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Something Wicked

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In Something Wicked, Rushmore McKenzie, who promised to retire after his last nearly-fatal case, gets talked into doing an old friend a favor involving a castle, a family fighting over an inheritance, and at least one mysterious death. Rushmore McKenzie was a detective with the St. Paul, Minnesota PD until unlikely events made him first a millionaire and then a retiree. Sin In Something Wicked, Rushmore McKenzie, who promised to retire after his last nearly-fatal case, gets talked into doing an old friend a favor involving a castle, a family fighting over an inheritance, and at least one mysterious death. Rushmore McKenzie was a detective with the St. Paul, Minnesota PD until unlikely events made him first a millionaire and then a retiree. Since then, he's been an occasional unofficial private investigator - looking into things for friends and friends of friends - until his most recent case put him into a coma and nearly into a coffin. Now, at the insistence of his better half Nina Truhler, he is again retired. That is, until a friend of Nina finds herself in dire straights and in desperate need of a favor. Jenness Crawford's grandmother owned the family castle - a nineteenth century castle that has been operating as a hotel and resort for over a hundred years. Since her grandmother's death, the heirs have been squabbling over what to do with it. Some want to keep it in the family and running as a hotel. Some want to sell it and reap the millions a developer will pay for it. And Jenness is convinced that someone - probably in the latter group - killed her grandmother. A conclusion with which the police do not agree. Now McKenzie finds himself back in action, trapped in a castle filled with feuding relatives with conflicting agendas, long serving retainers, and a possible murderer. And if McKenzie makes one wrong move, it could be lights out.


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In Something Wicked, Rushmore McKenzie, who promised to retire after his last nearly-fatal case, gets talked into doing an old friend a favor involving a castle, a family fighting over an inheritance, and at least one mysterious death. Rushmore McKenzie was a detective with the St. Paul, Minnesota PD until unlikely events made him first a millionaire and then a retiree. Sin In Something Wicked, Rushmore McKenzie, who promised to retire after his last nearly-fatal case, gets talked into doing an old friend a favor involving a castle, a family fighting over an inheritance, and at least one mysterious death. Rushmore McKenzie was a detective with the St. Paul, Minnesota PD until unlikely events made him first a millionaire and then a retiree. Since then, he's been an occasional unofficial private investigator - looking into things for friends and friends of friends - until his most recent case put him into a coma and nearly into a coffin. Now, at the insistence of his better half Nina Truhler, he is again retired. That is, until a friend of Nina finds herself in dire straights and in desperate need of a favor. Jenness Crawford's grandmother owned the family castle - a nineteenth century castle that has been operating as a hotel and resort for over a hundred years. Since her grandmother's death, the heirs have been squabbling over what to do with it. Some want to keep it in the family and running as a hotel. Some want to sell it and reap the millions a developer will pay for it. And Jenness is convinced that someone - probably in the latter group - killed her grandmother. A conclusion with which the police do not agree. Now McKenzie finds himself back in action, trapped in a castle filled with feuding relatives with conflicting agendas, long serving retainers, and a possible murderer. And if McKenzie makes one wrong move, it could be lights out.

30 review for Something Wicked

  1. 5 out of 5

    PamG

    David Housewright brings readers a locked room mystery in the latest book in the Mac McKenzie series. In Something Wicked , Rushmore McKenzie agrees to help a friend of his wife’s by investigating a death at a castle turned hotel and a family fighting over the inheritance. Rushmore McKenzie was a detective with the St. Paul, Minnesota police department until events made him a millionaire and he retired. However, he continues to take on unofficial private investigations for family, friends, and David Housewright brings readers a locked room mystery in the latest book in the Mac McKenzie series. In Something Wicked , Rushmore McKenzie agrees to help a friend of his wife’s by investigating a death at a castle turned hotel and a family fighting over the inheritance. Rushmore McKenzie was a detective with the St. Paul, Minnesota police department until events made him a millionaire and he retired. However, he continues to take on unofficial private investigations for family, friends, and others. After nearly being killed, he’s retired again and bored when his wife, Nina Truhler, owner of Rickie’s, a restaurant and jazz club, convinces him to go to Redding, Minnesota on a vacation. However, the real reason is that Jennes Crawford believes her grandmother was murdered and the siblings who inherited Redding Castle, a hotel and resort, are going to sell it to a developer. Jennes believes someone in the family killed their mother. McKenzie exudes wit, charm, and the occasional sarcastic remark while investigating crimes. Nina is smart, intelligent, and willing to help friends in need. She uses her business experience to give Jennes ideas on how to increase her revenue streams for the castle. McKenzie and Nina are a relatable couple who pull readers into their lives. Beside McKenzie’s relationship with his wife, his dynamic with Redding Police Chief Deidre (Dee) Gardner was one of the most compelling aspects of the story. The author weaves a tale involving friends, family, romance, action, death, racism, inheritance, social justice, and divisiveness that pulls readers in and keeps one hooked from beginning to end. Relationships drive the investigation. Diverse characterization and great world-building details add to the depth of the story. Even the effects of the recent pandemic on peoples’ views and actions play a role in the narrative. The writing flows so well the pages flew by. The plot is solid, absorbing, and intriguing and the historical references added a layer of interest to it. The ending has some surprises that will likely surprise some readers. The last chapter tied up most of the loose ends, but was all telling versus showing. My other quibble was that one of the key loose ends isn’t resolved. Overall, this engaging novel unleashes wit, suspense, romance, and mystery that make it a twisty read that keeps readers hooked. If you enjoy mysteries, then I recommend that you check out this one. I am looking forward to finding out what happens in McKenzie’s next investigation. This novel works as a standalone novel, but readers will get more background if they start with book one. St. Martin’s Press – Minotaur Books and David Housewright provided a complimentary digital ARC of this novel via NetGalley. This is my honest review. Opinions are mine alone and are not biased in any way. Publication date is currently set for May 24, 2022. This review was originally posted at Mystery and Suspense Magazine. ---------------------- Review coming soon.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Linden

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This novel is part of a series, but I was able to read it as a stand alone. McKenzie is a former policeman from Minnesota, and his wife Nina asks him to look into her friend's Jenness's claim that her grandmother was murdered. (The death was ruled natural--grandmother was 80+ and had some health problems.) When Nina and McKenzie go to Redding Castle to help, they find the unlikable siblings locked in battle over whether to sell the castle or continue operating it as a hotel.There is also a probl This novel is part of a series, but I was able to read it as a stand alone. McKenzie is a former policeman from Minnesota, and his wife Nina asks him to look into her friend's Jenness's claim that her grandmother was murdered. (The death was ruled natural--grandmother was 80+ and had some health problems.) When Nina and McKenzie go to Redding Castle to help, they find the unlikable siblings locked in battle over whether to sell the castle or continue operating it as a hotel.There is also a problem in town with a white supremacist group that claims they are not a white supremacist group. The book had a rushed ending, and the mystery of grandmother's demise was never investigated further. Two and a half stars. I received an ARC from Edelweiss and the publisher for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tad

    Rushmore McKenzie is a former police detective who became a millionaire and then a retiree. He has been an unofficial private investigator since then until his last case nearly cost him his life and left him in a coma. His wife, Nina, insisted that he fully retire. Until that is, a friend and former employee of Nina comes to her and asks for McKenzie's assistance. Jenness Crawford funs the family castle that operates as a hotel/resort in Redding, Minnesota. Jenness's grandmother has died and now Rushmore McKenzie is a former police detective who became a millionaire and then a retiree. He has been an unofficial private investigator since then until his last case nearly cost him his life and left him in a coma. His wife, Nina, insisted that he fully retire. Until that is, a friend and former employee of Nina comes to her and asks for McKenzie's assistance. Jenness Crawford funs the family castle that operates as a hotel/resort in Redding, Minnesota. Jenness's grandmother has died and now the relatives are feuding over whether to keep operating the hotel or sell the land to developers for millions. Jenness is convinced that her grandmother did not die of natural causes but the police do not agree. That's where McKenzie comes in. He finds himself trying to solve a locked-room mystery that includes a castle full of suspects. These include relatives with unique and common motives, long-serving staff, and some local troublemakers as well. McKenzie has to figure out if there was a crime and if so, how to avoid being the next victim. Something Wicked by David Housewright was a wonderful surprise. McKenzie and his wife Nina are so damn likable their pictures should be in the dictionary next to "Minnesota nice". The setting is so richly described you feel yourself sitting on the steps of the castle and taking in the legendary sunsets. The cast of characters are all three-dimensional and have understandable motivations, even if it takes some work to uncover them. The mystery is intriguing, especially as you are not sure if a crime has been committed, let alone how and by whom. McKenzie is such an engaging character with his laid-back demeanor and sharp eye. The plot unfolds with plenty of viable suspects, a few red herrings, and a skilled detective to piece it all together. I am so happy to discover this long-running series. It is easy to jump into the adventure as a new reader and this entry is sure to please existing fans. I look forward to reading more McKenzie adventures, both past and future. One of my favorite reads of the year. I loved everything about this book. I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Something Wicked Earns 5/5 Locked Doors…Engaging & Clever! It seems trouble in its many forms came all at once: Covid lockdowns, Nina and McKenzie’s honeymoon scrapped, Nina’s jazz club flirting with bankruptcy, and Mac getting shot. Now, however, there is a silver lining with the world opening up and Nina’s club, as well as Mac, are healing, so Nina suggests a vacation. Wink! Wink! Nine had already received a frantic call for help from friend and former employee Jenness Crawford. She is managing Something Wicked Earns 5/5 Locked Doors…Engaging & Clever! It seems trouble in its many forms came all at once: Covid lockdowns, Nina and McKenzie’s honeymoon scrapped, Nina’s jazz club flirting with bankruptcy, and Mac getting shot. Now, however, there is a silver lining with the world opening up and Nina’s club, as well as Mac, are healing, so Nina suggests a vacation. Wink! Wink! Nine had already received a frantic call for help from friend and former employee Jenness Crawford. She is managing the family hotel and resort, Redding Castle, and suspects her grandmother’s recent death was not of natural causes. She is very excitement when Nina and McKenzie show up although Mac is surprised it’s going to be a working vacation. Although Mac does have experience having been a retired St. Paul police detective, neither Nina or Mac are real private investigators; they just help out. After meeting Jen’s aunts and uncles, they learn her grandmother changed her mind about selling the property to developers, yet now she’s gone, the “Sibs” (siblings), are set on reaping the proposed millions. Seeing curious behaviors and hearing interesting conversations does pique Mac’s interest and brings into question…whether or not any of them resorted to murder in order to inherit control over the resort? Or was Tess’s success stopping a rezoning application for a right-wing, so-called religious group a factor? Or is a death just a death? Don’t trust coincidences! David Housewright’s nineteenth book was wickedly good making me a fan of his Mac McKenzie series. I worried starting so far into the series I’d have too many questions about background and previous incidents, but everything needed was provided, like many standalones. I was totally engaged with the clever, complex drama with plenty of family conflicts and angst over a white separatist/supremacist group and entertained by the multi-generational characters and the shocking conclusion with its right amount of perilous predicaments. Housewright’s writing style included sensory-laden descriptions, diverse personalities, and informative banter including fascinating facts about historical events and figures and Norse mythology, discussions related to several recent headlines, and debates on policing, white supremacists, and religious freedoms to add the realism I demand. The “Just So You Know” wrap up provided plenty of satisfying closure. Using a first-person narrative from McKenzie’s perspective with his inner thoughts and witty repartee was well-developed, but different since I usually read books with female leads; I kept seeing in my mind’s eye a woman, but I sorted that out by picturing my favorite heartthrob. Oooh, yeah! However, I am a sucker for food talk, and the discussion about Sticky Toffee pudding made me drool…alas no recipe, though. Very engaging. Don’t miss this one. Candidate for one of my top 2022 reads! Disclosure: I received an ARC from St. Martin’s Press thru NetGalley. My review is voluntary with honest insights and comments.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol lowkey.bookish

    Something Wicked is book number 19 in the Mac McKenzie series, but it is the first I have read. So, I expected not to get much depth for the main characters that comes with reading an entire series. However, I didn’t feel that way at all because Rushmore McKenzie is such an interesting, multi-faceted character. I wouldn’t mind reading the series to fully figure him out and his relationship with Nina Truhler. Something Wicked takes place in Minnesota and really reflects the current times in which Something Wicked is book number 19 in the Mac McKenzie series, but it is the first I have read. So, I expected not to get much depth for the main characters that comes with reading an entire series. However, I didn’t feel that way at all because Rushmore McKenzie is such an interesting, multi-faceted character. I wouldn’t mind reading the series to fully figure him out and his relationship with Nina Truhler. Something Wicked takes place in Minnesota and really reflects the current times in which we live. It deals with COVID and other issues facing us today. I haven’t read any mysteries set in Minnesota so that was an interesting change of pace for me. The mystery itself involves a castle, artwork, and family drama. There are complex relationships and intrigues that make the mystery interesting and hard to solve. Although the mystery was interesting, my favorite part of the story was the cast of characters. I especially enjoyed Mac’s dealings with the local police chief, Dee Gardner. I think Dee deserves her own series, she is so interesting and clever. Overall this was an engaging mystery with interesting characters. I received a complementary eARC from the publisher via Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike Stafford

    I was really happy to learn David Housewright was gifting us a new "McKenzie" novel in 2022. I was even happier after reading the advanced NetGalley copy from St. Martin's Press and Minotaur Books. Something Wicked is a nice twist on the locked room mystery which reminds us why McKenzie belongs on the Mt. Rushmore of private eyes. Housewright never fails to deliver marvelous mysteries. I hate to state the obvious, but he's one of the best in the genre. Of course, the book features the wit and ch I was really happy to learn David Housewright was gifting us a new "McKenzie" novel in 2022. I was even happier after reading the advanced NetGalley copy from St. Martin's Press and Minotaur Books. Something Wicked is a nice twist on the locked room mystery which reminds us why McKenzie belongs on the Mt. Rushmore of private eyes. Housewright never fails to deliver marvelous mysteries. I hate to state the obvious, but he's one of the best in the genre. Of course, the book features the wit and charm we've come to expect from the author. The "Murder, She Wrote" running gag is especially good. Something Wicked is both a timely read and exceptionally entertaining! One of the best in a strong series! #SomethingWicked #NetGalley

  7. 5 out of 5

    LJ

    First Sentence: "Jenness Crawford's voice trembled with rage" Rushmore McKenzie may have retired from the police force, but when a friend of his wife, Nina, asks for help, McKenzie can't refuse. Jenness believes someone murdered her grandmother despite a lack of evidence. However, her biggest concern is that her siblings want to sell their 1883 home, hotel, and restaurant, struggling since the pandemic, to developers. The Sons of Europa, a group calling for the preservation of white families, wan First Sentence: "Jenness Crawford's voice trembled with rage" Rushmore McKenzie may have retired from the police force, but when a friend of his wife, Nina, asks for help, McKenzie can't refuse. Jenness believes someone murdered her grandmother despite a lack of evidence. However, her biggest concern is that her siblings want to sell their 1883 home, hotel, and restaurant, struggling since the pandemic, to developers. The Sons of Europa, a group calling for the preservation of white families, want her to sell so zoning laws might be changed, and no one wants that. Housewright can be relied upon for an excellent sense of time and place, and wonderful dialogue. His realistic inclusion of life in the time of COVID was very well done. He deals with the issues of white supremacy, racism, greed, deceptiveness, infidelity, and more while being objective and non-preachy. McKenzie, Nina, and the town's sheriff Deb are the ones who hold the story together and maintain our interest. There is a danger inherent in a plot that centers on a family rivalry; the characters tend to be unpleasant. That was certainly the case here. While Jenness avoided that curse, she was overshadowed by the other characters. There were significant weaknesses to the book. Exposition can be interesting, but unless it moves the plot forward, it's filler. Highly dramatic points at 50 percent and 75 percent make one think of "Midsomer Murders." It becomes predictable rather than suspenseful. An ending that tells, rather than shows, seems lazy. Classifying this story as a "locked-room mystery" is deceptive, and a major loose thread, even when acknowledged in the epilogue, wonders why it was there in the first place. Housewright is usually better than this. It appeared his heart just wasn't in this book. SOMETHING WICKED relies on the strength of its principal characters, and they don't disappoint. A protagonist with a strong, committed, supportive relationship is such a pleasure. It may not overcome everything, but serves as the core for a decent way to spend a day. SOMETHING WICKED (UnlInv-Rushmore McKenzie-Minnesota-Contemp) – Okay Housewright, David – 19th in series Minotaur Books, May 2022, 336 pp.

  8. 5 out of 5

    V

    This isn't a series or author I've read before, it was fine as a standalone. Although, I think I would've enjoyed the background of previous in the series. The setting in the Minneapolis, St. Paul area was also new, interesting and unfamiliar to me. There were atmospheric and historical facts dispersed throughout. Other than quite a few characters to keep up with, it was an easy read. The matriarch of Redding Castle, Tess, has passed away leaving a large family of Redding descendants squabbling This isn't a series or author I've read before, it was fine as a standalone. Although, I think I would've enjoyed the background of previous in the series. The setting in the Minneapolis, St. Paul area was also new, interesting and unfamiliar to me. There were atmospheric and historical facts dispersed throughout. Other than quite a few characters to keep up with, it was an easy read. The matriarch of Redding Castle, Tess, has passed away leaving a large family of Redding descendants squabbling over keeping or selling the historic family estate. Jenness Crawford has asked her friend, Nina Truhler, to come help her save the castle from becoming condos. Jenness does not accept that her grandmother's death was natural, she thinks she was murdered. Nina's husband, a former detective, McKenzie, is tricked into thinking this is a weekend getaway. The eldest son, Benjamin, is executor of Tess's estate. He's married to Olivia, hard to say who has the more shocking secrets, Big Ben or Livie. The other siblings, Carly, Eden, and Anna, all have varying reasons to want the millions to be had by selling Redding Castle. Cassandra Boeve, (Cassie) is the owner of Boeve Luxury, LLC, a development company. She has her own agenda and secrets invested in the purchase of Redding Castle to build the new luxury condos. Her office administrator, Veronica, is another devious character entangled in the secrets. There's also a white supremacist hate group, the Sons of Europa, nearby. They make for another possible suspect in the plot as the strange occurances, burnings and threats continue. The Redding Police Chief, Deidre Gardner, (Dee) knows McKenzie. He gets caught up in the crimes and increasing drama at the castle. They have their hands full trying to solve the case. It was an entertaining, enjoyable and suspenseful read. While I wouldn't call it a thriller, I wanted to know "who did it", and didn't guess early on. The characters were described well and relatable. The voice in McKenzie's head drove me a bit nuts, but I assumed the relevance is in a prior book. I would read others in this series and recommend this one as worth the read. Thanks to NetGalley for the advance digital copy of "Something Wicked, Mac McKenzie #19", by David Housewright, and to Minotaur Books. These are my honest personal thoughts and opinions given voluntarily.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joyce

    336 pages 4 stars Nina Truhler is married to former St. Paul, Minnesota Police Department detective Rushmore McKenzie. While he is officially retired, he still occasionally gets involved in investigations. Nina owns a restaurant. Her business has struggled with the COVID crisis. She is now beginning to see the light at the end of that particular tunnel. After getting shot in his latest case, Nina insists he retire for good. Except…When Jenness “Jen” Crawford tells Nina her grandmother was murdered 336 pages 4 stars Nina Truhler is married to former St. Paul, Minnesota Police Department detective Rushmore McKenzie. While he is officially retired, he still occasionally gets involved in investigations. Nina owns a restaurant. Her business has struggled with the COVID crisis. She is now beginning to see the light at the end of that particular tunnel. After getting shot in his latest case, Nina insists he retire for good. Except…When Jenness “Jen” Crawford tells Nina her grandmother was murdered at the old castle she owned, Nina is intrigued. The castle was turned into a guest house long ago and sits with a beautiful vista. Nina and McKenzie travel there. McKenzie is, of course, drawn into another mystery. David Housewright writes a very good novel. This book is almost a cozy mystery. It is well written and plotted and the characters, especially Nina and McKenzie are engaging and likable. I especially liked the “Angela Fletcher” allusions. I was also glad to see the COVID crisis brought into the book. I want to thank NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press/Minotaur Books for forwarding to me a copy of this very good book for me to read, enjoy and review. The opinions stated here are solely my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Grow

    Once again Rushmore McKenzie finds himself involved in an investigation. McKenzie, once a detective with the St. Paul police department, had retired after a “situation” from one of his cases made him a millionaire. If you have not read the first book in this series, you really should and you will be hooked on McKenzie, his dry sense of humor and his ability to solve the “favors” he is able to do for friends. His wife, the lovely Nina Truhler and owner of the jazz club Rickie’s, has asked him to Once again Rushmore McKenzie finds himself involved in an investigation. McKenzie, once a detective with the St. Paul police department, had retired after a “situation” from one of his cases made him a millionaire. If you have not read the first book in this series, you really should and you will be hooked on McKenzie, his dry sense of humor and his ability to solve the “favors” he is able to do for friends. His wife, the lovely Nina Truhler and owner of the jazz club Rickie’s, has asked him to investigate the suspicious death of an elderly woman. The woman’s granddaughter, Jenness, once worked for Nina and believes that her grandmother was murdered when she decided not to sell her Redding Mansion Hotel. Tess’s five children were set to inherit the funds from the sale…would one of them have ended their mother’s life to force a sale for the money? A locked room, no autopsy of the body before cremation and five siblings who disagree on what should be done adds up to an intriguing puzzle for McKenzie, one is he determined to solve. I received an advance review copy at no cost and without obligation for an honest review. (paytonpuppy)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    Mac and Nina find themselves in the middle of a family feud-and more- when Nina convinces Mac to "vacation" in Redding, Minnesota, which just happens to be where her friend Jen's family castle (yes, castle) is located. Jen is convinced that her grandmother Cass was murdered, probably because of her turnaround on agreement to sell the castle to developers. Was that it? Well Jen's siblings (a horrid lot) and the Sons of Europa (an even worse group of white supremecists) are all tied up in this ent Mac and Nina find themselves in the middle of a family feud-and more- when Nina convinces Mac to "vacation" in Redding, Minnesota, which just happens to be where her friend Jen's family castle (yes, castle) is located. Jen is convinced that her grandmother Cass was murdered, probably because of her turnaround on agreement to sell the castle to developers. Was that it? Well Jen's siblings (a horrid lot) and the Sons of Europa (an even worse group of white supremecists) are all tied up in this entertaining mystery. Mac's a good character, Housewright has effectively incorporated the pandemic, and you might not (I didn't) guess where this goes. And, bonus is the positive relationship between Mac and Police Chief Dee Gardner. I've only read a couple of the books in this long running series so this was a sorta standalone for me and it was fine that way. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. A good read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Every avid reader loves to find a new-to-them series that has a long list of books to catch up with. I found myself reading #19 and now I have 18 to binge read. When I started Something Wicked I had some trepidation because I am one of those readers who prefers to read series in order. I needn't have worried. This worked fine as a stand alone and it hooked me from the first chapter. Mac and Nina are now on my list of favorite characters. The setting was what drew me in from the start. Who wouldn Every avid reader loves to find a new-to-them series that has a long list of books to catch up with. I found myself reading #19 and now I have 18 to binge read. When I started Something Wicked I had some trepidation because I am one of those readers who prefers to read series in order. I needn't have worried. This worked fine as a stand alone and it hooked me from the first chapter. Mac and Nina are now on my list of favorite characters. The setting was what drew me in from the start. Who wouldn't like to investigate a mystery at a castle/resort? Add family strife, nasty family members, a possible murder and inheritance....count me in. This mystery has it all. The writing style flows well, the characters are well developed and the puzzle was very satisfying. I can't wait to dive into the previous books. My thanks to the publisher, Minotaur and to NetGalley for giving me an advance copy in exchange for my honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    Got a newsletter from the local library about new books. I had never read anything by this author; it sounded interesting; this is the 19th book in a series so it must be good, right? I thought it was slow, boring in places and really simple. I enjoy a good mystery but this was not it. The author's writing style -lots of dialogue- reminded me of Stuart Woods. But this detective does not have the panache of Stone Barrington. He came across more like Columbo to me. And I really dislike McKenzie's c Got a newsletter from the local library about new books. I had never read anything by this author; it sounded interesting; this is the 19th book in a series so it must be good, right? I thought it was slow, boring in places and really simple. I enjoy a good mystery but this was not it. The author's writing style -lots of dialogue- reminded me of Stuart Woods. But this detective does not have the panache of Stone Barrington. He came across more like Columbo to me. And I really dislike McKenzie's continual references to his inner voice. Well, at least it did not take me long to read and it was a break from a book club book I was not ready to start.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    McKenzie finds himself helping a friend of his wife who thinks her grandmother has been murdered. he setting is a castle owned by the family for over a hundred years. After McKenzie and his wife, Nina, arrives the mystery only deepens. Was a crime committed or was it natural causes? Throw in a cast of greedy relatives, a white separatist group and several other characters, there is no shortage of suspects. This story will keep you guessing and wondering until the very end. I won this book in a G McKenzie finds himself helping a friend of his wife who thinks her grandmother has been murdered. he setting is a castle owned by the family for over a hundred years. After McKenzie and his wife, Nina, arrives the mystery only deepens. Was a crime committed or was it natural causes? Throw in a cast of greedy relatives, a white separatist group and several other characters, there is no shortage of suspects. This story will keep you guessing and wondering until the very end. I won this book in a GoodReads Giveaway.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda Gilliland

    This is the only series I read as soon as I buy it, like the old days. Character or plot driven, this is place driven. The author told me " To know who they are, you have to be where they've been." Another town and this one has a castle at the center. Of course there's a murder when the family's involved. But is there really an actual murder? You won't even find that out until the end. Mac and his favors. He's equally surprised at the presence of an old friend from the precinct. This is the only series I read as soon as I buy it, like the old days. Character or plot driven, this is place driven. The author told me " To know who they are, you have to be where they've been." Another town and this one has a castle at the center. Of course there's a murder when the family's involved. But is there really an actual murder? You won't even find that out until the end. Mac and his favors. He's equally surprised at the presence of an old friend from the precinct.

  16. 5 out of 5

    D

    I've enjoyed all the books in both series, especially his use of dialogue and the inner voice. I thought this was a particularly creative and complex story. We learned a lot of interesting insights about Nina who was integral to the story line as well as her former employee. Including the siblings and resort staff in the story arch made this book especially engaging as McKenzie and the chief of police sorted through all the clues and personalities and agenda's, discarding what didn't check out. I've enjoyed all the books in both series, especially his use of dialogue and the inner voice. I thought this was a particularly creative and complex story. We learned a lot of interesting insights about Nina who was integral to the story line as well as her former employee. Including the siblings and resort staff in the story arch made this book especially engaging as McKenzie and the chief of police sorted through all the clues and personalities and agenda's, discarding what didn't check out. I'm already looking forward to the next years installment!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Brouwer

    This book had great characters that were wonderfully woven. The atmosphere was realistic and enchanting. The plot was suitable suspenseful and had twists and turn. It was not the most action packed books but the charm of the characters help to keep it rolling at a good pace. Over all my love for these characters made this book a good read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Sembar

    This book had all the mystery and suspense that kept me focused and reading til the end. This is the kind of book I prefer that I can't put down. ( I wasn't able to get started on it as soon as I received it as other things had come up, but as soon as I did it was worth the wait.) This book had all the mystery and suspense that kept me focused and reading til the end. This is the kind of book I prefer that I can't put down. ( I wasn't able to get started on it as soon as I received it as other things had come up, but as soon as I did it was worth the wait.)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    Rushmore McKenzie's 19th adventure in detection has him confront a locked-room mystery (his first). As one should expect after seeing McKenzie in action before, he deals with it doggedly, backed up this time by his wife, Nina Truhler. Rushmore McKenzie's 19th adventure in detection has him confront a locked-room mystery (his first). As one should expect after seeing McKenzie in action before, he deals with it doggedly, backed up this time by his wife, Nina Truhler.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mlj9029

    Not his best, but he is one of the best. Entertaining and fun.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Stanley

    A good story with good writing and characters - as usual, but maybe a weak "5". But still a "5." Very entertaining. A good story with good writing and characters - as usual, but maybe a weak "5". But still a "5." Very entertaining.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Library book

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rick Molitor

    This was a very good thriller. The story is interesting but the thing that makes it special is the characters. He writes great characters and then weaves a wonderful story around them. A good read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This is a fun Minnesota mystery series!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steve Isenhower

    Good read A good addition to the McKenzie series. The author infused the storyline with his characteristic humor. Good mystery with a good solution

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    This was the first book in this series that I couldn't get in to. After taking a week to read half the book, I then skimmed to the end. This was the first book in this series that I couldn't get in to. After taking a week to read half the book, I then skimmed to the end.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kristin M. Wolla

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bob J

  29. 4 out of 5

    Patrick T. Breen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Willingham

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