Hot Best Seller

Eversion

Availability: Ready to download

From the master of the space opera, Alastair Reynolds, comes a dark, mind-bending SF adventure spread across time and space, Doctor Silas Coade has been tasked with keeping his crew safe as they adventure across the galaxy in search of a mysterious artifact, but as things keep going wrong, Silas soon realizes that something more sinister is at work, and this may not even b From the master of the space opera, Alastair Reynolds, comes a dark, mind-bending SF adventure spread across time and space, Doctor Silas Coade has been tasked with keeping his crew safe as they adventure across the galaxy in search of a mysterious artifact, but as things keep going wrong, Silas soon realizes that something more sinister is at work, and this may not even be the first time it's happened. In the 1800s, a sailing ship crashes off the coast of Norway. In the 1900s, a Zepellin explores an icy canyon in Antarctica. In the far future, a spaceship sets out for an alien artifact. Each excursion goes horribly wrong. And on every journey, Dr. Silas Coade is the physician, but only Silas seems to realize that these events keep repeating themselves. And it's up to him to figure out why and how. And how to stop it all from happening again.


Compare

From the master of the space opera, Alastair Reynolds, comes a dark, mind-bending SF adventure spread across time and space, Doctor Silas Coade has been tasked with keeping his crew safe as they adventure across the galaxy in search of a mysterious artifact, but as things keep going wrong, Silas soon realizes that something more sinister is at work, and this may not even b From the master of the space opera, Alastair Reynolds, comes a dark, mind-bending SF adventure spread across time and space, Doctor Silas Coade has been tasked with keeping his crew safe as they adventure across the galaxy in search of a mysterious artifact, but as things keep going wrong, Silas soon realizes that something more sinister is at work, and this may not even be the first time it's happened. In the 1800s, a sailing ship crashes off the coast of Norway. In the 1900s, a Zepellin explores an icy canyon in Antarctica. In the far future, a spaceship sets out for an alien artifact. Each excursion goes horribly wrong. And on every journey, Dr. Silas Coade is the physician, but only Silas seems to realize that these events keep repeating themselves. And it's up to him to figure out why and how. And how to stop it all from happening again.

30 review for Eversion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    Think of Diamond Dogs, HMS Terror, Jules Verne, Edgar Allan Poe - or Agatha Christie - in a bunch of (view spoiler)[virtual (hide spoiler)] alternate realities with a steampunk flavour, and you'll have an idea on what's this book revolving around, but... not quite. It's even gloomier than his other works and with a longer exposition than usual, but one that will pay off eventually. It gradually builds up tension, and is definitely messing with your mind - you won't be able to discern reality from Think of Diamond Dogs, HMS Terror, Jules Verne, Edgar Allan Poe - or Agatha Christie - in a bunch of (view spoiler)[virtual (hide spoiler)] alternate realities with a steampunk flavour, and you'll have an idea on what's this book revolving around, but... not quite. It's even gloomier than his other works and with a longer exposition than usual, but one that will pay off eventually. It gradually builds up tension, and is definitely messing with your mind - you won't be able to discern reality from imagination until almost at the end. Another thing that differentiate it from the others is that it's missing the grand scope, the vast universe and distances, the immensity of time scale which I loved to read about in his other books. This one is focused more on human (view spoiler)[and it appears that not only (hide spoiler)] mind, the mystery behind its mechanisms of defense when dealing with something unbearable. Overall, it's a bitter-sweet-dreadful novel, with an optimistic spirit about friendship, ethics, moral principles and tough choices. I was enraptured by the ingenuity of its construction, the (apparent) frailty of the main character, the premise and its conclusion, but I deeply missed the vastity of the universe. In Reynolds' novels I am not satisfied entirely with just the Solar system; I need more. >>> ARC received thanks to Orion Publishing Group / Gollancz via NetGalley <<<

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    *Review and rating to come as publication date approaches.* Thanks to the publisher for providing me with an advanced copy for review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tomislav

    Spheres have two surfaces – an inside and an outside. A sphere eversion turns it inside-out and reverses the two surfaces. Contrary to intuition, it is possible to do this without cutting or tearing or creasing the sphere’s surface. Cool! Yeah, but, well, it isn’t what Alastair Reynolds’ new science fiction novel is actually about. Alastair Reynolds is a former research astronomer with the European Space Agency, and now prolific hard-sf/space opera writer, best known for his Revelation Space nov Spheres have two surfaces – an inside and an outside. A sphere eversion turns it inside-out and reverses the two surfaces. Contrary to intuition, it is possible to do this without cutting or tearing or creasing the sphere’s surface. Cool! Yeah, but, well, it isn’t what Alastair Reynolds’ new science fiction novel is actually about. Alastair Reynolds is a former research astronomer with the European Space Agency, and now prolific hard-sf/space opera writer, best known for his Revelation Space novels and stories, almost all of which I have previously read. Eversion is a stand-alone novel, and not set in the Revelation Space universe. What it is, is a story told by a medical doctor aboard an exploratory sailing ship off the coast of Norway. While experiencing events in this reality, he is also writing a fiction about very similar events. (view spoiler)[As they approach a mysterious Edifice, there is some sort of pressure and this reality breaks down. It is replaced by an exploratory steamer working the coast of Antarctica, with similar characters and circumstances, but more sophisticated technology. There is a succession of such realities as Dr. Silas Coade comes closer and closer to an understanding of the true reality he is hiding from. The narrative bogs down, in repeatedly re-establishing the same plot and same characters in each new instantiation, sometimes in the word-heavy writing style of 19th century adventures. But by the last quarter, the reader senses that they are now learning the real reality. (hide spoiler)] While he at first seemed to be kind of a stick figure, Silas is revealed to be a surprisingly sympathetic and sincere individual, who selflessly does what needs to be done. So, my recommendation is to persevere through the Jules Verne-like opening to the emotional payoff of the ending. I found the novel to be conceptually related to Reynolds’ 2004 stand-alone novel Century Rain. In fact, the first chapter of Century Rain was included after the conclusion of this novel as a teaser. If you liked that, you will like this too. I read an advance Digital Review Copy of Eversion in an ebook format, which I received from Orbit Books through netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review on social media platforms and on my book review blog. This new title is scheduled for release on 2 August 2022.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shane Savitsky

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A bunch of feelings on this one, as someone who has been an avid reader of Reynolds' books in the past. The good stuff: This had all of the spooky alien atmospherics you'd expect in a Reynolds work, with gross bio-organics galore. I really enjoyed the mood of the steamship reality in particular. It all felt very Lovecraftian as they sight the Edifice and pick through that version of Europa, and it was nice to see Reynolds really excel at a different kind of genre. Easily the highlight of the book A bunch of feelings on this one, as someone who has been an avid reader of Reynolds' books in the past. The good stuff: This had all of the spooky alien atmospherics you'd expect in a Reynolds work, with gross bio-organics galore. I really enjoyed the mood of the steamship reality in particular. It all felt very Lovecraftian as they sight the Edifice and pick through that version of Europa, and it was nice to see Reynolds really excel at a different kind of genre. Easily the highlight of the book for me. The bad stuff: The sheer page count granted to the alternate realities and establishing the (often very similar!) facts in each of them can be brutally repetitive. Especially when it ultimately doesn't pay off in a satisfying way. There's so much time in the sailing ship reality, which takes up the full first quarter of the book, dedicated to the mystery of "thirteen and five," and it ends up simply being the name of the suit in the main timeline. Oof. The worst stuff: Naming your AI main character Coade. It wasn't a mind-bending reveal, it was a complete groaner. I honestly can't believe an editor let Reynolds keep that one in there. The bottom line: 3.5 stars, rounding up to 4. I was never bored while reading Eversion, even if I feel like its parts were better than its whole. Thanks to Orbit and Netgalley for the ARC!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Evan Ladouceur

    Eversion is a splendid book. It is a mystery of three intertwined stories - one set on a sailing expedition, another an airship, and the third a spaceship in the outer solar system. It is also a study of character and humanity. Dr. Silas Coade, who binds the three strands together, is a sympathetic figure who grows and matures throughout the book. The language is excellent and the writing and pacing sophisticated and mature. I read this in a day. I think Eversion’s melancholy feel will stick wit Eversion is a splendid book. It is a mystery of three intertwined stories - one set on a sailing expedition, another an airship, and the third a spaceship in the outer solar system. It is also a study of character and humanity. Dr. Silas Coade, who binds the three strands together, is a sympathetic figure who grows and matures throughout the book. The language is excellent and the writing and pacing sophisticated and mature. I read this in a day. I think Eversion’s melancholy feel will stick with me. Highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    AndiReads

    AWESOME! Alastair Reynolds is such an amazing writer. He could create a mind-bending story about paint drying on your wall! In Eversion, we find ourselves in the 1800's on an old ship exploring the ocean near Norway. Silas Coade is the on board physician and he is tasked with keeping the crew safe as they explore uncharted territory. Pretty basic, except, the story repeats after Silas dies...again, and again, and again. I personally do not like historical fiction, but Alastair had me sucked in to AWESOME! Alastair Reynolds is such an amazing writer. He could create a mind-bending story about paint drying on your wall! In Eversion, we find ourselves in the 1800's on an old ship exploring the ocean near Norway. Silas Coade is the on board physician and he is tasked with keeping the crew safe as they explore uncharted territory. Pretty basic, except, the story repeats after Silas dies...again, and again, and again. I personally do not like historical fiction, but Alastair had me sucked in to find out the why. After each death, Silas finds himself on a new voyage, with the same men, however he only just remembers a sliver of what happened before. You can't help but read on to learn what Eversion really means. This is science fiction at it's very best! If you like scifi, space voyages, and trippy twisty tales then Eversion is for you! #Orbitbooks #NetGalley #AlastairReynolds #Eversion

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    "Eversion" was my first taste of Alastair Reynolds, despite owning a few of his books and hearing great things about them. This story sucked me right in instantly and kept my attention throughout. The writing is exceptional. The characters are incredible. Having reached the end, I wanted to start over again. This should be an instant classic. Off to raid my bookshelves for more Alastair Reynolds! My thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was written voluntarily and is entirel "Eversion" was my first taste of Alastair Reynolds, despite owning a few of his books and hearing great things about them. This story sucked me right in instantly and kept my attention throughout. The writing is exceptional. The characters are incredible. Having reached the end, I wanted to start over again. This should be an instant classic. Off to raid my bookshelves for more Alastair Reynolds! My thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was written voluntarily and is entirely my own, unbiased, opinion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ira Smith

    As Eversion opens, we meet Silas Coade, ship’s physician on the Demeter, a sailing ship hired to find some sort of artifact off the coast of Norway in the 1800s. Calamity occurs, and then we meet Dr. Coade and the crew of the Demeter on a steamship in the later 1800s, and yet again later in time. The resolution of this strange plot wasn’t unexpected by me, but what happens after caught me totally off guard and kept me glued to the book. Eversion is well plotted, and has great writing and charact As Eversion opens, we meet Silas Coade, ship’s physician on the Demeter, a sailing ship hired to find some sort of artifact off the coast of Norway in the 1800s. Calamity occurs, and then we meet Dr. Coade and the crew of the Demeter on a steamship in the later 1800s, and yet again later in time. The resolution of this strange plot wasn’t unexpected by me, but what happens after caught me totally off guard and kept me glued to the book. Eversion is well plotted, and has great writing and characters. I just loved how Silas’ s character grew as the story unfolded. As Silas was truly the linchpin to the book, Mr. Reynolds did a masterful job in his creation. Well done and highly recommended. My thanks to Orbit Books and to Netgalley for providing an ARC of Eversion.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Blackburn

    Eversion by Alastair Reynolds- A twisty, spirited, at times confusing, but always enjoyable tale told by an unreliable narrator that foreshadows the humanity of AI. Silas Coade is a ships surgeon on a hazardous sea-fairing expedition in a ship of sails. Then the ship suddenly becomes a paddle-wheel vessel, then a dirigible air-ship, and finally an interplanetary space ship. Lost and reeling from all the changes around him, Silas must sift through the unknown and keep his passengers alive while n Eversion by Alastair Reynolds- A twisty, spirited, at times confusing, but always enjoyable tale told by an unreliable narrator that foreshadows the humanity of AI. Silas Coade is a ships surgeon on a hazardous sea-fairing expedition in a ship of sails. Then the ship suddenly becomes a paddle-wheel vessel, then a dirigible air-ship, and finally an interplanetary space ship. Lost and reeling from all the changes around him, Silas must sift through the unknown and keep his passengers alive while nothing but chaos awaits him. A very different story from Alastair Reynolds, but as bold and complex as his heavy duty space operas. Thanks NetGalley for this great ARC.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Although best known for his Space Opera books, in recent years Alastair has been producing material that is deliberately different. There’s his well-known Revelation Space series, certainly, but as well as his last novel, award-nominated Inhibitor Phase, there’s been “Space Pirates” with the Revenger series, stand-alone books such as House of Suns and Pushing Ice and the Poseidon’s Children series. To this we now must add Eversion, a story where all is not what it seems, and preconceptions are o Although best known for his Space Opera books, in recent years Alastair has been producing material that is deliberately different. There’s his well-known Revelation Space series, certainly, but as well as his last novel, award-nominated Inhibitor Phase, there’s been “Space Pirates” with the Revenger series, stand-alone books such as House of Suns and Pushing Ice and the Poseidon’s Children series. To this we now must add Eversion, a story where all is not what it seems, and preconceptions are often ruined. From the publisher: “A small group of intrepid explorers are in search of a remote and mysterious artefact. It's a well-funded expedition, well organised, which is lucky as they're sailing north of Bergen on the schooner Demeter, searching for a narrow inlet which will lead them to a vast uncharted lake - and their goal­­­-- Until disaster strikes. Doctor Silas Coade wakes from disturbing dreams, on the steamship Demeter, in pursuit of an extraordinary find almost too incredible and too strange to believe, secreted within a lagoon in the icy inlets of Patagonia. But as they come in sight of their prize he and the crew see they are not the first to come so far: there is a wreck ahead, and whatever ruined it may threaten them as well-- Shaking off his nightmares, Doctor Silas Coade joins his fellow exploders on the deck of the zeppelin Demeter and realises something has already gone dangerously wrong with their mission. If any of them are to survive, then he will have to take the exploration - and their lives - into his own hands . . .” The reviews for this one are describing it as “Gothic SF”. I must admit that at first this reads like something courtesy of Jules Verne or even H P Lovecraft. (Conan Doyle’s The Captain of the Pole-Star also springs to mind.) It’s an expedition story, written by a doctor on board the schooner Demeter (Bram Stoker readers, take note!) which takes on Lovecraftian tones as the expeditioners approach the mysterious Edifice (see also At the Mountains of Madness). The expedition group are a varied lot. Of the main characters, Topolsky is the tempestuous Russian leader, the rich gold-digger paying for the expedition, who seems to actively dislike Coade and sees his presence as a necessary evil. The Captain of the vessel, Van Vugt, is calm, even under increasing pressure. Coronel Ramos is a long-time friend of Coade, who is being paid to be the group’s bodyguard. Dupin is the hyperintelligent youngster on the voyage whose mathematical genius leads him prone to seisures. Reporter Miss Ada Cossile seems to be ever present and forever sniping at Coade. This is a difficult book to describe or explain without giving things away. However, as the publisher’s quotes above show,it is obvious that Coade seems to be making the journey more than once, in some sort of Quantum Leap meets Groundhog Day situation. Whilst doing this we cover a range of different places, from sailing ship to airship to spaceship, whilst we work out what is going on. This is a lot of fun in that we go from Jules Verne and steam punk to Doc Smith and Star Trek as the good Doctor tells the crew of the novel he is writing. This also covers a variety of styles of writing, from something that is Lovecraftian to China Mieville. There’s even a touch of Dante’s Inferno in there, albeit in an ice world. As the book progresses, little hints that things are awry begin to connect and make sense. For me this meant that I found myself turning the pages more, intrigued to know if the reasoning for the various mysterious events. The good news is that, despite a lot of metaphorical plates being spun at once, it does all eventually come together. There’s a big reveal about halfway through that the rest of the book spends its time resolving until there’s an apt, bittersweet ending. In summary then, this is an unusual story that is not typical Alastair Reynolds, but whose narrative drive, clever plot points and rigorous science make this an engaging read. Alastair deserves credit for writing something different, rather than just producing what readers know him best for. I enjoyed this one a lot.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yev

    Eversion isn't set within the Revelation Space series universe. It's entirely standalone. The main question you have to ask yourself is how much you think you'd enjoy reading about the same cast of characters sequentially going through similar scenarios at different times and locations for most of the book. If you don't mind that sort of repetition then this shouldn't be a problem for you. Eversion tries to do a lot, so in terms of genre I'd say it's a mystery adventure with a science fiction ba Eversion isn't set within the Revelation Space series universe. It's entirely standalone. The main question you have to ask yourself is how much you think you'd enjoy reading about the same cast of characters sequentially going through similar scenarios at different times and locations for most of the book. If you don't mind that sort of repetition then this shouldn't be a problem for you. Eversion tries to do a lot, so in terms of genre I'd say it's a mystery adventure with a science fiction background and a few horror elements. The vast majority of its narrative takes place on a ship of some sort. It starts out as an 1800s nautical tale of an assistant surgeon as part of a crew seeking to find a location off the coast of Norway. I didn't really care for any of the characters, but that's not uncommon for me when reading works by Reynolds. As one ought to expect from this author, the characters have memory and identity issues. My enjoyment started going downhill somewhat more than halfway through because I didn't like the current scenario or those that came after. This is also when the mysteries start being explained rather than hinted at. I found the plot and its twists to be rather lacking. Because Eversion has far fewer pages than his Revelation Space novels, I thought it the page would be appropriate. I was wrong. This should've been a novella. Apparently I wanted an entirely different story than what was written. Maybe I would've enjoyed it a bit more if I just went through it without thinking about it at all, or didn't know anything at all about it whatsoever. I don't know. I'd be disappointed regardless. I felt like dropping it at a few points because I simply wasn't engaged at all. The further along I got the less I enjoyed myself. The main reason I read it was to have read something published this month. I had hoped it would be more somewhat more enjoyable than it was. On a whim I read this with others as well because doing stuff with others can make basically anything at least somewhat better, ideally anyway.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    Kudos to Alastair Reynolds for trying something different, instead of his "usual" grand space opera. I appreciated that. Eversion us a fun mix of sci-fi, mystery, and Groundhog Day type of narrative. It owes a lot to classical adventure stories - Jules Verne and Star Trek TOS come to mind, with a bit of steampunk thrown in. I think that the author had quite a bit of fun with the tropes, and I liked how the writing style changed with each new "reality". I also cared more about the characters than Kudos to Alastair Reynolds for trying something different, instead of his "usual" grand space opera. I appreciated that. Eversion us a fun mix of sci-fi, mystery, and Groundhog Day type of narrative. It owes a lot to classical adventure stories - Jules Verne and Star Trek TOS come to mind, with a bit of steampunk thrown in. I think that the author had quite a bit of fun with the tropes, and I liked how the writing style changed with each new "reality". I also cared more about the characters than I usually do in Reynolds' books. Once we had the solution to the mystery, however, the resolution was too slow in coming. So I enjoyed the last third of the book a bit less and felt impatient, as in "let's get to the end already!" Eversion should have been shorter, perhaps, less time spent in each "reality"? Still, it was an enjoyable read - the last chapter was unexpectedly sweet.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    How often can a book throw you for a loop? This is not what fans of Alastair Reynolds' space opera might expect, nor what the opening chapters will lead you to believe. Indeed, the further in you go, the more you might be led astray... A slow opening belies a very different tale, and a journey well worth taking for those looking for something a bit different. Read my full review on my blog, LittleFrogScribbles. How often can a book throw you for a loop? This is not what fans of Alastair Reynolds' space opera might expect, nor what the opening chapters will lead you to believe. Indeed, the further in you go, the more you might be led astray... A slow opening belies a very different tale, and a journey well worth taking for those looking for something a bit different. Read my full review on my blog, LittleFrogScribbles.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maddalena

    I received this novel from Orbit Books through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review: my thanks to both of them for this opportunity. Alastair Reynolds' name is always enough to make me pay attention to any new book he publishes: so far I've learned to expect space opera stories strongly based on science and dealing with a galaxy-wide scope of events, so my curiosity was piqued by the blurb for Eversion, which sounded like a very different take from those themes. It turned out to be a very I received this novel from Orbit Books through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review: my thanks to both of them for this opportunity. Alastair Reynolds' name is always enough to make me pay attention to any new book he publishes: so far I've learned to expect space opera stories strongly based on science and dealing with a galaxy-wide scope of events, so my curiosity was piqued by the blurb for Eversion, which sounded like a very different take from those themes. It turned out to be a very unexpected, deeply engaging read that held my attention from start to finish and offered a quite unusual story that mixed some Groundhog Day vibes with tales of exploration and an alien mystery shrouded in a quasi-Lovecraftian shade of fear: in short, a story that compelled me to burn the proverbial midnight oil to see where the author would take me. The novel starts, quite unexpectedly, on a sailing ship from the early 19th Century, the Demeter, traveling through the icy waters of Norway: Dr. Silas Coade, the ship's surgeon, is the narrating voice of the story as he relates the goal of the expedition, a search for a mysterious construct – named the Edifice – that could be reached through a narrow passage in the ice. The expedition members include, besides the good doctor, the leader of the group, boisterous Master Topolsky; Coronel Ramos, a weapons and explosives expert; tormented mathematician Dupin, and a few others, including Lady Ada Cossile, a noblewoman of great knowledge and prickly disposition. As their intended destination approaches, we get to know the various members of the group and learn about the frictions generated by such different characters sharing close quarters: once the passage is located, though, and the wreck of a previous visiting ship – the Europa – is discovered, tempers flare in a heated exchange of accusations, and then disaster strikes in a most unexpected way. But it's not the end, because in the next chapter we find once again Dr. Coade on Demeter, only this time he finds himself on a late 19th Century steamship, forging the waters near Patagonia – and still looking for a mysterious passage and an equally mysterious Edifice... The pattern repeats itself again as the time frame proceeds forward and Demeter morphs from sail ship to steamship to dirigible to spaceship, always seeking to uncover the mystery of the Edifice, always forging through a dangerous passage and always meeting with disaster in one form or another. Some elements remain the same throughout the various versions of the story, however: the characters and their respective roles; Dr. Coade’s addiction to drugs and his literary aspirations which take the form of speculative fiction in which he imagines more advanced technology; Ramos’ head injury which Coade treats successfully and which leads to a close friendship between the two men; Ada Cossile’s pointed remarks which seem to target the doctor more than anyone else, and the hints that she might know more about him than circumstances seem to warrant. It all adds to a compelling narrative that kept me reading on as the picture gained more details with each new iteration, until the core of the puzzle was revealed and it opened the door toward the real situation and danger facing the complement of the Demeter. The buildup of narrative pressure is certainly the strongest element in Eversion: from the moment in which the story resumes after the first catastrophic ending, although in a slightly different form, it’s clear that there is more at work here than meets the eye, and obtaining the answers to the many questions posed by the story becomes the main attraction in this compelling novel, where the new elements manage only to tease the readers’ imagination, leading them to formulate hypotheses that most of the times prove wrong. When I previously mentioned the Groundhog Day vibes I might have made this story sound like a series of repetitions, but it’s far from that, not only because of the changes in temporal and technological setting for each iteration, but also because there is always some new detail that adds something to the overall picture, while never offering a way to pierce the mystery. Being kept guessing might prove somewhat frustrating, but it’s also a sure way to compel you to forge ahead and look for the final revelation - which will prove to be quite unexpected. One of the other intriguing components in this novel is the enigma tied to the Edifice, a place whose size and shape appear almost Lovecraftian in their mind- and space-bending quality and also because of the bothersome messages left by the unfortunate crew of Europa about the horrors waiting there: there is nothing more chilling than an incomplete message about something terrible and inescapable coming from the depths, and here it’s also paired with Dr. Coade recurring dream about a […] stumbling progress down a stone tunnel, a scurrying nightmare charged with the terrible conviction that I myself were already dead. which will get a startling but consistent explanation once the veil will be pierced. Compared to Alastair Reynolds’ previous works, Eversion lacks the sense of galactic vastness one can find in them, but it’s the rather confined background of this story which allows him to explore in greater depth the characters (something which I felt was somewhat missing from his other novels) and to linger on their interactions and personalities. There is a greater focus here on friendship and interpersonal relationships, mixed with some intriguing discussions about ethics and the kind of acceptable sacrifices to be tolerated in the quest for knowledge: it all gains an intriguing meaning once we learn about the reality of the situation facing Coade and the crew of Demeter, adding depth and humanity to what, until that point, was just a puzzling mystery. While quite different from my previous experience with Alastair Reynolds’ writing, Eversion proved to be a fascinating novel combining science fiction and mystery in a seamless blend: prepare for something unexpected but totally engrossing… Originally posted at SPACE and SORCERY BLOG

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    My thanks to both NetGalley and the publisher Orbit Books for an advanced copy of this science fictional mindbender. Sometimes life seems the same, not exactly a rut, but close enough that everyday always seems the same. Maybe the boat that you find yourself on changes from a sail boat to a steam boat, or even a dirigible, but everything else stays the same. You talk to the crew, you find something amazing at sea, things happen mostly bad, but nothing really changes. Alastair Reynolds in his book My thanks to both NetGalley and the publisher Orbit Books for an advanced copy of this science fictional mindbender. Sometimes life seems the same, not exactly a rut, but close enough that everyday always seems the same. Maybe the boat that you find yourself on changes from a sail boat to a steam boat, or even a dirigible, but everything else stays the same. You talk to the crew, you find something amazing at sea, things happen mostly bad, but nothing really changes. Alastair Reynolds in his book Eversion has written the kind of science fiction that will shake the reader out of any rut they find themselves in with a story that is not at all what one expects. Doctor Silas Coade is on his first sea voyage as doctor for an expedition that is attempting to find a gap in the coast of Norway, a gap in which great wonders await, thought he is really not sure. The crew is small and quite friendly, except for one member a woman who seems to expect a lot more from the good Doctor, more than he is capable of. The Doctor fills the time dealing with a deadly medical emergency, entertaining the crew with a sort of penny dreadful story and dealing with the boredom with pharmaceuticals. A discovery is made, things happen, and Doctor Silas Coade awakens on a boat bringing an expedition to Patagonia to find a gap that will lead to great wonders. Soon he finds himself on a Zeppelin, with a few more clues but even worse dangers awaiting him. This book is a surprise in that it takes the reader one way, turns around and goes another and yet doesn't loose a step or make the reader go, Oh come on now. The clues are there, the story is strong the plotting gives the story real consequences, and really never lets up. The characters no matter the era are all interesting, especially Coade, and his female rival, friend, possibly love. There are enough ideas for 3 novels, and each one would be good, but together this makes for a science fiction book you don't see much of. A book that wows with story, with science and with characters that really matter, and that you root for. I've read a few of Alastair Reynolds' previous books and always thought that he was more of a hard science space opera guy. I was wrong. Not just good science fiction, but good writing, and boy does the story whip around, and in a very good way. Recommended for fans of science fiction especially hard science fiction, and for people who enjoy really good adventure stories with a twist. Read it before it gets snapped up for a mini- series on some streaming service.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Eversion by Alastair Reynolds is the author’s latest novel, and is a bit different than his usual work. Most people know Reynolds from his Revelation Space series. His newest novel is a short standalone story, coming in at 300 pages. It is a quick and easy read, featuring a small cast of characters and concepts that are, mostly, easy to understand. So, it is somewhat of a departure from his dense and idea-heavy hard scifi novels. The mathematical concept of eversion describes turning a sphere ins Eversion by Alastair Reynolds is the author’s latest novel, and is a bit different than his usual work. Most people know Reynolds from his Revelation Space series. His newest novel is a short standalone story, coming in at 300 pages. It is a quick and easy read, featuring a small cast of characters and concepts that are, mostly, easy to understand. So, it is somewhat of a departure from his dense and idea-heavy hard scifi novels. The mathematical concept of eversion describes turning a sphere inside out in a three-dimensional space, without cutting or tearing. In the novel, Eversion, the mathematical concept actually ends up playing a very minor role in the story. The plot is largely character driven and is heavily focused on the main character of Doctor Silas Coade. Doctor Silas starts his adventure in an 1800s era ship at sea, serving as the assistant surgeon on an expedition to find a mythical structure called the Edifice. The voyage evolves throughout the novel from sailing ship to steam ship to zeppelin, and into the far future. Each voyage Silas experiences is a slightly different version of the expedition to the Edifice. Along the way his skills as a surgeon are called upon and he must prove his worth to the crew. The mystery of the Edifice is the constant focal point connecting all the separate voyages. It is a large alien structure that appears to be experiencing eversion. The only complaint I have about the novel is that the actual concept of eversion is not expanded upon as much as I was hoping for. But near the end, when much of the mystery is revealed, the Doctor’s character goes through a significant and interesting development, and the plot’s focus becomes much clearer. Eversion is not as dense or idea-heavy as Reynolds Revelation Space story, but is a quick page turner that explores a couple of interesting concepts. It is worth the read for fans of and beginners to Alastair’s work.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gayle Noble

    In the 1800s, Doctor Silas Coade is the Assistant Surgeon upon the Demeter, a sailing ship with a mission to find a mysterious artifact. Things go wrong from the start when one of the men in charge of security on the mission is hurt in a freak accident. Coade has to perform an emergency trepanation to relieve swelling on the brain, but the man starts to mutter strange things whilst recovering, including the title of Coade's book which he has never told or shown to anyone. When they are almost to In the 1800s, Doctor Silas Coade is the Assistant Surgeon upon the Demeter, a sailing ship with a mission to find a mysterious artifact. Things go wrong from the start when one of the men in charge of security on the mission is hurt in a freak accident. Coade has to perform an emergency trepanation to relieve swelling on the brain, but the man starts to mutter strange things whilst recovering, including the title of Coade's book which he has never told or shown to anyone. When they are almost to their destination, they see the wreck of the Europa, the ship which supposedly found the artifact first, but those onboard the Demeter had not been told that the Europa crew did not survive & they are understandably angry. Things go from bad to worse when their ship is sent by the strong currents on a collision course with cliffs of ice & Coade is killed by a falling mast. Many years later, a steam ship is travelling to find a mysterious artifact, onboard is young doctor, Silas Coade, the name of the ship - Demeter..... What a read this is. Once I started it I was hooked! Events are relived over & over again but with some small changes, by the same characters, & the main character starts to remember snippets from the previous missions. It's a story that gradually builds as the reader begins to work out some of what may be happening & therefore a review cannot say too much in case the plot is revealed. In one or two places we are told rather than shown, & some of mathematical talk about spheres etc lost me, but this is a definite recommend if you enjoy science fiction. My thanks to NetGalley & publishers, Orion Publishing Group/Gollancz, for the opportunity to read an ARC. I am voluntarily giving an honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    Eversion is the latest book from Alastair Reynolds. Doctor Silas Coade is part of a crew on a ship in the 1800's seeking a passage through the coastline to an artifact that will supposedly bring them wealth. But when the expeditions seem to start repeating themselves, and ending in disaster, Coade finds himself involved in a more sinister puzzle. I thought this read well from the start, with realistic dialogue and interaction between well-drawn characters; often with wry humour as they determine Eversion is the latest book from Alastair Reynolds. Doctor Silas Coade is part of a crew on a ship in the 1800's seeking a passage through the coastline to an artifact that will supposedly bring them wealth. But when the expeditions seem to start repeating themselves, and ending in disaster, Coade finds himself involved in a more sinister puzzle. I thought this read well from the start, with realistic dialogue and interaction between well-drawn characters; often with wry humour as they determine the best way to navigate the dangerous elements. With Coade repeating the mission, I thought it might be a familiar trope that would lessen the impact, but I found this wasn't the case as there was (for me) an unexpected reason why it was happening. So there was a big plot reveal around 60% through that was a real eye-opener, and more to come after that. As Mark mentions as well, it's hard to describe in too much detail because of spoiler, but this was different to the author's usual style - and I thought it was great. The plot twists that reveal themselves are very clever and impressive, making the last 40% of the book especially gripping. I've read pretty much all his books, but I think this is one of, if not his best in the last 10 years or so. And some may get put off by the first half (seemingly no SF elements, one setting), but things do change dramatically half way through or so.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lofty Ideas Bookshop

    Eversion by Alastair Reynolds is a story that follows Dr. Silas Coade throughout several timelines as he seeks to figure out why the events around him are repeating themselves. Unfortunately, this was a DNF for me. I wanted so much to love this story because I was looking forward to getting to the "in space" portion of it, but I had to stop at 50% when I realized I wasn't interested in the story and frankly dreaded picking it up. Not for me, and that's OK. Part of my dislike was my own fault -- Eversion by Alastair Reynolds is a story that follows Dr. Silas Coade throughout several timelines as he seeks to figure out why the events around him are repeating themselves. Unfortunately, this was a DNF for me. I wanted so much to love this story because I was looking forward to getting to the "in space" portion of it, but I had to stop at 50% when I realized I wasn't interested in the story and frankly dreaded picking it up. Not for me, and that's OK. Part of my dislike was my own fault -- I went into the novel thinking it was an epic story set in space in search of an artifact. I was anticipating a sci-fi story set in space, but you begin the story in the 1800s sailing on a ship with little to no "sci-fi" elements at the start. This storyline comes with all the other intricacies of the 1800s, particularly the language and happenings of the time, which were of little interest to me. I pushed through hoping that the next reset of the storyline would be better for me, but it was again another ship in perhaps the 1900s that felt repetitive to me. I also wasn't particularly attached to any of the main characters and at times was confused by what was actually happening. I do like the idea of the plot -- a doctor who is in a "groundhog day" scenario across multiple generations and locations -- but I didn't feel it was executed in a way that interested me. I seem to be an outlier amongst many positive reviews, so clearly this was just a book that wasn't for me but will be enjoyed by many others! Thank you to Netgalley and Orbit Books for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jonny

    An Unusual Gem Having finished the story I was most impressed with the first half of the book which takes the form of an absorbing oldy world-y adventure on the high seas in the spirit of a true ripping yarn of exploration and daring discovery. Yes, its as though expecting hard sci fi I had intercepted the wrong signal lol. Now I think I'd really benefit from a re-read actually, there were so many clues. And looking back, all those times I had to revisit sections to see if I read that correctly...T An Unusual Gem Having finished the story I was most impressed with the first half of the book which takes the form of an absorbing oldy world-y adventure on the high seas in the spirit of a true ripping yarn of exploration and daring discovery. Yes, its as though expecting hard sci fi I had intercepted the wrong signal lol. Now I think I'd really benefit from a re-read actually, there were so many clues. And looking back, all those times I had to revisit sections to see if I read that correctly...The double takes...Doh! Pure skill and invention here with Reynolds delivering so many high carat phrases, passages and words, all assembled in the way of a wise writer from centuries ago. Maybe like Moonfleet and very much like Heart Of Darkness or Dracula, yes the first half is stunning. Electrifying even. Not just on every page but many times on each page...there is always lightning. Time to be critical? maybe not, I was so impressed. Alistair Reynolds is completely entitled to evert his story at his own pace and as thoroughly as he feels necessary. Full marks from me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    sept_scribbles

    In all honestly, I expected this book to be your typical multiple-timeline, slightly-formulaic sci-fi thriller, possibly with a touch of romance thrown in. It was not. The multiple timelines, while slightly unfamiliar at first, were different enough that I didn't get bored, but still followed the same basic idea. In all of them, Doctor Silas Coade is a doctor onboard a ship destined for doom; there is the discovery of omission of a past, failed expedition and an ominous warning, yet the party ta In all honestly, I expected this book to be your typical multiple-timeline, slightly-formulaic sci-fi thriller, possibly with a touch of romance thrown in. It was not. The multiple timelines, while slightly unfamiliar at first, were different enough that I didn't get bored, but still followed the same basic idea. In all of them, Doctor Silas Coade is a doctor onboard a ship destined for doom; there is the discovery of omission of a past, failed expedition and an ominous warning, yet the party takes no heed and continues on. In every timeline, the goal is a mysterious structure named the "Edifice," and the timeline ends with Coade dying. But the real story starts a little over halfway through the book, where Coade realizes that Something Is Not Right, and the timelines are all something akin to figment of his imagination. They are trying to warn him of something; from here on, the timelines "stack" onto each other, with frequent switching from reality t0 fiction. I thought the execution of these chapters was fantastically well-done, and the differentiation between the two was clear while also leaving a sort of trepidatious feeling that I always love in any sci-fi novel. My favorite part of the novel, however, is definitely the ending, where Coade moves into a little town to be a land-based doctor. The nod to the first timeline (when Coade expresses his incompatibility with seafaring and longs for solid land) was a nice ending to Coade's story, and the mention of Ada Cossile (Coade's crush and the one who snaps him into reality, although there is no explicit mention of the two being in a romantic relationship) made it all the better. Overall, a solid novel, albeit a tad lengthy (but definitely worth the read) - 5/5

  22. 5 out of 5

    Beatrix Starling

    Big thank you to Netgalley for the arc of this book. Alastair Reynolds is my favourite sci-fi writer - but sadly this book wasn't for me, only got to read 30%. Will try again though some other time! It's masterful regardless, so it's all just me - i think English as second language makes it more tedious to read old English styles. The book is a bit slow paced with maybe too much detail and it really reminded me of Dan Simmons' The terror - another book i dnf-d 🙈 for the same reasons though i under Big thank you to Netgalley for the arc of this book. Alastair Reynolds is my favourite sci-fi writer - but sadly this book wasn't for me, only got to read 30%. Will try again though some other time! It's masterful regardless, so it's all just me - i think English as second language makes it more tedious to read old English styles. The book is a bit slow paced with maybe too much detail and it really reminded me of Dan Simmons' The terror - another book i dnf-d 🙈 for the same reasons though i understand why it's loved. I wish i got to learn where all the clever twists took the story - again, I'll try again someday. Best wishes for the book launch and i hope you all enjoy it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    An entertaining mix of classic action&adventure and sci-fi that kept me turning pages as I thoroughly enjoyed it. It's a bit slow at the beginning but after a few chapters it becomes a fast paced novel that kept me reading. I appreciated the storytelling and the world building It was the first book I read by this author and will try others as I read it's a bit different from his other work. This one is recommended if you want to read an entertaining story, a bit old fashioned at times but compellin An entertaining mix of classic action&adventure and sci-fi that kept me turning pages as I thoroughly enjoyed it. It's a bit slow at the beginning but after a few chapters it becomes a fast paced novel that kept me reading. I appreciated the storytelling and the world building It was the first book I read by this author and will try others as I read it's a bit different from his other work. This one is recommended if you want to read an entertaining story, a bit old fashioned at times but compelling. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  24. 4 out of 5

    Robert Micallef

    I first became aware of a life philosophy embedded in two of Reynold's stories Sleepover and Permafrost. And it's here, as well, written large. Like inanimate software constructs duking it out, philosophical constructs clash in this novel. From utilitarianism, to Kantian duty, to Stoic forbearance and a wonderful evocation of PKD's notion of empathy. A thoroughly satisfying read. Thank you, Mr. Reynolds. You're art is a tremendous consolation to those willing to accept they live in an atonal and I first became aware of a life philosophy embedded in two of Reynold's stories Sleepover and Permafrost. And it's here, as well, written large. Like inanimate software constructs duking it out, philosophical constructs clash in this novel. From utilitarianism, to Kantian duty, to Stoic forbearance and a wonderful evocation of PKD's notion of empathy. A thoroughly satisfying read. Thank you, Mr. Reynolds. You're art is a tremendous consolation to those willing to accept they live in an atonal and indifferent universe.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Braxiatel

    So, Alistair Reynolds can write a cute and romantic story even amidst all the horror. Ironically, the protagonist is, out of all of Alistair Reynolds's protagonists, the most empathetic one (view spoiler)[and he isn't even human (hide spoiler)] It's pretty good, even if the story gets very repetitive at times and you can see all the rather predictable plot twists coming, even at around the 30% mark honestly. So, Alistair Reynolds can write a cute and romantic story even amidst all the horror. Ironically, the protagonist is, out of all of Alistair Reynolds's protagonists, the most empathetic one (view spoiler)[and he isn't even human (hide spoiler)] It's pretty good, even if the story gets very repetitive at times and you can see all the rather predictable plot twists coming, even at around the 30% mark honestly.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Al

    This is a really great standalone, short book from Reynolds. It is a story about characters who happen to be existing in a context, not the other way round. It has a really fascinating premise with solid story progression and ‘oh!’ moments that push this firmly into 4 star territory. Finally, and what really consolidate the excellence of this book, was that it was fundamentally satisfying from start to finish.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    Ground hog day meets SF! Absolutely gripping! It’s got everything: expeditions spanning every great age, concluding in a tragic future when the true nature of the plight of both the narrator and his crew mates becomes clear. Intrigue, pathos, and a heart breaking existential dilemma underpinning the entire narrative. I was beginning to give up on this author but he has redeemed himself!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mikołaj

    Alastair Reynolds is a master storyteller - this book starts as an 18th century sailor’s tale and ends as as a discussion of deep learning / AI models morality in deep space, amazing story made in for-loop fashion ;), highly recommended

  29. 4 out of 5

    William

    A very cleverly written tale that really makes you think. I perhaps was primed to sympathise with the main character as I too am far from home and dreaming of a white house with a garden, on a hill in Plymouth, not too close to the sea, but not too far.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anna Cundiff

    This is the first book I have read by Alastair Reynolds and I went in blind (no synopsis). It took a bit for me to get into it but I was surprised at how engrossing the story became. I am excited to pick up his other work.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.