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The Prince of Nowhere

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Roda isn't afraid of the monsters that roam the wilds of the Aerlands. She's safe in her small town, surrounded by a wall of freezing, enchanted mist that keeps the beasts away. So when Roda rescues an injured crow on the instruction of her secret pen pal, Anonymous – whose letters arrive without warning and correctly predict the future – she's surprised to learn she's bro Roda isn't afraid of the monsters that roam the wilds of the Aerlands. She's safe in her small town, surrounded by a wall of freezing, enchanted mist that keeps the beasts away. So when Roda rescues an injured crow on the instruction of her secret pen pal, Anonymous – whose letters arrive without warning and correctly predict the future – she's surprised to learn she's brought one of the so-called monsters home. Because her crow is really a shape-shifting boy named Ignis. Ignis doesn't remember where he was going before he crashed. But Anonymous brought him and Roda together for a reason – and the only way to find out what Anonymous wants is to follow the trail of baffling clues in Roda's letters. Their perilous journey leads them into the mist and beyond, to a mysterious place called Nowhere. But Ignis has secrets, and the farther they get, the more Roda doubts she can trust him. As a nefarious force closes in, they'll have to put aside their differences and work together. For they might be each other's only defense against an enemy who threatens their past, present, and future.


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Roda isn't afraid of the monsters that roam the wilds of the Aerlands. She's safe in her small town, surrounded by a wall of freezing, enchanted mist that keeps the beasts away. So when Roda rescues an injured crow on the instruction of her secret pen pal, Anonymous – whose letters arrive without warning and correctly predict the future – she's surprised to learn she's bro Roda isn't afraid of the monsters that roam the wilds of the Aerlands. She's safe in her small town, surrounded by a wall of freezing, enchanted mist that keeps the beasts away. So when Roda rescues an injured crow on the instruction of her secret pen pal, Anonymous – whose letters arrive without warning and correctly predict the future – she's surprised to learn she's brought one of the so-called monsters home. Because her crow is really a shape-shifting boy named Ignis. Ignis doesn't remember where he was going before he crashed. But Anonymous brought him and Roda together for a reason – and the only way to find out what Anonymous wants is to follow the trail of baffling clues in Roda's letters. Their perilous journey leads them into the mist and beyond, to a mysterious place called Nowhere. But Ignis has secrets, and the farther they get, the more Roda doubts she can trust him. As a nefarious force closes in, they'll have to put aside their differences and work together. For they might be each other's only defense against an enemy who threatens their past, present, and future.

30 review for The Prince of Nowhere

  1. 4 out of 5

    Belles Middle Grade Library

    This was such a dark, mind boggling adventure! Loved it. I love this world the author has created with its backstory, the mist, the mage, monsters/creatures, Nowhere, etc. Very intricate, & it fascinated me from the start. The world building is amazing. I also loved the aspect of the notes left for Roda. Ignis has my heart. Everything we learn about him, including what he is, his flock, what he can do, what happened before he meets Roda-loved it all. Great discussions to be had from topics in he This was such a dark, mind boggling adventure! Loved it. I love this world the author has created with its backstory, the mist, the mage, monsters/creatures, Nowhere, etc. Very intricate, & it fascinated me from the start. The world building is amazing. I also loved the aspect of the notes left for Roda. Ignis has my heart. Everything we learn about him, including what he is, his flock, what he can do, what happened before he meets Roda-loved it all. Great discussions to be had from topics in here too. That gray area of morality in a way..if something is said to be wrong, but doing it could erase a huge tragedy….does that make you good or bad for doing it? And the question of: “What would I do in that situation?” Actually Ignis has part of my heart, & Will has the other. What a unique, incredible character. The twists had me floored, & gave me a headache lol But that goes along with the headache from the different timelines & trying to see it all in my head lol-authors that can write stories like this & not go crazy are full of pure talent! Lol I love it.(I’m joking about actually getting a headache lol Just saying this was an intricate puzzle of “time”). The way I feel about the ending depends on if there will be a sequel. If there will be, then I totally get why it ended that way & can’t wait to see what happens next. If not, while it did have a nice complete ending of sorts..it wasn’t as satisfying of an ending as I would have wanted. I was a little frustrated. But I loved the whole book so much that I still recommend this, & am so happy I read it. Darker upper MG that I love! This comes out May 3rd! STUNNING cover by Carly A-F too!💜

  2. 5 out of 5

    Celia

    Bold statement time: this has to be one of the best middle-grade books I have ever read. This is a hill I will gladly sit on forever. Big thanks to NetGalley and Harperkids for the arc. The vibes I got from this book were: Return to Oz, Mirrormask, and just about every Miyazaki film ever made. These are all the movies I love, so in turn, I loved this book. Roda is thrust into an adventure to save her mother when her anonymous pen pal guides her to seek out a mysterious place called Nowhere. Paire Bold statement time: this has to be one of the best middle-grade books I have ever read. This is a hill I will gladly sit on forever. Big thanks to NetGalley and Harperkids for the arc. The vibes I got from this book were: Return to Oz, Mirrormask, and just about every Miyazaki film ever made. These are all the movies I love, so in turn, I loved this book. Roda is thrust into an adventure to save her mother when her anonymous pen pal guides her to seek out a mysterious place called Nowhere. Paired up with a once injured crow-now-turned boy named Ignis, they climb onto dragons, fight automatons and navigate twists and turns all while deciding who to trust and who not to trust. First of all, I love fantasy worlds that incorporate modern-day living, tech, etc. I'm going to have to message the author to get a better hold on what sort of world this is, but it is rooted in our world but with fantasy elements. Nevertheless, the world-building was superb. There are so many aspects of this book that took me back to watching all Jim Henson's movies like Labyrinth and Dark Crystal, as well as the aforementioned Mirrormask and Return to Oz. Being introduced to those movies was one of the best times of my childhood. The time travel element is reminiscent of Howl's Moving Castle a tad bit. Oh, and it's masterfully written. Roda is fierce and determined while Ignis is a little crass but endearing. Ignis's past is very heartbreaking (that scene toward the end though WAHHHHHH) The family elements and Roda's love for her mother and aunt are also well done. I want to end this review with a pleeeeeeease write a sequel! The book does have a self-contained ending, but there is so much more to explore. I had so much fun reading this book and I hope you all will enjoy it too.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anuska

    HOWL'S MOVING CASTLE-INSPIRED MG FANTASY??? I'm in!! HOWL'S MOVING CASTLE-INSPIRED MG FANTASY??? I'm in!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    Thank you so much to HarperCollins Canada and Netgalley for the eARC! I haven’t read middle-grade fantasy in quite a bit, but this was such a lovely surprise! It was such a quick and easy read, and I adored it! The worldbuilding was incredibly detailed and intricate, and I loved learning about Nowhere and everything in between. From time travel to Aethons, it was filled with such magic, and I enjoyed the whole way through. The plot was actually quite suspenseful, and once I really got into it, I c Thank you so much to HarperCollins Canada and Netgalley for the eARC! I haven’t read middle-grade fantasy in quite a bit, but this was such a lovely surprise! It was such a quick and easy read, and I adored it! The worldbuilding was incredibly detailed and intricate, and I loved learning about Nowhere and everything in between. From time travel to Aethons, it was filled with such magic, and I enjoyed the whole way through. The plot was actually quite suspenseful, and once I really got into it, I couldn’t stop reading. It was exciting and fun, and was a whole rollercoaster of emotions. Plus some of the plot twists and cliffhangers there had my jaw DROPPED. I was on the edge of my seat, and I ended up reading a bunch of it in one sitting. At first, I was afraid I’d find reading characters younger than me to feel strange, but I ended up connecting with both Roda and Ignis. They were absolutely adorable and such a treat to read about! Roda was a little hard to figure out at first, but I loved her determination and strength, as well as her kind heart. Ignis was such a little cinnamon roll himbo that was just adorable to read about, and I felt so bad for him with all that he went through. Overall, it was a great read! I would recommend it for those who are new to reading and are around 9-12 as its short and fun! Again, thank you so so much to HarperCollins for the early copy and the book is officially released everywhere! 4/5 stars :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maya Prasad

    This middle grade fantasy is such a fun, whimsical adventure story! It follows 12yo Roda as she tries to unravel the strange notes left to her by Anonymous. They lead her to saving a crow who turns out to be a shape-shifter, and into the icy mists that surround her home town. Roda escapes monsters and mechanical giants, befriends a sentient bit of light, rides a comet, and possibly discovers a castle in the sky. There's so much magic and wonder in this story, and a fun twist! I think I read that This middle grade fantasy is such a fun, whimsical adventure story! It follows 12yo Roda as she tries to unravel the strange notes left to her by Anonymous. They lead her to saving a crow who turns out to be a shape-shifter, and into the icy mists that surround her home town. Roda escapes monsters and mechanical giants, befriends a sentient bit of light, rides a comet, and possibly discovers a castle in the sky. There's so much magic and wonder in this story, and a fun twist! I think I read that this was inspired in part by HOWL'S MOVING CASTLE, and yes I think fans of it will enjoy this too! Out May 3rd!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karina Evans

    Wonderfully imaginative! The scope of this world will blow your mind - it's like if Christopher Nolan wrote a middle grade book. Turny, twisty, and unexpected. I'm ready for this to be an HBO series so I can sort out every clue I missed while reading. 10/10!!!!!!! Wonderfully imaginative! The scope of this world will blow your mind - it's like if Christopher Nolan wrote a middle grade book. Turny, twisty, and unexpected. I'm ready for this to be an HBO series so I can sort out every clue I missed while reading. 10/10!!!!!!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sean Miller

    Short review: “THE PRINCE OF NOWHERE is everything you love about Studio Ghibli in book form.” Long review: This book is a middle grade fantasy superstar! I LOVED it so much. I will keep this review spoiler-free, but wow it’s going to be hard! This book perfectly captures those Studio Ghibli feelings of magic, nostalgia, whimsy, childlike wonder, that bittersweet longing and affection with a dash of melancholy, but above all, that triumphant feeling of hope. From chapter one, when Roda rushes an in Short review: “THE PRINCE OF NOWHERE is everything you love about Studio Ghibli in book form.” Long review: This book is a middle grade fantasy superstar! I LOVED it so much. I will keep this review spoiler-free, but wow it’s going to be hard! This book perfectly captures those Studio Ghibli feelings of magic, nostalgia, whimsy, childlike wonder, that bittersweet longing and affection with a dash of melancholy, but above all, that triumphant feeling of hope. From chapter one, when Roda rushes an injured, nearly frozen crow back to her house to revive it, you can’t help but root for her. She is so loveable, that you just want to run alongside her cheering, “Go Roda! I believe in you!” She’s such an easy character to connect with, and through all her adventure, relationships, hardships, you feel her every emotion. The dynamic between Roda and Ignis (the mysterious boy dropped into her life), is so fun, playful, and truly authentic. Middle school readers will easily relate to and adore these characters as they figure out not only each other, but also themselves. The lush fantasy world that Rochelle Hassan creates intertwines with the story so well, becoming a character in itself. It’s filled with magical creatures both familiar and unique and each one finding a creative and distinct place within the plot and mystery. The Ghibli-esque world grows and becomes more and more alive with every step Roda takes. I won’t give anything away(!!!), but I cannot stress enough the uniqueness and creativity that went into this world that constantly gave me an overwhelming sense of awe. What really puts the cherry on the top is how intricately plotted the mystery is. Even when you think you have it figured out, you don’t. With every new clue the mystery grows deeper until falling perfectly into place in an epic magical climax. Creating a unique mystery that is also so satisfying when revealed is such a make-or-break moment for me—and this book nails it. I cannot recommend this book enough. It’s the kind of classic, timeless fantasy story that kids reading it today will cherish and eventually want to read with their own children.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shifa S

    Wow! I was swept away by this book within the first few pages and I throughly enjoyed every second of reading it!! I can’t wait for the next book in this series and more by this talented author! Genre: MG Fantasy Ages: 10 plus Available: Amazon- preorder before the May 3 release date Screening: Really clean! A brief mention of a period and some fighting. Roda lives in Blume, where an icy mist surrounds her town to protect it from the dangers outside of it. When she receives a message from Anonymous w Wow! I was swept away by this book within the first few pages and I throughly enjoyed every second of reading it!! I can’t wait for the next book in this series and more by this talented author! Genre: MG Fantasy Ages: 10 plus Available: Amazon- preorder before the May 3 release date Screening: Really clean! A brief mention of a period and some fighting. Roda lives in Blume, where an icy mist surrounds her town to protect it from the dangers outside of it. When she receives a message from Anonymous with true foretelling, Roda is excited by the prospect of adventure. After rescuing a crow, Anonymous sends Roda on a mission, where Roda learns the affect of time travel and how small decisions can have big consequences. The Arab name of the author and protagonist attracted me to this book, and though there is no Arab or Muslim rep, I completely enjoyed getting lost in this story that was weaved so skillfully and so enjoyable, I can def see any tween being a huge fan of this book series! The book has lots of wisdom and important lessons for young readers woven into the action packed tale, and I loved Roda’s insight and maturing through the book. I truly can’t recommend this book enough, I seriously enjoyed it and am planning to preorder a copy for my own son!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Vitalis

    This book is full of twists and turns that will keep you guessing! Set in a small town surrounded by a mist that keeps monsters out, Roda lives a fairly typical life until she receives a note from a secret pen pal directing her toward an injured crow. But this is a world where everybody seems to carry secrets, and the crow is no exception. When her mother's life appears to be on the line, Roda and her "crow" set off an adventures guided by clues from Roda's pen pal. Eventually, Roda is going to This book is full of twists and turns that will keep you guessing! Set in a small town surrounded by a mist that keeps monsters out, Roda lives a fairly typical life until she receives a note from a secret pen pal directing her toward an injured crow. But this is a world where everybody seems to carry secrets, and the crow is no exception. When her mother's life appears to be on the line, Roda and her "crow" set off an adventures guided by clues from Roda's pen pal. Eventually, Roda is going to have to decide who she can trust––and whose side she is on. I can't say any more for fear I'll spoil the story!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Dassori

    A magical story in myriad ways! What a wonderfully written debut that follows the protagonist, Roda, on a high-stakes, fantastical journey. Rochelle Hassan's mysterious story is beautifully written and full of vivid descriptions, details and twists, but the pace still moves swiftly along in a manner that will pull in middle grade readers. I'm so taken with this story--I think kids will absolutely love it. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an advance copy. A magical story in myriad ways! What a wonderfully written debut that follows the protagonist, Roda, on a high-stakes, fantastical journey. Rochelle Hassan's mysterious story is beautifully written and full of vivid descriptions, details and twists, but the pace still moves swiftly along in a manner that will pull in middle grade readers. I'm so taken with this story--I think kids will absolutely love it. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an advance copy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I loved this book so much that I blurbed it - here's my blurb: "A dazzling story. The Prince of Nowhere will keep readers enthralled and guessing throughout its twists and turns." Seriously - you don't want to miss out on this! The Howl's Moving Castle comp is right on the mark, and Rochelle Hassan surprised me with wonderful twists in the story. I loved this book so much that I blurbed it - here's my blurb: "A dazzling story. The Prince of Nowhere will keep readers enthralled and guessing throughout its twists and turns." Seriously - you don't want to miss out on this! The Howl's Moving Castle comp is right on the mark, and Rochelle Hassan surprised me with wonderful twists in the story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kirin

    Is this the standard of middle grade fantasy? I don't read a lot of the genre, but either way this book is incredible., and I am blown away. The writing, the pacing, the world building, the plot complexity, all combining and keeping everything straight is impressive. It took a bit to get going and building a bond with the characters, but once the diagrams started, the pocket universe circling reality was explained, and the time traveling implications manifest I couldn't read fast enough. The boo Is this the standard of middle grade fantasy? I don't read a lot of the genre, but either way this book is incredible., and I am blown away. The writing, the pacing, the world building, the plot complexity, all combining and keeping everything straight is impressive. It took a bit to get going and building a bond with the characters, but once the diagrams started, the pocket universe circling reality was explained, and the time traveling implications manifest I couldn't read fast enough. The book is clean and I have already preordered it for my children aged 11-15, well over the target age, but engaging enough that they have been told they have to read it, so we can discuss. Roda starts getting mysterious notes that seem to protect the future in riddles, instruct her on what to do, and giver her something to look forward to. She doesn't keep secrets, but for some reason, she doesn't share the notes either. When a note leads her to take in a mysterious crow and the crow is a shapeshifting Aethon, it isn't just the mysterious notes that need figuring out. The action elevates and monsters, time travel, saving her mom, and confronting herself all will play out before the book is over. I'm not sure if the book is a series, but I kind of need closure while at the same time I like that the future for these characters is vague. This book releases tomorrow and I hope readers and educators will encourage middle school and up to spend sometime stretching their imaginations and considering what lies beyond the mist.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alexis The Nerdy Bruja

    4/5 Stars ** I received this as an E-ARC from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for my honest review, Thank you!** I had a great time reading this book. This went a little darker than I thought it would for a middle grade but it worked here. I'll admit that it took me a little to really get invested in the story and the characters, but once I did man was it great. I would highly recommend this middle-grade fantasy book. It's a great time and keeps you on the edge of your chair to find out 4/5 Stars ** I received this as an E-ARC from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for my honest review, Thank you!** I had a great time reading this book. This went a little darker than I thought it would for a middle grade but it worked here. I'll admit that it took me a little to really get invested in the story and the characters, but once I did man was it great. I would highly recommend this middle-grade fantasy book. It's a great time and keeps you on the edge of your chair to find out what happens next!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kactus

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Random, ranty thoughts: In theory I LOVE books about time travel, time loops, alternate selves and realities. In practice, I have rarely found one I've enjoyed. Thinking over all the books along the same vein that I've read over the last few years (including this one), I can pinpoint one, maybe two I've enjoyed. I think what it comes down to is: authors get so excited about the timey-wimey plot twist they've constructed that they forget to inject the book with anything else: convincing worlds, 3D Random, ranty thoughts: In theory I LOVE books about time travel, time loops, alternate selves and realities. In practice, I have rarely found one I've enjoyed. Thinking over all the books along the same vein that I've read over the last few years (including this one), I can pinpoint one, maybe two I've enjoyed. I think what it comes down to is: authors get so excited about the timey-wimey plot twist they've constructed that they forget to inject the book with anything else: convincing worlds, 3D characters, a theme that doesn't fall back onto the trite existentialism (yes, I'm calling an existentialist theme trite, because in the context of this subgenre it is overhashed) so on, so forth. I.e. they get so wrapped up in their own "cleverness" that they forget to have heart. And another thing -- because they insert timeline shenanigans, it means you have to turn on your brain when reading them. So flaws in world/character/theme that might otherwise go unnoticed stand out in sharp relief. So with that out of the way I'm goint to nitpick this additional entry in the timey-wimey subgenre. TLDR; while I do applaud the funky timeline twists (that's what the extra star is for) it's not great. THE PRINCE OF NOWHERE CHARACTER AND PLOT: I don't want to dwell too heavily on any of the predictability of the plot or perceived plot holes, because a) it's a middle grade book and b) I believe scifi and plot are firmly meant to be tools to facilitate a narrative of character growth so I don't really care about that. Of course in order for this plot/character relationship to work, there actually HAS to be some kind of character to mould lmao Roda, the protagonist, has nearly no personality. The only thing I learned about her was that she admired her "Aunt" Dora and her aunt's adventures, but that was only so she could be OMGWTFBBQ betrayed by the ~plot twist~ later. Like, this trait didn't inform her behaviour at all (I'm not counting when she tells herself to "be like Aunt Dora" to get herself to do things, bc those actions were all things she had to do for the plot to move forwards and didn't feel like organic actions she would have taken as a character/ the Aunt Dora motivation was tacked on so she'd have the drive to do literally anything other than sit on her bum. But I digress). She wasn't peppy or spunky or timid or thoughtful or self-determined or anxious or anything you could remotely say about a real person etc etc etc. She acted like an automaton and did things to facilitate the plot (yes, this means she essentially suffered no major setbacks for her actions) and had relatively no other thoughts or emotions other than the barest, surface level "human" emotions like, "I love my friends and family". Which is why the aforementioned timey-wimey "Aunt Dora and Roda were the same person" plot twist did nothing for me -- there wasn't any basis of Roda's character for me to draw any insights about the person she became, nor could I feel any sympathy for Roda's feelings of betrayal because the author hadn't established WHO Roda was enough for me to care about her, or her 2 week long sudden-BFF relationship with Ignis. Rinse and repeat for every other character in the book. WORLDBUILDING I don't really have many standards for worldbuilding for middle grade books because what child actually cares about the political/economic/religious system of the fantasy world they're reading about? But the one standard I do have is: establish, broadly, what is normal, so when the Plot Happens to the protagonist, you have a basis for which to establish how abnormal or extraordinary the events happening to them are. Hossan didn't do a great job of establishing any "normal" here. Aside from the additional details we're given about mist and monsters (more on this later), we're only told vague things about Roda going to school and living in a house with her mother. So when Roda encounters a secret passageway in her town, on a scale of 1-10, how surprised am I meant to infer she feels? And monsters and fantasy races exist, and some are terribly dangerous -- so when Roda encounters a giant dragon, how fearful am I meant to be for Roda's life? How much of the magic and tech in Nowhere is meant to be fantastical to me, the reader versus to the characters living in the world? There are ancient robots protecting the railways of the world -- so when Roda finds laser-beam shooting automatons in Nowhere, is that the equivalent of me walking into a fantasy world and finding a cool robot, or just a cool iPad that can also shoot laser beams? Normally I'd say you could infer from the protagonist's reactions, but since Roda reacts to everything with the same kind of lukewarm acceptance/surprise mix, it's hard to say. You get the gist. With all this said, since the majority of the book takes place not in Roda's city, but in secret caves and in Nowhere, what was the point of any of the worldbuilding at all? We learn, at the start of the book that the protagonist lives in a world where cities are enshrouded in a cold mist to protect the inhabitants from monsters. We infer that it is a dangerous journey and strangers aren't always welcome in town, before a stranger shows up in Roda's life, kickstarting the plot. None of the ramifications of that are explored whatsoever. It really seems like it's setting Roda and Ignis up to go beyond the mist and into the unknown, or face some kind of attitude or hostility from the people in the town, but nothing. So why waste words on what is essentially only mildy cool set dressing? And I say mildly cool only, because even though the concept is quite cool, Hossan hurries past it like it embarrasses her. We don't even get the vaguest description of what the city looks like, what the people look like, or what the characters wear or do on a daily basis? Again, I don't NEED these things, but in the absence of any other coherence or connection to the plot, I try to latch onto any detail to ground me in the setting -- and with that failing, the world falls apart utterly. IS IT FUN FOR KIDS "Oh," but you might say, "It's a middle grade book, you're thinking too hard about all of this!" -- to which I say, yeah I know, and therein lies my biggest problem with the book: it doesn't seem written FOR kids at all, and while no doubt some kids will enjoy it, that seems more like a coincidence than cause-and-effect. I don't have any way of dictating what middle grade "should" be, but I will say the majority of successful middle grade books I've read do the following: - Centre the kids of the story, showcase their tenacity and temerity in a world for adults. - Let the kids push the plot forwards. Like, surely this is the bare minimum? But THE PRINCE OF NOWHERE feels a lot more like the story of Aunt Dora and the Prince than Roda and Ignis'. Putting aside the fact they are the same people (but also not), Roda is pulled into the plot by Dora on account of a fake motivation (saving her mother, who it turns out was never in danger at all), is used as a tool by her to fulfil HER motivations, and whatever decisions Roda makes are (mostly) decisions Aunt Dora has made before (though, we are told at the end things turned out differently but we sure aren't shown it). Even Ignis and Roda's relationship seems like a shallow reflection of the decades of bitterness and betrayal and fondness between Aunt Dora and the Prince. It lowkey seems like Hossan wanted to write some YA fantasy star-crossed time loop enemies to lovers between a girl and a monster prince but swerved at the last minute -- yet still couldn't resist putting it in and sapping all the energy of the plot with it lol. TLDR; Roda does nothing, triumphs uniquely over nothing and carries no responsibility unto herself, making it a boring and passive book where the kids aren't the heroes. Lastly, I firmly believe the book could have lived up to it's potential if the writing was better, but alas it is written in the classic "debut author" style (oddly distanced voice, plods through events at a lumbering pace and suspiciously quickly at others, pushes past emotional touchpoints in the narrative without giving them room to breathe, doesn't know what elements to emphasise). 1.5 stars

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    Well this was tremendous, and the best middle-grade book I've read since I was lucky enough to pick up Megan Morrison's Grouded over a year ago. Roda and Ignis are impossibly not to love, both clever and flawed and with a fascinating, bittersweet relationship. I could have easily read another ~330 pages of these two, and that's the only reason this book wasn't an absolute favorite. (view spoiler)[ I hate open/ambiguous endings as a rule, and The Prince of Nowhere especially felt like the first h Well this was tremendous, and the best middle-grade book I've read since I was lucky enough to pick up Megan Morrison's Grouded over a year ago. Roda and Ignis are impossibly not to love, both clever and flawed and with a fascinating, bittersweet relationship. I could have easily read another ~330 pages of these two, and that's the only reason this book wasn't an absolute favorite. (view spoiler)[ I hate open/ambiguous endings as a rule, and The Prince of Nowhere especially felt like the first half of a duology (or even the first third of a trilogy), with so much room for more. (hide spoiler)] You better believe I'll be waiting for more from Hassan with bated breathe <3

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dragons*4ever

    ˜”*°👑𝕿𝖍𝖊 𝕻𝖗𝖎𝖓𝖈𝖊 𝖔𝖋 𝕹𝖔𝖜𝖍𝖊𝖗𝖊👑°*”˜ Dangerous mystical beasts and creatures reside in the Aerlands. The mist; a wall of mist that wraps around her whole town, separating it from the rest of the world. Roda's mysterious penpal Anonymous sends her a letter to go to the edge of the mist to rescue a crow. Ignis, a boy who can shape-shift from crow-to human. Together; they journey into the mist and to a place called Nowhere. There they find Anonymous, and both of their lives unravel. The Prince of Nowher ˜”*°👑𝕿𝖍𝖊 𝕻𝖗𝖎𝖓𝖈𝖊 𝖔𝖋 𝕹𝖔𝖜𝖍𝖊𝖗𝖊👑°*”˜ Dangerous mystical beasts and creatures reside in the Aerlands. The mist; a wall of mist that wraps around her whole town, separating it from the rest of the world. Roda's mysterious penpal Anonymous sends her a letter to go to the edge of the mist to rescue a crow. Ignis, a boy who can shape-shift from crow-to human. Together; they journey into the mist and to a place called Nowhere. There they find Anonymous, and both of their lives unravel. The Prince of Nowhere is brimming with time-travel, shocking plot twists, and emotion, in this masterpiece. Enthralling, magical, mystical, and absolutely brilliant. The Prince of Nowhere exceeded my expectations. The cover, and synopsis instantly intrigued me. I had also heard that it had elements from Howl's Moving Castle. I absolutely loved Hayao Miyazaki's movies, and Howl's Moving Castle was a good one. Anyone who loves good fantasy in general will absolutely love this book. This book felt a lot like a genre-bender, as in it didn't exactly fit one exact genre. 𝐏𝐥𝐨𝐭: [𝟓] The plot was something I had never seen before. From the start, it was quite unique. Then a twist happened in the middle that entirely threw me off and had me reeling. Every single plot twist in this book, I didn't expect. It used completely new plot twists for me that I have never seen before. Being so used to the over-used tropes, the fact that this book was such a unique gem in everything I have read was so amazing. The main themes in this book was one that were really important. Those horrible, painful moments in our lives are what have shaped us to who we are today. So what if we could erase that? What if we could go back in time and change that? And that hit hard. Because so many times I wondered "If only I could turn back in time." And the fact that this subject was used to create such a moral dilemma, was amazing. I'd never seen time-travel in a book before and it was something I found I quite enjoyed. The way Rochelle explains it was done masterfully! The world-building was so amazing. I really hope there is going to be a book two! I really loved the new mythical creatures introduced in this book that I hadn't seen before. This is a stunning debut book. 𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬:[𝟒] The characters were perfect. Not in the sense that they were "perfect", but they captured morally grey characters perfectly. I don't like characters that are passionately good or evil. Rochelle found the sweet spot in between good and evil, and that is where our characters take root. Sometimes the characters had good intention, bad ways of getting to the goal. I liked Roda. She was clever, but also struggled with her curiosity. I really liked Ignis's character. Ignis was really complex, his traumatizing past, and his need to fix things. Then there is our antagonist, who I simply sympathized with. Antagonists are normally boring to me. However, the antagonist in this book was one that I could relate to a lot. I understood his morals, his reasons. The antagonist had clear reasons, understandable morals, and his desperation and logic were written so well. Roda and Ignis's dynamic in this book was very refreshing and fun! 𝐖𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠: Rochelle Hassan has such an amazing writing style. It is interesting, amazing, and unique. I really love the way she writes her characters, world-building, and the plot twists. ˜”*°👑𝕮𝖍𝖆𝖗𝖆𝖈𝖙𝖊𝖗𝖘👑°*”˜ ☑️𝕽𝖔𝖉𝖆 ☑️𝕴𝖌𝖓𝖎𝖘 ☑️𝕿𝖍𝖊 𝕻𝖗𝖎𝖓𝖈𝖊 𝕺𝖋 𝕹𝖔𝖜𝖍𝖊𝖗𝖊 ˜”*°👑𝕮𝖔𝖓𝖈𝖑𝖚𝖘𝖎𝖔𝖓👑°*”˜ A really amazing book, I 100% recommend! (view spoiler)[I really loved this book! My only issue was the *ahem sudden amnesia trope? And the fact that a lot was unresolved hope this has a book two because than it will make more sense about why a lot was left open-ended. (hide spoiler)]

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark Buxton

    What worked: The Mist creates a dangerous and mysterious air in the opening pages. The frigid, frosty barrier surrounds the cities, protecting them from deadly monsters in the wild, but it hinders communication and isolates them from their neighbors. This icy boundary also makes Rona dream about leaving her city to explore other lands, hoping to experience the same adventures as her aunt. Her wishes come true, but they are initiated when she must find a way to help her poisoned mother. Unexpected What worked: The Mist creates a dangerous and mysterious air in the opening pages. The frigid, frosty barrier surrounds the cities, protecting them from deadly monsters in the wild, but it hinders communication and isolates them from their neighbors. This icy boundary also makes Rona dream about leaving her city to explore other lands, hoping to experience the same adventures as her aunt. Her wishes come true, but they are initiated when she must find a way to help her poisoned mother. Unexpected twists upon entering the mist escalate her problems, and the whole story brings up issues of time travel. Rona receives letters from Anonymous foretelling future events, but they create uncertainty and questions about what’s actually going on. Her adventure becomes a quest to discover the identity of the unknown person and find a way to save her mother. She’s accompanied by a boy named Ignis who’s able to transform into a crow. He’s not totally honest with Rona and his behavior is unpredictable, so he presents another mystery to be solved. The plot evolves into the topic of time travel, and it’s interesting to see how authors handle to various paradoxes it might present. What happens if someone goes back in time and causes the death of a parent? How could the person go back in time if they were never born? If someone has the power to change past or future events, should they? What are the ripple effects of changing history? Changing happenings that have already occurred might cause unexpected consequences that are worse than the true accounts. Time travel questions become the focus of the conflict. What didn’t work as well: The journey into the mist sometimes gets confusing and hard to follow. That can happen when traveling through an imaginary world, but it’s easily tolerated in this book. The important thing to remember is what’s happening at the moment while how the characters get there is not. Don’t overthink how things are happening and simply enjoy what you’re reading. The Final Verdict: Changing the future with friendship. The Mist makes this adventure of time travel and friendship feel different, and Rona’s kind heart gives her the power to face the magic and overwhelming odds working against her. I recommend you give this entertaining book a shot.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Casey Webb

    Picked this book up on a whim at the library, and I'll say it- I'm impressed. The world is a fascinating mix of modern-day tech, fantasy, and futuristic technology. (view spoiler)[(Plus time travel!) (hide spoiler)] I would have guessed all those elements would make for a confusing world, but the author managed to weave them together in a unique, breathtaking way that still somehow flowed. The beautiful world is complemented by an impressive plot. The book starts with a mystery, which only seems Picked this book up on a whim at the library, and I'll say it- I'm impressed. The world is a fascinating mix of modern-day tech, fantasy, and futuristic technology. (view spoiler)[(Plus time travel!) (hide spoiler)] I would have guessed all those elements would make for a confusing world, but the author managed to weave them together in a unique, breathtaking way that still somehow flowed. The beautiful world is complemented by an impressive plot. The book starts with a mystery, which only seems to deepen as Reda and Ignis come closer to what they hope is an answer. Sometimes the plot moved just a tad slow, but the questions kept me invested. Also, the TWISTS. (view spoiler)[(I guessed the big one around page 200. Absolutely magnificent. The realization that the letters of Dora rearrange to spell Reda, the fact that Aunt Dora just happened to also have an Aethon friend exactly her age...it was a lot of fun going back to read earlier scenes with this new realization.) (hide spoiler)] The twists are the true gem of the book! Some of the other reviewers have mentioned how they appreciate the deep morality questions brought up in the book, and I have to agree. It made for a bit of a darker read than I expected, but I'd much prefer this than a shallow book that avoids meaningful topics. I have a confession, though. With all that I loved about this book, I really struggled on whether to rate this as 4 stars or 5 stars. The writing is probably worth 5 stars, but I'm a sucker for satisfying, feel-good endings and, well... The Prince of Nowhere didn't quite finish as I'd hoped. However, my conscience berated me until I handed that final star over. To the author: Please, please, please make a sequel! (With a satisfying ending!)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Dang

    Mysterious letters, a shapeshifting boy/crow, and a girl who is about to discover unlikely secrets. Roda lives in a place where monsters room free but she is safe in her small town surrounded by a wall of freezing mist that keeps the beasts away. She’s been receiving letters from a secret pen pal that helps her, when she gets instructions to save a crow she does. She takes the crow home and nurses it back to health only to find out its a shape-shifting boy named Ignis. Ignis doesn’t remember whe Mysterious letters, a shapeshifting boy/crow, and a girl who is about to discover unlikely secrets. Roda lives in a place where monsters room free but she is safe in her small town surrounded by a wall of freezing mist that keeps the beasts away. She’s been receiving letters from a secret pen pal that helps her, when she gets instructions to save a crow she does. She takes the crow home and nurses it back to health only to find out its a shape-shifting boy named Ignis. Ignis doesn’t remember where he was going before he crashed into the enchanted mist but there has to be a reason Roda’s Anonymous penpal brought them together. So begins their journey to a mysterious place called Nowhere, just beyond the mist. But Ignis has secrets, so many secrets, and Roda doubt’s she can trust someone who keeps her in the dark. However their journey will push them to work together, and soon face an even greater dilemma. Throw in some time travel, some complicated moral decisions, and magic and you get a fantastic journey. Roda and Ignis are connected in more ways than they though and every action and choice they make will impact their past, present, and future. I hope there is a sequel to this book, it leaves on a bit of an open note and I would love to see where these characters go next and how their choices impact them. I had so much fun reading this and it was definitiely a unique story ( honestly definitely worthy of being a show/movie!!) *Thanks Netgalley and HarperCollins Children's Books, HarperCollins for sending me an arc in exchange for an honest review*

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eule Luftschloss

    trigger warning (view spoiler)[ memory loss (hide spoiler)] A series of mysterious letters leads a young person to a shapeshifter in need. What both don't know: There's an adventure in store for them. Though we're told the protagonist is twelve, she acts like a teen, and this is written like young adult, so I tagged it as such. If you're here because you've been told it's like Howl's Moving Castle: The only connection is that we have a guy with magical powers who is disgusted when his hair colour trigger warning (view spoiler)[ memory loss (hide spoiler)] A series of mysterious letters leads a young person to a shapeshifter in need. What both don't know: There's an adventure in store for them. Though we're told the protagonist is twelve, she acts like a teen, and this is written like young adult, so I tagged it as such. If you're here because you've been told it's like Howl's Moving Castle: The only connection is that we have a guy with magical powers who is disgusted when his hair colour changes. That's it. I did not get along with the writing. Or the characters. Or the plot. Which is a shame, since the basic idea is pretty great: This is set in the Aerlands, called thus because every city is shrouded by mist. Mist that is dangerous to cross, both because it's touch freezes you and because it hides terrible monsters. Supposedly a mage long ago has created the mist to protect the human cities, but it's unclear which tales about him are based on fact and which are entirely fabricated, which also means nobody has a clue about what else he did, or what his true motives might have been. Yeah this is a no from me. I read other reviews and was left with the question if we really read the same book. Regardless of if you're looking for middlegrade or ya, I am sure you can do better. Which doesn't mean that you should not read it if you really want to, just that I would not recommend this book when there are so many others to enjoy. The arc was provided by the publisher.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Wafflepirates

    *Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for providing an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review* This was a cute story with great worldbuilding and a plot that surprised me in many ways. The story follows Roda, who receives mysterious letters from someone she refers to as Anonymous, and the latest leads her to a strange discovery: a crow that flew into the most barrier surrounding her town and nearly froze to death. More surprising, the crow is actually a boy who can shapeshift named Ignis *Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for providing an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review* This was a cute story with great worldbuilding and a plot that surprised me in many ways. The story follows Roda, who receives mysterious letters from someone she refers to as Anonymous, and the latest leads her to a strange discovery: a crow that flew into the most barrier surrounding her town and nearly froze to death. More surprising, the crow is actually a boy who can shapeshift named Ignis. Ignis claims to have amnesia and Roda promises to help him figure things out, which becomes more than she bargained for on the night a comet appears overhead and a new message from Anonymous sends Roda and Ignis out beyond the barrier on a quest they don't really understand. There's interesting magic and time travel involved, and while things get crazy, the plot is always easy to follow while still keep you on your toes. I liked Roda's character, she reminds me a lot of some of Diana Wynne Jones's protagonists, and the story and writing style in general are very reminiscent of her books, which I liked. Roda and Ignis have an interesting dynamic, and their friendship is a bit rocky in its early stages, but without causing convenient plot tension. Overall, this was a fun read, and I look forward to more from this author.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hailey Huntington

    The Prince of Nowhere is a unique middle-grade fantasy novel. Roda and Ignis were relatable characters. Their motivations and struggles were understandable. I do think that they could have been developed a little bit more though, or that we maybe could have gotten to know them more. I would have liked to connect with them a little more. The worldbuilding was fun. There was certain whimsy to it--it seemed like anything could happen. The contemporary and fantasy elements also seemed to be balanced The Prince of Nowhere is a unique middle-grade fantasy novel. Roda and Ignis were relatable characters. Their motivations and struggles were understandable. I do think that they could have been developed a little bit more though, or that we maybe could have gotten to know them more. I would have liked to connect with them a little more. The worldbuilding was fun. There was certain whimsy to it--it seemed like anything could happen. The contemporary and fantasy elements also seemed to be balanced nicely. About halfway through the book, I guessed the main plot twist, which wasn't revealed until about 3/4 of the way through. So I wasn't surprised by it, but I had been curious to see if I was going to be right. SPOILERS BELOW: The time travel did confuse me a little, though it might be because Hassan's take on time travel is different than what I normally prefer. I like fixed timeline time travel, whereas The Prince of Nowhere has more of a dynamic timeline and a time loop. The ending was a little... disappointing. While Roda has grown as a character, the plot doesn't necessarily conclude since she and Ignis are still in the time loop. It felt a little too open. But it wasn't a bad ending. END SPOILERS Cautions: brief reference to periods; non-graphic violence

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Peters

    This wholly original MG fantasy masterfully walks the line between delivering the magical flash and fireworks the genre demands while also crafting intricately thoughtful, tangibly honest relationships between the characters, all while providing the reader a true, "read that section again"-level twist that rewards readers who have been paying attention the whole time. Spoiler-free synopsis; Roda lives in a mist-shrouded city with her feverous mother and adventurous aunt, awaiting the one-per-deca This wholly original MG fantasy masterfully walks the line between delivering the magical flash and fireworks the genre demands while also crafting intricately thoughtful, tangibly honest relationships between the characters, all while providing the reader a true, "read that section again"-level twist that rewards readers who have been paying attention the whole time. Spoiler-free synopsis; Roda lives in a mist-shrouded city with her feverous mother and adventurous aunt, awaiting the one-per-decade arrival of comet that streaks across the sky. But when she starts receiving anonymous notes portending things that haven't happened... yet, she saves and befriends a shape-shifting crow boy named Ignis and realizes something big is coming. Roda and Ignis are compelled to follow clues out into the mists, where monsters live and few return, to search out a way to reach the fabled comet and potentially save those they love. Along the way, the reader is treated to marvels like mist-breathing frost dragons, tiny AI personas that can inhabit any machine and even time travel turned in on itself; they are all elements that make Rochelle Hassan's debut truly stunning and an absolute winner for readers who want their fantasy tales to be a mixture of conventional and cutting edge, with equal parts magic and meaningful connections.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I thought The Prince of Nowhere was fun to read with an interesting mystery set in a richly imagined world. Anonymous has been delivering cryptic messages to Roda that make her think they might know the future.One note guides her to the outskirts of Brume against the dangerous mist that keeps monstrous things at bay. Just like the note says, Roda finds an injured crow and takes it home to nurse it back to health. The crow turns out to be an Aethon, Ignis, who hopes the author of the Anonymous let I thought The Prince of Nowhere was fun to read with an interesting mystery set in a richly imagined world. Anonymous has been delivering cryptic messages to Roda that make her think they might know the future.One note guides her to the outskirts of Brume against the dangerous mist that keeps monstrous things at bay. Just like the note says, Roda finds an injured crow and takes it home to nurse it back to health. The crow turns out to be an Aethon, Ignis, who hopes the author of the Anonymous letters can lead him back home.Instead, Roda and Ignis find themselves on a journey to find Nowhere by climbing the mist and catching a comet. The impossible becomes possible as the duo confront the past, present, and future to save the world as they know it. I really enjoyed the puzzle/mystery aspect of the book. It was fun to tease out with my 8 year old daughter. I thought the "big questions" asked in the book were well done for the book's target audience. The world was richly imagined. I would love to travel to the Aerlands again to learn more about it. I would recommend this book to those who enjoy reading science fiction/fantasy middle grade books with a mystery aspect.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tales Untangled

    Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of The Prince of Nowhere. I adored this middle grade fantasy. The first page sucked me in and didn't let go through the entire book. (I may have stayed up to midnight to finish it...) Hassan's book masterfully weaves family secrets, a mystery, and twists together. The themes of friendship and family come through in a subtle and satisfying way. It's an adventure story that keeps you on your toes! I loved how Roda and Ignis work together—fighting, arguing, making up, Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of The Prince of Nowhere. I adored this middle grade fantasy. The first page sucked me in and didn't let go through the entire book. (I may have stayed up to midnight to finish it...) Hassan's book masterfully weaves family secrets, a mystery, and twists together. The themes of friendship and family come through in a subtle and satisfying way. It's an adventure story that keeps you on your toes! I loved how Roda and Ignis work together—fighting, arguing, making up, disagreeing again. It felt so authentic to real kids. Roda's admiration for Aunt Dora has shaped her life and gives her the strength to keep going! When she receives notes from an anonymous writer, her life changes with Ignis. And I'm sorry, but I will not tell you who "anonymous"is and spoil the fun of you finding out for yourself. If I chose words to describe my experience reading, they would include: chill, unexpected, feathers, danger, home, stars, hidden, fast, creepy, friends, and family. I hope you pick up this book! Kids are going to adore it and want more! (I want more too!)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Edmunds

    A slightly new take on time travel adventures. Roda receives a mysterious, unsigned letter that both predicts the future and gives riddles. Intrigued, Roda eagerly awaits future letters from the sender she has named "Anonymous". When one message tells her to go to a cherry tree at the edge of town and bring home an injured crow, Roda follows the instructions...and thus begins her adventure. The story is okay. It would have benefited from greater character development. Within a few pages, the mai A slightly new take on time travel adventures. Roda receives a mysterious, unsigned letter that both predicts the future and gives riddles. Intrigued, Roda eagerly awaits future letters from the sender she has named "Anonymous". When one message tells her to go to a cherry tree at the edge of town and bring home an injured crow, Roda follows the instructions...and thus begins her adventure. The story is okay. It would have benefited from greater character development. Within a few pages, the main characters are friends. Why? After a few weeks, they have a deep trust. Why? So many details are left out that it feels surface level. Perhaps there will be more information and character development in the next book, but many mid-grade readers struggle to finish one book - will they be interested enough to stick through to book two to get this information? I'm not sure. Plus the time travel details and parallel stories going on gets a bit confusing, which might be too much for a casual reader.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emi Cohen

    eARC provided by Netgalley This is an intricate, fast-paced, vivid debut MG novel with some serious Miyazaki vibes! The number of plot twists make writing a non-spoilery synopsis nigh on impossible, so instead I'd like to gush about the world-building. "Whimsical" doesn't quite describe it, and neither does "refreshing," even though it's ultimately both of those things. It's more like... magical cloudy steampunk? Cloudy trains, dragons, and bird friends? Dragons with cloudy friendly trains and eARC provided by Netgalley This is an intricate, fast-paced, vivid debut MG novel with some serious Miyazaki vibes! The number of plot twists make writing a non-spoilery synopsis nigh on impossible, so instead I'd like to gush about the world-building. "Whimsical" doesn't quite describe it, and neither does "refreshing," even though it's ultimately both of those things. It's more like... magical cloudy steampunk? Cloudy trains, dragons, and bird friends? Dragons with cloudy friendly trains and steampunk bird-magic shenanigans? The fact that I can't categorize it off the top of my head is a pretty good indicator of how original this story is. Ultimately, The Prince of Nowhere is the kind of novel that begs to be turned into an animated film. It's cinematic in a way that will certainly appeal to young audiences, with enough dark moral complexity to allow for some lovely character development.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Agathe Cadieux

    ARC from Netgalley, HarperCollinsCanada/HCC Frenzy. What a story. It reminds me a little of the Mirror Visitor's serie by Christelle Dabos. A complexe universe, but with incredible turn of events and a really crazy adventure! I was sometimes a little lost in the details, but this is the kind of book that you read again to really immerse yourself in the story. A really good book from the author, and I can't wait to see what stories will come out of her head next. Quelle histoire. Elle me rappelle ARC from Netgalley, HarperCollinsCanada/HCC Frenzy. What a story. It reminds me a little of the Mirror Visitor's serie by Christelle Dabos. A complexe universe, but with incredible turn of events and a really crazy adventure! I was sometimes a little lost in the details, but this is the kind of book that you read again to really immerse yourself in the story. A really good book from the author, and I can't wait to see what stories will come out of her head next. Quelle histoire. Elle me rappelle un peu la série La Passe-Miroir, de Christelle Dabos. Un monde complexe, mais en plus des retournements de situation et une aventure pas mal rocambolesque! J'étais parfois un peu perdue dans les détails, mais c'est le genre de livre que tu relis pour vraiment bien entrer dans l'histoire. Un très bon livre par cette autrice, et j'ai bien hâte de lire les prochaines histoires qui sortiront de sa tête. Thank you to the publishers and author for the opportunity to review this book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Badua

    I want to tell you what this middle grade fantasy is about, but I don't trust myself not to accidentally spoil it for you. And trust me, you want to unravel everything for yourself. In the most general terms possible (sorry), this story centers on twelve-year-old Roda. An anonymous note leads her to a hurt crow. What follows is a journey full of mysteries, unforgettable characters, the draw of the past, and the promise of the future. The plot and the worldbuilding are so clever, and every time y I want to tell you what this middle grade fantasy is about, but I don't trust myself not to accidentally spoil it for you. And trust me, you want to unravel everything for yourself. In the most general terms possible (sorry), this story centers on twelve-year-old Roda. An anonymous note leads her to a hurt crow. What follows is a journey full of mysteries, unforgettable characters, the draw of the past, and the promise of the future. The plot and the worldbuilding are so clever, and every time you think you've got an idea of how everything works, it twists and expands in the best way. It's such a wonderful, satisfying read!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alysa

    The Prince of Nowhere is a fantastical, intricate, fast-paced, and incredibly vivid journey! Hassan's wholly new and magical world feels innovative and incredibly fresh, and yet there are so many emotional touchstones, that I always felt grounded in Roda's quest. I love how this story challenges our ideas of time/space/reality while keeping us guessing through numerous unexpected and incredibly gratifying plot-twists. Thank you to HarperCollins and Netgalley for the opportunity to read the e-arc. The Prince of Nowhere is a fantastical, intricate, fast-paced, and incredibly vivid journey! Hassan's wholly new and magical world feels innovative and incredibly fresh, and yet there are so many emotional touchstones, that I always felt grounded in Roda's quest. I love how this story challenges our ideas of time/space/reality while keeping us guessing through numerous unexpected and incredibly gratifying plot-twists. Thank you to HarperCollins and Netgalley for the opportunity to read the e-arc.

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