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Milo and Marcos at the End of the World

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When Marcos moves to town, Milo is forced to acknowledge the feelings he's kept hidden, especially from his religious parents. But as natural disasters begin to befall them the closer they become, Milo and Marcos soon begin to wonder if the universe itself is plotting against them in this young adult debut by playwright and creator of The Two Princes podcast, Kevin Christo When Marcos moves to town, Milo is forced to acknowledge the feelings he's kept hidden, especially from his religious parents. But as natural disasters begin to befall them the closer they become, Milo and Marcos soon begin to wonder if the universe itself is plotting against them in this young adult debut by playwright and creator of The Two Princes podcast, Kevin Christopher Snipes. Milo Connolly has managed to survive the first three years of high school without any major disasters, so by his calculations, he’s well past due for some sort of Epic Teenage Catastrophe. Even so, all he wants his senior year is to keep his head down and fly under the radar like the quiet, well-behaved, churchgoing boy that everyone thinks he is. Everything is going exactly as planned until the dreamy and charismatic Marcos Price saunters back into his life after a three-year absence and turns his world upside-down. Suddenly Milo is forced to confront the long-buried feelings that he’s kept hidden not only from himself but also from his deeply religious parents and community. To make matters worse, strange things have been happening around his sleepy Florida town ever since Marcos’s return—sinkholes, blackouts, hailstorms. Mother Nature seems out of control, and the closer Milo and Marcos get, the more disasters seem to befall them. In fact, as more and more bizarre occurrences pile up, Milo and Marcos find themselves faced with the unthinkable: Is there a larger, unseen force at play, trying to keep them apart? And if so, is their love worth risking the end of the world? From debut author Kevin Christopher Snipes, Milo and Marcos at the End of the World is a new coming-of-age novel about finding the courage not only to love others but also to love ourselves.


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When Marcos moves to town, Milo is forced to acknowledge the feelings he's kept hidden, especially from his religious parents. But as natural disasters begin to befall them the closer they become, Milo and Marcos soon begin to wonder if the universe itself is plotting against them in this young adult debut by playwright and creator of The Two Princes podcast, Kevin Christo When Marcos moves to town, Milo is forced to acknowledge the feelings he's kept hidden, especially from his religious parents. But as natural disasters begin to befall them the closer they become, Milo and Marcos soon begin to wonder if the universe itself is plotting against them in this young adult debut by playwright and creator of The Two Princes podcast, Kevin Christopher Snipes. Milo Connolly has managed to survive the first three years of high school without any major disasters, so by his calculations, he’s well past due for some sort of Epic Teenage Catastrophe. Even so, all he wants his senior year is to keep his head down and fly under the radar like the quiet, well-behaved, churchgoing boy that everyone thinks he is. Everything is going exactly as planned until the dreamy and charismatic Marcos Price saunters back into his life after a three-year absence and turns his world upside-down. Suddenly Milo is forced to confront the long-buried feelings that he’s kept hidden not only from himself but also from his deeply religious parents and community. To make matters worse, strange things have been happening around his sleepy Florida town ever since Marcos’s return—sinkholes, blackouts, hailstorms. Mother Nature seems out of control, and the closer Milo and Marcos get, the more disasters seem to befall them. In fact, as more and more bizarre occurrences pile up, Milo and Marcos find themselves faced with the unthinkable: Is there a larger, unseen force at play, trying to keep them apart? And if so, is their love worth risking the end of the world? From debut author Kevin Christopher Snipes, Milo and Marcos at the End of the World is a new coming-of-age novel about finding the courage not only to love others but also to love ourselves.

30 review for Milo and Marcos at the End of the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marieke (mariekes_mesmerizing_books)

    Milo and Marcos at the End of the World is a cute love story, covering heavy topics like anxiety, internal homophobia, and how to acknowledge your sexuality while being gay. Milo’s almost frantic voice, seeped through with anxiety and humor, was a pleasure to read, and I loved how both boys felt they were different when they met as fourteen-year-olds, developing feelings for each other while watching Golden Girls. Marcos, as an atheist but with very religious parents, and Milo, who had always bee Milo and Marcos at the End of the World is a cute love story, covering heavy topics like anxiety, internal homophobia, and how to acknowledge your sexuality while being gay. Milo’s almost frantic voice, seeped through with anxiety and humor, was a pleasure to read, and I loved how both boys felt they were different when they met as fourteen-year-olds, developing feelings for each other while watching Golden Girls. Marcos, as an atheist but with very religious parents, and Milo, who had always been the reliable and responsible church-going boy. The tone of the first part of the book reminded me of Simon James Greene’s books and Fin & Rye & Fireflies and therefore, will put a smile on the faces of those authors’ fans while the same tone downsizes all the bad things happening in this story simultaneously. But even though this story feels hysterical and humorous at times, the bad things do happen, and the second part of the book is grimmer and frightening. I felt for Marcos, who wanted to come out so badly, and sometimes I wanted to scream at Milo. But it’s so easy for me to judge him as I’ve never been in his situation, and I hate knowing there are still so many people in the world who feel they can’t come out because of their religion or conservative/judgmental family/people. Don’t expect this story to be a dystopian one. Yes, Mother Nature seems out of control, but it’s not a major plotline. In my opinion, Milo and Marcos at the End of the World is a classic queer contemporary story, more or less using a metaphor to show us that despite what happens, it’s okay to be who you want to be and who you want to be with. Overall, I really enjoyed the book and highly recommend it to those who love a rather sweet, sometimes feverish, and even funny story, wrapping heavy stuff, and don’t get triggered that easily by life dominated by (toxic) religion. Follow me on Instagram

  2. 5 out of 5

    booksandzoe

    This book really stunned me, in that it was nothing like what I expected, captured many nuanced depths of religious guilt as it relates to queerness, and tells a beautiful, but painful queer love story. I literally read the entire book in one sitting, about 4 hours. The protagonist struggles extensively with accepting his queerness due to the homophobia his parents and the Church inflict upon him. This struggle is exasterbated by the fact that every time the MC and love interest have an intense This book really stunned me, in that it was nothing like what I expected, captured many nuanced depths of religious guilt as it relates to queerness, and tells a beautiful, but painful queer love story. I literally read the entire book in one sitting, about 4 hours. The protagonist struggles extensively with accepting his queerness due to the homophobia his parents and the Church inflict upon him. This struggle is exasterbated by the fact that every time the MC and love interest have an intense moment, such as their first meeting, their first slow dance, etc, a freak accident happens such as a meteor striking the love interests car, or a sinkhole opening on the road in front of them. These coincidences add up, and serve to convince the main character that maybe God is punishing him for being gay. I thought the way the author wrote about the main characters religious struggle as well as the effects of being queer in a small, religious town was beautiful. It was so nuanced and heart wrenching. Though there are moments of joy between the protagonist and love interest, I would not say this story highlights queer joy at all--whether you look for that in a book will definitely impact your enjoyment. Personally, I like reading all ranges of stories, from the joyful to the tragic, so it wasn't a con for me. The relationship between the two boys is very well written; both characters have different beliefs and motivations, and their relationship is messy and authentic in a way that only queer relationships can be written. The main character is struggling with his religious guilt, while the love interest is an atheist with diehard religious parents. Following their journey made me so angry for both sides, because both have such valid points and experiences, but ultimately the very fact that they exist as queer people with different viewpoints on being out and what sacrifices they're willing to make to be together makes their relationship difficult. ‼️Slight spoilers in this paragraph‼️ I do wish the ending was more developed; I'm not sure I'm a huge fan on the overall message/execution of the apocalypse as a literary device. Was the point that God was going after them for being gay and they just decided not to care?? Was is a set of freak accidents?? This was probably left more open-ended on purpose, but I would like more care given to this narrative as I think it could be interpreted as a message about the community that isn't very good. I also think, despite leaving it open-ended, we just weren't left with enough information to even make good judgements on what message the author was trying to send. IDK maybe I'm just dumb and it flew over my head, but if it flew over my head as a 19 year old, what are the 14 year old readers going to think?? Overall, even though I wasn't a huge fan of the ending, I thought this book was phenomenal. The writing was so good, the characters were all so well written, I loved the relationship between Milo and Marcos, and I thought Milo's struggle with religion and their very religious setting was amazing. I will definitely be talking about this book on my page :) 4.5 stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    ☆ Todd

    Sounds promising! 😁 Blurb not posted on GR yet, so here it is from NetGalley: ----------------------------------------------- When Marcos moves to town, Milo is forced to acknowledge the feelings he's kept hidden, especially from his religious parents. But as natural disasters begin to befall them the closer they become, Milo and Marcos soon begin to wonder if the universe itself is plotting against them in this young adult debut by playwright and creator of The Two Princes podcast, Kevin Christop Sounds promising! 😁 Blurb not posted on GR yet, so here it is from NetGalley: ----------------------------------------------- When Marcos moves to town, Milo is forced to acknowledge the feelings he's kept hidden, especially from his religious parents. But as natural disasters begin to befall them the closer they become, Milo and Marcos soon begin to wonder if the universe itself is plotting against them in this young adult debut by playwright and creator of The Two Princes podcast, Kevin Christopher Snipes. Milo Connolly has managed to survive the first three years of high school without any major disasters, so by his calculations, he’s well past due for some sort of Epic Teenage Catastrophe. Even so, all he wants his senior year is to keep his head down and fly under the radar like the quiet, well-behaved, churchgoing boy that everyone thinks he is. Everything is going exactly as planned until the dreamy and charismatic Marcos Price saunters back into his life after a three-year absence and turns his world upside-down. Suddenly Milo is forced to confront the long-buried feelings that he’s kept hidden not only from himself but also from his deeply religious parents and community. To make matters worse, strange things have been happening around his sleepy Florida town ever since Marcos’s return—sinkholes, blackouts, hailstorms. Mother Nature seems out of control, and the closer Milo and Marcos get, the more disasters seem to befall them. In fact, as more and more bizarre occurrences pile up, Milo and Marcos find themselves faced with the unthinkable: Is there a larger, unseen force at play, trying to keep them apart? And if so, is their love worth risking the end of the world? From debut author Kevin Christopher Snipes, Milo and Marcos at the End of the World is a new coming-of-age novel about finding the courage not only to love others but also to love ourselves. -----------------------------------------------

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alex Lake

    As a queer person with religious trauma, this book is interesting to say the least. The main character's devotion to christianity is a little much at times, so I'd steer clear if you aren't comfortable reading about that stuff. The love interest and the best friend aren't super religious and there are talks about how religion isn't great or isn't for everyone, so that's something it keep in mind. Other than that, I really enjoyed it. It reeled me in and I literally read it in like six hours beca As a queer person with religious trauma, this book is interesting to say the least. The main character's devotion to christianity is a little much at times, so I'd steer clear if you aren't comfortable reading about that stuff. The love interest and the best friend aren't super religious and there are talks about how religion isn't great or isn't for everyone, so that's something it keep in mind. Other than that, I really enjoyed it. It reeled me in and I literally read it in like six hours because I just needed to know what happened next. There were discussions of internalized homophobia and racism and how problematic organized religion can be. I can't speak on how the racism was addressed, but I do think these explorations of internalized homophobia and seeing the main character's progression in that and how getting out of that mindset isn't a linear progression. For the apocalypse aspect, I think I got the wrong impression on what that would look like? I feel like the beginning was a little misleading in that aspect, but as the story progressed I understood what was really happening. It was definitely a very creative route to go and it certainly kept things interesting. The story almost had a Shakespeare vibes to it. Like a mix of Romeo and Juliet and The Tempest which was great for me as a Shakespeare enthusiast. Maybe that's why I read it all in one go. Either way, I do think that people will have a Time reading this book. It's a lot different from the Two Princes Podcast (which the author also apparently wrote), but I'd say it's still pretty good.

  5. 4 out of 5

    ash | आश ♥ [superache enthusiast]

    thank you netgalley for the arc ! *3.5 stars* huh, that was not what i expected. feeling bad for rating this lower than what i thought i would but rtc once i can process that ending.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bri

    THE FATTEST 5 STARS!!!! Milo and Marcos at the End of the World is a story about love and courage and being yourself even when the world seems totally against you. Milo and Marcos have a bit of a rough past. After meeting at Bible camp and it not ending so well, Milo is caught off guard when Marcos suddenly returns in his life three years later. And when he does, the chaos truly begins. The world is ending (maybe, probably, sorta). The world-ending aspect of this story was SO COOL! It happened ju THE FATTEST 5 STARS!!!! Milo and Marcos at the End of the World is a story about love and courage and being yourself even when the world seems totally against you. Milo and Marcos have a bit of a rough past. After meeting at Bible camp and it not ending so well, Milo is caught off guard when Marcos suddenly returns in his life three years later. And when he does, the chaos truly begins. The world is ending (maybe, probably, sorta). The world-ending aspect of this story was SO COOL! It happened just enough for it to be a reminder of the very intense stakes while also not happening to frequently to distract from the true heart of the story: Milo and Marcos's relationship. They feel like soulmates and I hate how cheesy that sounds, but dang it they were cute. Another review said it felt Shakespearean at times and I definitely agree! Think trippy Shakespeare end-of-the-world intense love. I think for any queer person who is growing up/has grown up in an intolerant and/or religious household/has religious trauma, this book will be both painful and validating to read. Religion is a big theme. That said, the book itself isn't religious, rather the MC (Milo) is and I think that's an important distinction. This book truly made me cry at times reading some of Milo's internalized self-hate/homophobia. That said, it is really moving and it made me laugh and smile a lot too. I think I wish there was maybe one or two more scenes where we got to see Milo and Marcos alone and being happy, but that’s my only little complaint and really I think that's just because I loved them so much. Marcos was such a good balance for Milo. He was patient with him and truly wanted Milo to love himself and, ugh, I cry just thinking about it!! Milo and Marcos are wonderful and have a kind of love that was felt throughout the book even when the characters weren't together. The friendship between Van and her boys is also very lovely. Van is how a friend should be written: flawed, but wonderful and dynamic with a distinct personality. She made mistakes but she always had Milo’s best interest at heart. The friendship between her and Milo makes my heart melt. I wasn't expecting the book to be this heavy, but I'm happy it was as I'm not sure I've read something quite like this before. I think it's desperately needed and it has become one of my favorites of all time. As someone who grew up in a similar environment as Milo, it was a book that felt especially heavy and close to my heart. As there are some triggering aspects to this story (homophobia, bullying, emotional abuse from parents), it will be tough to read for some. But I think it's definitely worth it to pull through because, though not everything ends perfectly, in the end, love wins out after all. Thank you to the author, HarperTeen, and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    4.5/5 I don’t want to say this took me by surprise since I didn’t really have any expectations going in, but it did. The examination of internalized homophobia here is what really makes this stand out from other YA contemporary books, for me at least. It’s honest and sad. But the book balances itself well, because even despite that struggle, there is a tenderness present in the pages, in Milo and Marcos’ romance, in the friendship and support of Van, and in the learning to accept and be proud of 4.5/5 I don’t want to say this took me by surprise since I didn’t really have any expectations going in, but it did. The examination of internalized homophobia here is what really makes this stand out from other YA contemporary books, for me at least. It’s honest and sad. But the book balances itself well, because even despite that struggle, there is a tenderness present in the pages, in Milo and Marcos’ romance, in the friendship and support of Van, and in the learning to accept and be proud of who you are even if it seems like the world is against it. A fantastic debut, and I hope this author writes more!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Vega

    Note: My english review will be at the end, just scroll down Thank you so much to NetGalley and HarperCollins for providing me this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. "You and me. Because whatever happens next, whatever you decide to do or wherever you want to go, I am here for you. I'm not leaving your side. Not now. Not ever. You and I are in this together. I promise" Español: Uff, no sé ni por dónde empezar con todas las cosas que sentí con este libro, son varias que espero explicarm Note: My english review will be at the end, just scroll down Thank you so much to NetGalley and HarperCollins for providing me this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. "You and me. Because whatever happens next, whatever you decide to do or wherever you want to go, I am here for you. I'm not leaving your side. Not now. Not ever. You and I are in this together. I promise" Español: Uff, no sé ni por dónde empezar con todas las cosas que sentí con este libro, son varias que espero explicarme en esta reseña pero desde ya puedo anticipar que definitivamente recomiendo este libro, siempre y cuando te sientas cómodo con las advertencias que tiene, porque a pesar de que es una historia muy linda siento que puede llegar a lastimar emocionalmente a alguna persona que tal vez esté pasando por una crisis de fe/sexualidad debido a todo por lo que pasa el personaje principal. Milo and Marcos at the End of the World es una historia de amor, aceptación y crecimiento; una historia donde veremos reflejados los problemas que de seguro la mayoría de personas Queer que forman o formaron parte de una religión sufrieron, y yo personalmente puedo dar mi afirmación de esto. Resumiendo un poco, Milo Connolly está listo para empezar su nuevo año escolar, donde quiere pasar nuevamente inadvertido y sin relevancia entre sus compañeros, pero todo su plan se irá a la basura con el regreso de Marcos Price a su vida tras un ghosting total de 3 años; con su regreso traerá consigo todos los sentimientos que Milo pensaba haber enterrado muy en lo profundo de su ser, después de todo aquellos sentimientos van en contra de todas sus creencias y su religión. Pero y si se diera una oportunidad? Que podría salir mal, no es como si el mundo se fuera a acabar, verdad? Primero quiero decir que la relación de Milo y Marcos se me hizo demasiado adorable, cada momento que ellos tenían juntos (los buenos, claro) me hicieron muy feliz y llenaron de amor a mi corazón, ver como Marcos podía sacar de su "caparazón" a Milo fue muy bonito y definitivamente quien no quisiese tener algo así. Pero no todo fue lindo en este libro, hubo momentos muy oscuros donde la homofobia interiorizada, auto-comentarios homofóbicos e insultos fueron las cosas por las que Milo tuvo que pasar en este libro, y aunque al principio pude ver esto como annoying poco a poco fui dándome cuenta que todo lo que Milo pasó y pensó en cierto punto yo también lo viví, y específicamente en 2 situaciones fueron las que me rompieron totalmente que sentí que las lágrimas podrían venir, porque damn enserio fue tan... real, y tal vez algunas personas no puedan relacionarse con este libro y tachen de inmaduro a Milo, pero personalmente creo que las personas Queer que crecimos dentro de un espacio religioso tóxico y con todos los prejuicios que esto conlleva fácilmente podrán ver su adolescencia reflejada, como lo fue en mi caso. En cierto punto llegué a pensar que todos los adultos en este libro eran muy malos y que los odiaba a todos, pero luego conocí a dos personajes que me hicieron volver a recuperar la fe en los adultos dentro de este libro, y en especial del último pues su actitud y postura no me la vi venir para nada y me dejó bastante sorprendido, definitivamente se ganó mi confianza dicho personaje. Con respecto a la metáfora del "fin del mundo" que se nos presenta tengo que admitir que me dejo confundido y creo que al terminarlo no lo comprendí del todo, en cierto modo me gustó el concepto que planteo el autor y tal vez supo manejarlo bien y solamente fui yo el que no lo entendió por estar concentrado más en otros aspectos de la historia. También debería agregar que algunas de las cosas que no me gustaron, que fueron muy pocas, fueron algunas actitudes del protagonista pues sí, algunas me parecieron algo exageradas, y en cierto punto lo entendía, pero luego pasaba algo y aparecía un poco de drama innecesario a mi parecer, aun así siempre quería ir a abrazarlo. Ahora un poco sobre el final, fue un lindo final pero, aparte de la gran confusión por la que estaba pasando en los últimos capítulos, siento que pudo haberse extendido un poco más con un epílogo, y ojo que tal vez en la versión final si lo agreguen, pues recordemos que tuve un acceso temprano a este libro, pero en fin, me gustó la manera con la que se concluyó la historia. Finalmente, obviamente recomiendo este libro para todas las personas, siento que el mensaje que da es muy lindo y la historia te hace empatizar con sus personajes y agarrarles cariño. Eso sí, antes de hacerlo te recomiendo que veas estos TW (Bullying, Homofobia, Racismo, Daño Emocional y Psicológico causado por Padres) y si te sientes seguro de tolerar eso, pues en algunas partes se llega a sentir fuerte algunos de esos temas, adelante y espero disfrutes mucho de esta historia. No olviden agregarlo a su calendario pues el libro oficialmente saldrá el 24/05/2022 Calificación Final: 4.5 estrellas English: Uff, I don't even know where to start with all the things I felt with this book, there are several that I hope to explain in this review but I can already anticipate that I definitely recommend this book, as long as you feel comfortable with the warnings it has, because although it is a very nice story I feel that it can emotionally hurt someone who may be going through a crisis of faith/sexuality due to everything that the main character goes through. Milo and Marcos at the End of the World is a story of love, acceptance and growth; a story where we will see reflected the problems that surely most Queer people who are or were part of a religion suffered, and I can personally give my affirmation of this. Summarizing a little, Milo Connolly is ready to start his new school year, where he wants to go unnoticed again and without relevance among his classmates, but all his plan will go down the drain with the return of Marcos Price to his life after a total ghosting of 3 years; with his return he will bring with him all the feelings that Milo thought he had buried deep inside, after all those feelings go against all his beliefs and his religion. But what if he were to give himself a chance? What could go wrong, it's not like the world is going to end, right? First I want to say that Milo and Marcos' relationship was too adorable to me, every moment they had together (the good ones, of course) made me very happy and filled my heart with love, seeing how Marcos could bring Milo out of his "shell" was very nice and definitely who wouldn't want to have something like that. But not everything was cute in this book, there were very dark moments where internalized homophobia, homophobic self-comments and insults were the things Milo had to go through in this book, and although at first I could see this as annoying little by little I was realizing that everything Milo went through and thought at a certain point I lived it too, and specifically in 2 situations were the ones that totally broke me that I felt the tears might come, because damn, it was so ... real, and maybe some people can't relate to this book and will label Milo as immature, but personally I think Queer people who grew up in a toxic religious space and with all the prejudices that comes with it can easily see their adolescence reflected, as it was in my case. At a certain point I came to think that all the adults in this book were very bad and that I hated them all, but then I met two characters that made me regain faith in adults in this book, and especially the last one because his attitude and position I did not see it coming at all and left me quite surprised, he definitely won my trust. With respect to the metaphor of "the end of the world" that is presented to us I have to admit that it left me confused and I think that when I finished it I did not fully understand it, in a way I liked the concept that the author raised and maybe he knew how to handle it well and it was only me who did not understand it because I was more focused on other aspects of the story. I should also add that some of the things I didn't like, which were very few, were some of the main character's attitudes because yes, some of them seemed a bit exaggerated, and at a certain point I understood it, but then something would happen and some unnecessary drama would appear in my opinion, even so I always wanted to go and hug him. Now a little bit about the ending, it was a nice ending but, apart from the great confusion I was going through in the last chapters, I feel it could have been extended a little more with an epilogue, and beware that maybe in the final version they will add it, because let's remember that I had an early access to this book, but anyway, I liked the way the story was concluded. Finally, I obviously recommend this book to everyone, I feel that the message it gives is very nice and the story makes you empathize with the characters and get attached to them. Of course, before doing so, I recommend you to see these TW (Bullying, Homophobia, Racism, Emotional and Psychological Damage caused by Parents) and if you feel confident to tolerate that, because in some parts you can feel strong some of those issues, go ahead and I hope you enjoy this story a lot. Don't forget to add it to your calendar as the book will officially be released on 05/24/2022. Final Rating: 4.5 stars

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mariana ✨

    This book just didn’t do it for me. I still think other people could enjoy it, though, so don’t let my review deter you from reading it. The romance: Yeah, the romance was not good. 💀 Sorry. Basically, Milo and Marcos meet at a summer camp. Marcos’ bed ends up soaked and instead of telling the camp counselors about it, they decide to share Milo’s bed… Literally, why????? You could NOT convince me to sleep with a complete stranger on a tiny bed for weeks for *literally no reason* 🥴. Why did the This book just didn’t do it for me. I still think other people could enjoy it, though, so don’t let my review deter you from reading it. The romance: Yeah, the romance was not good. 💀 Sorry. Basically, Milo and Marcos meet at a summer camp. Marcos’ bed ends up soaked and instead of telling the camp counselors about it, they decide to share Milo’s bed… Literally, why????? You could NOT convince me to sleep with a complete stranger on a tiny bed for weeks for *literally no reason* 🥴. Why did they do that??? Oh, I know why! Because the author needed a reason for them to get closer (in this case, *literally* get closer lol). 😑😑😑 If that wasn’t stupid enough, turns out these 2 weeks at camp were enough for them to fall deeply in love with each other (mind you, *WE* barely saw them together, so it made no sense why they even *liked* each other, let alone *fell in love* with each other) (and yes – it is stated multiple times that they were deeply in love after these 2 weeks 😑). There was no development. Their “love” (if you can even call it that) literally came out of nowhere. Plus, WE barely even saw them interact, so it was impossible to believe in their ~super deep love~. If them literally falling in love after knowing each other (and barely interacting) for 2 weeks wasn’t enough, there’s also the fact that they don’t even hear from each other for 3 YEARS but *somehow* are still in love. 💀💀💀💀💀 Yeah, there’s no way I would ever believe that, but especially not after literally not seeing them get closer and fall in love in the first place lmao. 🥴 If the author really wanted me to believe their love was *this strong*, he really should’ve tried to develop their relationship better (no offense 💀). They quickly got together, even though there was no development, no buildup and no romantic tension. And they were kinda cute, I guess. 🤷🏻‍♀️ I like that they communicated, apologized for their mistakes, cared about each other and verbally asked for consent during intimate moments (👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 !!!!!); but because we never saw their relationship develop, it was impossible to believe there were any feelings there at all. 😐 I literally felt nothing about them. Them getting together? Nothing. Their 1st kiss? Nothing. Them breaking up in the ~3rd act conflict~? Nothing. Them having sex? Nothing (actually – that’s a lie – I did feel something: astonishment. Y’all seriously decided to (view spoiler)[fuck as the world is ending (hide spoiler)] ??? Plus you didn’t even use a condom???? JAIL!!!!! 😭😭😭). The sci-fi element: Honestly, I barely understood the sci-fi part of this book (was it even sci-fi??????? I genuinely don’t know). Basically, whenever Milo and Marcos were together, bad shit happened. I never saw any explanation, but then again, I skimmed the last half of this book bc I was tired of it, so I might’ve missed it 🥴. The dumbest part to me was at the end, when (view spoiler)[they decide to run away from home with no plan during a hurricane (like fucking dumbasses). They go to a motel and everything outside is getting destroyed. Instead of a) fearing for their lives because of the hurricane, b) being worried because they literally didn’t bring anything with them when they ran away, or c) being scared because the police is coming after them (they’re minors who disappeared); they’re instead super horny and decide to have sex (while full on believing the world is getting destroyed because they’re having sex 💀. They straight up just didn’t care lmfaoooo 🥴😭). They wake up the morning after and the world outside, along with everybody on earth, IS LITERALLY GONE!!!!!!!! EVERYTHING DISAPPEARED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! But none of them is worried at all!!!! They just hang out and have sex. 💀💀💀💀 Bruh, how horny do you have to be to not be at least *a little bit* worried that everything and everyone is gone?? 🥴 Anywayssss. Turns out Milo just got into a coma because the motel collapsed on him and Marcos, so that last part never actually happened, but still, it was weird. 😐 (hide spoiler)] So, yeah. I never understood why all that weird stuff was happening (was it a coincidence, or was it actually sci-fi shit? Could this book even be considered a sci-fi dystopian? I wouldn’t say so, but okay. Whatever 😪). Religion: Milo was super religious, so he really struggled with being gay. I feel like this book does a decent job showing how awful religion can be for LGBT people – the fear and guilt that comes with it is honestly heartbreaking. Milo literally thought that god was punishing him for being gay. So sad!! ☹️ Both Milo and Marco’s parents were mega religious, too, and very homophobic – they literally hated their kids and tried to keep them apart. In the end they kind of come around, but personally I don’t feel sympathy for grown ass adults who choose to discriminate against people for no reason, and only *slightly* change their mind when their kids almost die. 😐 (I say “slightly” bc they were still homophobic in the end. They were “trying” not to be, though, which to me is not enough. Perhaps I’m just not as forgiving, though. I just can’t empathize with bigots. Maybe that’s just me. 🤷🏻‍♀️). Additionally, I feel like the author wanted me to empathize with Marcos’ mum, and don’t get me wrong, she was in a bad situation: a brown woman who married into a racist family, and her own husband didn’t want her to teach their kid to speak Spanish, because he’s a bigot. That obviously sucks! However, she was still a homophobe! Sure, Marcos’ dad was worse – he literally tried to send Marcos to conversion therapy, and the mum had to stop that from happening (literally the bare minimum lol). But I’m not gonna sympathize with a parent who keeps their child in that environment. Like, protect your kid, wtf???? Also, she literally pretended her gay brother was straight and had a “roommate” instead of a husband. Plus, it took her child almost dying for her to even think about not being a bigot? Okay, homophobe. 🙄🙄🙄 Anyways. I’m not religious, so I related much more to Marcos and Van (Milo’s bff). Perhaps if you grew up in this kind of environment and struggled to accept yourself because of religion you’ll enjoy this book more than I did.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie (Teacups & Tropes)

    ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ They say to never judge a book by its cover. But I did. I instantly knew I would love this book and the gorgeous cover didn't lie to me. I won't lie: Milo and Marcos at the End of the World was not what I expected. I legitimately thought that this was going to be an apocalyptical novel of epic proportions. But what it dealt with was religion, friendship, love, and family. I felt like I understood Milo so much. There were parts of this book that made me tear up, especially when he was tal ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ They say to never judge a book by its cover. But I did. I instantly knew I would love this book and the gorgeous cover didn't lie to me. I won't lie: Milo and Marcos at the End of the World was not what I expected. I legitimately thought that this was going to be an apocalyptical novel of epic proportions. But what it dealt with was religion, friendship, love, and family. I felt like I understood Milo so much. There were parts of this book that made me tear up, especially when he was talking about his anxiety and his ability to catastrophize situations. And despite feeling lonely, Marcos and Van are always by his side and on his team and I loved that. The actual catastrophes that occur in this book are both hilarious and terrifying. Like, a sinkhole, a blackout, a meteorite strike, a lightning strike, a fire, and a hurricane? Talk about bad luck. Or... is someone trying to ensure that Milo and Marcos stay apart? Are these signs? (view spoiler)[When the hurricane does hit, I was genuinely confused. I thought the world had ended and that somehow Milo and Marcos were the only two left alive. The descriptions of post-Acts-of-God were both beautiful and terrifying. No gravity? A daytime sky full of stars? An ocean of darkness? I mean, the ocean scares me on a good day. You couldn't pay me enough to walk on a beach next to inky blackness, even if I was in love. But turns out, the idea to hide at a beachfront hotel during a Cat 5 hurricane meant that Milo got buried under some rubble and hit his head. As our narrator, those chapters made much more sense. And I was glad that Milo and Marcos didn't have to live the rest of their lives alone. (hide spoiler)] I basically read this in one day and I couldn't put it down. It does talk about religion a lot, but it's an important part of the story and didn't detract from the plot, the characters, or the romance at all. If you read this, let me know what you think!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aly

    The only thing I knew going into this was the title, so I was hoping it was a dystopian novel. Unfortunately it isn't, but there are some crazy disasters that happen and they just might be cause by Milo and Marcos. There is quite a bit of focus on Christianity in this, with both characters reckoning their faith with their sexual orientations. I wouldn't classify this as Christian fiction though, it's more showing what a lot of people go through when their religion doesn't support who they are. I The only thing I knew going into this was the title, so I was hoping it was a dystopian novel. Unfortunately it isn't, but there are some crazy disasters that happen and they just might be cause by Milo and Marcos. There is quite a bit of focus on Christianity in this, with both characters reckoning their faith with their sexual orientations. I wouldn't classify this as Christian fiction though, it's more showing what a lot of people go through when their religion doesn't support who they are. I found Milo a bit frustrating at times, he tends to choose the easier path even if it hurts himself or others and cries rather than talk to his loved ones or come up with a plan on how to handle things. I do understand that he's in an incredibly difficult position and it's possible that he could be in danger if his feelings for Marco get out. I just wanted him to stand up for himself more when people treated him poorly. I wish we'd gotten Marcos' point of view in this. He's bold and brash and won't apologize for his feelings. I like that he stood strong even when his father was a homophobic jerk and refused to apologize. Marcos was definitely needed to bring Milo out of his shell. The disasters were interesting and gave the book something to set it apart. I'm glad I was able to snag a copy of this, especially during Pride month!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vee_Bookish

    Harper sent me an ARC of this what the FCK? THANK YOU??

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Rating: 2.5 I kind of liked the characters, but they would have been better if they had more personality. One character was a feminist, one was battling with internalized homophobia and religion, one was an atheist, and that was pretty much each of their personalities. The friendship in this book seemed like it wouldn't even exist without The Golden Girls. I thought this was going to be more about an apocalypse and it really wasn't. Maybe if you have ever struggled with religion and your identit Rating: 2.5 I kind of liked the characters, but they would have been better if they had more personality. One character was a feminist, one was battling with internalized homophobia and religion, one was an atheist, and that was pretty much each of their personalities. The friendship in this book seemed like it wouldn't even exist without The Golden Girls. I thought this was going to be more about an apocalypse and it really wasn't. Maybe if you have ever struggled with religion and your identity existing within it, you might like this, or you might want to stay away from it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    4.5* “I’m going to prove to you once and for all that God doesn’t care if two boys fall in love.” **TW for homophobia and religious trauma This was such a lovely story! At first, I was a bit surprised because it is decidedly contemporary, and not really the apocalyptic fare I'd assumed. But that ended up being just fine, because I really fell in love with the story I got! Milo has spent three years trying to forget he ever met Marcos. He's also been spending those years denying any feelings h 4.5* “I’m going to prove to you once and for all that God doesn’t care if two boys fall in love.” **TW for homophobia and religious trauma This was such a lovely story! At first, I was a bit surprised because it is decidedly contemporary, and not really the apocalyptic fare I'd assumed. But that ended up being just fine, because I really fell in love with the story I got! Milo has spent three years trying to forget he ever met Marcos. He's also been spending those years denying any feelings he experiences, namely those that have to do with his attraction to men. He mainly sticks with his bestie Van, and his church crowd, and the denial has been... well I wouldn't say it's working, obviously, but he's been existing, for the most part. But who pops up as the town new kid? Marcos, of course! Forcing Milo to deal not only with the hurt he faced when Marcos left camp without a word to him three years prior, but also the reemergence of the feelings he had for Marco, too. I could probably spend a full year writing about why I am so seethingly angry at Milo's family and church. But I am sure most of you get the gist. Milo has spend a large portion of his life feeling like he's doing something wrong, that he's "sinning", just because he likes guys. Milo's family and church should be thrilled that he is a kind person who contributes a lot to their communities. But Milo is doing everything in his power to make sure no one ever finds out that his feelings exist. Easier said than done, of course. Marcos is such a wonderful guy, such a light, that Milo ends up forgiving him, and he and Van welcome Marcos into their social circle. Soon, those old feelings are back, and bigger than ever. But every time Milo seems to acquiesce to his feelings just a little, disaster strikes. Literal, natural disaster. Milo, because of all the absurd religious rhetoric he's been fed his entire life, can't help but think perhaps this is the doing of his deity, smiting both boys for loving each other. The overarching message of this story is, of course, a good one. I'd not be enamored with this story otherwise, so you can rest assured that the religious trauma that Milo is going through is handled with care. Milo coming to terms with how he wants to move forward is obviously the biggest plot point here. He knows, despite his best efforts to deny it, that he will eventually have to either abandon hope of a future with Marcos, or come to terms with incurring his parents' (and potentially his church's) wrath. And here's the biggest thing to take away: no person should ever have to make those decisions. But they do, because a lot of parts of society are still complete and total garbage, and this is the unfortunate world we live in. My heart broke over and over and over for Milo and Marcos both. There are a lot of issues with both of their families (again, these are handled very well and delicately), as well as faith crises for both. I loved that they had Van to count on too, as she had already figured out the toxicity of the church, and therefore didn't worry about the ramifications. The ending was... a little out there for me, but still, the story as a whole was wonderful. It was a love story, yes, but also a great story about two young men growing up and being able to have their own agency. Bottom Line: Absolutely lovely and heart wrenching story about... well, like the quote says, two boys falling in love. You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight

  15. 4 out of 5

    Owen Chun

    Way more Jesusy than I thought.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Starr ❇✌❇

    I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: casual racism/colonialism, internalized homophobia (religious), conservative religious prejudice/homophobia, bullying/harassment, slurs, hate crime, threat of conversion therapy 4.6 Milo is a good, quiet Christian boy ready to finish out his senior year the same way- unnoticed and simple. But that plan seems to go up in smoke when someone from his past suddenly, impossibly reappears. Because once, three years ago, Milo learned something about himself that co I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: casual racism/colonialism, internalized homophobia (religious), conservative religious prejudice/homophobia, bullying/harassment, slurs, hate crime, threat of conversion therapy 4.6 Milo is a good, quiet Christian boy ready to finish out his senior year the same way- unnoticed and simple. But that plan seems to go up in smoke when someone from his past suddenly, impossibly reappears. Because once, three years ago, Milo learned something about himself that could have ruined everything, and pretending it never happened is the only thing keeping him moving forward. Marcos, and the time they spent together, is enough to fill Milo with terror- and something else better ignored- but there's more danger too. Because it seems like every time they get close, a natural disaster happens. This book! Oh my God. This book. This book is so well written, so emotional, so heart wrenchingly real. I loved every single second of getting to read this story- the upsetting, the hopeful, all of it. The energy of this story, the vibe of the characters and their insurmountable odds, it all felt timeless. It reminded me a lot of the queer theatre scene in the 80s, and I think that's a testament to how human, how connected this whole thing is. These are issues that aren't quite as in vogue to parade about anymore, but it doesn't mean that this messiness, the fear, doesn't still permeate the queer community. It felt lived and it felt human, and I think this book will resonate with so many people, of so many ages. And what keeps that heavy, old soul energy from bringing this book into solidly weighty territory is the beautiful, adorable romance between the characters. The romance too feels genuine, and from the start it truly feels earth moving, because it's more than just a romance arc, it's discovery, it's exploration, it's choice. I also really loved how the pacing was done. With the romance, I liked the decision to show the flashback all in one chunk, and the way that it breaks up the past and the present. And beyond that, the drama and the stakes are dealt with well, and the story moves along at a constant rate that means things never lag. The only thing for me, was that I wanted it just a little more heavy and disaster filled. The ending felt a tad Wizard of Oz, and I was holding out for even more disaster- though what we do get is pretty intense. But that's me. "Maybe a God who roots for love is the only God worth believing in." I loved this book! What a fantastic exploration of these characters and their internalized biases, what a fabulous, heartbreaking story. I honestly want everyone to read this one. Pre-review comments Can I just say: 😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

  17. 4 out of 5

    LGBT Representation in Books

    Trigger Warnings: Religion/Presbyterian, anxiety, Republicans, Bible camp, misogyny, racism, toxic masculinity, internalized homophobia, religious shame/guilt, past off page sex, underage drinking, vomit, past death of a grandparent, bigotry, lying, mega church, homophobia, religious trauma, coming out, slurs, bullying, vandalism, fighting, violence, natural disasters, fire, sex, hospital Representation: Vegetarian, Cuban American, Atheism, Puerto Rican, Gay, Agnostic Milo and Marcus at the End of Trigger Warnings: Religion/Presbyterian, anxiety, Republicans, Bible camp, misogyny, racism, toxic masculinity, internalized homophobia, religious shame/guilt, past off page sex, underage drinking, vomit, past death of a grandparent, bigotry, lying, mega church, homophobia, religious trauma, coming out, slurs, bullying, vandalism, fighting, violence, natural disasters, fire, sex, hospital Representation: Vegetarian, Cuban American, Atheism, Puerto Rican, Gay, Agnostic Milo and Marcus at the End of the World is a contemporary YA romance with apocalyptic elements. The story surrounds Milo and Marcos, two high school boys who meet at a summer Bible camp. Milo is the good, church going Presbyterian who does what his parents wish and tries to be a good person. Marcos is an atheist who doesn’t get along with his parents and is stuck at camp because his dad made him come. When the boys share special moments together, Milo is confused about what it could all mean and then Marcos abruptly leaves camp early. Three years later, the boys are reunited and some odd natural disasters occur whenever they are together. This eARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I really liked this book! I do want to preface that it is not for anyone with religious trauma and may be triggered by homophobic Christians. The story delves into the struggle that I think many of us deal with if you were raised in a church including the hatred you are taught for anyone who is different or not what the church leader deems “right.” As someone who was raised in a church, I could completely relate to Milo who prays to be “normal,” meaning straight. I also felt his hesitance to come out was so relatable to so many for fear of the unknown. The characters were actually quite interesting because Milo was so similar to my closeted self and when I first came out, and Marcos is so much more like who I am now. I think it’s important to emphasize that this story is about being closeted and growing up gay and religious. It is not about queer joy, although there are a few scenes that do express it. I loved the dance scene and the boys truly are in love! The author does all of this in such an elegant way that the book is realistic and not depressing. I also loved the incorporation of the natural disasters! It was so creatively done and the ending was so sweet!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joyfully Jay

    A Joyfully Jay review. 4 stars This story took a lot of unexpected twists, what with the natural disasters, revivalist showdowns, and a rather traumatic coming-out experience. There are moments that really made me pause, because Milo is such a heart-on-his-sleeve narrator and his pain is so acute. I was honestly scared that this was all going to go very wrong. I was also worried about the internalized homophobia Milo suffers and how that might affect young and questioning readers. Milo’s journey A Joyfully Jay review. 4 stars This story took a lot of unexpected twists, what with the natural disasters, revivalist showdowns, and a rather traumatic coming-out experience. There are moments that really made me pause, because Milo is such a heart-on-his-sleeve narrator and his pain is so acute. I was honestly scared that this was all going to go very wrong. I was also worried about the internalized homophobia Milo suffers and how that might affect young and questioning readers. Milo’s journey was one of necessary self-love, and once he fully embraced himself, he became a much more powerful character. Marcos is the rock he needs, a bulwark of acceptance and love that will allow Milo to climb up, stand higher on his own two feet. I loved how Van supported and held Milo’s hand, sometimes literally, as he rose beyond the darkness of his self-hate. I feel like this is a good, but tough read. It’s YA, and has age-appropriate situations, including alcohol use. Expect affection and some light physicality, but none of it graphic in a “romance” way. There is definite emphasis on the emotional journey, especially for Milo, and the ending is decidedly happy. Read Veronica’s review in its entirety here.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    I got an arc from @harper360ya, so thank you so much!!! 🥰 I started and finished this in the same day, i was definitely not so sure about it at the start following Milo's point of view. But he grew on me like Van and Marcos do as well!! The friendship Milo and Van have was so lovely to see, and the way they are friends and the way they are good and trying to be better people. Milo's Christianity is a whole point to this book so if you have religious tramua, this might be a trigger for you as it i I got an arc from @harper360ya, so thank you so much!!! 🥰 I started and finished this in the same day, i was definitely not so sure about it at the start following Milo's point of view. But he grew on me like Van and Marcos do as well!! The friendship Milo and Van have was so lovely to see, and the way they are friends and the way they are good and trying to be better people. Milo's Christianity is a whole point to this book so if you have religious tramua, this might be a trigger for you as it is does double down on it a few times. There is internalised homophobia as well. I did not expect the world things were happening the way they went down. But i was not disappointed to say the least. It was a lovely read to have and i am so glad i got the opportunity to read this!!! There is miscommunication where they do not talk about their feelings and assuming it all. I loved the growth we got to see with Milo.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lu

    This book is pretty amazing, hilarious and I loved every single thing. When Marcos, a boy Milo met at Bible Camp three years before and first crush, moves in his city, school and church his world is turned upside down. While Milo struggles with internalized homophobia and Marcos with an abusive father, they can't deny their mutual feelings. When weird things start happening like a meteor crushing Marcos's father' car, sinkholes and hurricanes, the boys start to wondering if their love is doomed f This book is pretty amazing, hilarious and I loved every single thing. When Marcos, a boy Milo met at Bible Camp three years before and first crush, moves in his city, school and church his world is turned upside down. While Milo struggles with internalized homophobia and Marcos with an abusive father, they can't deny their mutual feelings. When weird things start happening like a meteor crushing Marcos's father' car, sinkholes and hurricanes, the boys start to wondering if their love is doomed from God Himself. But they are not ready to give up on each other. With delicate themes like bigotry and abuse hidden behind religion, threats of conversion therapy, dealt with care and sensitivity, the author wrote an intense and intriguing book about two teenagers finding each other a second time and falling in love again. Interesting and heartwrenching is following Milo battling against his internalized homophobia, his fear of disappointing his religious parents, while on the other side Marcos is a bit more confident of his sexuality, but still facing his father's abuse and his mother's impotence in fighting back against her own abuser. Fortunately they have the support of Van,Milo's best friend, against bullying, abuse and religion used to hurt people. With ups and downs, fights and lies and growth, Milo and Marcos grow, learning to support, love and help each other and choosing one other and their happiness, fighting against bigotry and abuse. Milo's voice is brilliant and refreshing and it was a pleasure following him growing up, dealing with anxiety and fears, with his humor and sarcasm, trusting Van and then Marcos, accepting his own sexuality and embracing it fully, without, in the end, hiding any part of himself. Marcos' fierce stubborness and love, Milo's cautious opening up and Van's support were some of the things I loved the most in this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    3.5 Stars Note: I was provided with an ARC by the publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions here are my own. This book is really cute. I don't usually use that word to describes books, least of all romances. I don't usually care enough. And I will say, I was disappointed at the beginning when this book opens with a very typical male-YA-narrator voice AND character. But these characters grew on me. They really did. The apocalyptic elements weren't what I expected--a 3.5 Stars Note: I was provided with an ARC by the publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions here are my own. This book is really cute. I don't usually use that word to describes books, least of all romances. I don't usually care enough. And I will say, I was disappointed at the beginning when this book opens with a very typical male-YA-narrator voice AND character. But these characters grew on me. They really did. The apocalyptic elements weren't what I expected--and were, to be honest, a bit disappointing--but I still really enjoyed this book in the end. My full review will be available at Gateway Reviews on May 20, 2022.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Janna

    i live for queer dystopia!!! i post about queer books here: instagram / tiktok /twitter i live for queer dystopia!!! i post about queer books here: instagram / tiktok /twitter

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anna Marie

    Thank you so much, HarperCollins, Balzer + Bray, for allowing me to read Milo and Marcos at the End of the World early! After reading All That’s Left in the World about a week ago, I couldn’t believe my luck that the publisher also approved Milo and Marcos at the End of the World. If you look at the titles and the blurbs, both books seem to be similar. The stories are both about queer boys and disasters. But they couldn’t be more contrasting at the same time. Despite Milo’s sometimes hysterical Thank you so much, HarperCollins, Balzer + Bray, for allowing me to read Milo and Marcos at the End of the World early! After reading All That’s Left in the World about a week ago, I couldn’t believe my luck that the publisher also approved Milo and Marcos at the End of the World. If you look at the titles and the blurbs, both books seem to be similar. The stories are both about queer boys and disasters. But they couldn’t be more contrasting at the same time. Despite Milo’s sometimes hysterical and sarcastic voice, this book discusses heavy topics like overly religious parents and (internalized) homophobia. I grew up in a religious environment, and I saw up close what being (overly) religious did to people around me. Because of this subject, I don’t think this book is for everyone. On the other hand, it could help teens who live in a religious environment to find their place in the world. Therefore, I will recommend this story to students with care.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brady

    I got this arc off of NetGalley and these opinions are my own. I feel like Milo and Marcos at the End of the World was a good book. It was different then I expected it to be and not really about what happened thought it was going to be about. Milo and Marcos meet at Bible Camp and feelings start to brew but then Marcos disappears. Three years later he shows up in Milo’s life again. But Milo struggles with he feelings for Marcos and his connection to his religion. As their relationship grows stra I got this arc off of NetGalley and these opinions are my own. I feel like Milo and Marcos at the End of the World was a good book. It was different then I expected it to be and not really about what happened thought it was going to be about. Milo and Marcos meet at Bible Camp and feelings start to brew but then Marcos disappears. Three years later he shows up in Milo’s life again. But Milo struggles with he feelings for Marcos and his connection to his religion. As their relationship grows strange occurrences are happening, Milo begins to wonder if these are God’s way of letting them know they are committing sin. Are they doomed or can they be happy? Kevin Christopher Snipes writes a lovely book, it was just personally hard for to get into as I am not a believer in organized religion. It was hard for me o relate to Milo because of his struggle with his faith and his feelings for Marcos. Though I feel like any reader who’s struggled with that cross section between faith and being who they are could really relate to this book! I did enjoy Marcos and Milo and I though Van was wonderful! This book is definitely worth a read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katerina

    3/5 ⭐️ Thank you to Netgalley for sending me a copy of Milo and Marcos at the End of the World for review. All opinions and thoughts are my own! So I started this December 7th, and then life caught up with me and I set it aside. A month later here we are finally finishing it and getting around to writing a review as well. I am not going to lie there were a few reasons I set this book aside, and the biggest reason is the focus on religion. It's nothing bad but due to how I grew up I was quite trig 3/5 ⭐️ Thank you to Netgalley for sending me a copy of Milo and Marcos at the End of the World for review. All opinions and thoughts are my own! So I started this December 7th, and then life caught up with me and I set it aside. A month later here we are finally finishing it and getting around to writing a review as well. I am not going to lie there were a few reasons I set this book aside, and the biggest reason is the focus on religion. It's nothing bad but due to how I grew up I was quite triggered. If you are queer or struggle with religion and grew up in a severely religious household, and had internalized homophobia because of it as well as inner turmoil- just know there is a lot of that within the book and it could be triggering. However, putting that aside for a moment let's talk about what really made me happy about Milo and Marcos at the End of the World. First off the countless themes that are found throughout the book such as: coming out, religious beliefs, accepting other's religious beliefs and being open-minded, internalized homophobia, accepting oneself, loving oneself, finding love, finding courage, and so many more. I was swimming in a plethora of themes and I loved it! "Maybe people just have to have the courage to want all their dreams and not listen to anyone who asks them to choose." Milo and Marcos - I think they are the cutest couple and if the world would f-off for a second it would see that too. Milo is essentially the epitome of who I was in high school. I grew up in a religious household where I struggled with my beliefs and who I was, I honestly thought no one liked me and had internal dialogues where if a friend didn't call me they hated me, and more than anything I struggled with loving myself. This is who Milo is and you can see throughout the book that Milo severely struggles with loving himself and thus it causes A LOT of self-sabotage. This hurts my soul because I know how hard it is to function in a world where you want to be "normal" but you just can't be. (Who wants to be normal anyway!) Marcos, the one I would say I would identify with today, is the exact opposite of Milo. He is confident in most things, he believes in science and fact and really pushes people to think of that when it comes to religion. He also has his struggles with religion as his mother converted to Christianity due to his father, his father is anti-everything, and Marcos is an atheist. Then you have Van the best friend to Milo and literally my QUEEN. She is the voice of reason when these two are just idiots and I am all here for it! "But maybe if I don't think them or say them or act on them then everything will be okay." Where I struggled internally was the religion that was the main focal point within the book. I did not realize how badly this book would trigger that I would have to put the book aside. Milo struggles with internalized homophobia, to the point where he thinks that if he doesn't think about Marcos or his feelings "IT" will go away and he will be "normal". And because he has grown up in a religious household with very religious parents, he believes he is damned. It's sad we live in a society that convinces us we can't love ourselves and that our souls are damned for loving. Due to his struggles of queerness and religion, it really hit close to home and I found myself triggered quite often. Where my rating tanked, is that in the synopsis you get a sense that there was a dystopian element. Which I was excited about. However, it was a background piece and only referenced a few times throughout. You have natural disasters but they are not as often as it would seem. So in the end the true focus within this novel is religion and self-acceptance. This is fine but I feel like it was only added so that it was there for the MC to use as self-sabotage. Also, the plot was more in the background this time and character development took the show. Most of the time this is okay but not to the point where the ending doesn't make sense. Think of this book as just one big metaphor for self-love and religion. Would I recommend this? Absolutely, I think this book makes great points and shows the good and bad that can come with religion. As well as showing you can be religious but also BE YOU.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    *I recieved a free copy in exchange for an honest review* What a wild ride! I guess that's to be expected from a novel where bad things happen when these boys kiss, but it honestly felt like a roller coaster. It was well written, but I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would, though I'm glad it discussed some seriously tough topics. Homophobia and the fear of coming out to overly religious parents was almost worse than all the disasters that kept happening to Milo and Marcos. To be honest, a *I recieved a free copy in exchange for an honest review* What a wild ride! I guess that's to be expected from a novel where bad things happen when these boys kiss, but it honestly felt like a roller coaster. It was well written, but I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would, though I'm glad it discussed some seriously tough topics. Homophobia and the fear of coming out to overly religious parents was almost worse than all the disasters that kept happening to Milo and Marcos. To be honest, as someone who had loving parents and did not have fears of coming out, this book was not written for me and that's okay. It's amazing, in fact, because it's an enjoyable read that will speak to the teens it needs to. This book really does scream out "It's OKAY to be you, even if you're responsible for ending the world" and I love that about it. I know a few people who needed this book as teens and I'm glad that it's being released for younger generations. Also, I'm so glad queer YA fiction is branching out to more than just sad love stories these days. I need more crazy, bizarre LGBTQ reads in my life.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Milo, our main character, is rocked to the core when Marcos comes back into his life unexpectedly. His return forces Milo to face feelings that he had buried years ago. Coincidentally, the first signs of the world coming to an end also manifest. Milo remembers his meeting with Marcos years before, and begins to bargain with himself and try to rationalize what is going on. The more time Milo and Marcos spend together, the more we begin to see these signs that the world is coming to an end. This b Milo, our main character, is rocked to the core when Marcos comes back into his life unexpectedly. His return forces Milo to face feelings that he had buried years ago. Coincidentally, the first signs of the world coming to an end also manifest. Milo remembers his meeting with Marcos years before, and begins to bargain with himself and try to rationalize what is going on. The more time Milo and Marcos spend together, the more we begin to see these signs that the world is coming to an end. This book does such a fantastic job of metaphorically illustrating what it's like when the world that you have always known comes to an end. How will Milo and Marcos decide to spend their final days? This book has a strong religious plot weaved throughout. It really highlights the internal struggles of an LGBTQIA person raised within a religious family. I personally related to Milo, having been raised in a family deeply rooted in the church. When you're raised your entire life one way, it can be difficult to go against those teachings, even if the new way feels right. I felt Milo was really written with an authentic voice...His internal struggle was so genuine.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ash

    From PW: "When Marcos moves to town, Milo is forced to acknowledge the feelings he's hidden, not only from himself but also his religious parents. But as natural disasters begin to befall them and they become closer, can their love overcome freakish "acts of God" and vicious judgments?" From PW: "When Marcos moves to town, Milo is forced to acknowledge the feelings he's hidden, not only from himself but also his religious parents. But as natural disasters begin to befall them and they become closer, can their love overcome freakish "acts of God" and vicious judgments?"

  29. 4 out of 5

    Trigger Warning Database

    Trigger & Content Warnings Racism Internalised religious homomisia Hate crime Threats of conversion therapy Fire Hurricane Sinkhole Bullying

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    Ever since almost confessing his feelings to Marcos at summer camp, Milo felt like he could keep his feelings hidden. So far, his plan was working. Until Marcos moves back to town three years later. Per Milo’s calculations, it’s probably because he was due for some teenage catastrophe, anyway. Now, Milo is forced to confront the feelings he had for Marcos three years ago. The only problem? Every time the boys start to get close, something strange happenes. Meteors, sinkholes, blackouts. For Milo, Ever since almost confessing his feelings to Marcos at summer camp, Milo felt like he could keep his feelings hidden. So far, his plan was working. Until Marcos moves back to town three years later. Per Milo’s calculations, it’s probably because he was due for some teenage catastrophe, anyway. Now, Milo is forced to confront the feelings he had for Marcos three years ago. The only problem? Every time the boys start to get close, something strange happenes. Meteors, sinkholes, blackouts. For Milo, it seems like there’s a force trying to keep them apart. A force that could possibly bring about the end of the world. They have to decide, is their love worth the risk? Thanks to HarperTeen and NetGalley for an advanced copy of this to review! From the description, I absolutely knew that this was a book that was right up my alley. And I’m so happy I picked this up! I would continue to read about Milo and Marcos for as long as Snipes wants to write about them. Let me start by saying if you’re looking for a post-apocalyptic romance, this isn’t it. There are some natural disasters and weird things that happen throughout, but it’s not an end of the world kind of situation. Honestly, I would actually compare this to Shaun David Hutchinson’s books. It almost has that kind of feel to it, with all of these strange things happening. I wasn’t disappointed by this, though! The events all had their part to play, and they fit Milo and Marcos’ story well. Milo and Marcos! And Van! The characters in this were phenomenally done. Especially Milo, and Milo’s voice. From the beginning, I was hooked. I didn’t want to put this book down. Snipes nails Milo as a character, even if his internal monologue is sometimes hard to read. Growing up religious, he can’t reconcile his feelings for Marcos with his beliefs. Snipes does a great job putting the reader in his head and putting them through his thought process. The side characters were just as well done. Marcos speaks his mind, is ready to stand up for himself and for Milo. Van is Milo’s best friend and goes above and beyond for him. As a little trio, I love them and desperately want another book about them. All in all, if you’re looking for a strong, character driven MLM romance, definitely pick this one up when it comes out later this May! 4.5 stars

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