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Brotherhood

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Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker must stem the tide of the raging Clone Wars and forge a new bond as Jedi Knights. The Clone Wars have begun. Battle lines are being drawn throughout the galaxy. With every world that joins the Separatists, the peace guarded by the Jedi Order is slipping through their fingers. After an explosion devastates Cato Neimoidia, the jewel of the Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker must stem the tide of the raging Clone Wars and forge a new bond as Jedi Knights. The Clone Wars have begun. Battle lines are being drawn throughout the galaxy. With every world that joins the Separatists, the peace guarded by the Jedi Order is slipping through their fingers. After an explosion devastates Cato Neimoidia, the jewel of the Trade Federation, the Republic is blamed and the fragile neutrality of the planet is threatened. The Jedi dispatch Obi-Wan Kenobi, one of the Order’s most gifted diplomatic minds, to investigate the crime and maintain the balance that has begun to dangerously shift. As Obi-Wan investigates with the help of a heroic Neimoidian guard, he finds himself working against the Separatists who hope to draw the planet into their conspiracy—and he senses the sinister hand of Asajj Ventress in the mists that cloak the planet. Amid the brewing chaos, Anakin Skywalker rises to the rank of Jedi Knight. Despite the mandate that Obi-Wan travel alone—and his former Master’s insistence that he listen this time—Anakin’s headstrong determination means nothing can stop him from crashing the party and bringing along a promising but conflicted youngling. Once a Padawan to Obi-Wan, Anakin now finds himself on equal—but uncertain—footing with the man who raised him. The lingering friction between them increases the danger for everyone around them. The two knights must learn a new way to work together—and they must learn quickly, to save Cato Neimoidia and its people from the fires of war. To overcome the threat they face, they must grow beyond Master and apprentice. They must stand together as brothers.


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Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker must stem the tide of the raging Clone Wars and forge a new bond as Jedi Knights. The Clone Wars have begun. Battle lines are being drawn throughout the galaxy. With every world that joins the Separatists, the peace guarded by the Jedi Order is slipping through their fingers. After an explosion devastates Cato Neimoidia, the jewel of the Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker must stem the tide of the raging Clone Wars and forge a new bond as Jedi Knights. The Clone Wars have begun. Battle lines are being drawn throughout the galaxy. With every world that joins the Separatists, the peace guarded by the Jedi Order is slipping through their fingers. After an explosion devastates Cato Neimoidia, the jewel of the Trade Federation, the Republic is blamed and the fragile neutrality of the planet is threatened. The Jedi dispatch Obi-Wan Kenobi, one of the Order’s most gifted diplomatic minds, to investigate the crime and maintain the balance that has begun to dangerously shift. As Obi-Wan investigates with the help of a heroic Neimoidian guard, he finds himself working against the Separatists who hope to draw the planet into their conspiracy—and he senses the sinister hand of Asajj Ventress in the mists that cloak the planet. Amid the brewing chaos, Anakin Skywalker rises to the rank of Jedi Knight. Despite the mandate that Obi-Wan travel alone—and his former Master’s insistence that he listen this time—Anakin’s headstrong determination means nothing can stop him from crashing the party and bringing along a promising but conflicted youngling. Once a Padawan to Obi-Wan, Anakin now finds himself on equal—but uncertain—footing with the man who raised him. The lingering friction between them increases the danger for everyone around them. The two knights must learn a new way to work together—and they must learn quickly, to save Cato Neimoidia and its people from the fires of war. To overcome the threat they face, they must grow beyond Master and apprentice. They must stand together as brothers.

30 review for Brotherhood

  1. 4 out of 5

    Veronica Alvarez

    3.75 If you’re wondering if you should read this book, I'd say give it a try because you'll finally know what happened on that business on Cato Neimoidia, and of course no need to question if you're a prequel fan era (movies, Anakin, Obi-Wan, Obikin, Padme, Clones, etc). THIS WILL CONTAIN SPOILERS AND IT IS GOING TO BE A VERY DETAILED REVIEW WITH SOME THINGS ABOUT THE NOVEL AND MY OPINIONS ABOUT IT: Characters: Anakin. * We know that he’s new to having a mechanical hand, and he has to get used to it, 3.75 If you’re wondering if you should read this book, I'd say give it a try because you'll finally know what happened on that business on Cato Neimoidia, and of course no need to question if you're a prequel fan era (movies, Anakin, Obi-Wan, Obikin, Padme, Clones, etc). THIS WILL CONTAIN SPOILERS AND IT IS GOING TO BE A VERY DETAILED REVIEW WITH SOME THINGS ABOUT THE NOVEL AND MY OPINIONS ABOUT IT: Characters: Anakin. * We know that he’s new to having a mechanical hand, and he has to get used to it, of course it’s not as good as his organic hand so this causes problems not only in his fights but also personally, he describes it as “unnatural” therefore covers it up with a glove. * When he's watching the new Padawans/Jedi Knights he absolutely doesn't want a Padawan because “that’s the worst thing in the galaxy”. * He already has a black cloak, so as soon as he’s a Jedi Knight we know he already has some troubles (Attachments, marriage, his mother’s death and the sand people). * We see more scenes about his mother, which only makes everything sadder including a story that she used to told him when they were cruel with him or failed in one of his inventions, this absolutely broke me, we get to see her as being a normal mother and trying her best, always giving him inspired words (I hope we see Watto’s dead because I hate him so much). Obi-Wan. * He lets his hair grow out a little bit, and I really need to see it, it touches his shoulders, but Anidala mocks him and Anakin tells him to cut it out, which he eventually does, so did he do it because he wanted to? Or did Anakin have something to do with that? * He goes to see Dex, and I can't be more happy, we have more content with them and that makes Obi happy, if he’s happy, I’m happy. Dex told him multiple times “he got this'' or “just think more about the situation” and even wanted to leave, but Obi always got a response, this makes me think even though he's a Master, he’s still new to this or still needs some kind of guidance. * He likes his coffee straight black (of course he does). * I have no idea how many times Mike (the author) mentioned he doesn't like flying but it was a statement at some point. Obikin: * Obi said to Anakin multiple times they are equals, when we all know they're exactly not, for me that's Obi telling him that he has some authority now, he can be a little free as he always has struggled with that, just trying to make things better for him. * Obi wants to have some time alone with him in case he has any questions about being a Knight as if Ani cares, to make sure he feels ready, he's always trying to make sure he's fine. * When we see Anakin showing feeling towards Padme (way too many times) Obi thinks he should talk to him, but of course they were in the middle of a war so there was not ime and I think that's one of the reason to what happens to them, Obi never really talks to him, either way because Ani is “under pressure” or “they’re in a middle of a war”, etc. And that’s one of the reasons why they were doomed. * He really lets Ani do whatever he wants, Obi saw how he changed holodisplays for a podrace and waited until he sat and have a moment of quiet with his food, I get it he wanted to give him some space perhaps, we even get a thought thinking about Ani’s personal desires to blend the rules, which is completely true, but Obi never calls him out. * He knows Ani has a soft spot for Padme and every time he mentions her, he “occupied his thoughts(and the fact that Anakin didn’t even try to shield it created a monumental problem, a vulnerability that endangered both Anakin and the Republic), nevertheless Obi doesn't do anything about this. * Ani mentions Qui-Gon and how he wishes for him to see them, Obi responds with "He would be proud of you, his faith would be rewarded”, and yes perhaps it did make me tear up a little bit. * Obi tells him he “ must meet with the younglings and pass on your wisdom” he laughs at this and asks “Okay, seriously, what’s the assignment?” Obi says he’s serious about this, Ani said “No. You can’t be” (Laugh so hard with this one) and not only physical skills but the wisdom he's gathered (what wisdom I wonder, of destroying ships perhaps) and Ani must respond to all of their questions, I can only imagine Anakin’s face. * The times when they mentioned perhaps being separated or taking a break from each other could be the best, or things can go smoothly, it hit a lot too close to home. * Obi must go to Cato without any kind of communications, of course Ani doesn't care, so he gave him a modified comlink, and how it was okay to keep it because “he wasn't on the council”, also giving him excuses for Obi to have that kind of device, laughed with this one, further example Obi just go with the flow and accepted. * Kenobi mentions “What would life be without constantly fighting with Anakin?” and I just… Anidala. * Padme never makes comments about Anakin’s hand, she treats it as his own, and tells him it won't ever bother her which of course makes Anakin feel better. * Padme doesn't like long hair, and doesn't want Anakin to get one? Which is weird, because Anakin with long hair is superior, I bet she changed her mind when she saw how good he looks. * Obi follows him and he sees an interaction with them, which of course no one can deny there's something going on between them, even he senses different Ani’s emotions (not good ones in the case of attachments) towards her. * They have a date and I absolutely loved every part of it, them trying to look normal (especially Anakin) only husband and wife, no politics. * Ani gives Padme his padawan braid, which I don't know how to feel, for him that's important and wanted to give her a piece of himself, if you look at that, that's really sweet, but having your boyfriend's hair just there, it is weird. * After she stood up and hurried him to go to their speeder that had a blanket and “the look in her eye gave all the context he needed” and asked him to go somewhere private on the lower levers, I wasn't expecting that, even for me it was plain what Padme wanted to do. * Obi and Ani are talking when Obi tell him he'd run into Padme, and he responded “If you run into her again, tell her I say hello”, I laughed so much because he also had an awkward moment, I just think about AOTC and how awkward he can be when he said that, very subtle Ani. * He tested the comlink with her, and I absolutely loved how in insignificant things (like this) we see them having a connection. * Ani tries to distract her with physical temptation (that reminded me of the finale episode from the first TCW season). * In a paragraph we know they had sex twice! First on Naboo after their wedding “they'd isolated themselves”, then the night before Obi’s departure when “they indulged themselves” and I just… finally just before the chapter ends he goes to meet up with her for “their final night hopefully only wife and husband” so did they do it AGAIN? Plot. * This is a couple of weeks after AOTC, and before the TCW movie, and it has everything we like from this era (characters and storylines). * I was expecting it to be on the middle of a battle, or straight into action, I’d say this book is perfect for that, but it didn't happen, it was actually really calm, focusing on that, we see more about younglings being Padawans, the latter being Knights now, which I enjoyed it, I like that kind of stuff, and just to see how the character have been doing since AOTC. * I absolutely loved the sun dragon story and the meaning behind it. It has way too much lines or moments that remind me of AOTC and ROTS here are a couple of them: “Conflict often comes from a failure to listen” (Padme ROTS) “Goodbye, my young friend. May the Force be with you” (Their last meeting as BFF) Writing. I think it’s good, the amount enough to visualize what’s happening, but in certain aspects it lacked *** It is OUT!!! AAHH!! Wait for my long (of course it's gonna be long) review This is my most anticipated book of 2022 I'm so excited!! 🥰 *** Update: OMG! We finally have the cover and I can't 😭😭 I'm already crying they're so beautiful

  2. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    An excellent book, that gets better as it goes along. I was a bit worried because the book started out a bit slow, and not very action packed, but as the further I read the mire the pace of the book made sense. This is book covers the transition period, after Atrack of the Clones, (and Queen's Hope), Anakin becoming a Jedi Knight from a Padawan. The change in rank also affects his relationship with Obi-Wan. Though technically Obi-Wan still outranks him, he us no longer has direct master. I also l An excellent book, that gets better as it goes along. I was a bit worried because the book started out a bit slow, and not very action packed, but as the further I read the mire the pace of the book made sense. This is book covers the transition period, after Atrack of the Clones, (and Queen's Hope), Anakin becoming a Jedi Knight from a Padawan. The change in rank also affects his relationship with Obi-Wan. Though technically Obi-Wan still outranks him, he us no longer has direct master. I also like Obi-Wan's insecurities about his worthiness of his new position. Another great touch in this book is the fact that Obi-Wan recognises a position Anakin is in as he could have made a similar choice in his life. The side/supporting characters in this book are also great. They really add to both Obi-Wan and Anakin's development. Also the plotting and grooming of Anakin by Palpatine. As well as the first meeting on another classic Clone Wars character. Another great think about this book gets points for is dealing with Anakin's physical injury from Dooku. This is a great transition book for growth and character development. In the acknowledgement page thanks other writers and the collaboration between them is obvious.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dexcell

    This was such a good book. I absolutely loved it. The plot was simple, a bombing on Cato Namodia, and Obi-Wan was sent to figure out who did it, and keep the peace. Meanwhile, we see Anakin's first time teaching a Jedi Youngling, a zabrak by the name of Mill Ailbeth. Which was an incredibly heartwarming part of the story. He's also very good at writing Anakin and Padme, which I know other authors struggle with. Also, a brief appearance by Cal Kestis and Jaro Tapal which was amazing. And a Dynamic This was such a good book. I absolutely loved it. The plot was simple, a bombing on Cato Namodia, and Obi-Wan was sent to figure out who did it, and keep the peace. Meanwhile, we see Anakin's first time teaching a Jedi Youngling, a zabrak by the name of Mill Ailbeth. Which was an incredibly heartwarming part of the story. He's also very good at writing Anakin and Padme, which I know other authors struggle with. Also, a brief appearance by Cal Kestis and Jaro Tapal which was amazing. And a Dynamic-class freighter, gotta love the KOTOR callback. It definitely reminded me strongly of the Revenge of the Sith novel throughout when it was focused on Anakin, which I absolutely loved as that's like my favorite SW book of all time. I saw the author took a lot of inspiration from it. Great book in all. I'd love to see Mike Chen write more in the prequel era. He nailed the characters.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Books with Brittany

    Always desperate for more Anakin content!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    UPDATE: DelRey, if you're reading this: send an ARC my way? Haha, jk, unless...? ____________ Watch me making this my whole personality 🤞✨ UPDATE: DelRey, if you're reading this: send an ARC my way? Haha, jk, unless...? ____________ Watch me making this my whole personality 🤞✨

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    4.0 Stars This was a fantastic Star Wars novel that fills out the relationship development that needed to happen between Anikan & Kenobi, Anikan & Padme, and Anakin & Palpatine. If you love the prequels, then you will almost certainly love this one. This is easily one of the best Stars Wars EU books since Disney took over.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Romie

    “Neutrality in the face of extremism only gives the extremists more space to breathe.” I remember being little and sitting in the very first row in a packed movie theatre to see Revenge of the Sith. already then, I was intrigued and wanted more, wanted to see how Anakin was promoted as a Jedi Knight, seeing the first days of his marriage to Padmé, and more than anything, seeing how his relationship with Obi-Wan evolved. Mike Chen truly gave me everything I wanted. he gave us a deep-dive into Anaki “Neutrality in the face of extremism only gives the extremists more space to breathe.” I remember being little and sitting in the very first row in a packed movie theatre to see Revenge of the Sith. already then, I was intrigued and wanted more, wanted to see how Anakin was promoted as a Jedi Knight, seeing the first days of his marriage to Padmé, and more than anything, seeing how his relationship with Obi-Wan evolved. Mike Chen truly gave me everything I wanted. he gave us a deep-dive into Anakin’s complicated mind and allowed us to understand him on another level. I loved seeing how similar Anakin and Obi-Wan are in a way, how they are both incredible teachers in their own ways and how deep their emotions run. I adore Mill, a youngling struggling with her relationship to the Force and the Jedi Order becoming more and more military-like. I would happily read an entire book just about her. she’s such an important character when it comes to Anakin understanding that he can impact the youth in such a profound way. one last thing I found deeply interesting is how this book can be read as a commentary on colonialism and its aftermaths, as well as a commentary on war. I’m raising my metaphorical glass of caf to the author, it was brilliant! (4.29)

  8. 4 out of 5

    elisa dalle føg lands

    Disappointing. Oh lord, I dislike this book on a fundamental level. There was some nice lore here and there and even if Chen's Obi-Wan seemed to be spot-on, at the beginning of the book, in the last chapters his povs made me want to tear my hair out. So much mischaracterization and weird takes on his relationship with Anakin, whose chapters are absolutely terrible and OOC 90% of the time (they're filled with so much useless Mace Windu negativity and bashing. We know: they're not besties. But they Disappointing. Oh lord, I dislike this book on a fundamental level. There was some nice lore here and there and even if Chen's Obi-Wan seemed to be spot-on, at the beginning of the book, in the last chapters his povs made me want to tear my hair out. So much mischaracterization and weird takes on his relationship with Anakin, whose chapters are absolutely terrible and OOC 90% of the time (they're filled with so much useless Mace Windu negativity and bashing. We know: they're not besties. But they respect one another, and most certainly do not hate each other, thank you very much). This books simply ignores everything we know about these characters and how they think/behave and makes them into something they are not (Qui-Gon is mentioned every few lines for reasons that are beyond me, to be honest). And while at first i blamed it onto the unreliable narrator-iness of it all, in the end it's just poor writing. Also, the plot was pianfully boring. I basically skimmed through hoping to find some juicy bits, except there weren't any. Mainly, I was disappointed because I wanted to read about Anakin and Obi-Wan, but they barely interact in the book and when they're apart, Obi-Wan is the only one constantly thinking about him, while Anakin is busy enjoying married life and obsessing over his perfect wife, making EVERYTHING ABOUT HER (i know, honeymoon period, wohooo, but so much Anidala content in a novel called Brotherhood? meh). I'm used to a much more emotional and nuanced potrayal, the one found in old legends novel, so this fell very flat for me and would not recommend reading it if you're a hardcore Anakin and Obi-wan duo fan. For more casual readers it can be nice I guess?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Koan

    "A Surprise to be sure, but a welcome one". Going into 2022, this was not the book on my radar. I had other books higher on my anticipated list. However, in the last few weeks, some of my friends got ARCs and they all loved the book. It's the highest they've rated a book from Lucasfilm this year. So I had to get my hands on this book on opening day, and boy was it worth it! I have to start by saying that this is the most Prequel book I've ever read. The tone of the book fits perfectly as a blend o "A Surprise to be sure, but a welcome one". Going into 2022, this was not the book on my radar. I had other books higher on my anticipated list. However, in the last few weeks, some of my friends got ARCs and they all loved the book. It's the highest they've rated a book from Lucasfilm this year. So I had to get my hands on this book on opening day, and boy was it worth it! I have to start by saying that this is the most Prequel book I've ever read. The tone of the book fits perfectly as a blend of Attack of the Clones and the Clone Wars. Mike Chen writes Anakin better than any other canon writer in the business. He might also have the best grasp of Kenobi that we've gotten in literary form. You can tell Mike Chen did his homework. Not only did he rewatch the prequel movies and Clone Wars, but there are also references to canon comics, Legends books (most obviously Matthew Stover's "Shatterpoint" and James Luceno's "Cloak of Deception"), and also background material. This is definitely a book that feels well researched. Because of that, it also feels like the most "Legends" book we've gotten in the canon. The worldbuilding for Cato Neimoidia was fantastic! I think Chen really captures the culture and the imagery of the locations and the characters. The Neimodians themselves are much more fleshed out in this than anything we've ever gotten. The characters of Ruug and Ketar were excellently written. I also think that Chen did an excellent job writing politics, which is hard in Star Wars now. Some authors desire to write direct parallels (like E.K. Johnston), while other authors work incredibly hard to veer as far away from politics as possible. Mike Chen tackles some deep topics, but none of it is "preachy" or blatant, and he actually takes all sides of the arguments at some point in the book. There was a reveal that I was disappointed that they revealed in the marketing, because it would have been AMAZING in the book. That reveal was so well done that I wish I hadn't known about it before going into the book. Mike Chen also really writes the Jedi well. Obviously Obi-Wan and Anakin are the central focus, but Mill Alibeth has an excellent character journey that, dare I say it, made me have the same feels that I did with Ahoska's journey, although this journey happened in only one book. This just reinforces in me the idea that we need much more Clone Wars material, specifically books in the canon. They need an ongoing series that weaves in and out of the events of the Clone Wars show, featuring original characters. Overall, I positively loved everything about this book. It gave lots of action, lots of character moments, lots of themes, and lots of worldbuilding. It was also one of the most fun adult books I've read in the canon in a while. I absolutely loved this book and highly recommend it to all Star Wars fans, especially prequel fans. This is the book we've been waiting for! 9.5 out of 10!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andi

    Mike Chen. Dude. If you wished on a magic lamp to write a really good Star Wars novel, I think you need to rethink that wish and and ask to write 'Star Wars novels'. Because this was a god damn good book. I mean, you wrote that short-story but lets not talk the book it came from because it was a bit of a mess. Lets talk about your first Star Wars novel and you fucking slayed. The title of this book was Brotherhood and a lot of people are going to be sad because this book featured Anakin and Obi W Mike Chen. Dude. If you wished on a magic lamp to write a really good Star Wars novel, I think you need to rethink that wish and and ask to write 'Star Wars novels'. Because this was a god damn good book. I mean, you wrote that short-story but lets not talk the book it came from because it was a bit of a mess. Lets talk about your first Star Wars novel and you fucking slayed. The title of this book was Brotherhood and a lot of people are going to be sad because this book featured Anakin and Obi Wan not having a mission together. BUT. A brotherhood can form based on previous factors and or realizations accumulating. Case being, just because they realized their Brotherhood at the end of the novel does not make this a shit book. I liked how this book flowed like an actual Star Wars movie. There was also references and or thoughts and feelings the characters had that came up appropriately and not shoe-horned in. The characters were also written in character. Some people took issue with Mace Windu and Anakin having issues with one another. George Lucas made it known that Mace was very skeptical and or 'we'll see what happens' with Anakin. I mean, he fucking blocked him from a seat on the Jedi Council. I felt their discord with one another was perfectly in character. Chapter 51 is my favorite chapter of the entire book, and I am going to gush about it behind a spoiler cut because I loved it so much (view spoiler)[ This is an Obi Wan pov chapter! After completing their mission, Obi Wan, Yoda, Anakin, and the youngling that Anakin had a bond with are together. Anakin had the youngling tell Yoda that she was highly sensitive and she can feel the feelings and thoughts of others. Because she believes that this power is a good thing, she chooses to not become a Jedi and would rather be a Jedi who heals and or uses their power to comfort. Anakin is shocked by this and Obi Wan is shocked by Anakin's feelings and or care for her. It is then Obi Wan starts to realize that based on actions through the course of the book, Anakin has become like Qui Gon. Obi Wan then begins to realize the effect that Qui Gon had on the both of them. That Qui Gon may have sensed that Anakin had something different that made him special, that he cared instead of trusted the faith of the Force. Anakin uses his caring to be a good person and this causes Obi Wan to have a crisis moment and starts wondering the 'what if' he cared about Satine and ran away with her, would it make his choices in life better, or if he cared instead of used the Force, would that make things better? Obi Wan realizes that though the girl does not want to be a Jedi and it may go against their teaching, Anakin wants the girl to have whatever she wants because he believes in her. And in that moment, Obi Wan realizes that Qui Gon must have seen that too. (The helping of others, Shimi telling saying that Anakin was meant to help them.) Qui Gon bonded Anakin and Obi Wan together so that he could understand that feelings can help, and can lead to good or bad. But feelings can not be avoided because in instances like this, because Anakin cared about this girl and allowed her to open up to him, she made a choice for her good and for the good of others. (hide spoiler)] It's rare that I felt so deeply for a book, but I really want Mike to write up another Anakin and Obi Wan book. He did such a fantastic job here that I can't wait to see their adventures in a written format play out as he did on this book. If you were to choose any of the books since the Disney merger, this should be one of them.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eva B.

    Can't wait to decide for myself if "that business on Cato Neimoidia" counts or not. Can't wait to decide for myself if "that business on Cato Neimoidia" counts or not.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sofia

    I was so excited to read this book when it was first announced and I was anticipating it even more when the author mentioned to have some inspiration from Matthew Stover. Well, that excitement went down as soon as I started reading this book. For starters, for a book that is literally called "brotherhood" there's no brotherhood to find at all. Mike Chen's view of Obi-Wan and Anakin's relationship is so biased that it felt like I was reading a reddit "analysis" from a dude bro. ~Spoilers~ Obi-Wa I was so excited to read this book when it was first announced and I was anticipating it even more when the author mentioned to have some inspiration from Matthew Stover. Well, that excitement went down as soon as I started reading this book. For starters, for a book that is literally called "brotherhood" there's no brotherhood to find at all. Mike Chen's view of Obi-Wan and Anakin's relationship is so biased that it felt like I was reading a reddit "analysis" from a dude bro. ~Spoilers~ Obi-Wan: In this book Obi-Wan is portrayed as someone who cares for Anakin (he thinks about him admittedly MANY times) but their friendship is one sided. The narrative tries to push the idea that Obi-Wan is selfish and we’re supposed to believe that after spending 10 years with Anakin he still doesn’t really know him or understand him. Everything comes back to the unfortunately damned fan favorite theory that Anakin wouldn't have turned the way he did if he had been trained by Qui-Gon because Qui-Gon wouldn't have cared about his attachments to shmi and padme and he would have allowed him to do whatever he wanted. I can write you an entire analysis about how ridiculous that theory even is but I'll save you from the trouble and simply say that it's very obvious that the author likes that theory - a lot. Anyways, according to brotherhood, Obi-Wan is selfish for not compromising his values to somehow "be there" for Anakin and Padme is the only person who truly supports him. The author has chosen to ignore the plenty of statements from George Lucas himself outright confirming Obi-Wan to be to be THE person providing guidance to Anakin and to have utter faith in him because it serves his narrative :) it honestly feels like Mike Chen doesn't know what to do with Obi-Wan; on the one hand he's too overbearing and strict, on the other had, he can't deal with Anakin and be there for him. (the author goes as far as to write that Obi-Wan DISLIKED him at the start and their fights were mostly spiteful...) Anakin: When it comes to Anakin, he's somehow written even worse than Obi-Wan. The Anakin from this book gives 0 fucks for Obi-Wan and constantly thinks of Qui-Gon and how it would be if he was alive. Anakin was a child when Qui-Gon died and he only knew the man for few DAYS. While I understand he would probably be grateful that he was given the opportunity to be a jedi and fought for him when the council didn't want him, Anakin didn't even KNOW Qui-Gon as a person. With the way his thoughts are written you'd think that he was Qui-Gon's padawan and not Obi-Wan. Furthermore, Anakin is shown to "care" for the republic as a system and he now believes in it as an institution and thinks it works just fine, completely forgotten is the dialogue he had about it with Padme in Episode 2 and he suddenly doesn't really care about the beings around him (Anakin has always been emotional person, caring for others.) My theory is that Mike Chen might be one of the people in Star wars fandom who view this trait to be 'feminine' so he makes sure to erase it completely (similarly how tcw tried to do) Anakin is also portrayed as very... stupid? I know he can be naive sometimes but he's never outright an idiot. In the scenes where he could shine are given to someone else because Anakin must not be emotional or anything less than the toxic masculinity recent sw writers are obsessed with. An example of this is a scene where he should immediately get mad about something that happens Coruscant (given his background) but he doesn’t because Padme is with him so Padme reacts, gets the credit because she's a woman, she's allowed to be emotional and she's of course the only human being who cares about others apparently. Once again, the friendship between him and Obi-Wan is simply not there. Aside from the fact that Anakin never even thinks of him, his mind is only obsessing over Padme and how important Qui-Gon was to him in his life (reminder, he KNEW HIM FOR ONLY FEW DAYS). When it comes to Obi-Wan there are only few mentions and they're hardly even positive ones. When his life is in danger Anakin doesnt even want to rescue him. Yes, the Anakin who would rather burn down the world than lose any of his loved ones, would rather not risk any time away from his wife. Very in character. Padme: After the miserable time I had of reading EK Johnson terrible portrayal of Padme Amidala I thought I could finally be given a break but oh no. Padme in this book is typically the mother Teresa of the galaxy (Heaven forbid if we have a female character being written as a realistic human being with feelings and flaws). The ongoing attribution of shit that goes to Padme is both insulting and perpetuates the ever-growing misogyny to her character. Any empathy, agency and care about people is stripped from Anakin and is given to Padmè because she's the only one who should deal with emotional stuff. Let's not forget that in the core, Padme Amidala is always 'beautiful, kind but sad'. Nothing more, nothing less. (this is sarcasm in case you're wondering) Other characters: There's is an uncomfortable hatred towards Mace Windu. Just a month ago there was a tweet going viral about how Mace was the reason Anakin fell and everyone laughed at the person who wrote it. So I naively thought that we were past the point of blaming the jedi - let alone Mace himself, for Anakin's choices. In this book the Mace bashing kept coming. The character is constalty being slandered to the point he's almost a villain? I've already seen some people going with the 'Anakin is an unreliable narrator in this book' road but oh baby, he's not. In another chapter Obi-Wan also has the same thoughts - that Mace hates Anakin when that literally never happened; they always had a mutual respect. My God, it's 2022 quit with racism and always giving the most shit to Mace. I don't even care too much about his character to be honest but the Jedi were not the evil guys in the story. How many years should pass to finally accept this? I don't know. Conclusion: This book doesn't offer another side to the deep rooted friendship Anakin and Obi-Wan had. It's simply filled with mischaracterization of ALL the characters and poor writing that resembles YA too much. Does that mean that nobody can enjoy it? No, of course not. The plot was boring but 13 year old me who only cared for anidala and knew next to nothing about the politics of star wars would have had a blast. If you're a super casual fan or wear shipping goggles while reading it, I think you might get some enjoyment.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bria

    Okay this one was real good. A delight and an absolute menace of a book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    vicky.

    OBI-WAN AND ANAKIN CANON NOVEL I'M CRYING -- yeah... obi-wan and anakin barely interact :( and their voices don't really sound like them. everything we are told about how close they are, how great they work as a team it's shown, not told. for obikin supremacy please read Stealth and Siege! OBI-WAN AND ANAKIN CANON NOVEL I'M CRYING -- yeah... obi-wan and anakin barely interact :( and their voices don't really sound like them. everything we are told about how close they are, how great they work as a team it's shown, not told. for obikin supremacy please read Stealth and Siege!

  15. 5 out of 5

    TheGeeksAttic

    Star Wars: Brotherhood was written by Mike Chen. The book was published by Del Rey (thank you for sending out a copy for review). This story takes place shortly after the events of the film, Attack of the Clones. SUMMARY: A major city on the planet Cato Namodia had been attacked! The neutral home-world of the Namodians falls victim to the most devastating tragedy the planet has ever seen. The Separatists have done an investigation and point their finger to Coruscant, blaming the Galactic Republic Star Wars: Brotherhood was written by Mike Chen. The book was published by Del Rey (thank you for sending out a copy for review). This story takes place shortly after the events of the film, Attack of the Clones. SUMMARY: A major city on the planet Cato Namodia had been attacked! The neutral home-world of the Namodians falls victim to the most devastating tragedy the planet has ever seen. The Separatists have done an investigation and point their finger to Coruscant, blaming the Galactic Republic for the terror attack. Kenobi, who is temporarily seated on the Jedi Council, comes up with a strategic plan to prevent the Chancellor from visiting Cato Namodia, believing that a heavy Republic presence could spark unwanted tension. Kenobi takes it upon himself to go to Cato Namodia, to represent the Republic and head up an investigation of his own. While newly raised Jedi Knight - Anakin Skywalker is tending to duties he never dreamed of doing, passing on Jedi knowledge to a group of younglings. Meanwhile, on Cato Namodia, Kenobi meets with the a representative of the Separatist Party, Assaj Ventress. The investigation takes a turn for the worst, when Kenobi is set up by darker forces, leading the Namodians to believe Kenobi and the Republic are indeed their enemy. Anakin must get to Cato Namodia somehow to rescue Kenobi. But, let it be made known, again, "that business on Cato Namodia... doesn't count." OVERALL THOUGHTS: This is going be a heavy statement, but this is the best Clone Wars content I've experienced. Brotherhood is a perfect extension of Attack of the Clones. The story is highly entertaining with characters we know and love, as well as introducing some new characters that I wish we could get more of. Author Mike Chen did an outstanding job with this book, dropping the perfect amount of humor, action, and politics. (Star Wars politics, not real world garbage.) I had a really great time with this novel. This book was actually a lot of fun to read! If you've been watching my content for a while, you'll know I'm not a fan of the Clone Wars era, this book did everything right. I didn't want to put it down. I loved the format of short chapters, jumping to other characters/events, it makes the story unfold neatly and also gave the feeling of moving through the book quickly. I felt like the story read a lot like an Expanded Universe novel more so than other canon books (it's a feeling that can't really be explained). There was one thing that I couldn't stand though, the use of the word "disinformation." I like that we get a new story with Anakin and Kenobi in their prime, and exploring how their relationship transitioned from master and apprentice to equals (mostly... Kenobi had a seat on the council) Brotherhood is an absolute fun-fest of a Star Wars story! An Instant classic! Does the book have some silly tacky moments that could have been withheld, yes, but these moments were fine. For example, I was conflicted with the way Dexter Jettster, the Dex from Dex's Dinner, is used in this story. This Besalisk is Kenobi's go to for information trading. It mentions that Obi-Wan and Dexter had a youthful misadventure in the Unknown Regions. Chen reveals that Dex had his old "black-market" days, explaining why Kenobi comes to him for insight on specific intel that wouldn't typically be available elsewhere. Chen did a great job writing Anakin. The young Jedi Knight was assigned to a group of younglings, to pass on what wisdom he might have to the next generation. Anakin was so out of his element, being both intimated and frustrated with the young crowd. These moments were both funny and sad (knowing that these younglings would be butchered by Vader in just a few years). This is also the best look at the relationship of Anakin and Padme yet. The author did a really good job bringing the two together, showing us how the couple was able to work the relationship around their "galactic duties" and keep it secret, out of the public eye. Do I recommend this book? Yes, I'm amazed at just how great this book is, especially being a Clone Wars era novel. Rating: This book receives an A+ / 5/5 stars!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Arezou

    With the prequel era as my favourite Star Wars era, and Obi-Wan Kenobi as my all-time favourite character, it’s been something of an interesting experience this year. Even with the evidence right in front of me, I have a hard time believing that this is actually happening. I’m actually getting new stories with my fave. This sentiment of “I can’t believe this is real” carried me right through Mike Chen’s Brotherhood, and I mean that in the best way possible. The story, which details “that business With the prequel era as my favourite Star Wars era, and Obi-Wan Kenobi as my all-time favourite character, it’s been something of an interesting experience this year. Even with the evidence right in front of me, I have a hard time believing that this is actually happening. I’m actually getting new stories with my fave. This sentiment of “I can’t believe this is real” carried me right through Mike Chen’s Brotherhood, and I mean that in the best way possible. The story, which details “that business on Cato Nemoidia” that Obi-Wan refers to in Revenge of the Sith is the story of Obi-Wan and the newly-knighted Anakin Skywalker right on the verge of becoming the men we see in The Clone Wars. The truth of the war, and their role in it, hasn’t fully settled on them yet, and they are faced with trying to solve new problems with old solutions. An explosion on Cato Nemoidia separates the dynamic duo of Kenobi and Skywalker, as the former is sent to investigate on behalf of the Republic and the latter is sent on a separate mission accompanied by a squad of Clone Troopers and a group of Jedi Initiates. When word covertly reaches Anakin that Obi-Wan’s mission has been compromised, and with no other way to alert help, he charges in to save his former master, accompanied by empathetic initiate Mill. If ever there was a prequel-era book that fully grasps who these two men are to each other and to those around them, it’s Brotherhood. Their dynamic felt so organic, and so familiar. Chen is a writer who absolutely understands Anakin and Obi-Wan. He manages to balance them out, without ever coming down on the side of which one is the more “correct” Jedi. In his hands, there is no judgement call to make. Both are doing the best they can, and doing what they think is right within the parameters the galaxy has set for them. Though the narration is, in Chen’s own words, a tight third person, it never once feels limited in scope. The back and forth between Obi-Wan and Anakin’s points of view is occasionally peppered with narration from other characters — Mill, Nemoidian guard Ruug, and even badass Sith apprentice Asajj Ventress herself — to fill in the narrative gaps ensuring that the reader always has the fullest picture of what is going on. Though large interconnected stories can sometimes suffer for trying to connect too much to their one little piece of the narrative — or in some cases, not connect enough — Chen balances this extraordinarily well. Where this happens specifically is in bridging the gap between Obi-Wan and Anakin’s live action appearances and their animated ones. Though we as viewers understand the connection simply by virtue of their being the same characters, Chen takes the time to weave the strands of the two portrayals together, showing that one version of them simply does not exist without the other. As a final note, an aspect of the novel that truly resonated with me was the depiction of romance. Both new love and lost love were given their due here, and were made unambiguous on the page. Though Obi-Wan and Satine Kryze, Duchess of Mandalore never actually speak or interact, it is made obvious enough that the romance they shared in their youth has stayed with Obi-Wan still, and isn’t brushed aside in a quippy one-liner, but shown to be the integral part of his character that such early experiences tend to be. And then there is Anakin and Padmé, the newly-married forbidden love story that launched an entire saga. Though they do not spend all that much time together, what scenes we do get of them fit so naturally with where we last saw them in Attack of the Clones. Their passion for one another is never in doubt. Their affections, their hopes and dreams for the future, are not glossed over, but given the full weight of the romance it is, while letting the undercurrent on impending tragedy seem like the tragedy it is. It’s a common refrain I hear these days, that we are in a prequels renaissance. If this is a sign of things to come, if the stories my generation grew up with are being treated with such respect and seriousness, while keeping the humour and heart that made us love them in the first place, then I would say the prequel kids like myself are poised to come out on top. Star Wars: Brotherhood is out May 10, 2022. Special thanks to Del Rey for an advance copy for review purposes.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I was excited about Mike Chen’s Brotherhood from the moment it was announced. When I was a kid, Attack of the Clones and Star Wars: The Clone Wars were playing on a constant loop in my house, so a book that revisits Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi during this time in their lives is pretty much my dream scenario (I was also dying to know all about “that business on Cato Neimoidia”). Brotherhood certainly did not disappoint. Brotherhood serves as the perfect transition between the master and ap I was excited about Mike Chen’s Brotherhood from the moment it was announced. When I was a kid, Attack of the Clones and Star Wars: The Clone Wars were playing on a constant loop in my house, so a book that revisits Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi during this time in their lives is pretty much my dream scenario (I was also dying to know all about “that business on Cato Neimoidia”). Brotherhood certainly did not disappoint. Brotherhood serves as the perfect transition between the master and apprentice we see in AOTC and the brothers in arms we see in TCW. Obi-Wan is working on accepting that he is no longer responsible for Anakin. Anakin is adjusting to his newfound freedom as a Jedi Knight. Although Obi-Wan still has a lot of concern for his former Padawan, he truly wants to believe that Anakin can function independently. Not only is this a period of change for Obi-Wan and Anakin, but it is also a period of change for the entire Jedi Order. They must grapple with being generals commanding the war effort rather than only keeping the peace. Not every Jedi is ready to rush into conflict, lightsabers blazing, and this book offers characters the space to analyze their place in the war. I especially loved the callbacks (or maybe if you consider the timeline it is technically foreshadowing) to Matthew Stover’s 2005 novelization of Revenge of the Sith. I’ve called Stover’s novel a love letter to the prequel movies and I could see the exact same care and dedication that Chen put into the pages of Brotherhood. It is beautiful and it is heartbreaking and it will stick with you even after you close the book. (also thank you to PRH and Del Rey for sending me a copy of the book!)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I really wanted to love Brotherhood but it just didn't click for me on an emotional level. Anakin and Obi-Wan were excellently written at the individual level. I found myself wanting more out of their relationship with each other. (view spoiler)[They're not on page together for much of the story, which made it hard to buy the new warmth they have toward each other by the end of the story. (hide spoiler)] That said, Ventress was amazing as always. She added a lot to Brotherhood and was a great fo I really wanted to love Brotherhood but it just didn't click for me on an emotional level. Anakin and Obi-Wan were excellently written at the individual level. I found myself wanting more out of their relationship with each other. (view spoiler)[They're not on page together for much of the story, which made it hard to buy the new warmth they have toward each other by the end of the story. (hide spoiler)] That said, Ventress was amazing as always. She added a lot to Brotherhood and was a great foil for Obi-Wan.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Coen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Just now finished it! I enjoyed that thoroughly. I love the way it echoed the ROTS novelization. Hoe it pretty much ended where the Clone Wars tv show begins. How it takes from the Genndy Clone Wars show. How it -finally- gives is more Dex. And oh my God, Satine, even though only through mentions and a HoloNet newscast. Also, I'm so happy we finally get more answers about Obi-Wan knowing about Ani's and Padmé's feelings for eachother, and how he plans on handling it. Great book! Well worth it. Just now finished it! I enjoyed that thoroughly. I love the way it echoed the ROTS novelization. Hoe it pretty much ended where the Clone Wars tv show begins. How it takes from the Genndy Clone Wars show. How it -finally- gives is more Dex. And oh my God, Satine, even though only through mentions and a HoloNet newscast. Also, I'm so happy we finally get more answers about Obi-Wan knowing about Ani's and Padmé's feelings for eachother, and how he plans on handling it. Great book! Well worth it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cho

    just the right amount of emotional damage to prepare us for what we will all be going through at the end of this month. (side note: We are three years away from Order 66, I don't think I want to be introduced to any more Jedi younglings, thank you very much. I expect a full, decades-long biography of the long and happy lives of Mill Alibeth and anybody else who even just briefly appeared in this novel on my desk by Monday.) just the right amount of emotional damage to prepare us for what we will all be going through at the end of this month. (side note: We are three years away from Order 66, I don't think I want to be introduced to any more Jedi younglings, thank you very much. I expect a full, decades-long biography of the long and happy lives of Mill Alibeth and anybody else who even just briefly appeared in this novel on my desk by Monday.)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tanja Glavnik

    I honestly can't quite decide on the review for this one. On the one hand, I enjoyed the POVs and most of the characterization, but on the other I had a few quibbles that I'm definitely on the fence about. I like Obi-Wan, but that's probably because this generally felt like the Prequel Era Obi-Wan. I was okay with Anakin, except I'm not entirely sure that his portrayal was as faithful, but this stems from a much larger issue in this book, which is that the author seems to be under some sort of misa I honestly can't quite decide on the review for this one. On the one hand, I enjoyed the POVs and most of the characterization, but on the other I had a few quibbles that I'm definitely on the fence about. I like Obi-Wan, but that's probably because this generally felt like the Prequel Era Obi-Wan. I was okay with Anakin, except I'm not entirely sure that his portrayal was as faithful, but this stems from a much larger issue in this book, which is that the author seems to be under some sort of misapprehension that Obi-Wan and Anakin spent the ten years or so together constantly at logger-heads with no affection between them. It somehow paints Anakin as this solo island in the Jedi order (which, admittedly, he was definitely one towards the end) without ever reaching for Obi-Wan, which ... feels entirely wrong to me. Even watching Attack of the Clones alone, you can see that, beyond their back-and-forth and banter, there's a warmth and worry and connection between the two that isn't built solely on Anakin snarking back at Obi-Wan, trying to one-up him, or Obi-Wan trying to constantly reprimand him. You can see that Obi-Wan worries, that he cares enough to gently guide him, but also to be stern when need be. You can also see that Anakin looks up to Obi-Wan, that he respects him even if he might disagree with him, and that he often calls him "grumpy" in obvious affection which is meant to convey that it really doesn't bother Anakin but it's just communication. I feel this is where the author missed his mark - he portrays the bond that is probably the most important and strongest in the galaxy with way too much barbed wire wrapped around it that never existed except where book authors suddenly invented it. Were the two often times arguing? Yes. It must have been exhausting and exasperating being Obi-Wan sometimes, dealing with teenage Anakin. At the same time though, you CAN see he isn't just doing it because he promised Qui-Gon, but because he legitimately cares for Anakin as a person, within the tenements of the Jedi Order. Also, Qui-Gon. For a man who literally only went through Anakin's life for a handful of days, he sure does spend a whole lot of time parked in the guy's mind. WAY more than Obi-Wan, which makes no sense at all, because - and we quote Lucas here - OBI-WAN is the closest thing Anakin's ever had to a father. Qui-Gon may have been the means of getting them together, but it is OBI-WAN who does the heavy lifting. It's a disservice to the character AND the Kenobi/Skywalker bond by implying otherwise, and by enlarging Qui-Gon's role so much. Yes, things MAY have been different with Qui-Gon being Anakin's Master, but it did not happen. What ifs are just that, what ifs. The reality will always be Obi-Wan. And what's with the Mace Windu hate? I get that he was against training Anakin - so was Yoda - but the two never gave me hatred vibes in anything I watched in the visual medium. This feels like another sort of author-inserted situation that has little to nothing to do with the characterization we get in the movies and Clone Wars. Finally, I'd like to touch on the character of Mill who was made specifically for this book - and that's fine. I actually enjoyed seeing Anakin with a youngling and realizing that, welp, handling a full group of them is hard. The thing I'm bothered with is this: Mill supposedly feels emotions, right, at a very strong level, pain, suffering, that stuff. But don't Jedi feel them as a whole? Or am I missing something? Literally, in Attack of the Clones, Obi-Wan tells Anakin that his thoughts betray him when they go up to Padmé's apartment, meaning he can sense the waves of emotion coming off his Padawan, and also later can sense Padmé's happiness, so HER emotions as well. So you're telling me that two seasoned Jedi couldn't handle this without a kid along to add to the danger bit of the book without actually adding anything meaningful, other than reminding us, once again, that for some reason - despite the fact George Lucas has said and stated before that it's OBI-WAN who is Anakin's go-to for everything, which makes the secret of Padmé and their marriage that much bigger - the author decided Anakin hasn't told Obi-Wan things and has been keeping secrets. It's this that I have a problem with, and this that eventually knocks down my star rating from what COULD have been a really good one. But the book is much too focused on all the wrong and sometimes even made-up things, rather than the actual reality, which is that Skywalker and Kenobi work in this sprawling galactic tale precisely because they have a bond and attachment that gets irreparably broken when Anakin chooses the Dark Side. Yes, Obi-Wan failed Anakin, but he didn't fail him in all the ways the author tried to explain in this: Obi-Wan failed his former Padawan and friend and brother because he didn't acknowledge (or want to acknowledge out loud) that his emotional attachment was so incredibly strong it incinerated everything else around them. It's the Padmé secret and the marriage and the pregnancy which broke Pandora's box wide open, not some childhood stories from his mother that Anakin somehow didn't want to share with his one close link in an otherwise unknown world. It really isn't as complicated as authors are trying to make it - it didn't build up over the years with these "little things". It was the one secret, the one secret that shouldn't have been secret, and the only thing Anakin never told Obi-Wan that tolled the death bell. And I'm actually miffed that someone would imagine a character like Padmé Amidala mocking anyone. The word literally means 'tease or laugh at in a scornful or contemptuous manner'. Excuse me, have you met Senator Amidala? Or Padmé, at all? Would she ever, in her right mind, be scornful or contemptuous of a person who saved her life not just once, but two or three times in a row? Even Anakin going that route is a stretch, because it makes him downright mean and disrespectful to his Master - which he never was. He pushed boundaries, yes, but he RESPECTED OBI-WAN, always. He respected Mace Windu, always. He respected Yoda, always. There were definite creative choices made in this novel that significantly lower the rating I would have otherwise given it, and I disagree with the lot of them. Sadly, because it COULD have been great. As it is, I liked it, but it was, overall, just ok.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Unseen Library

    Rating of 4.25. It is dark days for the galaxy as the destructive Clone Wars between the Republic and the Separatists have just begun. As the galaxy splits down the middle and more and more systems join the war on opposing sides, the Jedi begin to take a new role as soldiers, the fragile peace they have long guarded slowly disappearing. When an explosion devastates the neutral planet of Cato Neimoidia, home of the Trade Federation, the Republic is blamed by Count Dooku and the Separatists. Despera Rating of 4.25. It is dark days for the galaxy as the destructive Clone Wars between the Republic and the Separatists have just begun. As the galaxy splits down the middle and more and more systems join the war on opposing sides, the Jedi begin to take a new role as soldiers, the fragile peace they have long guarded slowly disappearing. When an explosion devastates the neutral planet of Cato Neimoidia, home of the Trade Federation, the Republic is blamed by Count Dooku and the Separatists. Desperate to keep Cato Neimoidia from joining the Separatists, the Jedi dispatch Obi-Wan Kenobi to the planet to investigate the explosion and attempt to maintain the peace. However, Obi-Wan has his work cut out from him as he encounters a hostile planet, blinded by mourning and a long history of prejudice from the Republic. Worse, not everyone wants him to solve the crime, as Count Dooku’s sinister agent, Asajj Ventress, is also on Cato Neimoidia, attempting to turn the populace against the Republic. At the same time, Anakin Skywalker has been promoted to the rank of Jedi Knight and works to balance his new responsibilities with his secret marriage. Despite orders not to intervene on Cato Neimoidia, when Obi-Wan finds himself in himself trouble, Anakin races to help him, dragging along a promising Jedi youngling. However, with their relationship forever changed by Anakin’s promotion, can the two Jedi brothers still work together as they attempt to grow beyond master and apprentice? This was a fantastic new addition to the Star Wars canon that fans of the franchise are really going to enjoy. Containing an interesting character-driven story, Brotherhood was a great first outing from Chen, who successfully explored some of the best characters and settings of the Star Wars universe. To see the full review, click on the link below: https://unseenlibrary.com/2022/06/22/... For other exciting reviews and content, check out my blog at: https://unseenlibrary.com/

  23. 5 out of 5

    TheFreckledWriter

    Best Star Wars book I’ve ever read. I could scream about this story and how brilliant the author is for hours. I will spare you all my fangirling and just say that it was AMAZING!!! Brotherhood is so emotionally deep and it perfectly sets up the Clone Wars show while still keeping in mind the stories that came before and the stories that are after. SO FREAKING GOOD. The ending made me cry - I love my boys 😭❤️

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Larson

    Full review coming soon at Star Wars News Net. Wish I could say more. Brilliant, beautiful story I’ve been waiting for. Mike Chen is a gift.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ash

    I just finished this about 2min ago, and I don’t have the words to describe all my emotions. I love that this book was all about that time in Cato Nemodia that doesn’t count 😘 Also the way Mike Chen included references to other works was outstanding 🤩 The sun dragon, the quotes, Padme things, etc… I’m ready to read this again already lol I love this book so much

  26. 4 out of 5

    Zahira⚡️

    4,5 stars

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Anakin and Obi-Wan, Obi-Wan and Anakin... Legends in Action. While Matthew Stover's extraordinary novelization of Revenge of the Sith covers the very end of this iconic Jedi partnership this novel covers its beginnings as Kenobi and Skywalker both come to grips with their new roles in the shocking new reality of a galaxy at war. These characterizations were very well handled, as was a side story reminiscent of (view spoiler)[padawan-turned-terrorist for peace Barriss Offee as seen in THE CLONE WARS Anakin and Obi-Wan, Obi-Wan and Anakin... Legends in Action. While Matthew Stover's extraordinary novelization of Revenge of the Sith covers the very end of this iconic Jedi partnership this novel covers its beginnings as Kenobi and Skywalker both come to grips with their new roles in the shocking new reality of a galaxy at war. These characterizations were very well handled, as was a side story reminiscent of (view spoiler)[padawan-turned-terrorist for peace Barriss Offee as seen in THE CLONE WARS (hide spoiler)] . Less enthralling were POV chapters detailing the perspective of an elite Neimoidian guard and some very sparingly used chapters from the main antagonist. For my tastes five different POVs in a relatively slim book was probably one too many, but opinions will naturally vary on this. Since The Phantom Menace came out this has been the general image of Neimoidians. As a final thought, I enjoyed learning more about Neimoidian society and culture and can appreciate how the author sought to bring nuance and humanity to an alien race whose portrayal in Star Wars has been problematic from the get-go.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anna Kay

    Personally, I really liked this one. I enjoyed Anakin trying to find his way separately from Obi-Wan now that he's a knight. I enjoyed Obi-Wan questioning his convictions, his understanding of the Jedi Code itself and his interpretation of Qui-Gon's intentions for Anakin's training. I was worried about the portrayal of the original character, a Jedi youngling, but Mike Chen definitely understood how to make her an important part of the plot without making her the only focus or dropping the ball Personally, I really liked this one. I enjoyed Anakin trying to find his way separately from Obi-Wan now that he's a knight. I enjoyed Obi-Wan questioning his convictions, his understanding of the Jedi Code itself and his interpretation of Qui-Gon's intentions for Anakin's training. I was worried about the portrayal of the original character, a Jedi youngling, but Mike Chen definitely understood how to make her an important part of the plot without making her the only focus or dropping the ball on Anakin/Obi-Wan. 'Brotherhood' is in reference to the two of them re-defining their relationship now that Obi-Wan isn't the dominant force and authority in Anakin's life, he is no longer a child. How do they fit together now that Anakin is on more even footing and has authority over himself? The multiple perspectives were great and Chen did a great job of making Anakin more sympathetic instead of just a one-note cardboard cutout. For those complaining of too much Padme, she was barely in the book. There were a couple scenes of her and Anakin, and yes he thinks about her quite a bit. But it never felt like too much and Chen actually made me like their relationship, which usually I don't. I enjoyed seeing Asajj Ventress and as someone who hasn't watched the Clone Wars animated series yet it gives me more motivation knowing she's a main antagonist in it. I think that the audience for this one is clear. Mainly people that enjoy the Prequel trilogy, who wish for more stories in that time period with the characters actually being fleshed out and given adventures worthy of canon. People in other reviews are complaining of not enough action, probably forgetting just how politically driven and intellectual the prequels are in terms of storytelling (not counting the godawful dialogue). If you don't like the prequels, this won't change your mind. But it makes me excited for future Star Wars novels and I would love it if Disney let Chen write more in the universe, especially if it was in the timeframe of the prequels. The narrator for the audio was amazing, doing great voice acting and he was spot on for Anakin, Obi-Wan and Yoda especially. I highly recommend this book and the audio version.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kimmy

    Oh this book WAS AMAZING. Which makes me so happy because after the way I was disappointed by the Padmé and Ahsoka novels, I was so worried I would not enjoy this one. But I'm pleased to report that the issues I had with those ones (mediocre writing, bad plot pacing, characters being inconsistent to their movie versions) are not the case with this book. I saw on Twitter that Mike Chen drew a lot of inspiration for this book from the Revenge of the Sith novelization, and that is very evident throu Oh this book WAS AMAZING. Which makes me so happy because after the way I was disappointed by the Padmé and Ahsoka novels, I was so worried I would not enjoy this one. But I'm pleased to report that the issues I had with those ones (mediocre writing, bad plot pacing, characters being inconsistent to their movie versions) are not the case with this book. I saw on Twitter that Mike Chen drew a lot of inspiration for this book from the Revenge of the Sith novelization, and that is very evident throughout this story. Given that ROTS is one of my favorite books I've read in a while, this brought me so much joy. The writing style is unique, but very reminiscent of ROTS with a lot of gorgeous and impactful passages that stuck with me and made me emotional. Chen does an incredible job of writing these characters and bridging the gap between the ending of Attack of the Clones and the beginning of The Clone Wars series. Anakin and Obi-Wan have great character arcs both individually and together. Padmé also appears quite a few times in this book, and her scenes were a delight to read. Chen does a great job of capturing Anidala's relationship on the page. I love these characters so much and I'm glad I found a new book that did them justice. I hope to see Mike Chen do more Star Wars books like this in the future.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tim Joseph

    Good, not great. I enjoyed a lot of what Chen brought to both Obi and Ani's charachter arc here! While he did a good job of peppering in cameos and bridging Clone Wars to Movie arcs as well, there was some wiggle room that he could have done more. In all, we see great characteristics developing in Anakin, and Obi-Wan really starting to hit his Master swagger, which I loved! Good, not great. I enjoyed a lot of what Chen brought to both Obi and Ani's charachter arc here! While he did a good job of peppering in cameos and bridging Clone Wars to Movie arcs as well, there was some wiggle room that he could have done more. In all, we see great characteristics developing in Anakin, and Obi-Wan really starting to hit his Master swagger, which I loved!

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