Hot Best Seller

Beauty and the Beast: The Graphic Novel

Availability: Ready to download

In a dark forest, a merchant picks a rose for his daughter Beauty. It belongs to a terrible beast. To save his life, the merchant promises that his daughter will visit the creature. When she does, Beauty grows to like the beast. But can she ever love him?


Compare

In a dark forest, a merchant picks a rose for his daughter Beauty. It belongs to a terrible beast. To save his life, the merchant promises that his daughter will visit the creature. When she does, Beauty grows to like the beast. But can she ever love him?

30 review for Beauty and the Beast: The Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marquise

    The attempt and a graphic novel isn't too bad, although it does feel half-hearted, but the art is just terrible.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Authentic B&B version appropriate for kids. Simply but clearly illustrated. Authentic B&B version appropriate for kids. Simply but clearly illustrated.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    Summary: In this Graphic Novel retelling of the classic story, a widowed merchant leaves his three daughters and takes a trip to another part of the countryside. His two oldest daughters each ask for clothes and jewelry, his youngest, Beauty, asks for a rose and his safe return. On his way back home, the merchant unwittingly plucks a rose from the Beast's garden. Instead of eating the merchant, the Beast demands that Beauty be sent to his castle. The merchant returns home, confessing to Beauty th Summary: In this Graphic Novel retelling of the classic story, a widowed merchant leaves his three daughters and takes a trip to another part of the countryside. His two oldest daughters each ask for clothes and jewelry, his youngest, Beauty, asks for a rose and his safe return. On his way back home, the merchant unwittingly plucks a rose from the Beast's garden. Instead of eating the merchant, the Beast demands that Beauty be sent to his castle. The merchant returns home, confessing to Beauty that he has sacrificed her freedom to save his own life. Beauty accepts her fate and travels to the Beasts home. Slowly, Beauty comes to care for the Beast. She requests the chance to return home for a week to see her father. Beauty struggles between embracing her freedom and fulfilling her promise to the Beast. Michael Dahl's retelling ends in much the same away as the popular Disney tale, however, there are no angry villagers or anthropomorphic household goods to deal with. Evaluation: The simplified text make this retelling a good choice for reluctant readers. The anime-like illustrations are bound to appeal to both girls and boys. The book includes a glossary, a history of the classic story, writing prompts, and discussion questions for readers. These extras are a useful and value added extension of the text. Teacher Recommendation: Many grade levels contain a compare and contrast standard, and this book would be a great fit for that activity. Students could read a different version of the story to compare and contrast. Since this is a graphic novel, and much of the story is told through speech bubbles, this book would adapt nicely as a Reader's Theater activity, as well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jianna Balascio

    Awards: N/a Grade: 1-5 Summary: Beauty finds a rose that belongs to Beast. Her father promises him that she will visit him, and she falls in love with him despite his appearance. Review: This is the more classic tale of Beauty and the Beast, not Disney. It is appropriate for children, however, I don't know they will enjoy it as much. In Class Use: Fairytales, classics, children new to English

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Cunha

    When I requested this from my public library, I thought it was a book-length graphic novel, not picturebook-length. I found the transitions rough, and the art wasn't aesthetically pleasing to me. Ah, well. Hopefully, some kiddos get joy from reading it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Sanchez

    This book is text and illustration are just like a comic book. The book is easy to follow and fun to read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kaylabookworm22 L

    This was good but shorter than I thought it would be.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Yami

    Well, this story was good, it's just fantasy where everything goes well for all character, and to practice lecture and my english it was good

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Source: Naperville Public Library Michael Dahl and Luke Feldman work together to create an atypical and visually appealing version of the traditional Beauty and The Beast tale. The text in itself being a graphic novel allows the traditional tale to be read with more of a modern twist. The anime like characters are introduced in the beginning and the setting and circumstances of the story are set. From there on the story is told mostly through conversation and thoughts (via speaking and thinking bu Source: Naperville Public Library Michael Dahl and Luke Feldman work together to create an atypical and visually appealing version of the traditional Beauty and The Beast tale. The text in itself being a graphic novel allows the traditional tale to be read with more of a modern twist. The anime like characters are introduced in the beginning and the setting and circumstances of the story are set. From there on the story is told mostly through conversation and thoughts (via speaking and thinking bubbles) with small additions from a "narrator" of sorts throughout the tale. Beauty is a sweet and modest daughter to a merchant with two materialistic sisters. Their father sets out to travel and the sisters request fine things, while Beauty only requests a rose. Their father promises to return with their requests, as beauty truly worries for his safety. While about, the father picks a rose from a garden and is immediately confronted by the beast in anger. The beast requires that the man must return to him with his daughter. Beauty meets the beast, and after only one meal is asked to marry him. From there on she remains living at his castle with him and he persists to ask her for her hand in marriage daily. She continuously refuses and insists they are only friends. Eventually she asks and is permitted to leave, with the promise she will return. When she does not return in time, the beast begins to die. However, she realizes her love for him and returns just in time to tell him, save his life, and he transforms into a handsome prince. The anime like illustrations and layout of the graphic novel help this traditional tale to be modernized. The beast looks much less like an animal creature and more like a futuristic monster. The abrupt plot line of the story is interesting and somewhat comical to read with the knowledge of the traditional tale.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ☼Book her, Danno☼

    This is an interesting little book. The story is "Beauty and the Beast" but not the modern Disney-fied version. Instead it harkens back to the original where there are selfish sisters and a dad that promises to send Beauty to see The Beast, if only The Beast won't eat him. (He's not kept captive, you see) In this version, Beauty traipses off to see The Beast after her father arrives home. The two hang out and then, after awhile, she tells Beast that she misses her family, whereupon they agree she This is an interesting little book. The story is "Beauty and the Beast" but not the modern Disney-fied version. Instead it harkens back to the original where there are selfish sisters and a dad that promises to send Beauty to see The Beast, if only The Beast won't eat him. (He's not kept captive, you see) In this version, Beauty traipses off to see The Beast after her father arrives home. The two hang out and then, after awhile, she tells Beast that she misses her family, whereupon they agree she should go, promising to return in one week. What Beauty doesn't know as she departs is that all promises are binding in the castle. And that if she doesn't return within the allotted time that The Beast will die. Even with these small changes, the story will be fairly familiar to most of us who have heard it before. And in that sense, this book is likely to be a success with it's target audience. Where it might not succeed would be with children who aren't that familiar with story, or with children who are ready for a more detailed version. This one, you see, is rather short and rather light on continuity. You would think the story could be told in 40 pages, but in truth there isn't a great deal of text per page-- little more than a sentence or two -- and perhaps that's what accounts for the lapses. Talking Points::: This book is at the AR 2.6 level, which means that this is a graphic novel in a more simple form than you might be picturing in your mind. Luke Feldman's artwork is simple and appropriate for youngsters. The Beast is interesting without being scary, and the drawings are more cartoonish than anime. Sort of on the order of Dora the Explorer if done in darker tones. "Beauty and the Beast: The Graphic Novel" would be fine for reading aloud to very young children. The cartoon appearance will probably catch their eye. Kindergarteners and slightly older children who read above grade level should like it as well as the book tells a story without having tons of text to dissuade them. Older Children and adults aren't going to be as happy with the tale as it doesn't have any 'meat' to it. There's no real character development and no depth. Plus, the story is told in a rather sketchy way. Pam T~ mom and reviewer at BooksForKids-reviews

  11. 5 out of 5

    Suraia

    This graphic novel tells the classic fairy-tale of Beauty and the Beast through a new medium which focuses on the illustrations. The story is very simply told with very few words that maybe unfamiliar to children and even these words are listed at the back of the book in the glossary. It is most suitable for pupils in year one and two as I do not think it will be at all challenging for key stage two pupils. The book has many uses for teaching in primary schools. One focus for teachers is to ‘ensu This graphic novel tells the classic fairy-tale of Beauty and the Beast through a new medium which focuses on the illustrations. The story is very simply told with very few words that maybe unfamiliar to children and even these words are listed at the back of the book in the glossary. It is most suitable for pupils in year one and two as I do not think it will be at all challenging for key stage two pupils. The book has many uses for teaching in primary schools. One focus for teachers is to ‘ensure the continual development of pupils’ confidence and competence in spoken language’ skills as such the illustrations allow teachers to probe pupils in guided reading, to elicit from the child as to what is happening in the story, what they have understood and why they came to that conclusion. Although I have said this book would not be challenging for key stage 2 pupils, I feel that pupils who are new to English will benefit from reading this book as it is like a picture book but the pictures are targeted for older children. It can also be used to expose pupils to formatting stories in a different ways and can be put on the book corner for pupils to read for pleasure.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I was excited to see a graphic novel of Beauty and the Beast but was disappointed with its actual content. This version doesn't offer anything new to the traditional tale and the depiction of the beast is that of a fairly childish looking Godzilla. Beauty looks like she would fit right in with the Addams family, which is fine by me, but the story seems rushed and skips over parts where other authors choose to add interesting details. I did like the book's glossary, which makes arguably outdated I was excited to see a graphic novel of Beauty and the Beast but was disappointed with its actual content. This version doesn't offer anything new to the traditional tale and the depiction of the beast is that of a fairly childish looking Godzilla. Beauty looks like she would fit right in with the Addams family, which is fine by me, but the story seems rushed and skips over parts where other authors choose to add interesting details. I did like the book's glossary, which makes arguably outdated words like "carriage" and "maiden" accessible to modern readers, and there is a nice history of the fairy tale in general. In the original French novella of 1740, the beast is never transformed back into a prince; this was added 16 years later.

  13. 5 out of 5

    V.E.

    This is a very basic graphic novel adaptation of Beauty and the Beast. The story is missing several key elements from the original versions and was very flat. I agree with some of the other reviewers who say that the Beast looks more like a deranged gorilla than a fairy tale beast! It does have some discussion questions in the back that would be great for classroom or library lessons. I also liked the writing prompts. Other than that it was one of the weaker Graphic Fairy tale stories in the ser This is a very basic graphic novel adaptation of Beauty and the Beast. The story is missing several key elements from the original versions and was very flat. I agree with some of the other reviewers who say that the Beast looks more like a deranged gorilla than a fairy tale beast! It does have some discussion questions in the back that would be great for classroom or library lessons. I also liked the writing prompts. Other than that it was one of the weaker Graphic Fairy tale stories in the series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alena

    Fairy Tales - Beauty and the Beast. This was a cute book. I read it as an e-book. It was a quick read because it is a graphic novel. I would definitely use it for my 2nd graders. There are definitely differences from this story compared to the well known "Disney" story. The beast isn't pretty, Beauty has two other sisters, the father got caught taking a rose from the Beast's property because Beauty said she wanted a beautiful rose, and Beast wanted to see Beauty who would request for something t Fairy Tales - Beauty and the Beast. This was a cute book. I read it as an e-book. It was a quick read because it is a graphic novel. I would definitely use it for my 2nd graders. There are definitely differences from this story compared to the well known "Disney" story. The beast isn't pretty, Beauty has two other sisters, the father got caught taking a rose from the Beast's property because Beauty said she wanted a beautiful rose, and Beast wanted to see Beauty who would request for something that doesn't belong to her. This would be a good comparison book for my students.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    It’s a “graphic novel” for kids who would look at picture books as “for babies” but aren’t quite ready for actual graphic novels. The text is fairly well done – I liked the angle of cutting out the background and getting straight to the daughters’ requests – but the illustrations are clearly for a generation that are growing up with a /very/ different style of animation than I watch on Nickelodeon. So, not much to critique, because it does exactly what it should do, but it’s just not to my taste. It’s a “graphic novel” for kids who would look at picture books as “for babies” but aren’t quite ready for actual graphic novels. The text is fairly well done – I liked the angle of cutting out the background and getting straight to the daughters’ requests – but the illustrations are clearly for a generation that are growing up with a /very/ different style of animation than I watch on Nickelodeon. So, not much to critique, because it does exactly what it should do, but it’s just not to my taste. .

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lady Knight

    This is thus far my favorite in the series of Graphic Spin Fairytale retellings. Cute, yet still dark without being horrific (i.e. like Red Riding Hood: The Graphic Novel). Perfect for 6 - 12 or maybe even 13 year-olds. This is thus far my favorite in the series of Graphic Spin Fairytale retellings. Cute, yet still dark without being horrific (i.e. like Red Riding Hood: The Graphic Novel). Perfect for 6 - 12 or maybe even 13 year-olds.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeanna

    Super-basic version of B and B with super-basic illustrations. The best part about it was the Beast himself, who was definitely one of my favorite versions of Beast illustrations. He was so silly and cute you just wanted to hug him (probably not what the Beast would want, but you can't have everything!). Took about 3 minutes to read. Rating: G

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Graphic novels are not my favorite form of literature, so it's hard for me to give an unbiased review. This was okay, and I'm not sure how much understanding of the story someone would have if they didn't already know it. I think it hits all the highlights, but it's hard to say, since I know the story. I also DID NOT like the illustration of the beast!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lora

    I did not enjoy this book as much as Hansel and Gretel. I didn't really like the illustrations, they looked too much like computer images. I also felt that the author skimmed the story and tried to get it done as quickly as possible.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The drawings and colors used in this book were beautiful. I read this to my 3 year old and she sat and listened to the whole book. That proves it's a good read if a 3 year old will sit through it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Garner

    Liked that it had discussion questions at the end.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bobbie

    Cute

  23. 4 out of 5

    Holly Letson

    I really enjoyed this retelling of the story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Miss Ryoko

    Super cute illustrations! I've never read the tale of Beauty and the Beast (only know the story from Disney :-p), and for a children's graphic novel, I thought it was well done.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Quick read and decently done

  26. 4 out of 5

    Trisha Daniel

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nate Balcom

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Shutts

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.