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This Time Tomorrow

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What if you could take a vacation to your past? With her celebrated humor, insight, and heart, beloved New York Times bestseller Emma Straub offers her own twist on traditional time travel tropes, and a different kind of love story. On the eve of her 40th birthday, Alice's life isn't terrible. She likes her job, even if it isn't exactly the one she expected. She's happy wi What if you could take a vacation to your past? With her celebrated humor, insight, and heart, beloved New York Times bestseller Emma Straub offers her own twist on traditional time travel tropes, and a different kind of love story. On the eve of her 40th birthday, Alice's life isn't terrible. She likes her job, even if it isn't exactly the one she expected. She's happy with her apartment, her romantic status, her independence, and she adores her lifelong best friend. But her father is ailing, and it feels to her as if something is missing. When she wakes up the next morning she finds herself back in 1996, reliving her 16th birthday. But it isn't just her adolescent body that shocks her, or seeing her high school crush, it's her dad: the vital, charming, 40-something version of her father with whom she is reunited. Now armed with a new perspective on her own life and his, some past events take on new meaning. Is there anything that she would change if she could?


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What if you could take a vacation to your past? With her celebrated humor, insight, and heart, beloved New York Times bestseller Emma Straub offers her own twist on traditional time travel tropes, and a different kind of love story. On the eve of her 40th birthday, Alice's life isn't terrible. She likes her job, even if it isn't exactly the one she expected. She's happy wi What if you could take a vacation to your past? With her celebrated humor, insight, and heart, beloved New York Times bestseller Emma Straub offers her own twist on traditional time travel tropes, and a different kind of love story. On the eve of her 40th birthday, Alice's life isn't terrible. She likes her job, even if it isn't exactly the one she expected. She's happy with her apartment, her romantic status, her independence, and she adores her lifelong best friend. But her father is ailing, and it feels to her as if something is missing. When she wakes up the next morning she finds herself back in 1996, reliving her 16th birthday. But it isn't just her adolescent body that shocks her, or seeing her high school crush, it's her dad: the vital, charming, 40-something version of her father with whom she is reunited. Now armed with a new perspective on her own life and his, some past events take on new meaning. Is there anything that she would change if she could?

30 review for This Time Tomorrow

  1. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Reid

    When 40-year-old Alice is thrust back to 1996, she’s as shocked as one might expect. But what surprises her most is seeing her now ailing father, back to the vital and charming man he once was. Desperate to help him, Alice looks for a way in the past to save him in the present. I couldn’t put it down.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    the rare novel that leaves you torn between feverishly turning pages and setting it down so you can call the people you love.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paromjit

    Emma Straub's delightful time travelling novel celebrates New York City and explores the central father-daughter relationship. Native New Yorker Alice is approaching her 40th birthday, she is working in the admissions office of the exclusive and expensive Belvedere School, which she herself had attended, leaving her feeling as if she had never left as she now interviews the children of parents she went to school with. She tries to visit her ailing 73 year old father, Leonard, as much as she can, Emma Straub's delightful time travelling novel celebrates New York City and explores the central father-daughter relationship. Native New Yorker Alice is approaching her 40th birthday, she is working in the admissions office of the exclusive and expensive Belvedere School, which she herself had attended, leaving her feeling as if she had never left as she now interviews the children of parents she went to school with. She tries to visit her ailing 73 year old father, Leonard, as much as she can, even though he cannot speak to her, he is going to die soon, it could be anytime and it has her reflecting on where she is in her life and what she has and has not achieved. After meeting her long time best friend, the pregnant Sam, on her birthday, she ends up getting drunk and falling asleep, only to wake up at her childhood Pomander Walk home in 1996 on the morning of her 16th birthday. Leonard is an offbeat novelist who made his money writing a popular and lucrative sci-fi novel about 2 time travelling brothers that was made into a TV series. The independent Alice had a close relationship with him, she has never belonged to anyone other than Leonard, making her feel so alone, and she has forgotten what he was like before ill health took such a heavy toll on him. She now has a chance to see him anew, a younger man who walks everywhere, without the stress of whether it will be the last time she sees him. Could there possibly be any changes that 16 year old Alice, from her 40 year old perspective, can instigate that might change or influence her and Leonard's life for the better in the future? She is presented with the poignant opportunities to ask questions, hear his stories, some embarrassing, and Alice becomes aware of how many of her school friends she has forgotten through the years, such as Kenji Morris. The reader becomes immersed in 1990s nostalgia with the culture, the popstars and film stars of the period. Straub's storytelling has oodles of charm, heart and wit, Alice encounters numerous versions of herself, but which is the one that resonates most? The author paints an alluring and heart tugging picture of a father and daughter relationship, of friendship, of life, and its joys, love, loss, grief and challenges. The transitory nature of life is inescapable, pushing the need to tangibly appreciate loved ones in the here and now, Alice gets a second chance to do this through time travel, deepening her understanding and knowledge of Leonard. This is a gloriously engaging, hopeful and entrancing read that I think many readers will enjoy. Highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher for an ARC.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    Audiobook….read by Marin Ireland …..8 hours and 31 minutes. Tons of heart…and brilliant subtle messages. I LOVE- LOVE - LOVE this book….love what Emma Straub created. 5+++++ stars …..[emotionally impactful — dazzling, delectable, and salient] Note: a great gift for a daughter to give dad for Father’s Day coming up….or….a Dad to give his daughter- also on Father’s Day… Such a wonderful Dad/daughter book buddy read this could be. After listening to 8 ish hours in only 2 sittings - with a small break Audiobook….read by Marin Ireland …..8 hours and 31 minutes. Tons of heart…and brilliant subtle messages. I LOVE- LOVE - LOVE this book….love what Emma Straub created. 5+++++ stars …..[emotionally impactful — dazzling, delectable, and salient] Note: a great gift for a daughter to give dad for Father’s Day coming up….or….a Dad to give his daughter- also on Father’s Day… Such a wonderful Dad/daughter book buddy read this could be. After listening to 8 ish hours in only 2 sittings - with a small break in between….(I apologize for delay messages I need to return)….I chatted with Paul about this story — as I sometimes do — Things I shared with him… …People who say they have no regrets are lying. It’s human to have regrets… …."Our choices in life matter — but most are not permanent face tattoos". I wish as parents and educators we emphasized this to our youth more than drill the importance for one more SAT prep course. …This book had me dreaming, wishing, fantasizing about many little things I wish I might have done differently…. …I thought about my own 16th and 40th birthday ….both were the two ‘most’ memorable birthdays of my life. …I wish Paul and I had read this novel with Katy and Ali when Katy was around 16 and Ali 12….. ……conversations could spin off in the many valuable themes that Emma covers — opening up an easy vessel to an engrossing ageless-cross-generational—joyful, meaningful, insightful eye-opening discussion/s. And most…I loved this story — the characters —the mild suspense—the themes - the heart - the compelling cerebral aspects — the fantasy - the hidden truths — the wisdom — and the wonderful sentences and scenarios from start to finish. A few teasers….. ….Alice had dinner with Sam, her best girlfriend, …then she went to her favorite underground Russian bar. ….Then she got too drunk. ….Then she took a cab back to her father‘s house. ….Then she barf down the street. ….Then she fell asleep outside like a tramp. ….And when Alice woke up she was in bed in the guard house, her dad's potting shed… ot whatever. ….The guard house was mostly empty… so she moved a few things aside, and passed out. ….Alice wasn’t sure what time she fell asleep but it was probably around 3 or 4 AM. ….If Alice had had her phone she could’ve checked what time Uber dropped her off, but she didn’t have her phone. ….Leonard, Alice’s dad, told Alice it had to be between 3 or 4 AM because that’s the only time it works. ….Daddy shared his story…. about being somewhere else. ….It wasn’t 1996 anymore….. ….At first Leonard thought he was just having some kind of crazy hallucination… it was 1980… a very special day….. …."Things were always changing even when it didn’t feel like it". Alice was a great kid growing up. Many of her friends were all young academic scholars …on the track to Ivy League Colleges — Alice didn’t know what ‘she’ wanted. She wasn’t good at math but she was great at art. She was so well behaved- she mostly parented herself. If her Dad found drugs in her room he simply removed them- never punished her. He had no rules — because he trusted her. I was raised the same way. I remember parenting myself so much that I would tell my dates, I had to be home at a certain time. I didn’t. I set my own boundaries — I didn’t have any. What was soooo beautiful was the way this tale circles itself — discovers golden gems through time — time that was not relevant per se — but time that underlined ‘be here now’ (without being hokey or spiritual) — simply living our lives — unplanned living with hopes, dreams, love, loss, and hope. Totally awesome book!!!!! When Alice was an adult it wasn’t that she and her dad were not having honest conversations during their phone chats. They were probably better conversations than most adult kids had with their parents. They talked about what Netflix movies they watched—what books they were reading—restaurants—and her dad always liked hearing about the kids that she taught….. ….but they were conversations that skipped happily over more substantial subjects—- The development of this theme is outstanding…. I honestly could chat about the fabulous details and themes with others for hours…. I’m sure New Yorkers will adore it….great nostalgia particulars… but this West Coast California girl loved it just as much!!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Emma Straub fans will be pleased with her new novel, “This Time Tomorrow”. In this story, Straub takes on the idea of time travel and the ability to change the course of your life. In an NPR interview, Straub admits that this story is close to an autobiographical work in that, like her main character Alice, Straub was stressed and concerned for her father’s health. Straub’s father, the noted horror and suspense author Peter Straub, was gravely ill with a heart condition in August of 2020, and Em Emma Straub fans will be pleased with her new novel, “This Time Tomorrow”. In this story, Straub takes on the idea of time travel and the ability to change the course of your life. In an NPR interview, Straub admits that this story is close to an autobiographical work in that, like her main character Alice, Straub was stressed and concerned for her father’s health. Straub’s father, the noted horror and suspense author Peter Straub, was gravely ill with a heart condition in August of 2020, and Emma was by his side. She employed that “trauma” in her writing of this story. Ms Straub stated that she has always utilized writing to process her life and comprehend the people in her life. Thus, she wrote a story that most adults with aging parents can relate to: while sitting bedside with an ailing loved one, what if you could time travel back and change the trajectory of your life; would that make a difference in your life or a loved one’s life? Could you improve your future if you knew where your decisions led? The story opens with Alice sitting next to comatose father as she contemplates her life. She’s 40 years old, never been married, and working at the private school that she attended; basically she’s just drifted through life. She’s questioning her life choices, and she’s wondering if she could have done things differently, would that have led to a better outcome than this? She’s not unhappy, she’s questioning. It’s not like a mid-life crisis, more like a reckoning of all those choices made as an adult. And there’s the wonderment of growth, delayed or arrested development. Why do some people easily move into one phase from another, while others stay in one life stage, failing to launch? Staub also stated that she wrote the novel with the intention of reminding the reader to appreciate everything you have right now. For example, Alice is 40 when the story begins, and then she time travels back to when she was 16. She’s blown away at how young her father looked, how healthy he was. She is shocked that she ever thought of herself as an unattractive teen. Why didn’t she see herself as she was: young, healthy, intelligent and attractive? Straub prods us to realize that what we have now will be seen by our future self as perfection (you think your aching back is bad? In 20 years you will wish you could return to that “aching” back). Straub utilizes her strength in insight and humor. This is a story of do-overs. It’s a story of loving what you have.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ceecee

    4 -5 stars rounded up. As Alice Stern's 40th birthday is fast approaching, she ruminates on the time it takes to die as she watches her beloved father, novelist Leonard doing exactly that. Without giving too much away she finds a portal which transports her back to her 16th birthday in 1996! I find myself deeply envious of the opportunities this affords Alice especially in her relationship with Leonard. I love Emma Straub’s books so I guess I am very much the target audience for this one! The qua 4 -5 stars rounded up. As Alice Stern's 40th birthday is fast approaching, she ruminates on the time it takes to die as she watches her beloved father, novelist Leonard doing exactly that. Without giving too much away she finds a portal which transports her back to her 16th birthday in 1996! I find myself deeply envious of the opportunities this affords Alice especially in her relationship with Leonard. I love Emma Straub’s books so I guess I am very much the target audience for this one! The quality of her writing, the wry tone, the incisive nature of Alice’s thoughts effortlessly pull you into her world and you find yourself totally accepting the concept of the novel. It’s a poignant and emotional story as Alice reflects and becomes introspective on her life and what she has and hasn’t achieved. Alice at 16 and at 40 are both wonderfully portrayed. It’s interesting seeing the decisions she makes , what leads to them and how she feels towards her peers as she peers through 40 year old eyes. All the characters are well fleshed out and so easy to visualise but the standout feature is the relationship between Alice and Leonard, what a wonderful man he is. I love that it gives her the chance to ask him the questions she never did as a 16-year-old, because why would you? I am envious that I haven’t the opportunity to do the same! The other ‘stars’ of the show are the 1990s and New York City. The back to the future style trip evokes wonderful and multiple memories especially of film and music, the 90s being all about Oasis for me! The setting in New York City especially Pomander Walk where her father lives is full of charm and atmosphere but it’s very much a love letter to this vibrant and exciting city. The author transports me back to my trip there! It’s a delightful journey, beautifully written and I finish it with a lump in my throat. You never know what’s coming and you just have to be happy with what is there. With thanks to NetGalley and especially to Penguin Random House/Michael Joseph for the much appreciated arc in return for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    LeAnn

    I could not stop thinking about how old the cat was.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)

    Probably my favorite read of the year so far. I haven't cried this much reading a book in........years??????? I cannot believe that I have been sleeping on Emma Straub for so long. This was EVERYTHING and I have ordered her entire backlist because I need MORE immediately CW: death of a parent Probably my favorite read of the year so far. I haven't cried this much reading a book in........years??????? I cannot believe that I have been sleeping on Emma Straub for so long. This was EVERYTHING and I have ordered her entire backlist because I need MORE immediately CW: death of a parent

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    I found Straub's last book ALL ADULTS HERE a bit too schmaltzy for me but I am a sucker for time travel so I picked this one up. But I forgot when I did so that the Schmaltzy Time Travel story is a thing (Quantum Leap, for starters) because time travel can make you get all nostalgic about how things used to be/could have been. I could have forgiven a lot of the schmaltz of the second half if the first half was more cohesive. We start off laying the groundwork, showing us where Alice is in her li I found Straub's last book ALL ADULTS HERE a bit too schmaltzy for me but I am a sucker for time travel so I picked this one up. But I forgot when I did so that the Schmaltzy Time Travel story is a thing (Quantum Leap, for starters) because time travel can make you get all nostalgic about how things used to be/could have been. I could have forgiven a lot of the schmaltz of the second half if the first half was more cohesive. We start off laying the groundwork, showing us where Alice is in her life. On paper Alice's life doesn't look like much, but that actually bugged me! Alice seems pretty cool! She may not have the best job, she may not have a perfect romantic partner, but she also doesn't seem to be plagued by anxiety about what she doesn't have. The big problem for Alice is her father's illness, he is in the hospital close to death. This is where the book will end up taking us, to this father-daughter relationship, but it's weirdly not where it spends most of its time in the first half. When we do get the time travel, it's super weird how Alice doesn't seem all that worried about it. (If I had to potentially relive my life starting from the age of 16 I would be deeply deeply depressed! Having to redo school sounds like absolute torture!) Instead we move into nostalgia world. Some of this is sweet as Alice gets to spend time with her dad and appreciate his younger self in a way she couldn't then. Some of it is very oh isn't New York amazing??? (but only because this takes place almost entirely above Central Park South) and I have very low tolerance for that. I know this isn't a mystery but also I knew exactly where all of this was going from pretty much the beginning. Which is why I was so confused as we meandered through a whole different book before it got to what it was actually about. Alice's choices after she's gone back in time often don't make much sense, they don't feel rooted in who she really is or some idea of who she wants to be. And the book is better when it gets to its center, even if the center is the schmaltziest bit. Because at least that felt true and grounded. There are lots of long observations here, some of them sharp and hilarious, others that don't hit at all. So much of it is very much wanting to just sit and look around and consider how different things were 25 years ago. This will probably work great for a lot of readers, but for me it often didn't land.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tooter

    3.75 Stars

  11. 5 out of 5

    Librariann

    **I received an ARC of this title from the publisher, because I am a librarian and librarians are awesome!** Probably one of my faves of the year, for overall poignancy and a great take on the time travel trope. Also, cheers to being sixteen in 1996. Every reference, from the music to Rum Raisin to the Reality Bites poster to the faux Jordan Catalano leather thong choker was spot on. CK One! The Craft! I want to send this to all of the best girl friends I had at sixteen, but it's not out until Ma **I received an ARC of this title from the publisher, because I am a librarian and librarians are awesome!** Probably one of my faves of the year, for overall poignancy and a great take on the time travel trope. Also, cheers to being sixteen in 1996. Every reference, from the music to Rum Raisin to the Reality Bites poster to the faux Jordan Catalano leather thong choker was spot on. CK One! The Craft! I want to send this to all of the best girl friends I had at sixteen, but it's not out until May of next year! If you found The Midnight Library overly saccharine, this comes across much more subtly. I mean, I am pretty much THE audience for this book: exact right age demographic down to the year, loves reflective women's fiction, loves time travel stories. So it's not surprising that I enjoyed this one. What was unexpected was how much I loved Straub's writing style, the way she handled poignant introspection. It was also nice not to read a romance for a change. (I'm getting a little burned out on romances. THERE I SAID IT.) I've had a good string of books that I've really enjoyed lately. I don't know if it's because I'm in a mood for a certain thing and have the brainspace to read, or if it's because I'm really reading excellent books. Probably a little of both.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brandice

    In This Time Tomorrow, Alice is celebrating her 40th birthday. Her life is fine, maybe not amazing but she’s satisfied with things, minus the fact that her dad’s health isn’t well. She goes to sleep that night and wakes up back in 1996, as her 16 year old self. She’s young, her dad is younger again and she has no idea what’s going on. Once Alice accepts that she’s there in the past, can she change anything, positively impacting their future? There is an element of time travel in this story howev In This Time Tomorrow, Alice is celebrating her 40th birthday. Her life is fine, maybe not amazing but she’s satisfied with things, minus the fact that her dad’s health isn’t well. She goes to sleep that night and wakes up back in 1996, as her 16 year old self. She’s young, her dad is younger again and she has no idea what’s going on. Once Alice accepts that she’s there in the past, can she change anything, positively impacting their future? There is an element of time travel in this story however as a non sci-fi reader, it wasn’t overly complicated — I was able to just go with it. I enjoyed Alice and Leo’s father daughter relationship as well as Alice’s relationship with her best friend, Sam. This Time Tomorrow is a sweet story with some humor that prompts appreciation for the time we have.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    Emma Straub's 'This Time Tomorrow' is perfect for a refreshing and intriguing summertime (or anytime) read and/or listen. Main character, Alice Stern is reluctant in accepting the impending death of her 73-year-old father Leonard. He is ironically famous for his time travel novel 'Time Brothers', which was also made into a popular TV series. There is nothing Alice wants more than additional time with her father. She passionately wishes she could go back to the past and change that and many other Emma Straub's 'This Time Tomorrow' is perfect for a refreshing and intriguing summertime (or anytime) read and/or listen. Main character, Alice Stern is reluctant in accepting the impending death of her 73-year-old father Leonard. He is ironically famous for his time travel novel 'Time Brothers', which was also made into a popular TV series. There is nothing Alice wants more than additional time with her father. She passionately wishes she could go back to the past and change that and many other life choices she made as a young(er) person."Alice just wanted to push her hands against the walls of her life and see if they would move. She wanted to hit the reset button over and over again until everyone was happy, forever." As expected, Alice finds a way to time travel going back and forth between her past and present lives and learns some shocking revelations about her father's life when she was a child. She also seeks to change aspects of her past into what she believes will give her the ideal present life she has always yearned. For example, she works on trying to convince Leonard's (past) 40-year-old self to quit smoking so his 73-year-old self would not be so close death. She also wishes she could be married her childhood love interest when she sees him during the return visits to her past. These are a few examples of the important things Alice thinks would make her present life more meaningful and less stagnant. Some of what she wants changed happens, while not everything. In addition, when she does get what she "thought" she wanted she realizes maybe her life unfolded the way it did because that was the way it was meant to be all along. In the end what Alice concludes as a result of her time traveling experiences is optimistically reassuring: "All the tiny pieces added together make a life, but the pieces could always be rearranged." Narrator Marin Ireland never disappoints and does an absolutely tremendous job as the sole narrator for this novel. Her voice inflections and character transitions were seamless.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Olive Fellows (abookolive)

    In the early morning hours following her 40th birthday, Alice Stern drunkenly stumbles into the guardhouse outside her ailing father’s house, looking to sleep off her birthday libations. Most 40-year-olds would awaken to nothing but a raging hangover, but instead, magically, Alice opens her eyes to discover she’s back in 1996 on her 16th birthday. Her mind is the same, but she’s young again, free from the aches of impending middle age and free to redo some elements of her not-entirely-sweet 16. T In the early morning hours following her 40th birthday, Alice Stern drunkenly stumbles into the guardhouse outside her ailing father’s house, looking to sleep off her birthday libations. Most 40-year-olds would awaken to nothing but a raging hangover, but instead, magically, Alice opens her eyes to discover she’s back in 1996 on her 16th birthday. Her mind is the same, but she’s young again, free from the aches of impending middle age and free to redo some elements of her not-entirely-sweet 16. This dream scenario is the foundation of “This Time Tomorrow,” the latest novel from Emma Straub, co-owner of the beloved Brooklyn bookstore, Books Are Magic, and author of best-selling novels “The Vacationers” and “Modern Lovers.” Click here to read the rest of my review in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Blaine

    Alice wasn’t a writer, but she’d spent enough time sitting at dinner tables with novelists to understand that fiction was a myth. Fictional stories, that is. Maybe there were bad ones out there, but the good ones, the good ones—those were always true. Not the facts, not the rights and the lefts, not the plots, which could take place in outer space or in hell or anywhere in between, but the feelings. The feelings were the truth. … “How do I know if I’m living the right life?” … Happy endings were too Alice wasn’t a writer, but she’d spent enough time sitting at dinner tables with novelists to understand that fiction was a myth. Fictional stories, that is. Maybe there were bad ones out there, but the good ones, the good ones—those were always true. Not the facts, not the rights and the lefts, not the plots, which could take place in outer space or in hell or anywhere in between, but the feelings. The feelings were the truth. … “How do I know if I’m living the right life?” … Happy endings were too much for some people, false and cheap, but hope—hope was honest. Hope was good.Alice is about to turn 40 and she’s a bit stuck. She’s not the artist she hoped to be. She’s got a decent job as the Admissions Director at the private school where she was once a student, but her boss is retiring and that places everything in flux. She’s in a year-long relationship that is more than a bit lacking. But all of that is secondary to the fact that her beloved father is dying. So on the night of her 40th birthday, she has a little too much to drink and the crashes at her father’s house, only to wake up the next morning in her youthful body on the morning of her 16th birthday. Is it a dream? Or has she been given some type of chance to do something different that day that could affect her life—and her father’s—in the present? It’s hard to say much more about This Time Tomorrow without spoiling elements of the story. The mechanics of the time travel are revealed pretty late in the story, but they work and they suit the narrative. The novel expressly mentions influences such as the movies Peggy Sue Got Married and Back to the Future. I would say that it was also influenced by books such as Replay, 11/22/63, and The Midnight Library. I dare say the time travel portion of the story will feel familiar, and the ending may disappoint some readers looking for a different type of resolution. The time travel genre is a crowded space, or maybe it just feels crowded because I’m a sucker for time travel novels 😄. What separates This Time Tomorrow from so many other similar books is that Alice’s focus is not on finding love, or on fixing some past personal catastrophe. It’s a story about a perfectly ordinary adult who loves a dying parent and is given an impossible chance to interact with that parent in his prime and to re-experience all the little things about him that she didn’t appreciate at the time.The story was complicated—portals, a mystery to solve, different years, different realities. But Alice could read it for what it was, which was a love story. Not a romance—there was no sex in the entire book, a few kisses, that was it—the book was about the love between a single parent and their only child. It wasn't funny. It was earnest. It was the kind of thing that Leonard would never have said aloud to Alice, not in a million years. But it was true all the same.Ms. Straub has acknowledged that this story was inspired by caring for her father (novelist Peter Straub) through a serious illness. Their father-daughter relationship is the core of this novel, and it makes this book unique and surprisingly moving. Recommended.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jenna (still emerging from hiatus but still reading…!)

    Coming off a time of loss in my family that prompted a lot of personal retrospection, I wasn’t so sure about my readiness to read this book - but I’m really glad I did. Although I’m not the biggest magical realism fan, to say the least, and therefore wasn’t sure how I was going to like the time travel mechanism in this book either, Straub deploys this in a relatively unassuming and low-key way that SO well captures the process of coping with impending or ambiguous parental loss, engaging in grie Coming off a time of loss in my family that prompted a lot of personal retrospection, I wasn’t so sure about my readiness to read this book - but I’m really glad I did. Although I’m not the biggest magical realism fan, to say the least, and therefore wasn’t sure how I was going to like the time travel mechanism in this book either, Straub deploys this in a relatively unassuming and low-key way that SO well captures the process of coping with impending or ambiguous parental loss, engaging in grieving and reflection, and working toward acceptance and integration of the loss in moving forward. In particular, the special affection and bond between a single parent and a teen/young adult child, both struggling to do their best for themselves and one another over time, is movingly explored. All time travel novels seem to deal to some degree with questions of “should I or shouldn’t I have done ______?” or “what would have happened if I had done ______ instead?” or “how could I have stopped ______from happening?”, but I think Straub recognizes that these ultimately aren’t always the most useful or even interesting questions to ask - healing and cultivating self-trust, hope, and resilience around what DID actually happen is probably more useful and interesting - and she handled all this in a subtle way that I felt was refreshingly different. Straub is also characteristically very skilled at depicting smart teenagers, giving them credit for just how wise they can be, and also depicting strong female friendships and mentorships. I didn’t like Straub’s last novel, All Adults Here, very much, and I found Modern Lovers delightful but instantly forgot it, but in this one, Straub takes things to the next level and it felt very personal and deeper than her usual fare even though it was still a relatively light and enjoyable, summer-appropriate read. It’s a keeper that I hope will be around today and yes, tomorrow.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anna Avian

    I found this book to be quite boring. The story dragged without any compelling or exciting moments. Halfway through I just started to skim through the pages.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Full disclosure: I am a S.U.C.K.E.R. for the “do-over” trope. From . . . . To . . . . To . . . . And every other film ever made on the subject, I am always there for it. After this latest release, I’m also declaring myself a superfan of Emma Straub. All of her books have been hits for me and this was no exception. Maybe it was the trope itself or maybe it was simply that Alice was so close to my own age that when she found herself reliving her 16th birthday on the eve of her actual 4 Full disclosure: I am a S.U.C.K.E.R. for the “do-over” trope. From . . . . To . . . . To . . . . And every other film ever made on the subject, I am always there for it. After this latest release, I’m also declaring myself a superfan of Emma Straub. All of her books have been hits for me and this was no exception. Maybe it was the trope itself or maybe it was simply that Alice was so close to my own age that when she found herself reliving her 16th birthday on the eve of her actual 40th birthday every reference hit the mark . . . . I ended up picking this one up by chance on Father’s Day . . . . (belated shout-out to all you fellas) With no knowledge that this story would also contain such a strong father/daughter theme. Once again, it simply checked all of the boxes. Some books make me feel mired down in the details, but I couldn’t get enough here. From the posters on Alice’s teenage bedroom wall to the song selections to the magical neighborhood where she grew up . . . . I was hoping for Alice’s happy ending throughout. And speaking of the ending – completely satisfying. Solid 4 Stars for me.

  19. 5 out of 5

    emily • emilybookedup

    this was a quick read, but left me wanting a lot more. i love the time travel/alternate universe trope, however it wasn’t my favorite out of some i’ve read. i found it most difficult to connect with the female MC. i was much more attached to the male MC (dad) and wanted even more there from his POV or thoughts. i also found the ending to be rushed/random. i wanted to love it more, especially since it centered around the unique bond between daughter and dad as that’s very relatable for me. it was this was a quick read, but left me wanting a lot more. i love the time travel/alternate universe trope, however it wasn’t my favorite out of some i’ve read. i found it most difficult to connect with the female MC. i was much more attached to the male MC (dad) and wanted even more there from his POV or thoughts. i also found the ending to be rushed/random. i wanted to love it more, especially since it centered around the unique bond between daughter and dad as that’s very relatable for me. it was adorable and left me in my feels, but just needed MORE. overall, i didn’t love it but didn’t dislike it. it kept me invested and had alot of good moments and some really good quotes and perspective on what’s important and what matters and how life just happens. thank you to Riverhead for my gifted copy! this cover is beautiful.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    [4.5] I always enjoy Emma Straub's writing and expected a summery read that also digs deep into relationships. But this time I got much more. A 40-year woman with a dying father is drifting along when she finds the chance to travel back in time to the day she turns 16. I love the message of this novel, of finding the love and friendship in your life and appreciating it fully, especially the tender father-daughter relationship. I lost my father very recently and this novel strikes a deep chord in [4.5] I always enjoy Emma Straub's writing and expected a summery read that also digs deep into relationships. But this time I got much more. A 40-year woman with a dying father is drifting along when she finds the chance to travel back in time to the day she turns 16. I love the message of this novel, of finding the love and friendship in your life and appreciating it fully, especially the tender father-daughter relationship. I lost my father very recently and this novel strikes a deep chord in me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    Happy pub day!!! A wild and wonderful roller coaster ride of wonder! Time travel; zip back to the 90’s when your adult self turns into the teen you use to be, and your father is back to his healthy and spry self. You’ll laugh and cry, of course, that’s what fantastic books do! Don’t miss it! Thank you Edelweiss and Riverhead Books!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Allyson (bookstaandbujo)

    New favorite read of 2022. A classic time travel trope, where a woman wakes up on a milestone birthday and is 16 again. If you know Straub’s other works, you know she’s got some serious literary fiction chops — so imagine that with this lighthearted storyline. You’d think it wouldn’t work, but it does. It fun and it’s also poignant to the point of physically aching. She makes so many observations through the eyes of the main character, Alice, that made me laugh and made me cry. Remembering the da New favorite read of 2022. A classic time travel trope, where a woman wakes up on a milestone birthday and is 16 again. If you know Straub’s other works, you know she’s got some serious literary fiction chops — so imagine that with this lighthearted storyline. You’d think it wouldn’t work, but it does. It fun and it’s also poignant to the point of physically aching. She makes so many observations through the eyes of the main character, Alice, that made me laugh and made me cry. Remembering the days before cell phones. Seeing your parents as younger, more agile versions of themselves, and swelling with joy that they’re still happy, safe, and healthy. And confronting the notion that we have as grumpy adults that, “teenagers have it so much easier! You think it’s hard now, TikTok kid?? Just you wait till you have to get a job and pay bills!” kind of thing. Through Alice’s journey you remember how AWFUL it was to be a teenager… how brave and mature we really were, how things were hard then too. The grace she finally bestows upon herself (and others) was so emotional — and the things she took for granted before, she allows herself to cherish unabashedly. It felt like hugging my teenage self, something I wish so desperately I could do. Bleh. I loved it. CW: slow decline of parent throughout the entire book

  23. 5 out of 5

    Helga

    The morning after her 40th birthday, Alice wakes up a 16 year old girl. She’s doubly shocked when she sees her father who was at death’s door in the future, is hale and hearty. Is there a reason she has traveled back in time? Is there something she can do to fix the future? When I read the synopsis of this book, I thought it’s going to be an interesting read about going back in time and trying to straighten things out. But what I got was someone traveling back and forth in time so many times, I fel The morning after her 40th birthday, Alice wakes up a 16 year old girl. She’s doubly shocked when she sees her father who was at death’s door in the future, is hale and hearty. Is there a reason she has traveled back in time? Is there something she can do to fix the future? When I read the synopsis of this book, I thought it’s going to be an interesting read about going back in time and trying to straighten things out. But what I got was someone traveling back and forth in time so many times, I felt woozy. Add the cliché about ‘what if I kill baby Hitler', repetitious descriptions and meaningless conversations and apparently it being normal for teenagers to use drugs and smoke weed and cigarettes, even at school. At times it felt like I'm watching the movie 13 Going on 30 but in reverse.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    I’m a sucker for time travel narratives so when you pair the trope with the superb quality of Emma Straub’s trademark charm and witty prose? Well, consider me a GONER. In Straub’s This Time Tomorrow (one of the most anticipated reads of 2022), you get the following in your grab bag of a great book: — An awesome father figure, Leonard, who has achieved fame for penning a commercially successful novel about time-traveling brothers that gets made into a popular TV series (this was such a delightful M I’m a sucker for time travel narratives so when you pair the trope with the superb quality of Emma Straub’s trademark charm and witty prose? Well, consider me a GONER. In Straub’s This Time Tomorrow (one of the most anticipated reads of 2022), you get the following in your grab bag of a great book: — An awesome father figure, Leonard, who has achieved fame for penning a commercially successful novel about time-traveling brothers that gets made into a popular TV series (this was such a delightful Matryoshka doll effect to the whole time traveling theme it made me smile as I read about it) — A protagonist, Alice, contemplating the state of her life on the eve of her 40th birthday (a plot element of particular interest to me, seeing as I received an ARC of this book from a bookselling bestie as a gift for my own 40th birthday) — Alice’s best friend, Sam, who is just one of the best book BFFs I’ve come across in recent memory — All the mid-90s references you could dream of (including a who’s who of celebrity faces from the era that grace the walls of 16-year-old Alice’s bedroom) — A setting (Pomander Walk) within a setting ( New York City) that will charm your socks off Everything else you need to know, I’ll leave it up to you to discover (because the best time-traveling novels are about the journey of discovery, no?) and recommend you have a few tissues on hand for an ending that’s as satisfying as it is bittersweet.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Scottsdale Public Library

    Alice is exactly in the same place she was when she was 16; same town, same job - give or take. Why has she not moved on and how did she get to this place in her life where nothing is as she dreamed it would be. As she sits by her father Leonard’s hospital bed wondering if he can hear her, she wonders what she could have done differently. On her 40th birthday she wakes up in her own bed, in the same house she grew up in, although she is a bit younger - she is 16. How did she get here? Can she ch Alice is exactly in the same place she was when she was 16; same town, same job - give or take. Why has she not moved on and how did she get to this place in her life where nothing is as she dreamed it would be. As she sits by her father Leonard’s hospital bed wondering if he can hear her, she wonders what she could have done differently. On her 40th birthday she wakes up in her own bed, in the same house she grew up in, although she is a bit younger - she is 16. How did she get here? Can she change anything? Will it make a difference? If you like time travel books you will like this one. However, this puts a spin on the classic time-travel/romance novel. This novel uncovers the typical and not so typical father/daughter relationship and all the beauty that it possesses. ~ Pamela B.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    A time displacement story (not traveling thru time but moving from one time to another, over and over again). A love song to all things New York City and a light time travel/science fiction type novel. The audio book was narrated by Marin Ireland, she does a fabulous job. It was an easy and engaging listen I would recommend. The story follows Alice, just about to turn 40 and living in Brooklyn trying to figure out where her life is going and how she got to the confusing, rather aimless place wher A time displacement story (not traveling thru time but moving from one time to another, over and over again). A love song to all things New York City and a light time travel/science fiction type novel. The audio book was narrated by Marin Ireland, she does a fabulous job. It was an easy and engaging listen I would recommend. The story follows Alice, just about to turn 40 and living in Brooklyn trying to figure out where her life is going and how she got to the confusing, rather aimless place where she currently spends her days. She has a job as an admission counselor at a posh Manhattan private grade school, the one she herself attended. When she is not working she is at the bedside of her dying father--who raised her alone after her mother deserted them both when Alice was six. Leo, up to his current illness, lead a rather unfocused life after having a huge hit of a time travel book that was turned into a TV series. This kept them living on the upper west side of Manhattan in relatively comfortable circumstances during Alice's school years. Now Leo is dying and Alice is at a loss, not knowing how she will handle life without her Dad. So this is not a romance and not the feel good slice of life I expected. It is a well written story about grief, what is important in life and what we miss along the way. It reminded me some of The Midnight Library with the idea if we could go back and do it over, life, choices and made different ones--would the life you get, be that perfect one--the one we had dreamed or planned on when young. Could we have done something different that would have changed everything? Is there still time to make that change? There were some holes in the story, a need for a slight suspension of belief (alway true in a time travel story) but in all I found it a very good listen that used the time travel trope to say much about life and death, especially dealing with the death of a parent. It was sad but also quite heartwarming. Can't imagine not rooting for Alice and the important truths about herself she learns along the way.

  27. 4 out of 5

    ʚϊɞ Shelley's ʚϊɞ Book Nook

    The book was about the love between a single parent and their only child. The book was pretty great and I zoomed through it. The plot is told in alternating time of both Alice's sixteenth and fortieth birthdays. It's not really about time travel so much as it is about a father/daughter relationship and I was so jealous of Alice and her relationship with her dad. The book tells a story of real life...with its ups and downs, compromises and the difficulties we all have, even if you're able to r The book was about the love between a single parent and their only child. The book was pretty great and I zoomed through it. The plot is told in alternating time of both Alice's sixteenth and fortieth birthdays. It's not really about time travel so much as it is about a father/daughter relationship and I was so jealous of Alice and her relationship with her dad. The book tells a story of real life...with its ups and downs, compromises and the difficulties we all have, even if you're able to revisit the past...but there is also a lot of happiness and joy. I was really pleased with the way the book ended too, it was what I had been willing Alice to do for the last few chapters. All in all a really great book and I will definitely be reading more by Emma Straub, she writes beautifully.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This book was excellent, similar in feel to The Midnight Library or The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue. I loved the time travel aspect and how it all ties together. The relationship between father & daughter too just give the reader more of an emotional impact than the "typical" time travel story. This book was excellent, similar in feel to The Midnight Library or The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue. I loved the time travel aspect and how it all ties together. The relationship between father & daughter too just give the reader more of an emotional impact than the "typical" time travel story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Basic B's Guide

    Facing the approaching loss of her father, Alice feels a bit lost. It common to wonder if we would go back and change anything in our past. What if?… Alice is given an opportunity to have some perspective on her life and her father after time-traveling back to her 16th birthday. This reminded me a bit of Faye, Faraway and reminds us of the precious moments in our lives. While this had potential to be a winner for me, it didn’t feel fresh or unique enough to stand out. It was nostalgic and sentiment Facing the approaching loss of her father, Alice feels a bit lost. It common to wonder if we would go back and change anything in our past. What if?… Alice is given an opportunity to have some perspective on her life and her father after time-traveling back to her 16th birthday. This reminded me a bit of Faye, Faraway and reminds us of the precious moments in our lives. While this had potential to be a winner for me, it didn’t feel fresh or unique enough to stand out. It was nostalgic and sentimental and I did enjoy Alice more so than Katy from One Italian Summer. I did enjoy this more than her previous book, All Adults Here but perhaps this author is not for me. 3.5 stars

  30. 5 out of 5

    Castille

    Between my love of time travel books, Emma Straub's continued praise, and the glowing reviews I read, I was expecting This Time Tomorrow to be a highlight of the year. It's well written, and I do love the femininity that comes through Straub's writing here... It's not just that Alice is a female protagonist, nor is there any overtly feminist messaging in the plot or characters, but there is an inherent feminine quality to the writing itself that really shines. This non-romantic, non-feminist, bu Between my love of time travel books, Emma Straub's continued praise, and the glowing reviews I read, I was expecting This Time Tomorrow to be a highlight of the year. It's well written, and I do love the femininity that comes through Straub's writing here... It's not just that Alice is a female protagonist, nor is there any overtly feminist messaging in the plot or characters, but there is an inherent feminine quality to the writing itself that really shines. This non-romantic, non-feminist, but nonetheless female point of view also sets it apart from so many other time travel books, which are generally either more heavily into the male, sci-fi side; or romances. This Time Tomorrow is unique in that it focuses primarily on the protagonist's relationship with her father. It's refreshing and new, without the perfect bow of a happy ending, which is likely what will land this book on many critics' lists in 2022... But for me, I struggled to connect on an emotional level, when there's not much in the way of romance and the father is absent or comatose for so much of the story. I adore that the changes Alice makes don't necessarily lead to things being overwhelmingly better in her life, that even with the opportunity to go back, she doesn't know what change(s) exactly will produce a better outcome, that even in the end she still has more questions than answers, but I needed a little more connection between either she and her father or she and a love interest.

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