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The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School

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A sharply funny and moving debut novel about a queer Mexican American girl navigating Catholic school, while falling in love and learning to celebrate her true self. Perfect for fans of Erika L. S�nchez, Leah Johnson, and Gabby Rivera. Sixteen-year-old Yamilet Flores prefers to be known for her killer eyeliner, not for being one of the only Mexican kids at her new, mostly w A sharply funny and moving debut novel about a queer Mexican American girl navigating Catholic school, while falling in love and learning to celebrate her true self. Perfect for fans of Erika L. S�nchez, Leah Johnson, and Gabby Rivera. Sixteen-year-old Yamilet Flores prefers to be known for her killer eyeliner, not for being one of the only Mexican kids at her new, mostly white, very rich Catholic school. But at least here no one knows she's gay, and Yami intends to keep it that way. After being outed by her crush and ex-best friend before transferring to Slayton Catholic, Yami has new priorities: keep her brother out of trouble, make her mom proud, and, most importantly, don't fall in love. Granted, she's never been great at any of those things, but that's a problem for Future Yami. The thing is, it's hard to fake being straight when Bo, the only openly queer girl at school, is so annoyingly perfect. And smart. And talented. And cute. So cute. Either way, Yami isn't going to make the same mistake again. If word got back to her mom, she could face a lot worse than rejection. So she'll have to start asking, WWSGD: What would a straight girl do? Told in a captivating voice that is by turns hilarious, vulnerable, and searingly honest, The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School explores the joys and heartaches of living your full truth out loud.


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A sharply funny and moving debut novel about a queer Mexican American girl navigating Catholic school, while falling in love and learning to celebrate her true self. Perfect for fans of Erika L. S�nchez, Leah Johnson, and Gabby Rivera. Sixteen-year-old Yamilet Flores prefers to be known for her killer eyeliner, not for being one of the only Mexican kids at her new, mostly w A sharply funny and moving debut novel about a queer Mexican American girl navigating Catholic school, while falling in love and learning to celebrate her true self. Perfect for fans of Erika L. S�nchez, Leah Johnson, and Gabby Rivera. Sixteen-year-old Yamilet Flores prefers to be known for her killer eyeliner, not for being one of the only Mexican kids at her new, mostly white, very rich Catholic school. But at least here no one knows she's gay, and Yami intends to keep it that way. After being outed by her crush and ex-best friend before transferring to Slayton Catholic, Yami has new priorities: keep her brother out of trouble, make her mom proud, and, most importantly, don't fall in love. Granted, she's never been great at any of those things, but that's a problem for Future Yami. The thing is, it's hard to fake being straight when Bo, the only openly queer girl at school, is so annoyingly perfect. And smart. And talented. And cute. So cute. Either way, Yami isn't going to make the same mistake again. If word got back to her mom, she could face a lot worse than rejection. So she'll have to start asking, WWSGD: What would a straight girl do? Told in a captivating voice that is by turns hilarious, vulnerable, and searingly honest, The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School explores the joys and heartaches of living your full truth out loud.

30 review for The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aiden Thomas

    THE LESBIANA’S GUIDE TO CATHOLIC SCHOOL by Sonora Reyes is a story about bravery, love, and so much more. It’s about discovering what makes you feel most at home within yourself, and the comfort that comes with sharing those parts with the people you love, even when it’s scary. With a sweet sapphic romance and fiercely loyal friends, this book is a warm, protective hug for teens who are fighting to be seen as themselves in a world that wants them to hide.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lex Kent

    Yes! This is the book I wanted and needed. YA is a competitive space and there are so many good YA books out there, but this isn’t good YA, this is great YA. This is an example of why I read and love this genre so much. I love emotional YA that gives you all the feels and that is exactly what this book did. This book isn’t perfect, there are a few teeny tiny things, but this is Reyes’ YA debut (which makes it more impressive) and I enjoyed the hell out of it so this is an easy 5 stars for me. Thi Yes! This is the book I wanted and needed. YA is a competitive space and there are so many good YA books out there, but this isn’t good YA, this is great YA. This is an example of why I read and love this genre so much. I love emotional YA that gives you all the feels and that is exactly what this book did. This book isn’t perfect, there are a few teeny tiny things, but this is Reyes’ YA debut (which makes it more impressive) and I enjoyed the hell out of it so this is an easy 5 stars for me. This is one of those books that once you start reading it you can’t put it down. It is a good length, but there was no way I could stop reading. Before I go much farther I want to mention some possible triggers that the characters go through like homophobia, racism, and suicide. I’m not kidding but I think the first time I teared up was only 15% into the book. That is pretty impressive when you realize it means that Reyes made me care about the characters that quickly. And while I didn’t actually cry then, I sure was a mess before the book ended. Take my advice and keep a box of tissues next to you, you will need them. While this book made me an emotional mess at times, it was also heartwarming, sweet, and put multiple smiles on my face. When I say this book had all the feels I truly mean that. The friendships, familiar relationships, and of course the sweet sapphic romance, were all well written and they helped to balance out the harder to read parts. The rep was great and the characters were wonderful. There were some I loved, others I hated, and even the smallest of secondary characters were fully fleshed out. The sapphic romance just fits perfect with the feel of the book and they make a totally adorable couple. I think the only issue I really had is that I wanted more. I didn’t want the book to be over and I don’t want these characters stories to be over. TLDR: If you are a YA fan, this book is a must. If you’re not a big YA fan but still appreciate great stories, then this is still a must. Where is all the hype for this book?! Sometimes I just don’t get it, but I sure hope this book gets the readership it deserves. An ARC was given to me for a review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Talkincloud

    ABSOLUTELY AMAZING! This is what I was looking for in YA! <3

  4. 5 out of 5

    ~ a foray in fantasy ~

    We stan supportive parents!! This book is beyond perfect. The topics addressed are done so with respect— discussions of colonialism, religion, and LGBTQ+ rights all fit perfectly into the book. But, more importantly, the romance was so cute!!! I want what Yami and Bo have. The gay chaos is absolutely one of my favorite aspects of the book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sonora Reyes

    I mean I might be biased, but I thought it was pretty cool :)

  6. 5 out of 5

    alaska

    there are no words, only me yearning for this book like a true sapphic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    booksandzoe

    THIS WAS THE BEST BOOK EVERRRRRARAREARARWGLKNEA

  8. 5 out of 5

    Angel

    I feel like I should get an ARC of this simply because I, too, am gay and go to Catholic school and deserve some type of compensation.

  9. 5 out of 5

    ash | आश ♥ [superache enthusiast]

    i read this after a long week of school and a mental breakdown and this was just so. amazing??? as;dfklj istg it had everything i needed in a book - [poc] lesbians !! - (view spoiler)[mlm and wlw solidarity (hide spoiler)] - family dynamics - talks of internalized homophobhia, religious trauma, casual racism/stereotypes, adoption (from parents of different ethnicity than you), identity - eldest daughter mc - cute christmas/mall date(s) - female (straight vs queer) friendships - gays at catholic school i read this after a long week of school and a mental breakdown and this was just so. amazing??? as;dfklj istg it had everything i needed in a book - [poc] lesbians !! - (view spoiler)[mlm and wlw solidarity (hide spoiler)] - family dynamics - talks of internalized homophobhia, religious trauma, casual racism/stereotypes, adoption (from parents of different ethnicity than you), identity - eldest daughter mc - cute christmas/mall date(s) - female (straight vs queer) friendships - gays at catholic school rep :DD the ending was definitely faster paced but i actually enjoyed the change tho a certain chapter got a bit dark and surprised me istg

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emery Lee

    Cesar is my son and I would die for him. Thank you.

  11. 5 out of 5

    micah ➳ canonicallychaotic

    immediate add to faves shelf rtc!

  12. 5 out of 5

    JulesGP

    I felt this one deeply, all the way to my dna. I’m happy to say that I never stopped loving YA books and to now be able to read ya stories with Latino main characters, lights up my heart. Yamilet Flores and her brother, Cesar, transfer to a Catholic High School in an attempt to escape bullies and rumours. Slayton is attended by mostly rich, white teens and the Flores siblings are neither. Yami is also trying to hide the fact that she likes girls. It’s a big deal and she’s scared of what it might I felt this one deeply, all the way to my dna. I’m happy to say that I never stopped loving YA books and to now be able to read ya stories with Latino main characters, lights up my heart. Yamilet Flores and her brother, Cesar, transfer to a Catholic High School in an attempt to escape bullies and rumours. Slayton is attended by mostly rich, white teens and the Flores siblings are neither. Yami is also trying to hide the fact that she likes girls. It’s a big deal and she’s scared of what it might mean. Just the thought of possible consequences weigh heavily on her along with concern for her brother who’s been coming home from school, clearly having been beaten. Her mother works long hours at a call center and her father only texts from Mexico because he was deported years ago. Latina girls are often the mini mom when it comes to family responsibilities and so it’s no big surprise that Yami feels the weight of caring for Cesar along with having to deal with her own struggles. It’s heartwarming to see their closeness, their shenanigans, and their deep trust of one another. Often in books, stories skim over sibling ties so it’s refreshing to see a family where a brother and sister are tight. Sadly, in spite of their closeness, there are still a few secrets too deep to even share with one another. In 1980, I attended a mostly all white public high school, blue collar, and in the Chicago burbs. Although I was 20 years shy of coming out, I still knew I liked girls. The author is pitch perfect with the characters of Yami and Cesar, both sweet and imperfect. Yami, especially resonates in me, her delicate handling of situations, wanting desperately to be true to herself but so afraid to misstep with word or deed. Her crush and new friend, Bo, seems to epitomize who she longs to be, brave enough to express who she truly is and how she wants to carry herself in this world. Yami who wears big gold hoop earrings, Yami who loves to bead jewelry with her mother, Yami who is Queer and who hopes her family and friends will still love her anyway. Lastly, I enjoyed the familiar world of music and food, the neighborhood where the Flores family live, and the narrator’s warmth giving all of it the life it deserves. I can still hear Selena’s Dreaming of You with Yami and Cesar singing along.

  13. 4 out of 5

    atlas ♡

    i finally finished my first actual book this month everyone clap // rtc

  14. 4 out of 5

    cossette

    i spent the last 30% of this book sobbing my little eyes out. content warnings: outing, deportation, racism, lesbophobia, homophobic slurs, mentions of suicidal thoughts, disownment, implied homophobic violence, hospitalization

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lance

    4 stars. The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School was punchy, relatable, and a solid YA contemporary perfect to read during Pride Month.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    I always am looking out for book that look to balance queerness and religion, or just have religion surrounded by it- both in a good or bad sense. Because while I'm not specifically religious anymore I connect with narratives like that so well. So when I heard about this book about surviving as a Latina lesbian in Catholic school, naturally I was excited for it. And while I expected to enjoy this book it went on to surpass my expectations. I loved it. Sonora Reyes gave us a gem. The Lesbiana's G I always am looking out for book that look to balance queerness and religion, or just have religion surrounded by it- both in a good or bad sense. Because while I'm not specifically religious anymore I connect with narratives like that so well. So when I heard about this book about surviving as a Latina lesbian in Catholic school, naturally I was excited for it. And while I expected to enjoy this book it went on to surpass my expectations. I loved it. Sonora Reyes gave us a gem. The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School follows Yamilet Flores, who after being outed by her former best friend decides to transfer with her brother Cesar to a private Catholic and very white school. And being one of the only Latina girls at that kind of school would be hard enough if she didn't have to work so hard to stay closeted out of fear of how her mom would react. But when Yami starts school and meets Bo everything changes. Bo is out and not afraid to be herself in any circumstance. And as Yami and Bo grow closer she might be changing Yami's mind about that too. As Reyes mentioned in their dedication, this book is about love. And there is romantic love in this book, and I do love Bo and Yami together. They're extremely adorable. But this book is also about familial love and that is definitely my favorite part of this book. Yami and Cesar have such a wonderful (and realistic) sibling dynamic together. And how both of their relationships with their mom changes and develops through the book is so compelling and powerful. I honestly love their mom so much. This was a story that hit on love in every definition of the word. I think this is the first queer book that I can remember reading that is set in my hometown of Phoenix, AZ. There are a couple I can think of that visited or partially based, but they didn't really get it right. But this book so did. And honestly this might sound cheesy to bring up in a review but I absolutely loved it. Is this what it feels like when you live in a costal state and read lesfic? Although I grew up in one part and now live in another part of Phoenix that are both different from where this was primarily located, I could still vividly picture the area and the rich culture that goes with that. As well as I'm familiar with the Catholic school that I think this is loosely based on so that was cool too. I just really enjoyed having a book set in my city. The book also covers many other topics such as cultural appropriation, both unconscious and conscious racism, coming out, mental health issues, and disowning by a parent. I could dedicate a paragraph to each on how well and sensitively the book handled each of these topics, but that would take forever to write. Suffice to say, this book handles a lot of serious issues and does it truly well and is both powerful and touching at the same time. While this book has a romance, I wouldn't label it as a romance novel, because it is so much more. It isn't short, but I downed it in a day because I was so into it. I loved the descriptions of the culture, the characters, and the real emotions it brought up. 5/5 cws: outing, suicide, homophobia, racism Thank you to HarperCollins and Netgalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anya Smith

    This is definitely a new favourite book of mine! The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School follows Yamilet, who, after being outed by her former best friend, switches to a very white, conservative, Catholic School with her brother. The Young Adult genre needs more novels like this. Alongside a sweet friends-to-lovers romance, a loveable sibling dynamic and a humorous narration, Sonora Reyes also manages to explore what it's like to be a queer person of colour in a strict, white, Catholic School en This is definitely a new favourite book of mine! The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School follows Yamilet, who, after being outed by her former best friend, switches to a very white, conservative, Catholic School with her brother. The Young Adult genre needs more novels like this. Alongside a sweet friends-to-lovers romance, a loveable sibling dynamic and a humorous narration, Sonora Reyes also manages to explore what it's like to be a queer person of colour in a strict, white, Catholic School environment. The discussions surrounding race, culture, religion, deportation, sexuality and more were refreshing to see, and there was a great balance between those more serious topics and the sweet, funny moments. Despite being a standalone, the characters were really well developed - even the side characters that didn't get too much page-time! By the end of the novel I felt as though I truly understood and cared for both Yamilet and her brother. Overall, this is an excellent queer, young adult, contemporary novel which I highly recommend! Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with an E-ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    4/5 stars This book comes out on May 17th! Thank you to the author and the publisher for letting me read an advanced copy xxx This book was really, really good and I teared up quite a few times. Sonora Reyes writes with such honesty, it’s very clear this book is special and personal to them. The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School follows Yamilet Flores, a Mexican-American queer girl. After coming out to her best friend, who immediately turns on her, she and her brother move to a new, fancy 4/5 stars This book comes out on May 17th! Thank you to the author and the publisher for letting me read an advanced copy xxx This book was really, really good and I teared up quite a few times. Sonora Reyes writes with such honesty, it’s very clear this book is special and personal to them. The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School follows Yamilet Flores, a Mexican-American queer girl. After coming out to her best friend, who immediately turns on her, she and her brother move to a new, fancy Catholic school. There Yami meets Bo, her new pretty and openly-out friend, and her adventure begins. This book is all about Yami’s struggle to come out to her family and to herself, and we follow her journey as she comes to accept her identity and express herself. It is very genuine — not just in the representation (although it’s very clear this book was written by a Latinx queer author, yay for Own Voices rep!), but in how the characters talk. There’s some cheesy moments that I expect from a romance coming-of-age book, but the characters all speak like real, modern LGBT teens, which adult authors often fuck up. The part where Yami immediately thinks Bo is gay because of her rainbow vans was so spot on lol I absolutely loved the Flores family! Yami and her brother Cesar were honestly the core of this book and their sibling duo was PERFECTION! So many people fuck up the brother-sister friendship, but it was so accurate here, like I’m pretty sure I’ve harassed my brothers in the exact way Yami or Cesar annoy one another. Yami is hilarious and I loved her banter. Her mother is also a star and I wanna buy some of her jewellery! It also has a lot to say about race, and was done so well. Bo is a Chinese girl who is adopted by a white family, and her feelings in particular were so interesting. Yami is half-Indigenous Mexican through her father and we see her struggles in a mostly-white school firsthand. It tackles obvious racism through the bitchy mean girls, and also more subtle forms of racism. Really well done and powerful stuff. Took away one star because I felt there was an unsatisfactory conclusion to a couple of plot lines regarding certain characters. I would’ve liked to see parts of the middle chopped out for a longer epilogue, but it didn’t destroy the book by any means. Overall a really solid contemporary YA that I hope becomes big on TikTok or something, because it deserves it a hell of a lot more than some of the trash on that site :) x

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    About a million years ago (somewhere around 1988) I maintained a bibliography of LGBTQI+ books for children and young adults. Of course we didn't have the term LGBTQI+ back then, at first it was just lesbian and gay, then lesbian/gay/bisexual, then the term of choice became queer, and so on. I'm positing that there must be some sort of feedback loop that operates on the principle of the more we're represented in literature, the more clearly we can see and name ourselves, which leads to more book About a million years ago (somewhere around 1988) I maintained a bibliography of LGBTQI+ books for children and young adults. Of course we didn't have the term LGBTQI+ back then, at first it was just lesbian and gay, then lesbian/gay/bisexual, then the term of choice became queer, and so on. I'm positing that there must be some sort of feedback loop that operates on the principle of the more we're represented in literature, the more clearly we can see and name ourselves, which leads to more books, which leads to a better understanding of who we are in all our diversity, which leads to, etc. In 1988 the literature available was limited. We had the ubiquitous Heather Has Two Mommies. Then we had a demi-passel of teen problem novels. At the time, this body of literature was wonderful simply in existing, but it was also limited. Too many of the stories involved young people coming out and then being a) jumped by homophobes, b) rejected by their families, c) being expelled from school, or d) losing friends and becoming loners. The implication was that young LGBTQI+ people couldn't hope to be happy when they were young: they just had to grit their teeth, put up with the cruelties and losses, and hope to be able to run away to somewhere more "cosmopolitan" once they reached adulthood. Not really uplifting reading if you're thinking your life is headed this way. Another limitation was the very narrow set of people actually represented in these books. I knew of exactly two titles that had any characters who weren't white. About 80% of the teen novels involving girls took place in private boarding schools, as if it was only in such wealthy and privileged settings that a young woman could allow her thoughts to wander over to the possibility of Not. Being. Straight. Today the body of children's and young adults' LGBTQI+ literature is much more apt to include BIPOC characters from a variety of rungs on the economic ladder, which means that a young LGBTQI+ person has a much better chance of finding themselves in the books they read. All of which leads up to... Sonora Reyes' The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School, a young adult title that crosses a host of identity and economic boundaries without being irritatingly smug in that I-am-keeping-a-checklist-and-ticking-off-one-person-of-every-kind-from-a-variety-of-neighborhoods-and-family-structures way. The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School is a fun, reasonably non-didactic title that gives LGBTQI+ youth a sense that hope is for Now, and not just something to dream of a few decades down the road. Yamilet Flores, the novel's central character and first-person narrator is quirky, observant, and determined not to let anyone find out she's a lesbian. Her inner dialogues are full of the kind of conflicting impulses and sudden drops and leaps in self-acceptance that most of us will remember from our own high school years. Yamilet and her friends drive the action of the novel, learning to stand up for themselves and finding clever ways to respond to their heteronormative surroundings. This is a wonderful title for anyone who grew up LGBTQI+. Or straight. It's a wonderful title for anyone in the process of growing up LGBTQI+. Or straight. It's just a wonderful title. Buy it, read it, then pass your copy along to someone else who will enjoy it every bit as much as you will have found you did. I received a free electronic review copy of this title from the publisher via NetGalley; the opinions are my own.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Star

    Content warnings: homophobia, racism, coming out themes (central plot), underage drinking, suicide ideation, hospitalisation of a character, immigration, talks of deportation, talks of police brutality, slurs, parental homophobia. Rep: Yamilet is lesbian and Mexican-American, Bo is lesbian and Chinese, Cesar is bisexual and Mexican-American. This book is hard, wonderful, inspiring, sad, and beautiful. The family depiction in this book is so incredibly well done. Yamilet is lesbian. The one person sh Content warnings: homophobia, racism, coming out themes (central plot), underage drinking, suicide ideation, hospitalisation of a character, immigration, talks of deportation, talks of police brutality, slurs, parental homophobia. Rep: Yamilet is lesbian and Mexican-American, Bo is lesbian and Chinese, Cesar is bisexual and Mexican-American. This book is hard, wonderful, inspiring, sad, and beautiful. The family depiction in this book is so incredibly well done. Yamilet is lesbian. The one person she told about her sexuality outs her and it was so raw to read about and to read her go through it. She and her brother, Cesar, change schools since he had been bullied at his last one, and Yamilet needs to protect her brother, so she goes too - except that it's a Catholic school, with more white kids than any others. Yamilet tries to fly under the radar, to "be straight" and deal with her own internalised homophobia, all while trying to keep an eye on her brother, work, and do school on top of that. She doesn't expect Bo, though - Bo who is loud and proud and inspiring. Watching them get to know each other and develop their relationship was so lovely. I hurt for both of these girls, as well as Cesar, bless his soul, and I wanted to hug these three so much. There were moments in this book that made me cry, but it wasn't all sadness and hopelessness. What queer kids need more than anything is hope, and this book also gives that. These three belong in my heart forever now. 5/5 stars. Bookish links: Instagram / Twitter / TikTok / Blog

  21. 5 out of 5

    ⛅ Saniya (sunnysidereviews) ⛅

    --school/academia vibes --Lesbian MC --Latin rep This sounds so awesome! Can't wait! --school/academia vibes --Lesbian MC --Latin rep This sounds so awesome! Can't wait!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anniek

    There's a lot to love about this book, and it has a lot of strong elements. Overall though, I found it a little rough around the edges; it felt a little unfinished to me. Especially in the first half, the book felt like it missed direction. The second half proved a better experience for me, because it felt more focused, but I still felt like it could have been structured better. I just felt like a lot of the big emotional moments were a little rushed and could have gotten a little more attention There's a lot to love about this book, and it has a lot of strong elements. Overall though, I found it a little rough around the edges; it felt a little unfinished to me. Especially in the first half, the book felt like it missed direction. The second half proved a better experience for me, because it felt more focused, but I still felt like it could have been structured better. I just felt like a lot of the big emotional moments were a little rushed and could have gotten a little more attention. I did however love the sibling relationship especially!

  23. 5 out of 5

    charlotte,

    Rep: Indigenous Mexican American lesbian mc, Chinese American lesbian li, Indigenous Mexican American bi side character, Black gay side character CWs: outing, deportation, racism, lesbophobia, homophobic slurs, mentions of suicidal thoughts, disownment, implied homophobic violence

  24. 4 out of 5

    gauri

    excellent combination of emotional, cute and evoking, rtc!!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mia

    3.5 stars The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School has: sapphic friends to lovers with mutual pining and amazing siblings relationship. I just wished some emotional beats weren't rushed but overall I really liked this book. 3.5 stars The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School has: sapphic friends to lovers with mutual pining and amazing siblings relationship. I just wished some emotional beats weren't rushed but overall I really liked this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    ian (hiatus) nelson

    I TOTALLY CRIED OVER THIS AND I'M NOT ASHAMED this book is so so so so so so so good I'm not writing a review because I won't do it justice, BUT PLEASE READ THIS OMG PLEASE IT IS SO GOOD I TOTALLY CRIED OVER THIS AND I'M NOT ASHAMED this book is so so so so so so so good I'm not writing a review because I won't do it justice, BUT PLEASE READ THIS OMG PLEASE IT IS SO GOOD

  27. 5 out of 5

    hannah jo

    THIS WAS THE MOST PERFECT BOOK. I LAUGHED, I CRIED, I LEARNED, AND I FELL IN LOVE WITH ALL OF THE CHARACTERS. please please read this book it was so beautiful and so worth it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    cel ✼ readwithcel

    ACTUALLY A BANGER!!! DANG

  29. 5 out of 5

    Althea

    The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School was one of my most anticipated 2022 releases, and Sonora Reyes did not disappoint! The book follows Yamilet who moves to a private catholic school after her gifted brother gets a scholarship there. But just before leaving her old school, her ex-best friend outs her as a lesbian. Desperate for a fresh start, and scared that her family will find out about her sexuality, Yami decides to act as straight as possible at her new school. But on her first day there The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School was one of my most anticipated 2022 releases, and Sonora Reyes did not disappoint! The book follows Yamilet who moves to a private catholic school after her gifted brother gets a scholarship there. But just before leaving her old school, her ex-best friend outs her as a lesbian. Desperate for a fresh start, and scared that her family will find out about her sexuality, Yami decides to act as straight as possible at her new school. But on her first day there, she gets a crush on the only openly queer student at the school – Bo. First and foremost, I loved the representation in this book. And I don’t mean that only in the sense of the characters’ identities – although we do get a Latine lesbian, a Chinese lesbian, a bisexual Latine and a Black achillean character – but also in the sense of what it’s like being queer in high school. That includes the loneliness of it all when it comes to physical affection with your friends, and of course the homophobia. It felt so natural and so realistic and I hope that it acts as some comfort to queer teens that may be going through a similar time to Yamilet. Speaking of Yami, she was a really fun main character. I loved her passion and her love for her family. I loved how she made mistakes, and drunk called her crush, and that she just wasn’t perfect. And as well as all that, she was funny! I read parts of the book aloud to my girlfriend and there were times where we were both laughing out loud at her narration. Aside from Yami, I obviously loved Bo and how outspoken she was. It was also refreshing to see a bit more of a masculine-leaning sapphic character in a young adult book, and although I wish it wasn’t so exciting to only see one every so often, I did enjoy that a lot. Though they played a smaller role in the book, I did enjoy Cesar, Yami’s brother, and Jamal popping up every so often, though I wish that in general the side characters were a bit stronger, especially Yami and Bo’s close friends. This book is a really great journey of self discovery and love – loving yourself, loving your family, and of course loving others! It’s a really valuable addition to the amazing queer young adult novels that are on offer now and I can’t wait to read what Sonora Reyes releases next!

  30. 5 out of 5

    dezzy

    4.5 stars. this was such a fun and emotional read, and i smiled so much at the sapphic romance because they're so adorable aahhhh 🥺🥺 i appreciated the nuanced exploration of navigating one's queerness within Catholicism, and i love the empowering and supportive messages of this book!! (view spoiler)[so sad that Yami's dad was homophobic and not accepting of either of his children in the end, but i'm really glad her mom came around to supporting both her queer children. self-reflection, growth, and 4.5 stars. this was such a fun and emotional read, and i smiled so much at the sapphic romance because they're so adorable aahhhh 🥺🥺 i appreciated the nuanced exploration of navigating one's queerness within Catholicism, and i love the empowering and supportive messages of this book!! (view spoiler)[so sad that Yami's dad was homophobic and not accepting of either of his children in the end, but i'm really glad her mom came around to supporting both her queer children. self-reflection, growth, and unconditional love - we love to see it!! (hide spoiler)]

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