wait to rea Well, another fabulous book in the Rivers of London series, the Waterstones edition has another short story as an extra dealing with Nightingale's experiences pre war and in World War 2. Both the novel and short are once again, full of action, humour and wonder. As I try to avoid spoilers I will only say that Mr Aaronovitch has put in a few pointers as to where he intends to take the series in the future and I cannot wait. The only complaint I would make about these books is I cannot wait to read them and as soon as my copy of the book was delivered and collected I had started it and finished it, now I am going to have to wait impatiently for the next instalment. It really does make me sympathise with those that are waiting on the conclusion of GRRM's opus.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ay

    So good! Start with book 1. Multifaceted characters, wonderful world building and great plot. I need to backtrack a few books and see if I can work out what is happening with the foxes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Theo Logos

    “I didn’t expects the Spanish Inquisition” This simple nod to geek culture buried in a drive-by bit of dialogue elucidates the witty charm of this series while simultaneously stating the heart of this book’s plot. In this ninth offering of the ongoing adventures of Peter Grant, detective and wizard in a special, magical branch of the London force, the case indeed centers around lethal magic formed and loosed by the infamous Spanish Inquisition. This book comes roaring back from the slightly below “I didn’t expects the Spanish Inquisition” This simple nod to geek culture buried in a drive-by bit of dialogue elucidates the witty charm of this series while simultaneously stating the heart of this book’s plot. In this ninth offering of the ongoing adventures of Peter Grant, detective and wizard in a special, magical branch of the London force, the case indeed centers around lethal magic formed and loosed by the infamous Spanish Inquisition. This book comes roaring back from the slightly below par book eight. The case of the moment provides a complex, sympathetic antagonist, and fast paced action and suspense. Meanwhile, the longest running ongoing story line of the series is seamlessly weaved into the plot. The dialogue is sharp, and the characters compelling. All the elements that have made this the best ongoing series in urban fantasy are here in force. Two notes: to fully appreciate this book, you really need to read the series from the beginning. As in the similar Dresden Files series, to fully know and appreciate the large cast of characters it is best to follow their introductions and development from the beginning and in order. Secondly, even if you don’t usually do audiobooks you really should here. Kobna Holdbrook-Smith is a fantastic voice actor who give unique life to a large cast of characters, and if you aren’t listening to his reading you are missing one of the great joys of the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    ❀⊱RoryReads⊰❀

    4 Stars

  20. 5 out of 5

    June

    11. Feb. 2022: Calling it right now: Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Wulf Krueger

    Finally! I’m free of this book! I used to really like this world and its rather unique inhabitants as well as the stories Ben Aaronovitch so expertly told us. This time around, though, I was bored by the lacklustre story at the centre of “Amongst Our Weapons”: An “Angel of Death” is killing the owners of some obscure rings with Lesley being on the hunt for said rings. Peter does his best to prevent further deaths. Through 80% of this instalment in the series, I only read it in bed because it serve Finally! I’m free of this book! I used to really like this world and its rather unique inhabitants as well as the stories Ben Aaronovitch so expertly told us. This time around, though, I was bored by the lacklustre story at the centre of “Amongst Our Weapons”: An “Angel of Death” is killing the owners of some obscure rings with Lesley being on the hunt for said rings. Peter does his best to prevent further deaths. Through 80% of this instalment in the series, I only read it in bed because it served as a perfect sleeping drug. The abysmal pacing, being told about Beverly’s pregnancy (mostly referred to as “the bulge” which felt derogatory even though it most certainly wasn’t meant like that), quite a few encounters with the culprit but hardly any progress until the very end - it all made for a veritable snoozefest. Nightingale is mostly around and yet feels strangely absent - he doesn’t have much of a role at all. Fortunately, there were a few redeeming moments: Peter refuses to lay a trap to just plain kill the culprit but looks for a better solution. Lesley plays a much better role than previously and - very importantly - the foxes are back. Not as prominently as they deserve but at least they’re there and hilarious as ever. And, of course, Beverly’s and Peter’s twins are finally born! Still, “Amongst Our Weapons” read like Aaronovitch has lost any real intrinsic motivation to write these novels. He routinely wrote another entry which will, undoubtedly, sell well but his heart doesn’t seem to be in it anymore. A sad two stars out of five. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram Ceterum censeo Putin esse delendam

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    3.5 stars. A bit cookie-cutter at times, but still pretty enjoyable overall. There were some interesting overarching developments in this one but for the most part I don't feel like this book covered much new ground. I still enjoyed it enough that I'll pick up the next one, but I'm hoping for something different in terms of the book structure and plot, kind of like how Dresden Files stopped being focused around a specific case each book. Kobna Holdbrook-Smith continues to be the highlight of the 3.5 stars. A bit cookie-cutter at times, but still pretty enjoyable overall. There were some interesting overarching developments in this one but for the most part I don't feel like this book covered much new ground. I still enjoyed it enough that I'll pick up the next one, but I'm hoping for something different in terms of the book structure and plot, kind of like how Dresden Files stopped being focused around a specific case each book. Kobna Holdbrook-Smith continues to be the highlight of the series for me. He does another fantastic job with the audiobook.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This is still an incredibly fun and interesting series but I didn’t enjoy this quite as much as the others. For me there wasn’t enough Nightingale and there wasn’t enough about Peter advancing his magic skills, particularly as Lesley seems to have turned into Macavity. There were also a number of diverse characters who felt forced, whereas in previous books in the series the diversity felt very natural.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janine Ballard

    4 stars The mystery at the center of Amongst Our Weapons, Ben Aaronovitch’s latest urban fantasy novel, begins with a murder at the London Silver Vaults. Peter Grant, the hero of the series and a police detective specializing in investigating paranormal crimes, is called to the scene along with his counterpart, Sahra Guleed, and his boss, Thomas Nightingale (Peter also brings with him his trainee/apprentice, Danni, whom he and Nightingale have recently recruited). The murder took place at one of t 4 stars The mystery at the center of Amongst Our Weapons, Ben Aaronovitch’s latest urban fantasy novel, begins with a murder at the London Silver Vaults. Peter Grant, the hero of the series and a police detective specializing in investigating paranormal crimes, is called to the scene along with his counterpart, Sahra Guleed, and his boss, Thomas Nightingale (Peter also brings with him his trainee/apprentice, Danni, whom he and Nightingale have recently recruited). The murder took place at one of the underground stores. The victim, David Moore, had leveled a pistol at the shopkeeper, silver dealer Phillip Arnold, and demanded a ring that he’d once given to his ex-wife and that she told him she had left at Phillip’s shop. The ring sounded like a puzzle ring, and it bore alchemical or mystical symbols. Phillip had been unable to help; the shop had no record of such a ring and he could not find it anywhere. The robbery, says Phillip, was interrupted by a flash of blinding light. A moment later David Moore was lying on the floor, a huge hole carved out of his chest. An autopsy reveals that whatever blasted the cavernous hole in David Moore’s chest also shot a metal cylinder into his body, and the cylinder had the magical signature known as vestigia, which is made up of faint sensory impressions. Clearly the murder was paranormal in some way, but the type of magic it involved is not one that Peter and Nightingale are familiar with. This is a partial review. The complete review can be found here: https://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/r...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gaby

    So good I finished it in a day.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barb in Maryland

    4 stars for this enjoyable outing. I had a great time with this one. It was good to see Peter back in a police setting after his adventures in False Value. The case is a very tricky one, which is just what Peter needs to keep his mind off the fact that his lover, Beverly Brook, is due to give birth to twins Any Day Now. The murder method is definitely magical; and one murder soon becomes two murders. The victims are connected, it seems, by more than their common cause of death. And we're off on a f 4 stars for this enjoyable outing. I had a great time with this one. It was good to see Peter back in a police setting after his adventures in False Value. The case is a very tricky one, which is just what Peter needs to keep his mind off the fact that his lover, Beverly Brook, is due to give birth to twins Any Day Now. The murder method is definitely magical; and one murder soon becomes two murders. The victims are connected, it seems, by more than their common cause of death. And we're off on a frantic search to track down and protect other potential victims. An old adversary makes an appearance, as does a very scary new threat. The plot has several interesting twists and turns before we have our dramatic showdown with the murderer. Peter does just barely manage to wrap-up the case before the babies make their appearance. The book ends on a good note, with changes ahead. But those are for the next book--I hope we don't have to wait too long.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Darcy

    This was another good addition to this series. Peter once again finds himself chasing after something he and everyone else is puzzled about. Along the way they learn some things, encounter some old foes, that oddly seem to be trying to help them. All of this while Beverly is about ready to give birth to the twins. Of course Peter manages to figure things out and they win, but the best part of the book comes at the end. First with the birth of the twins, then later with Peter's talk with Nighting This was another good addition to this series. Peter once again finds himself chasing after something he and everyone else is puzzled about. Along the way they learn some things, encounter some old foes, that oddly seem to be trying to help them. All of this while Beverly is about ready to give birth to the twins. Of course Peter manages to figure things out and they win, but the best part of the book comes at the end. First with the birth of the twins, then later with Peter's talk with Nightingale. Things are a changing for Peter on more than one front, but I feel like he will be up to the task and he can make a difference going forward.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Frank Burns

    The new Rivers, 5 star material. Given my reviews of previous Rivers books you would maybe assume I was always going to give this 5 stars but I do try to be fair in my review scores. A book in a well loved series still has to be a great book on its own to get 5 stars from me and this one certainly was. Lots of droll, trademark magical police procedural hi-jinks. Deftly delivered with engaging characters and that ineffable drive to read just one, more, page. There will inevitably be a re-read in 6 The new Rivers, 5 star material. Given my reviews of previous Rivers books you would maybe assume I was always going to give this 5 stars but I do try to be fair in my review scores. A book in a well loved series still has to be a great book on its own to get 5 stars from me and this one certainly was. Lots of droll, trademark magical police procedural hi-jinks. Deftly delivered with engaging characters and that ineffable drive to read just one, more, page. There will inevitably be a re-read in 6 months or so where things I missed on the first eager read pop out at me. That I am already pleasantly anticipating that re-read speaks to the quality of this. Excellent stuff that comes highly recommended from me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zhi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. **MAJOR SPOILER ALERT** I was not expecting to enjoy this as much as I did, since I came to this with lower expectations after reading some of the more ambivalent reviews on GR. But in all honesty - this is probably now one of my favourite Peter Grant novels, if not my favourite, to date. What to say? Amongst Our Weapons features: - a self-contained mystery disconnected from the larger story arcs (my favourite!), - is neither crazily convoluted (or messily written, like in False Value with the alt **MAJOR SPOILER ALERT** I was not expecting to enjoy this as much as I did, since I came to this with lower expectations after reading some of the more ambivalent reviews on GR. But in all honesty - this is probably now one of my favourite Peter Grant novels, if not my favourite, to date. What to say? Amongst Our Weapons features: - a self-contained mystery disconnected from the larger story arcs (my favourite!), - is neither crazily convoluted (or messily written, like in False Value with the alternating timelines), - solid and consistent pacing, - geek galore (cough SEVEN RINGS, oh ye Tolkien geeks), - has superb payoffs for readers who’ve diligently followed the series from Book 1 (I cheered wildly at Guleed’s parkour moves! the return of Lesley May! Seawoll backstory! Significant cameos from characters in previous novels! THAT ENDING! which I did not expect this soon in the series but more about that later!), - well-written magic battle sequences, - much new lore and more backstory too, - and the best: a deeper look into the evolving psyche of my two faves, our unreliable narrator-protagonist Peter, and Thomas Nightingale. (I have so many feelings about the two of them from how they’ve been in Book 1 till… here we are, at Book 9.) This book, very unexpectedly, delivered almost everything I’ve loved about the Peter Grant series in a sleek package and reminded me about the best things about this series for me. Sure, the plot may not the most inventive - I saw some of the twists from miles away - but it was delivered well, and I have very little complaints about how everything was set-up and neatly wrapped up, and how it gives space for more to come and yet also could be a very nice closure for the series indeed (should Aaronovitch want to end the series here? which it feels like he does? WHO’S CUTTING THE ONIONS.) I also appreciated the peeks especially at magical traditions away from the snobbish patriarchal British magic system that Ben Aaronovitch has taken so much care to both make us love it and realise all of its flaws - not least symbolised by the Ladies Gallery in the Folly. But to the part that moved this from “solid entry into the Peter Grant series” into “OMG GASP! OMG WHO CUTTING DA ONIONS” territory: The ending (and this entire boom actually) was such a callback - deliberately - to how Peter and Nightingale first met, as apprentice and mentor, as subordinate and boss, as bright-eyed bushy tailed officer and PTSD-ridden crazily competent in battle magic and nothing else officer, as modern and inventive young chap to stuck in old roots (tragic backstory included - oh wait I’ve mentioned that) senior personnel… and where we’ve gotten to: - Nightingale’s worry (concern! care!) for someone who’s more than just another apprentice and his desire for nothing but the best for Peter!, and acknowledgement that one day, Peter will be a much better boss than him and him being perfectly fine with it because he was never the visionary he was the solid and dependable backup, Nightingale’s realisation that he CAN move on from the tragedies of Ettersberg and of being a man out of his time to actually enjoy what he has now - the freedom to see the world unmarred by war, to give back not as part of the police force but to enjoy teaching, and not about battles but going back to the joys of magic which he started out with as a young chap in Casterbrook himself - Peter moving from unhealthy to healthier methods of coping with his trauma from all the shit that he’s gone through since he became part of the magic police, not least Lesley’s betrayal and defection, Peter’s inventiveness and his love for people and his sense of duty and his courage still shining through despite everything, Peter slowly taking on responsibilities and growing into them, Peter’s moral dilemmas and never shying away from making hard decisions (oh that scene where he and Nightingale contemplate killing our primary antagonist because there’s no way out and the sheer contrast between how they see the situation and yet knowing that the decision would hurt both of them deeply in very different ways but DEEPLY, UGH KILLED ME) You know… there were things that were very obvious (like that ending obviously where Nightingale announces his retirement and Peter nearly faints), but there’s so much wonderful subtlety in their relationship and I love how far they’ve come now. As you can see, I have SO MANY FEELINGS about them, about this book, and I am so so so delighted to have followed Peter’s journey this far. I only wish we could see Peter’s journey from Nightingale’s eyes. (I only wish we could have more Nightingale.) 4.5 stars, rounded off to 5 because it was well-rounded indeed.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    4.5 stars A consistently excellent police-procedural fantasy series that I devour as soon as they arrive.

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