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Someone in Time: Tales of Time-Crossed Romance

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Even time travel can’t unravel love Time-travel is a way for writers to play with history and imagine different futures – for better, or worse. When romance is thrown into the mix, time-travel becomes a passionate tool, or heart-breaking weapon. A time agent in the 22nd century puts their whole mission at risk when they fall in love with the wrong person. No matter which par Even time travel can’t unravel love Time-travel is a way for writers to play with history and imagine different futures – for better, or worse. When romance is thrown into the mix, time-travel becomes a passionate tool, or heart-breaking weapon. A time agent in the 22nd century puts their whole mission at risk when they fall in love with the wrong person. No matter which part of history a man visits, he cannot not escape his ex. A woman is desperately in love with the time-space continuum, but it doesn’t love her back. As time passes and falls apart, a time-traveller must say goodbye to their soulmate. With stories from best-selling and award-winning authors such as Seanan McGuire, Alix E. Harrow and Nina Allan, this anthology gives a taste for the rich treasure trove of stories we can imagine with love, loss and reunion across time and space. Including stories by: Alix E. Harrow, Zen Cho, Seanan McGuire, Sarah Gailey, Jeffrey Ford, Nina Allan, Elizabeth Hand, Lavanya Lakshminarayan, Catherynne M. Valente, Sam J. Miller, Rowan Coleman, Margo Lanagan, Sameem Siddiqui, Theodora Goss, Carrie Vaughn, Ellen Klages


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Even time travel can’t unravel love Time-travel is a way for writers to play with history and imagine different futures – for better, or worse. When romance is thrown into the mix, time-travel becomes a passionate tool, or heart-breaking weapon. A time agent in the 22nd century puts their whole mission at risk when they fall in love with the wrong person. No matter which par Even time travel can’t unravel love Time-travel is a way for writers to play with history and imagine different futures – for better, or worse. When romance is thrown into the mix, time-travel becomes a passionate tool, or heart-breaking weapon. A time agent in the 22nd century puts their whole mission at risk when they fall in love with the wrong person. No matter which part of history a man visits, he cannot not escape his ex. A woman is desperately in love with the time-space continuum, but it doesn’t love her back. As time passes and falls apart, a time-traveller must say goodbye to their soulmate. With stories from best-selling and award-winning authors such as Seanan McGuire, Alix E. Harrow and Nina Allan, this anthology gives a taste for the rich treasure trove of stories we can imagine with love, loss and reunion across time and space. Including stories by: Alix E. Harrow, Zen Cho, Seanan McGuire, Sarah Gailey, Jeffrey Ford, Nina Allan, Elizabeth Hand, Lavanya Lakshminarayan, Catherynne M. Valente, Sam J. Miller, Rowan Coleman, Margo Lanagan, Sameem Siddiqui, Theodora Goss, Carrie Vaughn, Ellen Klages

30 review for Someone in Time: Tales of Time-Crossed Romance

  1. 4 out of 5

    RoshReviews

    An interesting anthology of short stories having two themes in common – time travel and romance. The collection features sixteen stories, fourteen original to this book and two that are long-standing favourites of the editor. The stories are of various lengths and moods. While all the stories stay true to the spirit of time travel, only a few are more oriented towards the romance factor. This affected my enjoyment of some of the stories because they worked wonderfully as Sci-fi but not as Sci-fi An interesting anthology of short stories having two themes in common – time travel and romance. The collection features sixteen stories, fourteen original to this book and two that are long-standing favourites of the editor. The stories are of various lengths and moods. While all the stories stay true to the spirit of time travel, only a few are more oriented towards the romance factor. This affected my enjoyment of some of the stories because they worked wonderfully as Sci-fi but not as Sci-fi romance. I relished the ones that did justice to both the themes fairly, even if not in equal amounts. Most of the stories have quality content and quite imaginative writing. A few of the authors left me awed at their creative faculty. A couple of the stories were written in the modern style of not using quotation marks for spoken dialogues. I don't enjoy reading this kind of writing, so these stories weren’t among my favourites. Plus points for having stories that were diverse and had LGBTQ representation. The introduction by editor Jonathan Strahan elaborates wonderfully on the use of time travel as a narrative device in stories. Make sure you begin with this intro before diving into the stories. Of the sixteen tales in the book, these seven were my utmost favourites and they reached or crossed the four star mark. Most of the rest of the stories were clustered around the 3 star mark, and mainly because I wasn’t satisfied with the treatment of the ‘romance’ theme in them. Roadside Attraction - Alix E. Harrow - 🌟🌟🌟🌟💫 What becomes of the broken-hearted when they find a time-travel stone? Do they go back to rectify matters with their ex or do they search for a new direction in life? Enjoyed this sweet tale. First Aid - Seanan McGuire - 🌟🌟🌟🌟 This is the story that made me look at time travel in a very realistic and practical manner. I didn’t like the romance element in this tale, otherwise it would have been a straight 5 star. I Remember Satellites - Sarah Gailey - 🌟🌟🌟🌟 What happens when you are the chosen one for an assignment that forces you to bid adieu to all you know and love in order to do your duty? Loved the feelings in this one. The Golden Hour – Jeffrey Ford - 🌟🌟🌟🌟 A very unusual tale of love across time. Had a few loopholes in logic, but I still liked it for balancing both the main themes of the anthology well. Unbashed - Sam Miller - 🌟🌟🌟🌟 Such a poignant tale! The writing style made it a bit tricky to read but I loved the overall story. Romance: Historical - Rowan Coleman - 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 Think of the best romances and the best time travel tales. Bring the best features of these in a story. This is the result. Loved every single bit about it. (Would have gladly give it ten stars if I could.) Time Gypsy - Ellen Klages - 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 This was written in 1999 but feels as fresh as the rest of the collection. An innovative and intriguing plotline that will keep you hooked from start to end. 3.65 stars based on the average of my ratings for all the stories. I feel that if you read this book as a collection of time travel stories, you will enjoy it a lot better than if you pick it up wanting a combination of time travel and romance. Recommended to time-travel lovers. My thanks to Rebellion and NetGalley for the DRC of “Someone in Time: Tales of Time-Crossed Romance”. This review is voluntary and contains my honest opinion about the book. *********************** Join me on the Facebook group, Readers Forever! , for more reviews, book-related discussions and fun.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Schizanthus Nerd

    Self confessed romantiphobe here. So why did I put my hand up to read a romance anthology? In my defence, there’s time travel, one of my very favourite things to read about and do. Shh! You’re not supposed to mention that bit. Also, there are contributions by two of my favourite authors, Alix E. Harrow and Seanan McGuire, so it was kind of inevitable that this book would find its way to me in every timeline. Roadside Attraction by Alix E. Harrow When Floyd approaches the pillar of sandstone covere Self confessed romantiphobe here. So why did I put my hand up to read a romance anthology? In my defence, there’s time travel, one of my very favourite things to read about and do. Shh! You’re not supposed to mention that bit. Also, there are contributions by two of my favourite authors, Alix E. Harrow and Seanan McGuire, so it was kind of inevitable that this book would find its way to me in every timeline. Roadside Attraction by Alix E. Harrow When Floyd approaches the pillar of sandstone covered in graffiti, he’s certain he knows what he’s searching for. “Did you find your destiny?” The Past Life Reconstruction Service by Zen Cho Rui is using the Past Life Reconstruction Service because he’s seeking inspiration. “Your dream won’t affect anyone or anything else. The most it can do is change the world inside you.” First Aid by Seanan McGuire Taylor has been preparing for her one way trip to Elizabethan England for years. There was no going back. There never had been. I Remember Satellites by Sarah Gailey When you work for the Agency, a short straw trip means you’re not coming back. Everybody draws the short straw in the end. The Golden Hour by Jeffrey Ford Mr Russell is trying to write his novel when he meets the time traveller. “Past or future?” I asked. “Where the clues lead, young man. Where else?” The Lichens by Nina Allan There’s something important in the past that’s not accessible in Josephine’s time. Meanwhile, I’m sitting here fantasising about the idea of books being able to be transported to the past. So you know about lichens? Kronia by Elizabeth Hand So many fleeting moments, finding one another over the course of lifetimes. Unrecognized: I never knew you. Bergamot and Vetiver by Lavanya Lakshminarayan To save the past, this time traveller is willing to destroy their future. “To thirst is to be alive, but to devour is to be monstrous.” The Difference Between Love and Time by Catherynne M. Valente Loving the space/time continuum can be complicated. Be my wife forever, limited puddle-being. Unbashed, Or: Jackson, Whose Cowardice Tore a Hole in the Chronoverse by Sam J. Miller It all comes back to this moment. “Walk me home?” Romance: Historical by Rowan Coleman Communicating through books is probably the most romantic thing ever. Beth steadied herself; after all she had spent her whole life in training for this moment, preparing unreservedly to believe in the impossible. The Place of All the Souls by Margo Lanagan In that realm, they’re perfect. In this one, they’re happily married … but not to one another. Whatever came of the discovery, there was at least a moment’s peace to be enjoyed, now that she knew. Timed Obsolescence by Sameem Siddiqui Two time travellers meet throughout time. “Was discovering random historical factoids what drew you into this line of work?” A Letter to Merlin by Theodora Goss Guinevere loves Arthur in every lifetime. “You’re going to be dead in twenty-four hours. Would you like to save the world?” Dead Poets by Carrie Vaughn The love of poems and poets. The study of literature is the process of continually falling in love with dead people. Time Gypsy by Ellen Klages Sara Baxter Clarke has been Dr. McCullough’s hero since she was a child. “I’m offering you a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.” I have four favourite reads in this anthology: the two I was here for in the first place (no big surprise there) and two by authors who were new to me. Rowan Coleman’s story made me tear up. It was also the only story that made me interrupt the reader sitting beside me (who was partway through a chapter of the book they were reading), declaring that they need to read this right now. In case you’re wondering, I was forgiven; they loved it as much as I did. It’s just such a beautiful story. Ellen Klages’ story, where heroes can live up to your expectations, had me railing against injustice even as I was feeling all mushy about the growing love between the protagonists. The bottom line? If a romantiphobe can find so much to love about this anthology, then the rest of you are in for a treat. Content warnings include mention of (view spoiler)[abortion, death by suicide, domestic abuse, homophobia, miscarriage and sexual assault. Readers with emetophobia may have trouble with a few sentences. (hide spoiler)] Thank you so much to NetGalley and Solaris, an imprint of Rebellion Publishing, for the opportunity to read this anthology. I’m rounding up from 4.5 stars. Blog - https://schizanthusnerd.com

  3. 5 out of 5

    Zaynab

    As with all anthologies, there was a good amount of variance in quality—particularly re: enjoyability— in this book. With some being knockouts and others veering on dull. But, there are a few statements that can be broadly applied to the anthology as a whole. 1. While there was a solid amount of diversity in gender identity and sexual orientation within the stories; the contributing authors were overwhelmingly white. Because we are dealing with time travel, and in many of the stories dealing wit As with all anthologies, there was a good amount of variance in quality—particularly re: enjoyability— in this book. With some being knockouts and others veering on dull. But, there are a few statements that can be broadly applied to the anthology as a whole. 1. While there was a solid amount of diversity in gender identity and sexual orientation within the stories; the contributing authors were overwhelmingly white. Because we are dealing with time travel, and in many of the stories dealing with history directly, the ones that allowed us to step outside of a western/white viewpoint were some of the most unique and interesting; but they were few and far between. 2. While all of them deal with love in some form, very few of the stories deal in romance. By this I don’t mean that they don’t live within the constraints of the modern day romance genre—expecting some amount of lightness and a HEA. Rather, for some, the relationships or connections built between any given characters were not all that convincing. The “romance” elements here felt easily replaceable or removable in many of the stories—perhaps due to the more conceptual nature of their premises. While there are some exceptions I feel the anthology as a whole could benefit from being labelled differently, as there was a more consistent focus on one individual’s journey with love (concept) than romance between two or more characters. *arc review

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emma Cathryne

    I LOVE time travel romance so this short story collection was instantly intriguing. Once I realized the author lineup included some of my favorite sci-fi/fantasy authors (Cathrynne M. Valente, Zen Cho, Alix E. Harrow, etc) I bumped this forward on my to-read shelf. Little did I know, this collection is also gorgeously, heartwarmingly, unabashedly queer - at least 10 of the 16 stories feature explicitly LGBTQ+ characters or romances. It makes sense for a book about romantic love to be a celebrati I LOVE time travel romance so this short story collection was instantly intriguing. Once I realized the author lineup included some of my favorite sci-fi/fantasy authors (Cathrynne M. Valente, Zen Cho, Alix E. Harrow, etc) I bumped this forward on my to-read shelf. Little did I know, this collection is also gorgeously, heartwarmingly, unabashedly queer - at least 10 of the 16 stories feature explicitly LGBTQ+ characters or romances. It makes sense for a book about romantic love to be a celebration of all its many manifestations, but that doesn't change the warmth kindled in my heart by representation featured prominently in my favorite genre. My top three stories were: 1. The Difference Between Love and Time by Cathrynne M. Valente: A funny, heartfelt tale of woman who is courted across the span of her life by a physical manifestation of the space-time continuum. I want to print this story out and frame it over my bed so I can read it anytime I feel lost, alone, or at all wavering in my faith in the transcendent and eternal power of human connection. 2. Time Gypsy by Ellen Klages: A queer scientist travels back in time to meet her hero, a female physicist from the 1950s. This story provides a deeply painful reminder of the affront to human rights suffered by queer people in midcentury America, while also touching on issues of misogyny in academia and gentle love story between two brilliant gay women. As a bisexual scientist myself, this really hit hard. 3. A Letter to Merlin by Theodora Goss: A woman in climate ravaged future on the edge of death is brought into a program run by scientists from a dwindling future in which her consciousness is projected into important people from the past in an effort to change the future. Her assignment? Queen Guinevere. Probably the most compelling story conceptually and a fresh take on the time loop trope, providing a perspective on the future that is both melancholy and strangely hopeful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brittney

    This is such a fantastic collection of love-through-time short stories! I normally do not enjoy sci-fi or anthologies, but I've been finding that I am rather enjoying them! Some of these stories I liked more than others, but you won't find one that was bad! This is such a fantastic collection of love-through-time short stories! I normally do not enjoy sci-fi or anthologies, but I've been finding that I am rather enjoying them! Some of these stories I liked more than others, but you won't find one that was bad!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nils | nilsreviewsit

    Someone in Time: Tales of Time-Crossed Romance is an anthology of short stories by various authors including Alix E. Harrow, Zen Cho, Jeffrey Ford, Nina Allan, Elizabeth Hand, Lavanya Lakshminarayan, Catherynne M. Valente, Sam J. Miller, Rowan Coleman, Sarah Gailey, Margo Lanagan, Sameem Siddiqui, Theodora Goss, Carrie Vaughn, Ellen Klages, and Seanan McGuire. This anthology, as you can probably tell, delves into the themes of time-travel, love, loss and reunions through a variety of narratives a Someone in Time: Tales of Time-Crossed Romance is an anthology of short stories by various authors including Alix E. Harrow, Zen Cho, Jeffrey Ford, Nina Allan, Elizabeth Hand, Lavanya Lakshminarayan, Catherynne M. Valente, Sam J. Miller, Rowan Coleman, Sarah Gailey, Margo Lanagan, Sameem Siddiqui, Theodora Goss, Carrie Vaughn, Ellen Klages, and Seanan McGuire. This anthology, as you can probably tell, delves into the themes of time-travel, love, loss and reunions through a variety of narratives and diverse characters. I have chosen to review four of these stories which were my favourites and left the biggest impact on me. These are stories which celebrate love, self discovery and finding your soulmate. Roadside Attraction by Alix E Harrow This is the story of Floyd Butler, a young man who runs through time searching for what he had already found. On the day that Floyd is dumped by his girlfriend Candace Stillwater, he decides to take a trip to The Ticket Through Time Theme Park and use The World’s One and Only Time Machine in the hopes of having a heroic adventure. Over a period of months he travels back and forth through time, always returning not quite satisfied. Though all is not so bad, because each time he does return someone waits for him. Someone who he can share stories of his wild adventures with, someone with strikingly long eyelashes. If you know me, you know I love Alix E Harrow. Her poetic and beautifully descriptive prose, her heartbreaking story arcs and her well crafted diverse characters always hold a special place for me. Roadside Attraction was no exception. This short story was a sweet slice of chocolate cake which filled my heart with such comfort and warmth. Harrow shows us that destiny doesn’t need to be a sweeping grand concept, sometimes it can simply be discovering and accepting who you are. “Floyd had never had his heart broken, not really, but he wondered if it felt like this: a hunger so sharp it hurt, a want so vast it splintered ribs.” The Past Life Reconstruction Service by Zen Cho “Rui closed his eyes in a temperature-controlled room in Hong Kong in winter. He opened his eyes to the glare of tropical sunshine. The air was humid, like the warm breath of a god.” What if you could experience glimpses of your past lives? That’s exactly what The Past Life Reconstruction Services offers. A chance for those to choose a moment in time and travel back to the life they led during that exact time. Boasted as, “A leap into the unknown”. But what if each time you went back to your past life, you always met your ex? Well that’s exactly what happens to Rui. What I enjoyed most about this story is Zen Cho’s twist on the portrayal of the ex partner. This isn’t a tale of an ex who treated Rui badly, oh no this is where Rui chose ambition over his soulmate. Whichever past life Rui enters, whether he be a male, female or in one scene even an animal, he always recognises who his ex is. Cho reflects that there are some people in life who we are fated to and not realising their worth, letting them slip through our fingers, can be the biggest mistake of all. First Aid by Seanan McGuire Taylor or Bridget as she is now to be called is from the 22nd Century. It should be a century of progression, of peace and prosperity but the world has gone turned to trash. A patriarchal society still reigns, the air has become toxic and fresh food has become rare, the people live on synthetically engineered food to survive. Bridget volunteers for the Deep Time Project—a project designed to explore the mysteries of history by sending volunteer time travellers to blend into the population of whichever era they visit and send notes to the future to help learn from the past. The program offers medical care and a generous amount of money, both of which Bridget sorely needs. The only catch is if you enter the program you give up your family and friends and present life. But for someone like Bridget, she has little choice. Therefore she agrees to get sent to Elizabethan England and live the remainder of her life there. But something goes very wrong. “This was supposed to be the greatest moment of her life, the day she gave up the woman she'd been for the sake of the woman humanity needed her to be.” What I loved about this story was that Bridget never felt at home in the 22nd century, not in her body, not in the patriarchal society and certainly not within her own family, even though she does all she can to help her sister Emily. Yet it is through an accident, a glitch in the time travel machine that sends her to a place where she finds love, where she can finally be Taylor and truly belong. I Remember Satellites by Sarah Gailey It all starts with a short straw. That’s the job no one wants, a job where the real you no longer exists, a job with no return, and unfortunately our protagonist Violet Anne Fitzwallace draws the short straw. To be sent back in time to cause a scandal before Prince Henry’s coronation, Anne’s future is set to marry a man she cannot stand. However upon her first meeting with Henry, she breaks the first rule: No Contact. Anne meets someone who is part of her life in the timeline she has come from, a person she was supposed to forget, had to forget, didn’t want to ever forget. This was an utterly beautiful story where the characters escape the fate others impose on them and create their own path, doing what makes them the happiest. Even if that means leading a double life. Gailey’s prose is packed with emotion, lust, passion, tenderness and longing. In such a short narrative I was swept away in a forbidden romance that even time itself couldn’t pull apart. “I breathed her in, the air around her tasted so familiar, tasted just like Dani. Like salt air, like thunderstorms, like warm flannel sheets on a cold winter night. "Do you remember satellites?" I asked, my fingers curled tight in the fabric of her sleeve.” ARC provided by Jess at Rebellion Publishing. Thank you for the copy!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    “The course of time’s river does not consider the possibility of confluence when past and future collide in an infinite second.” “Time is not a mighty river, it’s not a stream, nor a burbling brook. Time doesn’t flow. It’s one vast contiguous form like a giant wheel of cheese.” I love the concept of time travel, and whether it’s on the page or on the screen I can’t resist a good time travel story! I’m also a fan of short story anthologies, so I was beyond excited to pick up this book! Each story i “The course of time’s river does not consider the possibility of confluence when past and future collide in an infinite second.” “Time is not a mighty river, it’s not a stream, nor a burbling brook. Time doesn’t flow. It’s one vast contiguous form like a giant wheel of cheese.” I love the concept of time travel, and whether it’s on the page or on the screen I can’t resist a good time travel story! I’m also a fan of short story anthologies, so I was beyond excited to pick up this book! Each story involves time travel of some sort, as well as a theme of love. Some of the stories were pure sci-fi while others swerved more toward fantasy or even historical fiction, and the different takes on time travel and time manipulation were so interesting to read! The love aspects included new love and lost love, forbidden love and familial love, and the seemingly never-ending search for love. I was excited that a few authors I have previously enjoyed were included in this anthology, and I’ve discovered several others whose work I want to read more of! My top 5 favorites, in no particular order, were: ✨ Roadside Attraction by Alix E. Harrow ✨ First Aid by Seanan McGuire ✨ I Remember Satellites by Sarah Gailey ✨ The Difference Between Love and Time by Catherynne M. Valente ✨ Time Gypsy by Ellen Klages 💫 Bonus (because I’m indecisive and I loved too many of these) Romance: Historical by Rowan Coleman I recommend this if you love time travel stories and are tired of the same old “man time travels while woman stays home and waits for him” trope! Thanks to NetGalley and Rebellion for this ARC!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I was so obsessed with the idea of this when I first heard of it, and now after finishing, I’m even more obsessed with the execution of it. AHHHH how I loved it! There are definitely stories in particular that stand out, but I’m so in love with all of this as a whole that I feel as if it’s the collection in its entirety that matters. The imagination, intelligence, humour, sadness, creativity, romance, warnings, wisdom, resilience on display here…absolute magic.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Runalong

    A glorious set of SF&F tales with love as a core theme. Brilliantly delivered stories from a host of our best authors await you - will warm the heart Full review - https://www.runalongtheshelves.net/bl... A glorious set of SF&F tales with love as a core theme. Brilliantly delivered stories from a host of our best authors await you - will warm the heart Full review - https://www.runalongtheshelves.net/bl...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dan Trefethen

    Virtually any science fiction author will respond when Jonathan Strahan asks them to submit a story to an original anthology, and this one shows that: Many of the top authors and new authors working today have contributed to this book. The idea of time-crossed love was too tempting to resist: Apparently everybody wants to write a story about that. Some are funny, most are poignant, and all are engaging. While it is not emphasized in the marketing material, Strahan confesses he was inspired by two Virtually any science fiction author will respond when Jonathan Strahan asks them to submit a story to an original anthology, and this one shows that: Many of the top authors and new authors working today have contributed to this book. The idea of time-crossed love was too tempting to resist: Apparently everybody wants to write a story about that. Some are funny, most are poignant, and all are engaging. While it is not emphasized in the marketing material, Strahan confesses he was inspired by two stories about queer love, and many of these stories have queer protagonists. I mention that because successful stories of romance between queer people can be hard to find, and people who feel centered by such stories should know about them. On the other hand, the blurb describes stories about people “of all genders”, and that includes a story involving the space-time continuum itself, who if described as a breakfast cereal would be “Cap'n Crunch Oops All Genders” (thanks, Cat Valente, for that image). Anyhow, most of the stories are delightful and affirming. Reading this book made me feel the sentiment of one time-traveler who sends a postcard sent back to the future: “Having a wonderful time. Thanks for the ride.”

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    I thought I'd pace myself and read a story a day, fat chance. I tore through this collection of time travel short stories in one sitting. So many inventive ideas how to travel through time. So many sweet love stories. I've discovered authors that I hadn't read anything by before, and which I'll certainly read more of. Highly recommend this collection! Full review: https://scepticalreading.com/2022/04/... I thought I'd pace myself and read a story a day, fat chance. I tore through this collection of time travel short stories in one sitting. So many inventive ideas how to travel through time. So many sweet love stories. I've discovered authors that I hadn't read anything by before, and which I'll certainly read more of. Highly recommend this collection! Full review: https://scepticalreading.com/2022/04/...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Buchli

    I generally enjoy both short stories and time travel stories, so I was primed to enjoy this book. And I certainly did! As is the case with story collections, there were some stories I enjoyed more than others, but none of these were duds. Thanks to NetGalley for providing an ARC copy for my review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Harris

    I'm grateful to the publisher for an advance e-copy of Someone in Time to consider for review. This is a collection of stories of time-crossed lovers, by some major names in contemporary SFF - there are stories here by Alix E. Harrow, Carrie Vaughn, Catherynne M. Valente, Elizabeth Hand, Ellen Klages, Jeffrey Ford, Lavanya Lakshminarayan, Margo Lanagan, Nina Allan, Rowan Coleman, Sam J. Miller, Sameem Siddiqui, Sarah Gailey, Seanan McGuire, Theodora Goss and Zen Cho. As with any such collection, p I'm grateful to the publisher for an advance e-copy of Someone in Time to consider for review. This is a collection of stories of time-crossed lovers, by some major names in contemporary SFF - there are stories here by Alix E. Harrow, Carrie Vaughn, Catherynne M. Valente, Elizabeth Hand, Ellen Klages, Jeffrey Ford, Lavanya Lakshminarayan, Margo Lanagan, Nina Allan, Rowan Coleman, Sam J. Miller, Sameem Siddiqui, Sarah Gailey, Seanan McGuire, Theodora Goss and Zen Cho. As with any such collection, part of the fun was reading pieces by authors I hadn't encountered before, as well as recognising the styles and approach of some I was more familiar with, and seeing how those addressed the overall theme of the anthology. Blending time travel and romance sounds straightforward, but it's not just a matter of two time travellers (or a time traveller and a citizen of the past or future) falling for one another, is it? With the possibilities of forbidden knowledge from another timeline, or of losing a lover in the multiverse, or, with whole futures at stake, having to do the Right Thing, there is much to explore. Among my favourites were Allan's story The Lichens, in which future time-adventurer Joe (Josephine) falls for Helen, a woman living at the time of Culloden. It has a sense familiar in her writings of taking part in a wider universe with various mysteries alluded to but left unresolved. I enjoyed Joe's and Helen's delicate dance around each other, expressed by each separately in the idioms of their own times which combine to create a narrative with emotional depth. Or there's Sam J Miller's Unabashed, or: Jackson, Whose Cowardice Tore a Hole in the Chronoverse, which is a story of a lost love, a young man who's lost his just-met boyfriend and sees through a whole life all the ways that things could have gone differently. More, he inhabits a myriad of possible worlds of regret and self-blame - a vivid way to bring to life those times when the multiverse tips and it's impossible inability to fix it. This reminded me of themes in Miller's forthcoming collection Boys, Beasts and Men. And in Ellen Klages' Time Gypsy, there's a glimpse of California in the bad old days as time travel enables a moment heroine to travel back to the 50s to unravel an issue of scientific attribution. It's so vividly imagined - both the casual sexism and homophobia, and the human connections that route around it. I simply love Klages' writing. But really, all of the stories here are excellent. In Alix E Harrow's Roadside Attraction, I loved the idea that a working time "machine" - actually, a sandstone obelisk in a remote rural community in the US - could become one of those local attractions that brings in a trickle of tourists and has an extensively stocked gift shop. Such is the fate of the object here, which attracts Floyd Butler - heart not really broken by Candace Stillwater - to seek out adventure. The presence of time travel is almost incidental, simply providing a means of escape as Butler runs into increasing levels of danger rather than face what his heart is telling him. A beatifully imagined story, all the more so for the balance between the personal and the cosmic. In a slightly different conception of time travel, Zen Cho's The Past Life Reconstruction Service imagines a service that can immerse the subject in their own previous incarnations. It's time travel, but then again, it's not. Setting the scene, perhaps, for self-discovery rather than messing with the timeline (an issue many of the stories here have to navigate) we see Rui, a brilliant film director who is stymied creatively after the poor reception of his most recent film, distract himself by exploring past iterations of himself, taking in different genders, different periods of history, and even different species - in one iteration, he has the life of a cow. Each time, a perplexing presence appears - can that be telling him something? Seanan McGuire's First Aid takes Taylor back in time for research purposes. It's a strictly one-way trip, intended to immerse the subject in her era so that she can bury notes for the future, and the prep is extreme - including surgery to help her blend in with the folk of Elizabethan England. You can't prepare for every eventuality, though, and surgery can't anticipate matters of the heart. This was a sweet story juxtaposing the grim near-future financial necessity which drives Taylor to do what she does and the possibility of fining something - someone - that can redeem her from it. Moving from time exploration to the "Time Police" idea which had to feature here, Sarah Gailey's I Remember Satellites features a young woman being sent back for a "short straw" operation. You'll recognise the setting, though the names have been changed. It's a sacrificial assignment to change the the past - or, perhaps, prevent it being changed, but the reality of what's going on is less important than the dilemma here: the pull of love against duty as two young women, far away from home, weigh their passion against world-changing consequences. The Golden Hour, by Jeffrey Ford, introduces its time traveller in the first sentence. Our narrator's encounter with him is slightly beguiling, allusive, taking place in a quiet town that seems to be nowhere in particular or perhaps, everywhere at once. It's a story of quite observation and the working out of a puzzle, whose nature isn't actually revealed until almost the end. Also among my favourites here, Elizabeth Hand's Kronia takes this sense of wonder, of having no firm ground, even further. It's a story that, read closely, seems to contradict itself, presenting alternatives and crossings over, enhanced by being written in the second person and therefore posing the question, is this being told to the Other or is it somehow hypothetical? Sometimes I thought it was one, sometimes the other, but the sense of possibility seems very apt for the story of a romance, or a potential one. If I had to name an absolute favourite in this book it might well be Bergamot and Vetiver by Latanya Lakshminarayan. This none has it all. There is a hopeless quest for a lost love, a burning injustice to be resolved and a massive, irredeemable tragedy. We see a traveller from the - a - future visit a past, a past which, unknowing, she is bound to affect. Positing the advanced technology and knowledge advantage of the future as a potential source of exploitation, Bergamot and Vetiver is I think the story here that seems to question the whole ethical basis of time travel, not just point up its potential unintended consequences. Catherynne M Valente's The Difference Between Love and Time is very difficult to sum up. Of all the stories here, it's perhaps the most distinct, introducing us to "THE SPACE/ TIME CONTINUUM" as a character ('It is, as you have probably always expected, non-linear, non-anthropic, non-Euclidean, and wholly non-sensical'). It is also dangerous to fall in love with, or dangerous not to fall in love with, depending - in this surreal, Cubist painting of a narrative, all truths are true and all untruths as well, the beginning is the middle and the end, the beginning. Romance: Historical by Rowan Coleman was always going to delight me, because it's a story about a bookshop. Beth, a young assistant who wants nothing more than to disappear into the bookshelves, finds that something else got there first. You'll find no time machines or paradoxes here (well, not exactly any paradoxes) but instead rather a sweet romance, the more so for being clearly, hopelessly, doomed. Really enjoyable. The Place of All the Souls by Margo Lanagan takes us both to a near future bless with longevity but perhaps cursed by infertility, and a Victorian past, linked by time travel, and is one of the few stories here that examines infidelity and jealousy as a daughter learns some truths about her mother. It rather splendidly illustrates the theme of love finding its way, as does Timed Obsolescence by Sameem Siddiqui which imagines a future where one can employ a time-traveller to go back and record a Significant Moment featuring an ancestor. But where there are employees there will be office romances, whether the employees are desk bound or ferreting back through the timelines. In A Letter to Merlin, Theadora Goss gives us the real background to The Matter of Britain as a dying woman form the future endlessly revisits one corner of history - or mythology - seeking to change the timeline. But that aspect is actually almost incidental, what really impressed me here was what is only hinted at, an interior view of the whole fantastical tale of Arthur, Guinevere and Merlin which would make a cracking novel, I think. Carrie Vaughan's Dead Poets features one of the most inventive methods of time travel I can recall, although in a sense it's of a piece with several stories in this book that portray it as a mental exercise, rather than the creation of elaborate physics. That's in keeping with the theme of the story: 'The study of literature is the process of continually falling in love with dead people'. And how. The protagonist here follows her heart and in return, receives a wholly unexpected insight into one of the darkest love stories of history. Creepy, beautiful and entrancing, this one is simply glorious. So - time travel as accident, as profession, as mental exercise; alternate timelines precious and to be preserved (until forbidden love says otherwise) or the subjects of manipulation and exploitation, love both attained and deferred, its object gloriously present or lost in a myriad of dimensions, realities and alternatives - they're all here, and much more. A collection that will get the pulse racing in place, or evoke a sigh in others. But always fun, readable and heartfelt.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

    Someone in Time is a collection of time-travel romance short stories. As with any collection, I found my feelings were mixed. There were some I liked. Some that were okay. Some that did not work for me. If nothing else, it introduced me to new authors I will be looking to read more of. Roadside Attraction by Alix E. Harrow was a three-star rating. I’ll be honest and say I rounded this one down, simply because I wanted a little more from it. As it was, this was a nice start to the collection, a st Someone in Time is a collection of time-travel romance short stories. As with any collection, I found my feelings were mixed. There were some I liked. Some that were okay. Some that did not work for me. If nothing else, it introduced me to new authors I will be looking to read more of. Roadside Attraction by Alix E. Harrow was a three-star rating. I’ll be honest and say I rounded this one down, simply because I wanted a little more from it. As it was, this was a nice start to the collection, a story that pulled me in easily and had me powering through it in no time. It was a sweet story, and I adored the way it came together. The Past Life Reconstruction Service by Zen Cho was a two-star rating. While I liked the concept of this one, I never quite fell for it in the way I had hoped. I think this is because the soul mate element of this one felt a bit brushed to the side. It was vital to the story, yet I would have liked to see more of the interactions between them instead of just being told how things were. First Aid by Seanan McGuire was a three-star rating. This was another concept I liked but was again disappointed by the romance side of it. I felt the romance element of this one was an afterthought, as though it had been tacked on at the end when it was remembered that the collection was supposed to have a romantic element. I Remember Satellites by Sarah Gailey was a four-star rating. I’ll be honest and say that I rounded this one up. Like the first story in the collection, this was a great mix of time-travel and romance, one that sucked me in with ease. The more I read, the more invested in the story I became, and I adored the way the pieces fell into place. The Golden Hour by Jeffrey Ford was a three-star rating. My thoughts flickered on this one for a while, my views changing, but I cannot deny the fact that this one kept me gripped. It was a story that kept me turning the pages, one where it added subtle twists to transform what I worked out into something that was unique. The Lichens by Nina Allan was a two-star rating. This was another one where I felt the romance element was an afterthought. It was another time-travel story that was interesting, albeit one where I didn’t quite connect with the writing style, but it would have been better had the romance not felt forced. Kronia by Elizabeth Hand was a two-star rating. I think this was just one of those stories that I didn’t jive with. It was a little too out there for me. That is not a bad thing, it just means I quickly forgot about this one. Bergamot and Vetiver by Lavanya Lakshminarayan was a two-star rating. I appreciated the historical elements of this one, the civilisation packed into this story, but it was another one where I found the romantic element felt forced. I was curious about the way things out play out, but the forced feel of the romance toward the end lessened my enjoyment. The Difference Between Love and Time by Catherynne M. Valente was a four-star rating. I’ll be honest and say that this one was my favourite. It was a wild ride, and I could not get enough of. It was just on the right side of strange for me and it had me grinning throughout. Unbashed, or: Jackson, Whose Cowardice Tore a Hole in the Chronoverse by Sam J. Miller was a two-star rating. While I really liked the emotional side of this one, it was a story that was easily forgotten. It was powerful in the moment, yet it was so quick it was lost in the other stories that left lingering lengthy effects. Romance: Historical by Rowan Coleman was a three-star rating. This was a great combination of time-travel and romance, although I did find the story to be a little easy to predict. That was not enough to ruin my enjoyment, but it did mean it was not a favourite in the collection. The Place of all the Souls by Margo Lanagan was a two-star rating. This was another where I was not impressed by the romance side of things. The time-travel elements were interesting, although I would have liked more, but I felt no investment in understanding the romance – which was disappointing, considering the romance was important in this one. Time Obsolescence by Sameem Siddiqui was a two-star rating. I’ll be honest and say that I think I missed something with this one. It never really held my attention, and when things came together at the end I was left with questions that I felt I should have understood. Unfortunately, as I did not enjoy it in the way I had hoped, I had no desire to go back and find what I had missed. A Letter to Merlin by Theodora Goss was a four-star rating. While we do not actively see the romance in this one, it was done much better than in some of the other stories. It mixed the story of Merlin (that I love) with time-travel, providing an approach that gave it a unique spin. In fact, I’d love to read this set as a full-length story. Dead Poets by Carrie Vaughn was a two-star rating. Again, this was one where I never really felt the romantic elements. I know it looked at a different type of love, yet I felt it went against what the aim of the collection was. Thus, I was left wanting more. That said, it was an interesting approach to time-travel and something different. Time Gypsy by Ellen Klages was a three-star rating. I’ll be honest and say that I rounded this one down. It was another interesting story, yet I found this one a little too easy to predict. The big detail at the end was a little too obvious, and it lessened the impact of the story. It was an enjoyable end to the book, though. All in all, while there were some in this I did enjoy, I feel it wasn’t quite the right mix of time-travel and romance in most of the stories. Had I gone in expecting less romance, I probably would have enjoyed these more. As it was, I felt like I was promised something that I was not fully provided.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brandee

    Check out this review and more on The Quill to Live! You will find sixteen short stories of time-crossed romance in Someone in Time. Editor Jonathan Strahan collected 14 original stories from notable authors to be featured alongside two existing tales that he favors. The anthology has a little bit of everything, and the collection’s diversity of storytelling, characters, and depiction of love is exquisite. Roadside Attraction - Alix E. Harrow - After a breakup, Floyd tries to run from his problem Check out this review and more on The Quill to Live! You will find sixteen short stories of time-crossed romance in Someone in Time. Editor Jonathan Strahan collected 14 original stories from notable authors to be featured alongside two existing tales that he favors. The anthology has a little bit of everything, and the collection’s diversity of storytelling, characters, and depiction of love is exquisite. Roadside Attraction - Alix E. Harrow - After a breakup, Floyd tries to run from his problems by throwing himself through a time-traveling roadside attraction. The Past Life Reconstruction Service - Zen Cho - Rui explores his past lives for inspiration after his latest movie failed, but he keeps encountering his soul mate who left him in the present day. First Aid - Seanan McGuire - Taylor volunteered to be sent back to Elizabethan England to record history for a payout that will support her sister living in 2108. I Remember Satellites - Sarah Gailey - A woman runs into a former lover after she is sent back in time to marry a prince. The Golden Hour - Jeffrey Ford - A writer stumbles across a time traveler stuck in the past. The Lichens - Nina Allan - Helen Stone meets a woman from the future who gives her an odd, but very important task. Kronia - Elizabeth Hand - A narrator recounts all the moments they met and didn’t meet their lover through memories in time. Bergamot and Vetiver - Lavanya Lakshminarayan - Orumurai travels back in time to unearth the secrets of an ancient civilization’s water system. The Difference Between Love and Time - Catherynne M. Valente - A narrator recounts their tumultuous relationship with the space/time continuum. Unbashed, or: Jackson, Whose Cowardice Tore a Hole in the Chronoverse - Sam J. Miller -Jackson revisits the past to undo a wrong. Romance: Historical - Rowan Coleman - A woman working in a quiet bookshop discovers messages from the past in the form of book titles. The Place of All the Souls - Margo Lanagan - Della encounters her past soul mate in the present day after she has created a family with someone else. Timed Obsolescence - Sameem Siddiqui - Synaz falls in love with a woman in the in-between when traveling to the past to capture memories for clients. A Letter to Merlin - Theodora Goss - Janelle is sent through time to become Guinevere to ensure that she betrays Arthur in each timeline. Dead Poets - Carrie Vaughn - A literature professor in love with dead poets travels back in time to witness a moment in history. Time Gypsy - Ellen Klages - Carol McCullough is forced back in time to find critical information about time travel. Someone in Time displays the many forms of human connection that occur across years and sometimes, different timelines and realities. There are depictions of love, loss, and quirky experiences that can only happen when someone falls out of their timeline. Time travel is depicted as common as a roadside attraction in Alix E. Harrow’s tale and then becomes an advanced technological achievement fighting to keep the last members of humanity alive in A Letter to Merlin. It is both a tool for destruction like in Bergamot and Vetiver and something frivolous that can be purchased as seen in Timed Obsolescence. One of my personal favorite stories from the collection is Unbashed, or: Jackson, Whose Cowardice Tore a Hole in the Chronoverse. It is only a three-minute read, yet it overwhelmed me with the sheer force of emotions splayed out on those few pages. The Difference Between Love and Time also stands out as a weird and heartbreaking tale that personified the space/time continuum and shows how chaotic it was to love such a thing. I was also absolutely charmed by Romance: Historical and found it to possess one of the more satisfying conclusions in the collection. I’ve only mentioned a few here, but I found something to love in each story that graced the pages of Someone in Time. This anthology is perfect for both hardcore sci-fi fans and anyone who may only dip their toes in the genre from time to time. With short stories, there is no time to get caught up in complicated space/time minutiae, but you can enjoy the premise and get lost in love along the way. Rating: Someone in Time - 8.5/10 I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an unbiased review. The thoughts on this story are my own.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    4.31 out of 5, rounded down to 4. A very high quality of content in this anthology, and there were no absolutely terrible stories. I chose this book because of the inclusion of certain authors. Funnily enough, these were the stories I enjoyed the least! My TBR pile now includes fantastic new authors discovered in this work. Thank you so much (I think ;))! My favourites were: Time Gypsy - Ellen Klages; Dead Poets - Carrie Vaughn; The Lichens - Nina Allan; Roadside Attraction - Alix E Narrow; and The Dif 4.31 out of 5, rounded down to 4. A very high quality of content in this anthology, and there were no absolutely terrible stories. I chose this book because of the inclusion of certain authors. Funnily enough, these were the stories I enjoyed the least! My TBR pile now includes fantastic new authors discovered in this work. Thank you so much (I think ;))! My favourites were: Time Gypsy - Ellen Klages; Dead Poets - Carrie Vaughn; The Lichens - Nina Allan; Roadside Attraction - Alix E Narrow; and The Difference Between Love and Time - Catherynne M Valente Roadside Attraction - Alix E Harrow 5* Beautifully written and held my heart in each word. The Past Life Reconstruction Service - Zen Cho 4* What you try to run away from follows you everywhere. Or, as we say in Scotland, "What's for you won't go past you." First Aid - Seanan McGuire 3* I'm afraid this didn't grab me at all. I Remember Satellites - Sarah Gailey 5* Such a strong sense of love in these words. The Golden Hour - Jeffrey Ford 5* Drew me in completely. I had no idea where this story would take me. The Lichens - Nina Allan 5* Beautifully written, sensitive, and so atmospheric. Kronia - Elizabeth Hand 3* Okay. A quick read. Bergamot and Vetiver - Lavanya Lakshminarayan 4* Good story. Was desperate for the main characters to spend more time together. The Difference Between Love and Time - Catherynne M Valente 5* So powerful, full of expression, emotion, and atmosphere. Unabashed, Or: Jackson, Whose Cowardice Tore a Hole in the Chronicles - Sam J Miller 4* Short, well-written, and engrossing. Romance: Historical - Rowan Coleman 5* Such a heartbreaking tale. The Place of All The Souls - Margo Lanagan 3* A wee bit confusing for me, unfortunately. Timed Obsolescence - Sameem Siddique 3* This didn't grab me at all, sorry. A Letter To Merlin - Theodora Goss 5* Loved this tale. A very easy read. Dead Poets - Carrie Vaughn 5* Adored this story. Beautifully haunting. Loved the ending. Time Gypsy - Ellen Klages 5* Was completely engrossed. Very easy reading, but some not easy content. Loved the ending. I chose an ARC of this anthology which I voluntarily and honestly read and reviewed. All opinions are my own. My thanks to NetGalley and Rebellion.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Suj

    This is a 16 story anthology of time travelling romances edited by Jonathan Strahan. Most of the authors are already well established fantasy/ sci fi writers. Given the strong LGBTQ+ themes of the stories and the diversity of voices, this could be a great introduction to the present speculative fiction genre. Roadside attraction (Alix Harrow): Present day gay man trying to find his destiny by traveling all over time. It is a sweet, gently paced romance. Past life reconstruction (Zen Cho): Soul ma This is a 16 story anthology of time travelling romances edited by Jonathan Strahan. Most of the authors are already well established fantasy/ sci fi writers. Given the strong LGBTQ+ themes of the stories and the diversity of voices, this could be a great introduction to the present speculative fiction genre. Roadside attraction (Alix Harrow): Present day gay man trying to find his destiny by traveling all over time. It is a sweet, gently paced romance. Past life reconstruction (Zen Cho): Soul mates are real and their gender, timeline, species don't matter in this story set in the future. The quick time trips are disorienting and fun. First aid (Seanan McGuire): Humans from the future are being sent to embed in the past with no way of return. There is an unexpected glitch and a time traveller is lost. The story is great but the romance is relegated to the background. I remember satellites (Sarah Gailey): Story about time traveling agents/lovers who are meant to preserve history. Related to actual 1930's British history. The Golden Hour (Jeffrey Ford): [CW: suicide] A time travel story told through the POV of an NPC, absolutely unexpected, beautifully written, and a haunting end. The Lichens (Nina Allan): A sad romance between a botanist from the 22nd century and a teacher from 18th century Scotland during the Jacobite revolts, told in a unique breathless narrative voice. Stunning prose. Kronia (Elizabeth Hand): The second best of the lot. Extremely disconnected narrative, almost like a montage but still evokes a sweet strange love story. The attack on 9/11 provides the crux for this time travelling couple. Bergamot and Vetiver (Lavanya Lakshminarayan): A researcher from a dying Earth in the future meeting an ancient engineer from the Indus Valley Civilization just before it ends. The authors touch of using Tamil words for a proto-dravidian civilisation adds to the world building. The difference between love and time (Catherynne Valente): Best story in this set. A human person in love with the personification of space/time continuum and their tumultuous relationship. Heartbreakingly beautiful story, told non linearly. Unbashed, or, Jackson, whose cowardice ripped a hole in the Chronoverse (Sam Miller): Beautiful, sad, shortest story of the collection. One man's guilt manifests multiple timelines. Romance: Historical (Rowan Coleman): A bookshop in London with a gap in the shelves bridging the present and past. Simple nice story with a bit of literary fun, like using book titles to make conversation. The place of all the souls (Margo Lanagan): A story about finding soul mates in a time travel way-station, the setting switches between past, future and a timeless void. The writing is a little hard to parse, the relationships were not believable, thus this one story felt unsatisfactory. Timed Obsolescence (Sameem Siddiqui): A sweeping romance between time traveling professionals, told in second person voice, with a strange sad twist. Takes a while to get into the story but worth it by the end. Capitalist dystopian future, with really cool references to South Asian culture/food etc. Letter to Merlin (Theodora Goss): Excellent juxtaposition of a far away dystopian future and a far away medieval past, a re-interpretation of the Arthur and Guinevere legend. Both time settings are well fleshed out and are equally believable. Dead Poets (Carrie Vaughn): Lovely little story of meeting a favourite dead poet from the 16th century. The romance is abstract but the prose is very pretty. Time Gypsy (Ellen Klages): [CW- homophobia, assault] Scientists time traveling to the time of discovery of time travel, set in 2006 & 1950's San Francisco. Though it shows an unsettlingly close look at institutional homophobia and misogyny, the core story is satisfying to read. Overall: An absolute smashing collection of trippy love stories, 10/10 would recommend to fans of both time travel sci fi and sweet cute love stories. I did end up reading most of the stories twice. For fun. Thanks to Netgalley for the eARC!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    “Baby, the difference between love and time is nothing. Nothing. There is no difference. The love we give to each other is the time we give to each other, and the time we spend together is the whole of love." I'm not going to lie, the only reason I picked this book up was because of the Alix E Harrow short story. Wow am I glad I took a chance on this one! This Time Travel anthology is filled with stories that make you ache and hurt, love and cry. Instead of the typical superhero guy goes back in “Baby, the difference between love and time is nothing. Nothing. There is no difference. The love we give to each other is the time we give to each other, and the time we spend together is the whole of love." I'm not going to lie, the only reason I picked this book up was because of the Alix E Harrow short story. Wow am I glad I took a chance on this one! This Time Travel anthology is filled with stories that make you ache and hurt, love and cry. Instead of the typical superhero guy goes back in time, this collection features lgbtqia+ people finding happily ever afters. It has women in STEM getting revenge on male colleagues trying to steal their work. It has humanity working together to try and extend and save humanity from ourselves. While not ever story was happy or hopeful, the overwhelming majority were and that was the real joy of this book. Someone in Time has stories from all different genres; sci fi and fantasy, speculative fiction and romance, and some Magical Realism. With every short story collection there's going to be stories that are better than others, but this collection is such a strong, well rounded group of stories. It's a rare book that has me preordering a copy before I've even finished it. But after four of the short stories I had already ordered a copy and started finding more short story collections to devour. "Futures were so much harder than destinies. They were full of doubts and uncertainties, long nights and uncomfortable conversations with your mother. It took guts, to face your future." Truly a fantastic anthology. Thanks NetGalley and Solaris for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Ceasar

    ****Thank you so much to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read this book ahead of its release. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Someone In Time is a collection of short stories, all by different authors, that focus on time travel and romance. I mean, this is about the most perfect idea for a short story collection I have ever hear of. When I saw I love time travel, I LOVE time travel. It’s not always done well but when it is, it’s *chef’s kiss.* My usually complaints that s ****Thank you so much to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read this book ahead of its release. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Someone In Time is a collection of short stories, all by different authors, that focus on time travel and romance. I mean, this is about the most perfect idea for a short story collection I have ever hear of. When I saw I love time travel, I LOVE time travel. It’s not always done well but when it is, it’s *chef’s kiss.* My usually complaints that surround time travel were avoided completely in this book. The big catch-22 surrounding time travel is that you really can’t change the past because any changes made are already in effect in the present. The stories in this book cleverly make sure they don’t have to deal with that issue. Not every story in this book was amazing but some were so perfect that the overall collection gets a higher rating. The story by Catherynne M. Valente is now a part of my soul. It was so moving. I would buy a physical copy of this book at full retail value for that one story. A few other stories that really stood out to me where the ones by Alix E. Harrow, Zen Cho, and Rowan Coleman. The only negative about this collection is that because the stories are so short and are about time travel, you are not going to have all your questions answered. In fact, you won’t have many questions answered at all. You really just have to accept the world the author sets up and go with it. I didn’t have a problem with it but I know some people will.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Griffin

    A romance anthology with a sci-fi twist was new for me, and after seeing the list of authors included several favorites, I was thrilled that Rebellion, Solaris, and NetGalley provided me an eARC. One of the best things about this collection was how it allowed me to sample 10 new-to-me authors and find writing styles, characters, and concepts that encouraged me to pick up further works from the author. Carrie Vaughn's story, Dead Poets, which starts with the incredible line "The study of literature A romance anthology with a sci-fi twist was new for me, and after seeing the list of authors included several favorites, I was thrilled that Rebellion, Solaris, and NetGalley provided me an eARC. One of the best things about this collection was how it allowed me to sample 10 new-to-me authors and find writing styles, characters, and concepts that encouraged me to pick up further works from the author. Carrie Vaughn's story, Dead Poets, which starts with the incredible line "The study of literature is the process of continually falling in love with dead people." was such a favorite, that she's now on my list of authors to read. Nina Allan's story, The Lichens, was my overall favorite and so fun. What started as something that felt very similar to Outlander fanfiction subverted so many tropes and was a huge fun surprise. The diversity of the romance in this collection is also a huge plus; it's something I rarely see outside of Young Adult anthologies. I could be miscalculating, but I think there are as many LGBTQIA+ stories as there are cis and hetero ones! We also have women in a wide variety of careers, including many in STEM. Personal favorites beyond the ones mentioned above include the stories from Alix E. Harrow, Zen Cho, Seanan McGuire, Rowan Coleman, and Theodora Gross. If you want a romantic time-travel compendium with some fresh romance takes, look no further.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Someone in Time is a collection of short stories united by the theme of time travel and romance. While I’m an avid reader of sci-fi, romance isn’t my go to genre at all; nonetheless, I enjoyed this collection overall. I did find it a bit uneven — my individual star ratings for the stories ranged from 2.5 to 4.5, and I also DNF’ed two stories (one because within the first few pages I knew it wasn’t working for me, the other having a slur in its title really put me off). My average rating for the Someone in Time is a collection of short stories united by the theme of time travel and romance. While I’m an avid reader of sci-fi, romance isn’t my go to genre at all; nonetheless, I enjoyed this collection overall. I did find it a bit uneven — my individual star ratings for the stories ranged from 2.5 to 4.5, and I also DNF’ed two stories (one because within the first few pages I knew it wasn’t working for me, the other having a slur in its title really put me off). My average rating for the stories that I finished works out to 3.7 so I've rounded up to 4. There are some great stories here: my favourites were by Alix E. Harrow, Zen Cho, Sarah Gailey, Theodora Goss, Carrie Vaughn, and Lavanya Lakshminarayan. I’m happy to have read this collection because of those six favourite stories, I’d only read other work by the first three, so I’ve now found three more authors’ work to seek out more of (which is one of my favourite parts of reading anthologies). I do appreciate that there is a lot of LGBTQ+ representation in this anthology, and some diversity in other respects as well. I also like that, overall, this collection has a fairly hopeful tone. Content warnings: medical content, terminal illness, death, war, homophobia, grief, hate crime Thank you to NetGalley and Rebellion/Solaris for providing an ARC in exchange for this review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Natali Vargas

    It’s been a good long while since I’ve read a short story collection, and thinking about how to talk about it is challenging, but this collection is certainly worth the ponder. The theme of time travel romance immediately got me interested, and the varied nature of the stories themselves kept me interested. I enjoyed how some stories were very contained, fulfilled stories/worlds, while others were more open-ended, making you pause and reflect on where the story could go or what kind of world it It’s been a good long while since I’ve read a short story collection, and thinking about how to talk about it is challenging, but this collection is certainly worth the ponder. The theme of time travel romance immediately got me interested, and the varied nature of the stories themselves kept me interested. I enjoyed how some stories were very contained, fulfilled stories/worlds, while others were more open-ended, making you pause and reflect on where the story could go or what kind of world it could take place in. There was a wonderful variety of emotional pay offs depending on the story, and the sexuality and identity representation was excellent. My favorite stories were almost all the ones with tones of yearning of varying degrees: particularly The Lichens, and The Difference Between Love and Time. Some SS don’t always give you enough time to be intensely immersed, but two of these were highly successful there for me, Bergamot and Vetiver, and Time Gypsy. Many of these made me look forward to seeking out the authors’ other work, and to be on the lookout for the next short story collection that might speak to me. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for a digital ARC of this book!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cari Allen

    Thank you to NetGalley, Solaris Books, and all of the authors for this advanced digital readers copy in exchange for an honest review. There is not a trope that I love more than time travel romance, or even just time travel in general. These 16 short stories all understood the assignment and each and every one is not only beautifully written, but the love described is both real and relatable. Someone in Time does a phenomenal job of representing all walks of consensual adult love. The stories, al Thank you to NetGalley, Solaris Books, and all of the authors for this advanced digital readers copy in exchange for an honest review. There is not a trope that I love more than time travel romance, or even just time travel in general. These 16 short stories all understood the assignment and each and every one is not only beautifully written, but the love described is both real and relatable. Someone in Time does a phenomenal job of representing all walks of consensual adult love. The stories, although steeped in magical realism, are utterly believable and were mesmerizing to read. Although I could easily have read through this anthology in one sitting, I found I wanted to stretch my enjoyment of the stories out as much as possible. Some standout favorites include First Aid by Seanan McGuire, who never ever disappoints, Dead Poets by Carrie Vaughn, and Time Gypsy by Ellen Klages. There were a few stories that I found a bit confusing, but I blame that on my lack of interest in super futuristic technology than the writing itself. Recommended for fans of diverse reads, Outlander, and The Time Traveler’s Wife.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shona Tiger

    This collection of mostly queer stories is a treat for fans of time travel. Sixteen stories take you across a huge span of time and many places, from Earth to Space. My favourite story was The Difference Between Love and Time, by Catherynne Valente, a mindboggling love story with the Space/Time Continuum as the beloved. I’ve never read anything quite like it. A close second was Romance: Historical by Rowan Coleman, set in a bookstore. I also enjoyed First Aid, by Seanan McGuire, a tale of time tr This collection of mostly queer stories is a treat for fans of time travel. Sixteen stories take you across a huge span of time and many places, from Earth to Space. My favourite story was The Difference Between Love and Time, by Catherynne Valente, a mindboggling love story with the Space/Time Continuum as the beloved. I’ve never read anything quite like it. A close second was Romance: Historical by Rowan Coleman, set in a bookstore. I also enjoyed First Aid, by Seanan McGuire, a tale of time travel gone only slightly wrong, depending on your perspective. The Golden Hour by Jeffrey Ford turns the tables on the reader, and Timed Obsolescence by Sameem Siddiqui had possibly the best plot. Bergamot and Vetiver, by Lavanya Lakshminarayan, is a beautiful and evocative story. Read particularly if you’re into queer love, as this anthology is heavy on that theme, but also read because this is a very good and very entertaining SF collection. Rated: 8/10 Thank you to Rebellion Publishing and to NetGalley for this eARC.

  25. 4 out of 5

    ★Kait Plus Books★

    I liked some stories more than others, but overall a great collection! A LETTER TO MERLIN by Theodora Goss was definitely my favorite! thank you so much to NetGalley and Solaris Books for letting me read an early copy of this book! Blog | Twitter | Instagram | TikTok | Facebook | Pinterest | Storygraph | Readerly I liked some stories more than others, but overall a great collection! A LETTER TO MERLIN by Theodora Goss was definitely my favorite! thank you so much to NetGalley and Solaris Books for letting me read an early copy of this book! Blog | Twitter | Instagram | TikTok | Facebook | Pinterest | Storygraph | Readerly

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maree

    This was a lot of fun. I love time travel stories, and this collection gives you a gorgeous bouquet of them - each with a sprig of romance tucked inside. Funny, charming, quirky, heartbreaking, they run the whole gamut. It was also really cool to see LGBTQ representation throughout - it's not emphasized to make the reader feel virtuous or for the publisher's marketing quota, we're just out here bending time and space and also people are queer, so deal with it. I love this approach and hope to se This was a lot of fun. I love time travel stories, and this collection gives you a gorgeous bouquet of them - each with a sprig of romance tucked inside. Funny, charming, quirky, heartbreaking, they run the whole gamut. It was also really cool to see LGBTQ representation throughout - it's not emphasized to make the reader feel virtuous or for the publisher's marketing quota, we're just out here bending time and space and also people are queer, so deal with it. I love this approach and hope to see more of it. Recommended for fans of the Time Traveler's Wife and suitable for most YA readers.

  27. 5 out of 5

    nihaarika

    3.75 stars (rounded off to 4) I have always been fascinated by the concept of time travel and anything to do with time. I was really excited to read Someone in Time . It's a collection of wonderfully-crafted stories by some familiar and new-to-me authors. I enjoyed a lot of the stories; the way they began and ended was just perfect. In the span of a few thousand words, these incredible authors got me to love and enjoy their characters and settings. While there were some stories that left me fe 3.75 stars (rounded off to 4) I have always been fascinated by the concept of time travel and anything to do with time. I was really excited to read Someone in Time . It's a collection of wonderfully-crafted stories by some familiar and new-to-me authors. I enjoyed a lot of the stories; the way they began and ended was just perfect. In the span of a few thousand words, these incredible authors got me to love and enjoy their characters and settings. While there were some stories that left me feeling a tad bit confused, overall, I think I really enjoyed reading them all. Thank you to Rebellion Publishing and Netgalley for my e-ARC!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Roberta R. (Offbeat YA)

    Mini blurb: A varied bunch of time-travel stories spanning/mixing different eras and exploring the trope from a number of different angles, in which soul mates cross time and space and sometimes lose each other in their flow. *** First off...DISCLAIMER: I requested this title on NetGalley. Thanks to Rebellion/Solaris for providing an ecopy. This didn't influence my review in any way. Another anthology with Seanan McGuire in the line-up, plus centering around one of my favourite story devices...I br Mini blurb: A varied bunch of time-travel stories spanning/mixing different eras and exploring the trope from a number of different angles, in which soul mates cross time and space and sometimes lose each other in their flow. *** First off...DISCLAIMER: I requested this title on NetGalley. Thanks to Rebellion/Solaris for providing an ecopy. This didn't influence my review in any way. Another anthology with Seanan McGuire in the line-up, plus centering around one of my favourite story devices...I briefly hesitated before I clicked on the "Request" button because the romance part scared me - now that is something I normally don't enjoy in my books - but ultimately, the time travel + Seanan McGuire combo won...and I'm pleased to report that I ended up liking this collection a lot. For one, the writing quality is very high overall, and most of the story premises/twists on the genre are a breath of fresh air. And just so you know, half the stories are queer (maybe even more, if you look at The Difference Between Love and Time, where the love interest is the space-time continuum, whose pronouns are "it/everything" 😁). Some of these tales are smile-inducing or heart-warming; some are melancholic or (at least in a couple of cases) tragic; some are open-ended, but mostly hopeful, since with time travel you (almost) always have a chance. Some have their characters travel with their bodies, others with their minds. Some are, well, not hard sci-fi, but more grounded in technology; some treat time travel like a kind of magical device; at least one of them equates time travel with memory, with a tragic but beautiful result. I must point out that I skimmed a couple of stories because I wasn't clicking with the style, and one didn't do much for me, but as I said, that's not me passing judgment on the book's quality. I genuinely think there's something for everyone in here, as long as time travel is even remotely your jam 🙂. Note: definitive review (due to time commitments, I've decided not to write full-length reviews anymore for short stories, novellas and anthologies, except in special cases or unless they're part of a series).

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This was a fantastic time travel anthology. All of the stories were more character/feeling driven than science-driven, haha, which is just what I'm looking for in time travel fiction! Most of the stories were LGTBQ-focused, which was refreshing. May favorites: First Aid by Seanan McGuire, I Remember Satellites by Sarah Gailey; Kronia by Elizabeth Hand; The Difference Between Love and Time by Catherynne M. Valente; “Time Gypsy by Ellen Klages; and A Letter to Merlin by Theodora Goss (although in t This was a fantastic time travel anthology. All of the stories were more character/feeling driven than science-driven, haha, which is just what I'm looking for in time travel fiction! Most of the stories were LGTBQ-focused, which was refreshing. May favorites: First Aid by Seanan McGuire, I Remember Satellites by Sarah Gailey; Kronia by Elizabeth Hand; The Difference Between Love and Time by Catherynne M. Valente; “Time Gypsy by Ellen Klages; and A Letter to Merlin by Theodora Goss (although in that instance, I'd have loved about 50 more pages of the world-building! Highly recommend this to anyone looking for engaging time travel. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lex Arsenault

    (3.5 rounded up to 4) I must begin by saying that Jonathan Strahan is a fabulous editor, and he chose the cream of the crop for this sci-fi anthology; 14 of the 16 were original to this book, the other 2 being favorites of Strahan. As with most anthologies, the content of Someone in Time was quite diverse; the inclusion of LGBTQIA+ characters/story lines is what originally drew me to this book, and to begin with 2 queer romances was a delight. The majority of these stories do fit in the category (3.5 rounded up to 4) I must begin by saying that Jonathan Strahan is a fabulous editor, and he chose the cream of the crop for this sci-fi anthology; 14 of the 16 were original to this book, the other 2 being favorites of Strahan. As with most anthologies, the content of Someone in Time was quite diverse; the inclusion of LGBTQIA+ characters/story lines is what originally drew me to this book, and to begin with 2 queer romances was a delight. The majority of these stories do fit in the category of time travel, however I don't think that I would necessarily describe all of them as "sci-fi romance." There is a romantic underline associated with time travel in general, but the stories I enjoyed the most in this anthology were equally as sci-fi as they were romantic. Roadside Attraction stands out as my personal favorite, a story about a young man in Kansas who discovers, through time travel, that he is exactly where he is supposed to be. (And, with whom he is supposed to be with.) Alix Harrow has such a gift with her heartbreaking story arcs, and I was happy that this story had a satisfying ending. Thank you to Rebellion and NetGalley for the ARC of “Someone in Time: Tales of Time-Crossed Romance”. This review is voluntary and contains my honest opinion about the book.

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