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Cat Kid Comic Club: On Purpose

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The Cat Kid Comic Club is deep in discovery in the newest graphic novel in the hilarious and heartwarming worldwide bestselling series by Dav Pilkey, the author and illustrator of Dog Man. The comic club is going in all different directions! Naomi, Melvin, and siblings are each trying to find their purpose. Naomi has an idea to get rich quick that causes a lot of commotion The Cat Kid Comic Club is deep in discovery in the newest graphic novel in the hilarious and heartwarming worldwide bestselling series by Dav Pilkey, the author and illustrator of Dog Man. The comic club is going in all different directions! Naomi, Melvin, and siblings are each trying to find their purpose. Naomi has an idea to get rich quick that causes a lot of commotion and emotion. And when faced with rejections, the friends try and try again to stay true to their vision. To top it off, a surprise visitor comes to class to stir things up. Will a desire for money and power cloud Naomi's purpose? Is it quitting time? Will the club ever be the same? The hilarity is nonstop as the baby frogs navigate sibling relationships, follow their path, and create art -- with purpose! Featured as stories-within-the-story, the mini comics showcase each baby frog's perspective and individual art style. In this groundbreaking graphic novel series, award-winning author and illustrator Dav Pilkey uses a variety of techniques -- including acrylic paints, colored pencils, photography, collage, gouache, watercolors, and much more -- to illustrate each frog's creative purpose and encourage teamwork. The kaleidoscope of art styles, paired with Pilkey's trademark storytelling and humor, fosters creativity, collaboration, independence, and empathy. Readers of all ages will enjoy this fun, exciting, and purposeful graphic novel adventure.


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The Cat Kid Comic Club is deep in discovery in the newest graphic novel in the hilarious and heartwarming worldwide bestselling series by Dav Pilkey, the author and illustrator of Dog Man. The comic club is going in all different directions! Naomi, Melvin, and siblings are each trying to find their purpose. Naomi has an idea to get rich quick that causes a lot of commotion The Cat Kid Comic Club is deep in discovery in the newest graphic novel in the hilarious and heartwarming worldwide bestselling series by Dav Pilkey, the author and illustrator of Dog Man. The comic club is going in all different directions! Naomi, Melvin, and siblings are each trying to find their purpose. Naomi has an idea to get rich quick that causes a lot of commotion and emotion. And when faced with rejections, the friends try and try again to stay true to their vision. To top it off, a surprise visitor comes to class to stir things up. Will a desire for money and power cloud Naomi's purpose? Is it quitting time? Will the club ever be the same? The hilarity is nonstop as the baby frogs navigate sibling relationships, follow their path, and create art -- with purpose! Featured as stories-within-the-story, the mini comics showcase each baby frog's perspective and individual art style. In this groundbreaking graphic novel series, award-winning author and illustrator Dav Pilkey uses a variety of techniques -- including acrylic paints, colored pencils, photography, collage, gouache, watercolors, and much more -- to illustrate each frog's creative purpose and encourage teamwork. The kaleidoscope of art styles, paired with Pilkey's trademark storytelling and humor, fosters creativity, collaboration, independence, and empathy. Readers of all ages will enjoy this fun, exciting, and purposeful graphic novel adventure.

30 review for Cat Kid Comic Club: On Purpose

  1. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Orey

    A step up from book 2! I thought it was going to go somewhere profound again when one of the characters receives a rejection from a publisher, but instead... Well. The book gets a good point across about perseverance and not giving up (and there's a VERY brief moment about sticking with your work and being yourself instead of grinding your uniqueness down with norms), but for me it missed a real opportunity. At this point in the series, I'm ready for some new material. The same comics are cycling A step up from book 2! I thought it was going to go somewhere profound again when one of the characters receives a rejection from a publisher, but instead... Well. The book gets a good point across about perseverance and not giving up (and there's a VERY brief moment about sticking with your work and being yourself instead of grinding your uniqueness down with norms), but for me it missed a real opportunity. At this point in the series, I'm ready for some new material. The same comics are cycling through, and while I still like them, their premises were what made them funny the first time around. Three books in, I'm feeling diminishing returns. Anyway, that's my adult perspective. My kid was still excited and absorbed by the book (especially by the rejection drama! Again, a bit of a missed opportunity there) but wasn't quiiiite as into it as the first book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    As a series, Cat Kid Comic Club is brilliant. And, I know, it's a Dog Man spinoff, so of course it's brilliant, but seriously this series is brilliant. And I'm saying that as a librarian, not as a total Dog Man fangirl! So, it is officially my professional opinion that Dav Pilkey is accomplishing some impressive stuff with these books: 1. There's an overarching narrative connecting the books that functions as a frame story, which gives this series a boost in the reading comprehension skills depar As a series, Cat Kid Comic Club is brilliant. And, I know, it's a Dog Man spinoff, so of course it's brilliant, but seriously this series is brilliant. And I'm saying that as a librarian, not as a total Dog Man fangirl! So, it is officially my professional opinion that Dav Pilkey is accomplishing some impressive stuff with these books: 1. There's an overarching narrative connecting the books that functions as a frame story, which gives this series a boost in the reading comprehension skills department! 2. Most of the individual mini-comics the baby frogs create as part of this club are themselves serialized narratives, which both gives kids an incentive to reread the previous books and encourages them to remember several disparate plotlines! 3. The titular club is all about Cat Kid teaching the baby frogs how to make their own comic books, with the main point being that everyone can make a comic; this empowers kids to make their own comics and stories, too! 4. Because the baby frogs share and discuss their comics, readers learn about different story elements and artistic mediums! 5. The mixed media sections encourage sustainability by using recyclable materials and broken toys to create artwork! 6. Much like Dog Man, these books teach kids about empathy and kindness and love and other positive personal values in a way that doesn't feel preachy or didactic! 7. This series also has accessible lessons about privilege and discrimination and tolerance! 8. Two of the baby frogs are trans/nonbinary! Pure brilliance. Also this latest installment made me cry with the Skeleton Girl comic.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen

    Cat Kid Comic Club books are my new favorite philosophy textbooks. Holy crap. They are so much fun and deftly reach out through a bunch of ridiculous butt jokes to touch your soul.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Thaggard

    I would die for this series

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    Was excited for this; I like that this series is teaching creativity and I think Pilkey’s jokes are dumb and funny. There were a couple of spots in this book that made me uncomfortable, though, and it ended with a quote by Dale Carnegie about how failure is important, with the subtext of the book being that _navigating_ failure is important. Yes, but so is acknowledging context. I like that these kids books openly acknowledge the heartaches that come with existence, but don’t like the “up by you Was excited for this; I like that this series is teaching creativity and I think Pilkey’s jokes are dumb and funny. There were a couple of spots in this book that made me uncomfortable, though, and it ended with a quote by Dale Carnegie about how failure is important, with the subtext of the book being that _navigating_ failure is important. Yes, but so is acknowledging context. I like that these kids books openly acknowledge the heartaches that come with existence, but don’t like the “up by your bootstraps vibe” that I’m ultimately left with. And I think he took a dig at some critics about something he probably should have done more grappling with. I like that these books always make me want to dig deep into convos with my kids about creativity and pain and persistence and friendships, et al…I’m just not sure Pilke and I would see eye to eye if we were to have the same talks.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bethe

    Wacky comic book fun continues in week 3 of Cat Kid’s Comic Club in which comics are submitted to a publisher with different results. Love the Time Out Rock, the Underwerewolves, and especially Skelopup! Still don’t care much for Chubbs McSpiderbutt.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    AWESOME

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Elnaji

    It was an awesome book and I enjoyed reading it and I'm excited to ready the next one! It was an awesome book and I enjoyed reading it and I'm excited to ready the next one!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Wolf Reader

    Good book. I was surprised how in real life, somebody took 2,000 pictures for McSpidderbutt (but only ended up using 111). Can't wait for book four! Good book. I was surprised how in real life, somebody took 2,000 pictures for McSpidderbutt (but only ended up using 111). Can't wait for book four!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alan Castree

    Mind the Trolls in the Amazon Comment Section Cat Kid Comic Club is a spinoff of the incredibly well written children's comic Dog Man, by Dav Pilky, which focus on children expressing themselves though comics in their own style. There’s the main story of Cat Kid and Molly teaching Flippy’s adopted frog children how to make comics, and then some other short stories scattered about, made by the kids. Melvin and Naomi often take the spotlight through their arguments and pursuits of getting published Mind the Trolls in the Amazon Comment Section Cat Kid Comic Club is a spinoff of the incredibly well written children's comic Dog Man, by Dav Pilky, which focus on children expressing themselves though comics in their own style. There’s the main story of Cat Kid and Molly teaching Flippy’s adopted frog children how to make comics, and then some other short stories scattered about, made by the kids. Melvin and Naomi often take the spotlight through their arguments and pursuits of getting published, but all the kids get a chance to shine by showing off their own collaborative comics, which also have ongoing stories and evolve throughout the whole series. When ordering Volume 3 I was bombarded by a lot of angry 1 star reviews on Amazon. First thought was, “okay, what did Pilky do that pissed off all these people?” Turns out most of these people just don't like the phases "Full frontal nudity" and "gender equality." We were still waiting for our book to arrive the next day and the kids were curious about my conversation with my partner about these reviews, so I turned to the kids and said, “Hey guys, the new Cat Kid has full frontal nudity in it!” They didn’t know what that was, “You know, naked people!” They wondered what it could be, who’s naked in the comic? My mind was going wild with ideas too. It is a book about “art” so who knows! Turns out, the “full frontal” joke is really a one-off line about cartoon characters not wearing clothes (a joke older than Looney Tunes, though the terminology has changed with time). It was pretty funny, though I felt a little let down after all this outrage and there weren’t even any naked people. Regardless, Cat Kid Comic Club continues with the genius of the first two volumes and evolves it even more. My kids went back and read the previous individual stories again to see how they evolved, such as “Supa Fail” and “Chubbs McSpider Butt.” We all look forward to what those stories will become in the 4th volume. Of course, each household is different and some of this content may be upsetting to some, so it's definitely important to know what's in it and pre-read any content you intend to give to your children especially if you're more stick on certain topics. People’s limits certainly vary. Otherwise, if you’re at all interested in art and storytelling this Cat Kid series is a wonderful series to follow. This book also talks about some of the hardships pursuing art entails (specifically, in this story, is the rejection letter the one artist receives sue to what others may perceive as comments about gender… that actually became funnier after reading all those one star reviews on Amazon), but most importantly teaches you the love of self expression through art. If you’re an adult that loves art and the art of story, and don’t mind reading things for younger audiences, definitely check out any of the Cat Kid books, they’re brilliant! If you meet that criteria and also have kids, it should be a no brainer. P.S. If you feel like it, go check some of the more appropriate reviews on Amazon as "helpful" if you can. P.S.S. Edited my review because it was a lot of me complaining about people complaining. Hope this revision is better.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Not my jam. Worse than Dog Man. Kids love them. Great. I am glad they resonate with lots of kids, but they don't really hit with me. (For the record, I'm actually ok with Captain Underpants, but feel like Pilkey gets worse with every spinoff.) There is barely a story and some low key stuff about book banning and perseverance. Not my jam. Worse than Dog Man. Kids love them. Great. I am glad they resonate with lots of kids, but they don't really hit with me. (For the record, I'm actually ok with Captain Underpants, but feel like Pilkey gets worse with every spinoff.) There is barely a story and some low key stuff about book banning and perseverance.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steven Grant

    Stevens review:I loved this book, they did literally everything "ON PURPOSE!" The part Little Petey scribbles all over the chalk board and he did it "ON PURPOSE!" The tadpoles made a comic book so inappropriate with poop and pee jokes and they even say "what the fuck?" (I couldn't believe they said that in a kids book) and they made the comic that way "ON PURPOSE!" There's a scene where the tadpoles take a shower, one of them drops the soap "ON PURPOSE!" (but then the tadpole gets raped because Stevens review:I loved this book, they did literally everything "ON PURPOSE!" The part Little Petey scribbles all over the chalk board and he did it "ON PURPOSE!" The tadpoles made a comic book so inappropriate with poop and pee jokes and they even say "what the fuck?" (I couldn't believe they said that in a kids book) and they made the comic that way "ON PURPOSE!" There's a scene where the tadpoles take a shower, one of them drops the soap "ON PURPOSE!" (but then the tadpole gets raped because that's why they say "Don't drop the soap!") And "Georgie" the tadpole kills himself "ON PURPOSE!" Also the fish in this book made me sad and made me think of my old fish Philip. Marc's review:Man, I hate reading kids books, but this one was funny as shit. I never thought I would see and read somebody "dropping the soap" in a kids book. This book was very dark and I was surprised to see that Steven gave it 5 freaking stars. Parents, if you read this book, please skip over chapter 10, because that's the part where a tadpole "drops the soap" and I don't think kids need to see what "rape" is either. So, as always, Don't drop the soap in kids books! or as the book says, "Don't do it ON PURPOSE!"

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary Pimbblet

    I read this with my ten year old daughter, but my twelve year old kept coming to listen to it as well. There’s not anything new to this story, the same comic formats used in the second book of the series are recycled here, but the comics themselves are pretty cool. It’s not really a stand alone book though, it’s very clearly a set up for the next in the series, and won’t make much sense if you haven’t read the others. Despite all that there are some really great messages here. It’s obvious some of I read this with my ten year old daughter, but my twelve year old kept coming to listen to it as well. There’s not anything new to this story, the same comic formats used in the second book of the series are recycled here, but the comics themselves are pretty cool. It’s not really a stand alone book though, it’s very clearly a set up for the next in the series, and won’t make much sense if you haven’t read the others. Despite all that there are some really great messages here. It’s obvious some of the points about offensive comics are Pilkey’s explanation of his withdrawn caveman book (which personally I didn’t find offensive at all). It’s written with clear understanding and vision, and in a way accessible to kids. I enjoyed it, my kids enjoyed it, it’s only because it’s not really a full stand alone book that I haven’t given a higher rating.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    This review is written by my kid: Naomi the frog likes to write books. When she writes a book that she knows a publisher will like, she can’t wait for it to be published. However, what Naomi actually wants is to become a millionaire. Her father, Flippy, says that she probably won’t make a million dollars, even if her book gets published. One question: will Naomi’s book even get published? This book is very funny, like the other two Cat Kid Comic Club books. I like the cover art, and I really like This review is written by my kid: Naomi the frog likes to write books. When she writes a book that she knows a publisher will like, she can’t wait for it to be published. However, what Naomi actually wants is to become a millionaire. Her father, Flippy, says that she probably won’t make a million dollars, even if her book gets published. One question: will Naomi’s book even get published? This book is very funny, like the other two Cat Kid Comic Club books. I like the cover art, and I really like the art in the book, because I think that all of the characters’ facial expressions in the book look really silly. There are mini comics in the book that I think are delightful. I recommend this book to people who like funny stories.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Graphic Novel I received an electronic ARC from Scholastic, Inc. The adventures continue as the third week of the Comic Club unfolds. Naomi submits her comic for publication and Melvin becomes her agent. She is committed to being rich so she can buy stuff for everyone. Her conversations with her dad offer moments for readers to think about in the midst of the humor. I appreciate the emphasis on perseverance and believing in yourself. Pilkey is a master at making the absurd work in his artwork and w Graphic Novel I received an electronic ARC from Scholastic, Inc. The adventures continue as the third week of the Comic Club unfolds. Naomi submits her comic for publication and Melvin becomes her agent. She is committed to being rich so she can buy stuff for everyone. Her conversations with her dad offer moments for readers to think about in the midst of the humor. I appreciate the emphasis on perseverance and believing in yourself. Pilkey is a master at making the absurd work in his artwork and writing.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    Honestly, deep, but I feel like I enjoyed this so much more as someone who understands the complexity of the issues that were brought up as opposed to the intended audience who might not understand the whole context of the issue with the rejections from the publisher. I also liked the fact that there was a trans and an enby frog but again that was only hinted at and I knew that but a younger reader would probably miss it or be confused. Nevertheless there were still great lessons that could be e Honestly, deep, but I feel like I enjoyed this so much more as someone who understands the complexity of the issues that were brought up as opposed to the intended audience who might not understand the whole context of the issue with the rejections from the publisher. I also liked the fact that there was a trans and an enby frog but again that was only hinted at and I knew that but a younger reader would probably miss it or be confused. Nevertheless there were still great lessons that could be enjoyed by any age.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ellon

    I really love Pilkey! This is another great installment in the Cat Kid Comic Club series. It discusses creating book, navigating failure, and so much more. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is that I don't remember enough of the comics from the first books to be able to appreciate the continuing sub-stories but, as another review mentioned, this will encourage kids to reread the other books, which is actually a good thing for them but makes me not love the book as much as some other books I really love Pilkey! This is another great installment in the Cat Kid Comic Club series. It discusses creating book, navigating failure, and so much more. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is that I don't remember enough of the comics from the first books to be able to appreciate the continuing sub-stories but, as another review mentioned, this will encourage kids to reread the other books, which is actually a good thing for them but makes me not love the book as much as some other books.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    The club learns a bit about publishing, how to draw using letters, and conformity. Plus, they learn how not every book is for every reader and that some might just be offended. If he could have dropped the full frontal nudity comment (yup, they're drawing comic characters without clothes), this would have been perfect. As these appeal to such a wide age range, that remark was a bit much. Otherwise, perfect. The club learns a bit about publishing, how to draw using letters, and conformity. Plus, they learn how not every book is for every reader and that some might just be offended. If he could have dropped the full frontal nudity comment (yup, they're drawing comic characters without clothes), this would have been perfect. As these appeal to such a wide age range, that remark was a bit much. Otherwise, perfect.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nate Hipple

    After the misstep of volume 2, On Purpose is a perfect course correction and focuses in on what makes this series shine: its advice for young writers. To that end, it’s the best volume yet. Unfortunately, I just cannot bring myself to care about the tadpoles as lead characters. Maybe it’s their dull visual design? I also didn’t really get into the newest volumes of the tadpole’s comics in here.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mary T

    I really enjoy this series! I don't think this one was quite as good as the others, but I enjoy the storytelling throughout. I read it to my 4-year-old and almost-3-year-old during some early morning snuggles. A lot went over their head, but they were engaged enough to last the whole book without asking me to stop! I really enjoy this series! I don't think this one was quite as good as the others, but I enjoy the storytelling throughout. I read it to my 4-year-old and almost-3-year-old during some early morning snuggles. A lot went over their head, but they were engaged enough to last the whole book without asking me to stop!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I will forever be a fan of Dav Pilkey and this series just gets more and more impressive. What an encouraging and creative way to get kids interested in art!!! And it’s clever enough for adults to enjoy too

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    I've been enjoying the Cat Kid Comic Club books with my 7 year old. I've preferred this series to others by Dav Pilkey. I like the way he weaves in art styles and approaches to the creative process of writing a book along with everyday silliness that appeals young kids. I've been enjoying the Cat Kid Comic Club books with my 7 year old. I've preferred this series to others by Dav Pilkey. I like the way he weaves in art styles and approaches to the creative process of writing a book along with everyday silliness that appeals young kids.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    My son & I read this book together and we could not stop laughing. It was highly entertaining. The theme of the boo was also a great message. My sons says he loves how it shows you it’s okay to be different. Overall we love the authors books.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Cat Kid Comic Club in it's third week, but this time we're dealing with how to deal with disappointment (not getting their comics published) and finding what purpose you want to pursue. Again, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this with Jared. Cat Kid Comic Club in it's third week, but this time we're dealing with how to deal with disappointment (not getting their comics published) and finding what purpose you want to pursue. Again, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this with Jared.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Leo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The main character, Naomi, tries to become rich by writing a book but it doesn't work out. It's okay though! Flippy teaches The Book Club that mistakes help you grow. I enjoyed it because it was enter taining like always. The main character, Naomi, tries to become rich by writing a book but it doesn't work out. It's okay though! Flippy teaches The Book Club that mistakes help you grow. I enjoyed it because it was enter taining like always.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lionel

    I think that they should have more copies of this book!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tim Earp

    Dav Pilkey is the king! He needs to write a bazillion books every year. Seriously! Go, man, go!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This book opens with Dolly Parton's famous "find out who you are and do it on purpose" quote, so really it was already incredible This book opens with Dolly Parton's famous "find out who you are and do it on purpose" quote, so really it was already incredible

  29. 4 out of 5

    wildct2003

    Still a great series

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Namba

    Super fun story. Kind of a try, try again theme about book submissions.

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