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Bad Gays: A Homosexual History

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Too many popular histories seek to establish heroes, pioneers and martyrs but as Huw Lemmey and Ben Miller argue, the past is filled with queer people whose sexualities and dastardly deeds have been overlooked. We all remember Oscar Wilde, but who speaks for Bosie? What about those ‘bad gays’ whose unexemplary lives reveals more than we might expect? Part revisionist histor Too many popular histories seek to establish heroes, pioneers and martyrs but as Huw Lemmey and Ben Miller argue, the past is filled with queer people whose sexualities and dastardly deeds have been overlooked. We all remember Oscar Wilde, but who speaks for Bosie? What about those ‘bad gays’ whose unexemplary lives reveals more than we might expect? Part revisionist history, part historical biography and based on the hugely popular podcast series, Bad Gays subverts the notion of gay icons and queer heroes and asks what we can learn about LGBTQ history, sexuality and identity through its villains and baddies. From the Emperor Hadrian to notorious gangster Ronnie Kray, the authors excavate the buried history of queer lives. This includes fascist thugs, famous artists, austere puritans and debauched bon viveurs, imperialists, G-men and architects. Together these amazing life stories expand and challenge the mainstream assumptions of sexual identity. They show that homosexuality itself was an idea that emerged in the nineteenth century and that its interpretation has been central to major historical moments of conflict from the ruptures of Weimar Republic to red-baiting in Cold War America. Amusing, disturbing and fascinating, Bad Gays puts centre stage the queer villains and evil twinks in history.


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Too many popular histories seek to establish heroes, pioneers and martyrs but as Huw Lemmey and Ben Miller argue, the past is filled with queer people whose sexualities and dastardly deeds have been overlooked. We all remember Oscar Wilde, but who speaks for Bosie? What about those ‘bad gays’ whose unexemplary lives reveals more than we might expect? Part revisionist histor Too many popular histories seek to establish heroes, pioneers and martyrs but as Huw Lemmey and Ben Miller argue, the past is filled with queer people whose sexualities and dastardly deeds have been overlooked. We all remember Oscar Wilde, but who speaks for Bosie? What about those ‘bad gays’ whose unexemplary lives reveals more than we might expect? Part revisionist history, part historical biography and based on the hugely popular podcast series, Bad Gays subverts the notion of gay icons and queer heroes and asks what we can learn about LGBTQ history, sexuality and identity through its villains and baddies. From the Emperor Hadrian to notorious gangster Ronnie Kray, the authors excavate the buried history of queer lives. This includes fascist thugs, famous artists, austere puritans and debauched bon viveurs, imperialists, G-men and architects. Together these amazing life stories expand and challenge the mainstream assumptions of sexual identity. They show that homosexuality itself was an idea that emerged in the nineteenth century and that its interpretation has been central to major historical moments of conflict from the ruptures of Weimar Republic to red-baiting in Cold War America. Amusing, disturbing and fascinating, Bad Gays puts centre stage the queer villains and evil twinks in history.

30 review for Bad Gays: A Homosexual History

  1. 5 out of 5

    milo in the woods

    queer villains and evil twinks you say? i’m in 😏

  2. 5 out of 5

    Meike

    Currently binge-listening the podcast - I mean, episode 1 already references Klaus Theweleit, and the show goes on citing tons of sources, so it's super scholarly, but also evidently relevant and damn interesting. Currently binge-listening the podcast - I mean, episode 1 already references Klaus Theweleit, and the show goes on citing tons of sources, so it's super scholarly, but also evidently relevant and damn interesting.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emily Sarah

    Messy gays for days. Let’s start with the fact -if this had less graphic descriptions of sex- it would be so bloody perfect as material to be used and taught in schools. This book covers so much history, especially for Europeans and English folk, that our historians usually try to hide or barely mention beneath piles of text. Whilst I enjoyed the brief comedic moments, and queer humour we can all bask in, it was also surprisingly hard hitting. Though this book primarily focussed on the tales of Messy gays for days. Let’s start with the fact -if this had less graphic descriptions of sex- it would be so bloody perfect as material to be used and taught in schools. This book covers so much history, especially for Europeans and English folk, that our historians usually try to hide or barely mention beneath piles of text. Whilst I enjoyed the brief comedic moments, and queer humour we can all bask in, it was also surprisingly hard hitting. Though this book primarily focussed on the tales of white, queer males; it’s mostly from an aspect of looking at how their actions had severe consequences for others like the trans, BIPOC and other queer communities. Or how situations like the aids epidemic were catered to healing the rich white elite. Entries like those that discuss the English implemented, enslavement of people en masse in the Congo. History that is devoid of us in schools for fear of making us look barbaric that NEEDS to be taught. It was passages like this that had me incredibly thankful for this books existence. I will say it is fairly graphic, and incredibly shocking, and I am glad it’s being brought more so to light. It mentions the Pits and Perverts benefits, history I’m wildly intrigued by and aware of, but also more out there tales I had no idea of. There is also a lot of mentions how Jewish people were affected by the actions of certain queer men & how prevalent the antisemitism was within the queer community. Overall I was really taken aback by this in the best way, I was expecting something piled with humour and got something so entirely eye opening that really shines a light on how singular gay culture was in the light of acceptance. Whilst it also displayed struggles, as queer and trans people, it greatly demonstrated that being queer does not exempt you from harming others. Quite often in history it showed the willingness to throw other at risk groups under the bus for one’s acceptance or benefit. I would seriously recommend this. Thank you to verso for sending me a copy, this was a brilliant read. TW’s listed below, please skip if you want no spoilers/info. TW’s / CW’s I noted: Mentions of physical and mental abuse of children, SA, homophobia, colonisation, enslaved people, SA , torture and forced work of enslaved people, racism, antisemitism, holocaust mentions, corrective surgery and conversion therapy mentions of both gay and trans people, grooming mentions, mentions of hanging, beheading, scarifices, gore, amputation scenes, witchcraft, parental abuse, graphic sex, group sex mentions, bodily mutilation, starvation, Islamaphobia.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Carrol

    What can evil and complicated queer people from history teach us about shaping and understanding modern queer identity? Quite a lot it turns out! Meticulously researched, well written and fun to read it doesn't skimp on any of the salacious or rude bits either What can evil and complicated queer people from history teach us about shaping and understanding modern queer identity? Quite a lot it turns out! Meticulously researched, well written and fun to read it doesn't skimp on any of the salacious or rude bits either

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I'm not sure what definition of bad is being used here. Legally bad at the time? Then Casement counts. In service to an Empire? Then yes to Lawrence. But it is very confusing. There is only one lesbian, and only one person who is not a white European or American. And must of the entries are well known. But it is an entertaining read. I'm not sure what definition of bad is being used here. Legally bad at the time? Then Casement counts. In service to an Empire? Then yes to Lawrence. But it is very confusing. There is only one lesbian, and only one person who is not a white European or American. And must of the entries are well known. But it is an entertaining read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marcela (marcereads)

    [PR product: review copy sent by the publisher] In this book, the authors (and hosts of the Bad Gays podcast) present a brief biography of several historical figures who are considered from morally complex to plain evil. They aim to shed light on the fact that we usually remember the gay icons and heroes of LGBTQ+ history, but overlook the queer villains who may also have something to offer or reveal. It mainly focuses on white gay men, proving how they have also harmed other marginalised groups, [PR product: review copy sent by the publisher] In this book, the authors (and hosts of the Bad Gays podcast) present a brief biography of several historical figures who are considered from morally complex to plain evil. They aim to shed light on the fact that we usually remember the gay icons and heroes of LGBTQ+ history, but overlook the queer villains who may also have something to offer or reveal. It mainly focuses on white gay men, proving how they have also harmed other marginalised groups, often for their own benefit. As they write, “‘Gay is good,’ went the old slogan, but it’s no good at all on its own”. This book was fascinating, eye-opening and even funny. It sheds a light on how the concept of homosexuality has evolved through time and will keep evolving, inevitably influenced by history. I didn’t expect to be so into a book with so many historical facts, but this has proven to be a really easy read, since you can jump in and out, the chapters are short and the stories were captivating. It is definitely a book I will revisit, as I found it so informative and thought-provoking.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vitaly

    Finished this page-turner in a few sittings. Indeed, one of the best books I’ve read this year! 

At its core, the book arguably lays out profound limitations of the contemporary liberal understanding of queer identities. Lemmey and Miller are building a case for a more nuanced and (lol) heterodox way to grapple with male homosexuality throughout history which is 
filled with horny homosexual villains and evil twinks. Some arguments worked good for me, but some shortcomings were inevitable due t Finished this page-turner in a few sittings. Indeed, one of the best books I’ve read this year! 

At its core, the book arguably lays out profound limitations of the contemporary liberal understanding of queer identities. Lemmey and Miller are building a case for a more nuanced and (lol) heterodox way to grapple with male homosexuality throughout history which is 
filled with horny homosexual villains and evil twinks. Some arguments worked good for me, but some shortcomings were inevitable due to the scope of this very Western Europe-centred book. The most eye-opening part was the chapter on Margaret Mead and her legacy. I wasn't aware that colonial violence and problematic ethnographic records of colonised people had profoundly shaped the Western understanding of queer culture and emancipation in the 20th century. Queens, if you are going to read only one book during the pride month this year, make it this one.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Trigger warning: racism, genocide, Nazis, sexism, homophobia, domestic abuse, gang violence, murder, suicide I consider myself an amateur queer historian, and I love reading queer history. It has been a long time since I’ve read a book that is filled with such a broad range of queer history told so well that I have never heard before. The authors also give a very needed perspective on how cis white gay men will use their power to make themselves safe, often while oppressing others for the same re Trigger warning: racism, genocide, Nazis, sexism, homophobia, domestic abuse, gang violence, murder, suicide I consider myself an amateur queer historian, and I love reading queer history. It has been a long time since I’ve read a book that is filled with such a broad range of queer history told so well that I have never heard before. The authors also give a very needed perspective on how cis white gay men will use their power to make themselves safe, often while oppressing others for the same reasons, which is an aspect of our community that I think needs to be talked about more. My only complaint is that I wish I could give it more stars. I will definitely check out the podcast.

  9. 5 out of 5

    elin c. carlsson

    1.5 stars. The only way I can explain this book is if you imagine your teacher taking about an upcoming subject that you find really interesting and actually look forward to. Then when the time comes the teacher takes that really interesting subject and makes it the most boring thing ever. You know the kind of lesson where you have to focus on wiggling your toes so you don't fall asleep and then you leave the class remembering nothing and feeling disappointed. Yeah, that's how I feel right now. 1.5 stars. The only way I can explain this book is if you imagine your teacher taking about an upcoming subject that you find really interesting and actually look forward to. Then when the time comes the teacher takes that really interesting subject and makes it the most boring thing ever. You know the kind of lesson where you have to focus on wiggling your toes so you don't fall asleep and then you leave the class remembering nothing and feeling disappointed. Yeah, that's how I feel right now.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David St John

    A really good history book, addictive dives into the lives of lesser known, more conflicted queer men (and one woman), tracing the ways different aspects of gay politics is entangled within larger imperial politics. So fun to read and very nuanced on people who might otherwise have had horrible impact on the world.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer L. Hess

    Although I enjoyed this book, I was left wishing more than just one woman was profiled. I know that lesbians aren't, perhaps, the primary academic subject for the authors. But I'd think they'd encounter a few more "bad gay" women or trans people over the course of their research. And, paradoxically, the book suffers from a lack of diverse, queer representation. Although I enjoyed this book, I was left wishing more than just one woman was profiled. I know that lesbians aren't, perhaps, the primary academic subject for the authors. But I'd think they'd encounter a few more "bad gay" women or trans people over the course of their research. And, paradoxically, the book suffers from a lack of diverse, queer representation.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathrine

    just discovered the podcast. obsessed

  13. 4 out of 5

    Margot

    Well-researched, engaging and thought-provoking commentary on some of the "bad gays" of history. Lemmey and Miller thoughtfully examine the ties between homosexuality and (de-)colonization, fascism, misogyny and the masculine ideal in Western society. Tackled with plenty of nuance and pithy comments that provide some levity. I was particularly interested in the chapters on Weimar Berlin and Pim Fortuyn, the latter of which I somehow didn't even know was gay - which really just proves the book's Well-researched, engaging and thought-provoking commentary on some of the "bad gays" of history. Lemmey and Miller thoughtfully examine the ties between homosexuality and (de-)colonization, fascism, misogyny and the masculine ideal in Western society. Tackled with plenty of nuance and pithy comments that provide some levity. I was particularly interested in the chapters on Weimar Berlin and Pim Fortuyn, the latter of which I somehow didn't even know was gay - which really just proves the book's point that the LGBT+ community tends to be rather selective in which figures we claim as our own. Great premise, impeccably executed. I was very happy to learn that there's also a podcast, which I am hereby also heartily recommending for those who prefer that kind of thing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    1.5 stars rounded up. Where to begin? First, the good: some interesting profiles of gays who are notable that I had never heard of. That's about all the good I can say. For a book about "bad gays" (and there are no shortage of them around!) there sure were a lot of gays who are either ambiguously bad and only bad read in very modern light. The author basically suggests every queer in history who wasn't radically anti-capitalist, anti-imperial, and fully intersectional was "bad." I'm not sure I a 1.5 stars rounded up. Where to begin? First, the good: some interesting profiles of gays who are notable that I had never heard of. That's about all the good I can say. For a book about "bad gays" (and there are no shortage of them around!) there sure were a lot of gays who are either ambiguously bad and only bad read in very modern light. The author basically suggests every queer in history who wasn't radically anti-capitalist, anti-imperial, and fully intersectional was "bad." I'm not sure I agree. A final point: there are ways to write books that are simultaneously academic AND readily accessible. Throwing in a bunch of fancy words and then adding "you go girl!" isn't one I support.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Greg Florez

    “We do not get to choose who we are but we do get to choose how, and with whom, we dance: what queerness, what faggotry, what transness, what gender trouble and abolition will be for us and with us and to us. The past is still with us; the revolutions of the queer future beckon.” Brilliant dissection of what homosexuality is and how same sex attraction and sexuality has been viewed and seen by genuinely the some of the bad gays in history.

  16. 4 out of 5

    George Neville-Neil

    An interesting lay persons history book of sometimes complicated, and sometimes actually evil, queer folk. The authors view of "bad" is really that these people were queer but that their queerness did not make them archetypical heroes. It's interesting, mostly well written, and informative, with a well stated slant that at least for my part, I agree with. Will this matter to anyone not interested in the topic? Maybe. As a piece of history writing, though, it is complicated by the attempted use o An interesting lay persons history book of sometimes complicated, and sometimes actually evil, queer folk. The authors view of "bad" is really that these people were queer but that their queerness did not make them archetypical heroes. It's interesting, mostly well written, and informative, with a well stated slant that at least for my part, I agree with. Will this matter to anyone not interested in the topic? Maybe. As a piece of history writing, though, it is complicated by the attempted use of street vernacular in places, maybe to spice it up, or to make it less dull, but what these little interjections do is really distract from the history. History does not have to be dull, and it also doesn't need discussions of "fucking" to spice it up, as one could easily say the same thing in a way that's less jarring and fits with the accompanying paragraph. The question of "Did this person have sex with members of the same sex?" can easily be answered without jarring the reader. Lest one think this is prudishness, it's not, I'm fine with street language, when it's well integrated into the rest of the text. All this being said, if you have an interest in history, or queerness (or LGBTQAI*) or their intersection, you should probably read this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    Absolutely fascinating...and timely. As a history teacher, I find this an excellent work of scholarship and a useful study about labels and identity...and how things change in the strangest and most counter-intuitive of ways. I also appreciate the attempt to frame the subject with colonialist and racial viewpoints that don't feel like shouting at the rain or preachy declaiming from on high. That said, I would probably rate this closer to 4.5 stars, primarily due to an attempt to interject moment Absolutely fascinating...and timely. As a history teacher, I find this an excellent work of scholarship and a useful study about labels and identity...and how things change in the strangest and most counter-intuitive of ways. I also appreciate the attempt to frame the subject with colonialist and racial viewpoints that don't feel like shouting at the rain or preachy declaiming from on high. That said, I would probably rate this closer to 4.5 stars, primarily due to an attempt to interject moments of hipness/with-it-ness that feels incredibly jarring compared to the rest of the text. Luckily, it all but disappears by the second half.

  18. 5 out of 5

    theodore

    this was genuinely so interesting like i have been terrorizing everyone i know over the last week with chapter summaries of everything i learned in this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Casey Browne

    Queer villains and evil twinks, you say? I’m in 😏 TW’s / CW’s I noted: Mentions of physical and mental abuse of children, SA, homophobia, colonisation, enslaved people, SA, torture and forced work of enslaved people, racism, antisemitism, holocaust mentions, corrective surgery and conversion therapy mentions of both gay and trans people, grooming mentions, mentions of hanging, beheading, sacrifices, gore, amputation scenes, witchcraft, parental abuse, graphic sex, group sex mentions, bodily mutil Queer villains and evil twinks, you say? I’m in 😏 TW’s / CW’s I noted: Mentions of physical and mental abuse of children, SA, homophobia, colonisation, enslaved people, SA, torture and forced work of enslaved people, racism, antisemitism, holocaust mentions, corrective surgery and conversion therapy mentions of both gay and trans people, grooming mentions, mentions of hanging, beheading, sacrifices, gore, amputation scenes, witchcraft, parental abuse, graphic sex, group sex mentions, bodily mutilation, starvation, Islamaphobia. Currently binge-listening the podcast - I mean, episode 1 already references Klaus Theweleit, and the show goes on citing tons of sources. Hence, it's super scholarly but also evidently relevant and damn interesting. Let’s start with the fact -if this had less graphic descriptions of sex- it would be so bloody perfect as material to be used and taught in schools. This book covers so much history, especially for Europeans and English folk, that our historians usually try to hide or barely mention beneath piles of text. Whilst I enjoyed the brief comedic moments, and queer humour we can all bask in, it was also surprisingly hard-hitting. Though this book primarily focuses on the tales of white, queer males, it’s mainly from an aspect of looking at how their actions had severe consequences for others like the trans, BIPOC and other queer communities. Or how situations like the aids epidemic were catered to healing the wealthy white elite. Entries like those that discuss the English implemented enslavement of people en masse in the Congo. History that is devoid of us in schools for fear of making us look barbaric NEEDS to be taught. Passages like this made me incredibly thankful for this book's existence. I will say it is pretty graphic and shocking, and I am glad it’s being brought more to light. It also mentions the Pits and Perverts benefits, history I’m wildly intrigued by and aware of, but also more out there tales I had no idea of. There are also a lot of mentions of how Jewish people were affected by the actions of certain queer men & how prevalent the antisemitism was within the queer community. Overall I was really taken aback by this in the best way, I was expecting something piled with humour and got something so entirely eye-opening that really shines a light on how singular gay culture was in the light of acceptance. Whilst it also displayed struggles as queer and trans people, it extensively demonstrated that being queer does not exempt you from harming others. Quite often in history, it showed the willingness to throw other at-risk groups under the bus for one’s acceptance or benefit. I would seriously recommend this - it was a brilliant read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Steven Edmondson

    Bad Gays really clearly belongs to a category i’d define as ‘good verso’ (see also: revolting prostitutes). The older I get, the more theory that can’t really be mapped onto experiences or at least some kind of story start to feel like those little houses made out of lollypop sticks - they can range from pretty rickety to absolutely beautiful, constructed with a tangible, traceable artistry and dexterity - but either way you’re not going to be able to live in it. My exposure to a lot of the work Bad Gays really clearly belongs to a category i’d define as ‘good verso’ (see also: revolting prostitutes). The older I get, the more theory that can’t really be mapped onto experiences or at least some kind of story start to feel like those little houses made out of lollypop sticks - they can range from pretty rickety to absolutely beautiful, constructed with a tangible, traceable artistry and dexterity - but either way you’re not going to be able to live in it. My exposure to a lot of the works and contexts this book relates back to is limited - but it’s interesting to reflect it back to the last bit of ‘queer theory’ non-fic I read - as this book’s identification of the ‘chosen family’ concept as a part of the white gay political identity most worth saving was identified by Sarah Schulman - (who this book goes on to repeatedly refer to in its chapters on the AIDS crisis) as a site of critical political danger and a space in which theoretical conceptualisations of accountability tend to collapse. I don’t have a horse in that race - both arguments can be true at once I suppose. Also - was surprised that this book identifies Robert Graves as most known for ‘The White Goddess’ as surely I, Claudius and The Greek Myths are read more widely. A friend old me he had a poem go on viral on twitter or tiktok or whatever so he’s probably and permanently most famous for that now. Don’t know what poem it was but i hope ‘the suicide in the copse’ was in the mix! And I don’t really recognise the description of the book (per my local book shop’s recommendation stand) as raucous and gossipy - but I’ve not listened to the podcast and maybe if I had the tone of those conversations might be overlayed on the voice this book assumed for me. But imo this book is very careful - it qualifies its most speculative assertions or conclusions, and is studiously checks and rechecks the dynamics at play. Humour punctuates the text rather than dominates it. In its own way, and non-perjoraritively - it’s actually quite a polite book, just also playful. Anyway, I felt like a learnt a lot and enjoyed this a great deal.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christina Meyer

    Some chapters were stronger than others, and at first, I questioned some additions. But, as it went on, the trajectory of the book was clear, showing—albeit subtly—how whiteness, maleness, and nationalism developed around certain privileged queers to sever the liberatory possibilities of queerness from the status of individual bad gays (usually cis white men). I cannot express how much I loved this book from its wry humor (“bottom-shaming is as old as Western civilization”) to the strange fun fa Some chapters were stronger than others, and at first, I questioned some additions. But, as it went on, the trajectory of the book was clear, showing—albeit subtly—how whiteness, maleness, and nationalism developed around certain privileged queers to sever the liberatory possibilities of queerness from the status of individual bad gays (usually cis white men). I cannot express how much I loved this book from its wry humor (“bottom-shaming is as old as Western civilization”) to the strange fun facts (Frederick the Great’s pink palace and greyhounds). The introduction and conclusion, in particular, moved me greatly after seeing the genealogy of how we came to our current era, marked by a struggle between homonormativity/rainbow nationalism and a broad movement for queer and trans liberation. I really felt that I needed this book (among others) during this Pride month when queer and trans rights are under attack and bad gays (in particular, TERF-y lesbians) are undermining the solidarity of our communities. I do think that I would have missed out on a lot of this book if I hadn’t listened to the podcast and attended a book talk for it, but anyone who wants to read this book should just listen to the podcast!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Lee

    4.5 rounded up 🌟 "It is not always so easy, especially when subjects are marked by whiteness and other forms of power and privilege, to neatly separate the good from the bad, the right from the wrong. The answer, though, is not to simply stan our heroes and shush up about their flaws and faults; rather, it's to understand how people have made and been made by history, how and why they have failed, and how and why we might succeed." A brilliant, fascinating & insanely well researched book about so 4.5 rounded up 🌟 "It is not always so easy, especially when subjects are marked by whiteness and other forms of power and privilege, to neatly separate the good from the bad, the right from the wrong. The answer, though, is not to simply stan our heroes and shush up about their flaws and faults; rather, it's to understand how people have made and been made by history, how and why they have failed, and how and why we might succeed." A brilliant, fascinating & insanely well researched book about some of the bad gays of History. It did a really good job of highlighting each individual and giving mini biographies of each it then combined it with how homosexuality & queerness was treated during their life times. I love their podcast and this is a brilliant extension.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Fascinating! These stories are entertaining and often harrowing. There are a fair number of editing mistakes in this (first) edition, and many big, clunky sentences take away from the text’s readability. Nevertheless, the authors make their case convincingly that marginalisation does not necessarily engender solidarity, and that some of history’s most powerful and potentially transformational white gay men were happy to sacrifice broader social transformation to protect their own fame and fortun Fascinating! These stories are entertaining and often harrowing. There are a fair number of editing mistakes in this (first) edition, and many big, clunky sentences take away from the text’s readability. Nevertheless, the authors make their case convincingly that marginalisation does not necessarily engender solidarity, and that some of history’s most powerful and potentially transformational white gay men were happy to sacrifice broader social transformation to protect their own fame and fortune.

  24. 4 out of 5

    FWK

    how do you write a book about historical bad gays and open up with freaking Oscar Wilde only to portray him as an innocent martyr who suffered by the hand of "evil twink Bosie" (the author's words not mine) while glossing over the fact that Wilde himself was a huge pedophile? why do people love to present him as a figure of homosexual persecution and ignore the parts of his trial where he was accused of ASSAULTING MINORS? what about him going to Algeria to prey on young boys? not so glamorous fo how do you write a book about historical bad gays and open up with freaking Oscar Wilde only to portray him as an innocent martyr who suffered by the hand of "evil twink Bosie" (the author's words not mine) while glossing over the fact that Wilde himself was a huge pedophile? why do people love to present him as a figure of homosexual persecution and ignore the parts of his trial where he was accused of ASSAULTING MINORS? what about him going to Algeria to prey on young boys? not so glamorous for your book I suppose

  25. 4 out of 5

    Frankie

    4.5

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tucker

    Very happy about this analysis of villainy. Posted some learnings to Medium. Very happy about this analysis of villainy. Posted some learnings to Medium.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Camille

    Being aquired

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    1

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

  30. 5 out of 5

    lilîtu ἄθεος Ovita

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