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Atomic Anna

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Three generations of women work together and travel through time to prevent the Chernobyl disaster and right the wrongs of their past. Three brilliant women. Two life-changing mistakes. One chance to reset the future. In 1986, renowned nuclear scientist, Anna Berkova, is sleeping in her bed in the Soviet Union when Chernobyl’s reactor melts down. It’s the exact moment she tear Three generations of women work together and travel through time to prevent the Chernobyl disaster and right the wrongs of their past. Three brilliant women. Two life-changing mistakes. One chance to reset the future. In 1986, renowned nuclear scientist, Anna Berkova, is sleeping in her bed in the Soviet Union when Chernobyl’s reactor melts down. It’s the exact moment she tears through time—and it’s an accident. When she opens her eyes, she’s landed in 1992 only to discover Molly, her estranged daughter, shot in the chest. Molly, with her dying breath, begs Anna to go back in time and stop the disaster, to save Molly’s daughter Raisa, and put their family’s future on a better path. In ‘60s Philadelphia, Molly is coming of age as an adopted refusenik. Her family is full of secrets and a past they won’t share. She finds solace in comic books, drawing her own series, Atomic Anna, and she’s determined to make it as an artist. When she meets the volatile, charismatic Viktor, their romance sets her life on a very different course. In the ‘80s, Raisa, is a lonely teen and math prodigy, until a quiet, handsome boy moves in across the street and an odd old woman shows up claiming to be her biological grandmother. As Raisa finds new issues of Atomic Anna in unexpected places, she notices each comic challenges her to solve equations leading to one impossible conclusion: time travel. And she finally understands what she has to do. As these remarkable women work together to prevent the greatest nuclear disaster of the 20th century, they grapple with the power their discoveries hold. Just because you can change the past, does it mean you should?


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Three generations of women work together and travel through time to prevent the Chernobyl disaster and right the wrongs of their past. Three brilliant women. Two life-changing mistakes. One chance to reset the future. In 1986, renowned nuclear scientist, Anna Berkova, is sleeping in her bed in the Soviet Union when Chernobyl’s reactor melts down. It’s the exact moment she tear Three generations of women work together and travel through time to prevent the Chernobyl disaster and right the wrongs of their past. Three brilliant women. Two life-changing mistakes. One chance to reset the future. In 1986, renowned nuclear scientist, Anna Berkova, is sleeping in her bed in the Soviet Union when Chernobyl’s reactor melts down. It’s the exact moment she tears through time—and it’s an accident. When she opens her eyes, she’s landed in 1992 only to discover Molly, her estranged daughter, shot in the chest. Molly, with her dying breath, begs Anna to go back in time and stop the disaster, to save Molly’s daughter Raisa, and put their family’s future on a better path. In ‘60s Philadelphia, Molly is coming of age as an adopted refusenik. Her family is full of secrets and a past they won’t share. She finds solace in comic books, drawing her own series, Atomic Anna, and she’s determined to make it as an artist. When she meets the volatile, charismatic Viktor, their romance sets her life on a very different course. In the ‘80s, Raisa, is a lonely teen and math prodigy, until a quiet, handsome boy moves in across the street and an odd old woman shows up claiming to be her biological grandmother. As Raisa finds new issues of Atomic Anna in unexpected places, she notices each comic challenges her to solve equations leading to one impossible conclusion: time travel. And she finally understands what she has to do. As these remarkable women work together to prevent the greatest nuclear disaster of the 20th century, they grapple with the power their discoveries hold. Just because you can change the past, does it mean you should?

30 review for Atomic Anna

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    Atomic Anna is a sci-fi time travel novel centred around the Chernobyl nuclear accident. 1986: Anna Berkova, an esteemed nuclear scientist, is asleep in her bed when she suddenly time travels to the exact moment of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Somehow, she has travelled to the future where she meets her estranged daughter Manya, shot in the chest, begging Anna to save her daughter Raisa. Philadelphia in the 1960s: adopted Manya, now called Molly, lives with her grandparents. Recently, Molly s Atomic Anna is a sci-fi time travel novel centred around the Chernobyl nuclear accident. 1986: Anna Berkova, an esteemed nuclear scientist, is asleep in her bed when she suddenly time travels to the exact moment of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Somehow, she has travelled to the future where she meets her estranged daughter Manya, shot in the chest, begging Anna to save her daughter Raisa. Philadelphia in the 1960s: adopted Manya, now called Molly, lives with her grandparents. Recently, Molly started writing a comic book series titled Atomic Anna. It’s her dream for it to be published. But her life takes a turn when she meets and falls in love with Viktor, a charming but toxic man. Philadelphia in the 1980s: Raisa is a self-taught math prodigy living with her grandparents. She’s a bit of a loner until she meets her neighbour Daniel. Raisa grew up reading Atomic Anna, and oddly, new editions have been cropping up and seem to be asking for her help. This sci-fi novel follows the lives of these three women. The plot’s pace is even, although the timeline skips around quite a bit. Atomic Anna tackles the phrase “just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.” It explores the risks of producing nuclear weapons. It asks whether it’s possible for a weapon to be created but not used and who controls it. I am happy I read this, as science fiction is not a genre I read often. I am far from a science buff, but the author did a great job explaining everything in simple enough terms. I would recommend Atomic Anna if you want a story that blends sci-fi, historical fiction, and thriller. Thank you to Grand Central Publishing for providing me with a copy to review. https://booksandwheels.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    Atomic Anna by Rachel Barenbaum is a science fiction fantasy novel that is based on the real life historical event of the Chernobyl disaster. The story in Atomic Anne is one that is told by changing the point of view between the characters and with different timelines for the characters. Anna Berkova is a nuclear scientist who was sleeping when Chernobyl’s reactor melts in 1986 and at that exact moment Anna’s dream of time travel actually came true. Anna traveled a few years into the future where Atomic Anna by Rachel Barenbaum is a science fiction fantasy novel that is based on the real life historical event of the Chernobyl disaster. The story in Atomic Anne is one that is told by changing the point of view between the characters and with different timelines for the characters. Anna Berkova is a nuclear scientist who was sleeping when Chernobyl’s reactor melts in 1986 and at that exact moment Anna’s dream of time travel actually came true. Anna traveled a few years into the future where she saw her adult daughter, Molly, get shot. Even though Molly and Anna had not been close with Molly being raised by adoptive parents Anna knows she needs to do whatever she can to save Molly and she needs her granddaughter Raisa’s help. I’ve always had an interest in reading fiction based on real life events with it seeming to bring even more life into a story so I thought Atomic Anna by Rachel Barenbaum would be right up my alley. Unfortunately this one wasn’t a hit as I sat down to read it I found that the pacing seemed kind of slow in my opinion which made the story drag for me. Then as I got to know each of three generations of women they all felt too similar and not really likable and overall I’d kept wishing for more from the scifi side than what i was finding so I wasn’t a huge fan leaving this one at two stars. I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley. For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.com/

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Of course I LOVE this book!! I poured my heart into every page. I hope you love it, too.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I read Atomic Anna in one day - couldn't put it down! Rachel Barenbaum does a fantastic job of weaving the different strands and stories of three generations of strong women. Anna, Molly, Raisa and supporting characters Yulia, Lazar, Daniel, Yasha are all battling their own demons while trying to do what they think is right for their loved ones. It's at once a brilliant meditation on responsibility to family and society while also a fun, page-turning tale of time-travel. I loved it and can't wai I read Atomic Anna in one day - couldn't put it down! Rachel Barenbaum does a fantastic job of weaving the different strands and stories of three generations of strong women. Anna, Molly, Raisa and supporting characters Yulia, Lazar, Daniel, Yasha are all battling their own demons while trying to do what they think is right for their loved ones. It's at once a brilliant meditation on responsibility to family and society while also a fun, page-turning tale of time-travel. I loved it and can't wait to recommend this to friends. Book clubs will also find a lot to discuss here!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Guylou (Two Dogs and a Book)

    📚 Hello Book Friends! What do four generations of exceptional women, a time machine, a comic strip, and the Chernobyl disaster have in common? They are the premises of ATOMIC ANNA by Rachel Barenbaum. In 1986, Anna is a brilliant Russian scientist, but she is haunted by her mother’s abandonment, and her abandonment of her own daughter. While working in Chernobyl on her time travel theory, she experienced her first jump in time at the exact moment the nuclear reactor melted. She is propelled in t 📚 Hello Book Friends! What do four generations of exceptional women, a time machine, a comic strip, and the Chernobyl disaster have in common? They are the premises of ATOMIC ANNA by Rachel Barenbaum. In 1986, Anna is a brilliant Russian scientist, but she is haunted by her mother’s abandonment, and her abandonment of her own daughter. While working in Chernobyl on her time travel theory, she experienced her first jump in time at the exact moment the nuclear reactor melted. She is propelled in the future and faces the daughter she gave away a long time ago. This encounter will incite Anna to travel through time to alter the future to save her family or save the people of Chernobyl. Will she succeed or make things worse? You have to read this brilliant book to find out. #bookstadog #poodles #poodlestagram #poodlesofinstagram #furbabies #dogsofinstagram #bookstagram #dogsandbooks #bookishlife #bookishlove #bookstagrammer #books #booklover #bookish #bookaholic #reading #readersofinstagram #instaread #ilovebooks #bookishcanadians #canadianbookstagram #bookreviewer #bookcommunity #bibliophile #atomicanna #rachelbarenbaum #hbgcanada #grandcentralpub #bookreview

  6. 4 out of 5

    Readingcaptures

    This book is phenomenal. The storyline captivated me from page one and I just could not put it down. It became my obsession for 2 days. The writing is so poignant and elaborate. This was a huge task to be a novel about historical fiction, coming of age and a bit of sci-fi with the time machine part. It all worked together like a perfect cocktail. This book is 400 + pages but so fast paced it basically goes by on a blink of the eye. I loved all the characters. My main gals are flawed, raw and per This book is phenomenal. The storyline captivated me from page one and I just could not put it down. It became my obsession for 2 days. The writing is so poignant and elaborate. This was a huge task to be a novel about historical fiction, coming of age and a bit of sci-fi with the time machine part. It all worked together like a perfect cocktail. This book is 400 + pages but so fast paced it basically goes by on a blink of the eye. I loved all the characters. My main gals are flawed, raw and perfect. I feel like maybe the writer has mom issues ? With all the need of hearing someone say I’m proud of you. But that’s neither here or there. Read this book if you need a change from your usual. This book is a smash hit.

  7. 4 out of 5

    thereadingowlvina (Elvina Ulrich)

    What It's About: In 1986, renowned nuclear scientist, Anna Berkova, inadvertently makes her first jump and travels to 1992, during the Chernobyl reactor meltdown. She sees her daughter Molly bleeding out from a gunshot wound and with her dying breath begs Anna to go back in time to prevent the disaster and change their family's past. My thoughts: I have to admit that I am a sucker for time travel stories although I don’t often read sci-fi books! There is just something about time traveli What It's About: In 1986, renowned nuclear scientist, Anna Berkova, inadvertently makes her first jump and travels to 1992, during the Chernobyl reactor meltdown. She sees her daughter Molly bleeding out from a gunshot wound and with her dying breath begs Anna to go back in time to prevent the disaster and change their family's past. My thoughts: I have to admit that I am a sucker for time travel stories although I don’t often read sci-fi books! There is just something about time traveling that I love so much since I was a kid. So, naturally this book grabbed my attention and I loved it so much! It was better than what I expected! It was so well-written and well-plotted with three strong female protagonists - I couldn't ask for more! This story navigates through the POVs of Anna, Molly and Raisa in their respective timelines. I loved all the POV equally. Their individual stories in their timelines are all unique and different and I loved how all tied up nicely in the end and made sense! Now I am not a science person but the author's explanation on the time travel theory is easy for me to understand. I really appreciate that! I also loved how instead of chapters, this story has nine different parts and each part has a saying/teaching from Pirket Avot (Chapters of the Fathers) which is a compilation of Jewish ethical teachings and maxims, and it ties in with what that part of story is about. My favourite is, "Do not judge your fellow man until you have been in his position." In a nutshell, regardless if sci-fi is your genre, you do not want to miss out on this book! It has a bit of everything - historical fiction, sci-fi, mystery, and thriller. It is a book about family, friendships, redemption, sacrifice and choices - a book that will tug at your heartstrings! ***Thank you Grand Central Publishing for this gifted ARC copy. All opinions expressed are my own.***

  8. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    Having enjoyed Barenbaum's first novel, A Bend in the Stars, I was excited to read her new novel. Her hallmark is mixing family drama, science, and history in a creative way. Anna Berkova is a famous nuclear scientist in Russia, but her safety systems fail, leading to the catastrophic Chernobyl reactor meltdown. Anna's brilliance allows her to develop a time machine, and she dedicates herself to avoiding the disaster. Meanwhile, she cannot handle the stress of her personal life and sends her youn Having enjoyed Barenbaum's first novel, A Bend in the Stars, I was excited to read her new novel. Her hallmark is mixing family drama, science, and history in a creative way. Anna Berkova is a famous nuclear scientist in Russia, but her safety systems fail, leading to the catastrophic Chernobyl reactor meltdown. Anna's brilliance allows her to develop a time machine, and she dedicates herself to avoiding the disaster. Meanwhile, she cannot handle the stress of her personal life and sends her young daughter (Manya/Molly) to America with her BFF. Molly struggles in America, especially her feelings of abandonment and falls for a gangster, who believes in her comic book talents. Things go badly for Molly and her now husband, and their brilliant daughter, Raisa, whose immense talent in science is like her grandmother, Atomic Anna. As the books skips back and forth in time travelling segments, Anna finds herself in her science lair on Mount Aragats with Molly, who is dying from a gunshot wound and who begs her to go back in time to save Raisa. Anna is forced to decide whether her family is more or less important than preventing Chernobyl. A touching story of three generations of women in Russia and Philadelphia' Little Russia. Recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stacy40pages

    Atomic Anna by Rachel Barenbaum. Thanks to @grandcentralpub for the gifted Arc ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ In a journey through decades, we meet Anna who was involved in Chernobyl’s reactor, her daughter Molly coming of age in the 60’s and getting drawn into drugs, and Molly’s daughter Raisa, lonely and a genius with math. I love a good time travel book. However I’m not very scientific, so it has to stay light in the tech area. This one was perfectly done. I was so invested in the story and characters that I was al Atomic Anna by Rachel Barenbaum. Thanks to @grandcentralpub for the gifted Arc ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ In a journey through decades, we meet Anna who was involved in Chernobyl’s reactor, her daughter Molly coming of age in the 60’s and getting drawn into drugs, and Molly’s daughter Raisa, lonely and a genius with math. I love a good time travel book. However I’m not very scientific, so it has to stay light in the tech area. This one was perfectly done. I was so invested in the story and characters that I was all about the science aspect as well (which as lightly done). I love how we got to know generations of the same family, in two different countries and with differing troubles. The ending seemed to happen pretty fast, especially for a lengthy book, but I was very satisfied. “There was no correct time - only relative time, which meant the present, past, and future were blurred.” Atomic Anna comes out 4/5.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Galloway

    This is one of those book that ramped up to about four stars early on, but once it reached the end I was pretty disgusted with it. It explores a lot of interesting topics and ideas -- from clever layering of time travel jumps to postpartum depression, complicated family relationships, prejudice against immigrants, gaslighting and emotional abuse, and so on. It brings up many ethical conundrums -- do you save who is here or a zillion people from the past? Should you change the past at all -- even This is one of those book that ramped up to about four stars early on, but once it reached the end I was pretty disgusted with it. It explores a lot of interesting topics and ideas -- from clever layering of time travel jumps to postpartum depression, complicated family relationships, prejudice against immigrants, gaslighting and emotional abuse, and so on. It brings up many ethical conundrums -- do you save who is here or a zillion people from the past? Should you change the past at all -- even major tragedies -- when you have no idea how that will affect the future? And then... The novel takes a huge nose dive when it says it doesn't care about all those things and, perhaps, none of it matters (including the gaslighting and depression) because... LOVE. And that blood ties are all that matter. Plus we can throw in some stereotyping about another country that some simple research could have cleared up quick. I honestly found the end of the novel kind of gross in how it washed away all their real world problems... and in how this one major character who seemed to cause a bunch of issues because of her holier-than-thou attitude apparently is just right. Barf.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Shelburne

    I absolutely *love* this book! Barenbaum has written a stunning epic about three generations of time-traveling women using their heads and their hearts to change their lives and the history of the world. This is a gorgeously-written story of family, science, love, and an abiding faith in something better. I can't wait to recommend ATOMIC ANNA to every reader I know! I absolutely *love* this book! Barenbaum has written a stunning epic about three generations of time-traveling women using their heads and their hearts to change their lives and the history of the world. This is a gorgeously-written story of family, science, love, and an abiding faith in something better. I can't wait to recommend ATOMIC ANNA to every reader I know!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Thrilling, whiz-bang time travel courtesy of three generations of passionate, genius women—each blinded at times by ambition, fear, resentment, and regret— who must collaborate over time and distance to stop disaster on the large scale and within their own troubled family. A stunning, wild ride!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christie«SHBBblogger»

    Title: Atomic Anna Series: standalone Author: Rachel Barenbaum Release date: April 5, 2022 Cliffhanger: no Genre: historical fiction, time travel As a huge fan of Rachel Barenbaum's A Bend in the Stars, I probably would have been excited to read her follow up regardless of what the plot happened to be. I was extremely impressed with her writing and was already looking forward to seeing what she came out with next. Then I read the synopsis for Atomic Anna and this book became one of my most anticipate Title: Atomic Anna Series: standalone Author: Rachel Barenbaum Release date: April 5, 2022 Cliffhanger: no Genre: historical fiction, time travel As a huge fan of Rachel Barenbaum's A Bend in the Stars, I probably would have been excited to read her follow up regardless of what the plot happened to be. I was extremely impressed with her writing and was already looking forward to seeing what she came out with next. Then I read the synopsis for Atomic Anna and this book became one of my most anticipated reads this year. Why? Because I'm kind of obsessed with time travel novels and there aren't nearly enough out there for me to get my hands on. Beyond that, what really excited me was the prospect of weaving multi-generational female family relationships into that time travel plot. How would time travel help or hinder these women's relationships? Their careers, personal lives, their personal demons? Anna made a lot of bad choices that affected her own personal happiness as well as the generations to follow. The question was whether or not she could pinpoint where so much began to go wrong and reverse it before it even happens. I'm going to be real when it comes to my feelings about Anna. She was a brilliant woman academically, but when it came to her personal life, she was hopeless. I had a really difficult time liking her for the majority of the book. I admired her intelligence and strength of spirit, however, she was quite selfish in many ways which made it really hard to feel an attachment to her. There were many points of view in this novel, but Anna's is really the central point to everything. Anna's mistakes in regards to her husband Yasha, and their child Molly would ruin so many lives. Yulia and Lazar contributed by being secretive and controlling with Molly causing her to spiral down into addiction, which in turn led her own daughter to suffer because of it. While I did sympathize about Anna's experiences leading up to this, because of the way the storyline is set up, Anna doesn't really go through a gradual progression of enlightenment. She tries to fix things without digging very deeply within herself for the answers, and because of that always seems to fall short of making significant progress. It happens all at once, at the climax of the story, so things felt quite rushed in that regard. Anna's daughter Molly grows up in America, but she doesn't feel at home there. She's too American to be Russian like Yulia and Lazar who raised her, and she's too Russian to acclimate with the other kids in her school. She loses herself in her art and rebels against the traditional, boring boundaries her parents try to keep her in. If there was any kind of communication and honesty between them, so much could have been avoided. She feels unsupported and unloved and goes looking for it in the worst place possible. From Molly's chapters, you witness so many mistakes on her part you just want to shake her. And that brings us to Raisa, my favorite character of the book. Raisa was brilliant like her grandmother, but unlike Anna, she was not at the root of the disastrous events in her life. She suffered because of her mother and grandmother, none of it was from her own making. She was a genius, really, and deserved the chance for the bright future she had every capability of achieving. Out of the three women, she was also the only one to have a healthy romantic relationship instead of a toxic one. Raisa had a maturity about her that was so refreshing to read, and I realized I was looking forward to reading her chapters the most. I loved seeing her sweet relationship with Daniel develop, as well as watching her forge a path back to her mother and grandmother before the conclusion. I thought that the plot was very intricate and it all came together in the end, however it became somewhat chaotic with the different POV switches, multiple timelines, and alternate realities. This book is the opposite of linear. It's kind of a jumbled, jarring, knot of time that you have to pick apart one tiny, twisted piece at a time. That may not be a downside for some readers, but for me personally it caused my reading pace to lag at times. Overall, I did enjoy Barenbaum's writing style once again, and she impressed me with her very original story. It's definitely unlike any other time travel book I've read before so it gets major points for that. I'm very excited to see where this author takes us in the future. FOLLOW SMOKIN HOT BOOK BLOG ON:

  14. 4 out of 5

    Almira

    Science fiction is not a genre I normally read, however, since the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and then the Russians overtaking the Chernobyl nuclear power plant early in the war (2022), this book appeared with the Chernobyl connection, I thought it would be interesting to read. I do remember the "meltdown" of the Number 4 reactor in 1986. As this was also a time travel with the Russian woman who "created" the nuclear chain, leading to the disaster, wanting to travel back to 1986 to stop the even Science fiction is not a genre I normally read, however, since the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and then the Russians overtaking the Chernobyl nuclear power plant early in the war (2022), this book appeared with the Chernobyl connection, I thought it would be interesting to read. I do remember the "meltdown" of the Number 4 reactor in 1986. As this was also a time travel with the Russian woman who "created" the nuclear chain, leading to the disaster, wanting to travel back to 1986 to stop the event from happening, I wondered IF the author might have backed herself into a corner - after all, the event did happen, and undoing it would have been very interesting. I didn't have a clue as to how she was going to justify an appropriate ending. But she did, and I was pleased with the outcome.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ric

    A time travel story that centers around the Chernobyl disaster? Sounds great to me and you know, it was pretty good. The problem was that it was only pretty good because it was way longer than it needed to be. There were a lot of times in this book that the story just dragged on and felt so slow and boring. I enjoyed the family drama that was the main story of this book though, and the POVs that we followed through the story were great. My favorite was probably Raisa, but all of them were good. A time travel story that centers around the Chernobyl disaster? Sounds great to me and you know, it was pretty good. The problem was that it was only pretty good because it was way longer than it needed to be. There were a lot of times in this book that the story just dragged on and felt so slow and boring. I enjoyed the family drama that was the main story of this book though, and the POVs that we followed through the story were great. My favorite was probably Raisa, but all of them were good. The time travel mechanics were a little weird but all in all this was a fun book, just not quite as fun as I thought it would be going into it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    I was resistant to this book’s questionable charms, which is a bit of a disappointment. I’m usually a sucker for a good time-travel story, like The Time Traveler's Wife or Somewhere In Time or Time and Again. Is that the problem with this book? Is it missing that one crucial word? Should it be Atomic Anna Time? {Buffalo Bill} “What time is it, kids?” {Peanut Gallery} “It’s Atomic Anna Time!” If you don’t know what that’s a reference to, you need to build yourself a time machine. I’m afraid this b I was resistant to this book’s questionable charms, which is a bit of a disappointment. I’m usually a sucker for a good time-travel story, like The Time Traveler's Wife or Somewhere In Time or Time and Again. Is that the problem with this book? Is it missing that one crucial word? Should it be Atomic Anna Time? {Buffalo Bill} “What time is it, kids?” {Peanut Gallery} “It’s Atomic Anna Time!” If you don’t know what that’s a reference to, you need to build yourself a time machine. I’m afraid this book’s problems go a lot deeper than the title. There’s the gaping plotholes, irksome anachronisms and some real pacing issues. At the heart of the book is exactly what makes Anna “Atomic.” What is it that gives her the power to travel back and forth in time? The answer is pretty much “radiation and stuff.” Really? “Radiation and stuff?” We’re going back to Marvel comics in the ‘60s? That’s when “radiation and stuff” created half their characters, whether it was Peter Parker’s radioactive spider bite or Bruce Banner taking a Hulk bath in gamma radiation. That’s the best this book could come up with? I know that there’s nothing to base time-travel science on since it doesn’t exactly, you know, exist. But it should at least seem somewhat plausible, or it can spoil the fantasy. In Michael Chricton’s Timeline (there's that word again!), the time machine took up all the space in a mammoth warehouse. Imagining this gigantic contraption put some flesh and bone on the fantasy of time travel, something I found sorely lacking in Anna. The plotholes that pop up undermine an already shaky foundation. This one that slithered in near the beginning bothered me for the rest of the book. Anna travels from 1990s Russia to 1970s Philadelphia. She finds the people she’s looking for. They get on a bus and she follows them. Just how does that work? Did this woman who has never been to our country travel back in time with United States currency to pay for her admission onto a bus? And she’ll certainly draw the attention of the people she’s supposed to be surreptitiously following if they’re facing towards the front of the bus and see her get on or argue with the driver because she can’t pay the fare. What annoyed me the most was how often my literary nemesis snuck in. That would be “the anachronism!” I hate anachronisms! One thing I learned about Rachel Barenbaum is that she was born after MTV because the '70s are foreign territory for her. She has one of her characters using a calculator in 1970. No they’re not. Certainly not what we would associate with the word “calculator”, which would be what was first known as the pocket calculator. Or, as we know it today, our damn telephones. But miniaturized calculators weren’t mass produced until about 1974. I guess this character could have been using the only model of calculator available in 1970, which was a tube-monstrosity weighing about ten pounds and costing about $1,000, but I highly doubt it. That’s right… I researched calculators for this review! I wish Ms. Barenbaum had done the same when she was writing her book. In that same year, the same character talks about going to a “disco bar.” A whowhatnow? There is a chance that someone living in 1970 New Jersey might have gone to the Big Apple and visited a discotheque, but discos, as a place, didn’t exist yet in 1970. Certainly not like the infestation of discos whose spread was just a few short years away. And that’s what they were called; discos. No one referred to them as “disco bars.” All of this contributes in dragging down a story that takes far too long to get to its ending. The last thing a time travel book should do is waste a lot of what it’s traveling through. And the ending itself was half predictable with a dose of way too much sugar. I certainly wouldn’t say that Ms. Barenbaum is a bad writer. I found some of her characters compelling, and I felt that she captured the stifling oppression of the Soviet Union in all its gray paranoia. But the shoddy time travel story had me checking my watch. My Mickey Mouse watch. Look it up while you’re traveling back to watch Howdy Doody.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    Thank you to NetGalley and Grand Central Publishing for allowing me to read this ARC! Content Warning: death (including that of children), murder, violence, alcoholism, drug addiction, anti-Semitism, misogyny, sexual harassment, war, homophobia (mentioned). Anna Berkova is a famous nuclear scientist, the brilliant mind who created Chernobyl and its reactors, and in 1986, she is sleeping peacefully in her bed. When the reactor melts down, causing one of humanity's greatest catastrophes, Anna also a Thank you to NetGalley and Grand Central Publishing for allowing me to read this ARC! Content Warning: death (including that of children), murder, violence, alcoholism, drug addiction, anti-Semitism, misogyny, sexual harassment, war, homophobia (mentioned). Anna Berkova is a famous nuclear scientist, the brilliant mind who created Chernobyl and its reactors, and in 1986, she is sleeping peacefully in her bed. When the reactor melts down, causing one of humanity's greatest catastrophes, Anna also accidentally jumps through time. She finds herself on Mount Aragats in 1992, and her daughter, Molly -- dying from a gunshot wound. Molly begs her to go back in time and save Anna's granddaughter, Raisa, from whatever unfortunate future is coming for her. Exploring Anna's life as she goes from wartime Berlin to making nuclear weapons back in the USSR, Molly's as she grows up in 1960s' Philadelphia drawing comics and falling for a gangster who will make her life hell, and Raisa's as she tries to come to terms with her family's past, present and future, all three women will be forced together in the hopes of preventing total disaster -- Chernobyl's, and their family's. What a powerful, moving novel! I've had some rough reading patches this year, especially with ones I've been eagerly waiting for, so I was so happy to find that Atomic Anna struck all the right notes for me. At its heart, this story tells the history of a family in all its bloody secrets, love and drama, but it also takes a look at life for Soviet women -- both those who remained in the USSR, and those who left. From the very first page, I was spellbound, intrigued by the time travel questions that have captivated human minds for centuries: if you can change something, does that mean you should? The three main women are all fully-fleshed out, with an authenticity that makes their chapters all equally enchanting. I liked the mixture of historical detail with science, and I felt that Barenbaum seamlessly joined those two different elements together. Out of all three, Raisa is probably my favorite, although I have a soft spot for them all; there were elements of their personalities that were similar, a sort of passing down of strength and intelligence, but also things that set them apart from one another. Raisa has such a powerful voice, and I loved that in spite of her family's complicated past, she fights to both understand it and also to not let it change the person that she is. As someone who has only a rudimentary grasp of math (and who it does not come easily for), I really enjoyed living through the minds of these scientific women who rose above in their determination to understand the world and ask difficult questions. The writing is simple, distinct, and makes it easy to fly through page after page. This is not Barenbaum's first novel, and I certainly will now be going back to pick up her debut. I think all of us are fascinated by time travel -- how could we not be? Regret is one of the most fundamental human emotions, and aren't there so many moments where we wish we could turn back the clock? The ideas Barenbaum expands on are beautifully done, questioning the morality of nuclear science and the ethics of changing even the smallest events of the past. The inclusion of their family's Jewish religion and culture was wonderful. They struggle with it and what it means for them, in times and places where being Jewish is enough to end their lives completely and totally, loving, hating and questioning it in equal measure. The Jewishness of this book is a core element, unable to be extracted from its Russianness or Americanness or female-focus. There are Shabbat dinners, discussion of what it means to be Jewish, bar mitzvahs, the lurking horror of memories of pogroms and destruction. Perhaps it sounds simple, clichéd, but it's beautiful. I applaud Barenbaum for the love and hope in this book, even as it remembers and discusses darkness and fear. It is, perhaps, timely that this novel is coming out now, when we are recalling Russia's past and also fearful for its present and the future Putin is creating. While we fight for the Ukraine and the voices of Ukrainians, it's important to remember that there are Russians also fighting against this act of cruelty and inhumanity -- just as people rose up against the Soviet regime not so very long ago. Highly recommended, and in particular, recommended for mothers and daughters.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Edens Book Den

    I loved the authors first book, A Bend in the Stars. It’s so beautifully written and the story is captivating. When I saw the author had a new book coming out I knew I had to read this. Atomic Anna opens with an incredible prologue! Anna, who is a Russian scientist, time jumps at the exact moment Chernobyl explodes. When she comes to, she is lying on a mountainside in the snow. She sees a cabin in the distance that has a slight familiarity to it, but she also senses danger. As Anna enters the ca I loved the authors first book, A Bend in the Stars. It’s so beautifully written and the story is captivating. When I saw the author had a new book coming out I knew I had to read this. Atomic Anna opens with an incredible prologue! Anna, who is a Russian scientist, time jumps at the exact moment Chernobyl explodes. When she comes to, she is lying on a mountainside in the snow. She sees a cabin in the distance that has a slight familiarity to it, but she also senses danger. As Anna enters the cabin and goes deeper inside, she sees blood and someone lying on the floor. She’s alive, but she’s been shot. To Anna’s shock the woman claims she’s her daughter, Molly. Anna is confused, but upon seeing a family heirloom on Molly, she knows it must be true. Her dying daughter then proceeds to tell her, “You must change things,” that “They failed,” and that Anna has to “Save her granddaughter.” I was riveted from the beginning! It felt like a mix of the tv show The Americans meets Timeline. Time jumps/ time travel, lots of family secrets, science, and espionage. There were a few main characters and their decisions that had me so frustrated. I’m leaving that information vague because there are so many twists and turns you need to just start reading and enjoy the story. The timeline runs over most of the 20th century so there are many different story arcs to the characters. This is a very somber read and at times heartbreaking too. It does have a satisfying ending. The one drawback and the reason for the 4 stars and not 5 is we are sometimes being told of events that took place. I would prefer to have the feeling of experiencing each specific event with the characters. It’s a minor thing since the story is never boring or dull, but I really wanted more of each event and timeline. I did feel like this book could have definitely been turned into a series of books. I cannot deny the way the story is weaved and told is just brilliant. 4/5 stars! I received an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    This was a thoroughly entertaining historical fiction, intergenerational family story with a time travel plot. Told from the perspective of three incredibly smart women whose lives are intertwined in ways we only fully discover as the story unfolds. Anna is one of the nuclear scientists responsible for building Chernobyl and when the reactor goes of in 1986 she feels forever guilty, becoming obsessed with finding a way to go back in time and prevent the disaster. In the meantime Molly is growing u This was a thoroughly entertaining historical fiction, intergenerational family story with a time travel plot. Told from the perspective of three incredibly smart women whose lives are intertwined in ways we only fully discover as the story unfolds. Anna is one of the nuclear scientists responsible for building Chernobyl and when the reactor goes of in 1986 she feels forever guilty, becoming obsessed with finding a way to go back in time and prevent the disaster. In the meantime Molly is growing up in 1960s America being raised by Russian immigrants. A troubled teen, Molly just wants to pursue her art and her life gets off track when she falls in love and runs away with a drug dealer. Addicted to drugs and alcohol Molly ends up pregnant, scared and afraid she won't be able to stay sober, so she returns home to her parents to give birth to the baby. When Raisa is born things are going well for the first few years until her father shows up again, dragging Molly back into the life she fought so hard to escape. In one timeline Raisa ends up in foster care, yet with intervention from Anna, she gets another chance and is able to grow up as a teen math prodigy. The way these three stories came together at the end kept me on the edge of my seat. This book is perfect for fans of the tv show Timeless or The time traveler's wife. Great on audio with a full cast narration, including Natalie Naudus. Highly recommended and I can 't wait to read the author's debut novel next. I couldn't put this book down, even with its substantial length, I didn't get bored for a minute! CW: drug addition, death of loved ones, parental imprisonment, parental abandonment

  20. 4 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    Atomic Anna is the story of three generations of women from one family who work together and build a time machine to stop Chernobyl. It's also about healing relationships and going back to find a way forward. The book brings up many questions: how do you heal a mother-daughter relationship? How do you find love? And, how do you find that future that you want? The time machine element of this story reminded me of Back to the Future, only in Chernobyl-style. The book dives into the moral and ethica Atomic Anna is the story of three generations of women from one family who work together and build a time machine to stop Chernobyl. It's also about healing relationships and going back to find a way forward. The book brings up many questions: how do you heal a mother-daughter relationship? How do you find love? And, how do you find that future that you want? The time machine element of this story reminded me of Back to the Future, only in Chernobyl-style. The book dives into the moral and ethical question around controlling time, "If we could go back and change time, should we?" I also loved how the women got so much agency. Anna makes a whole Marvel creature align with Atomic Anna as a superstar, which is how she exerts control over the uncontrollable universe around her. To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/rac...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Geonn Cannon

    This was a great book that used time travel well but, at the same time, the ending fell pretty flat for me. It's a fine example of using scifi to tell about otherwise normal people and their complicated lives. But after spending 90% of the novel on three women, it suddenly brought in the story of a fourth woman who was The Most Important. It's not as if she just came out of nowhere or anything, but it was jarring to have the focus shift so suddenly when we were far more invested in Anna, Molly, This was a great book that used time travel well but, at the same time, the ending fell pretty flat for me. It's a fine example of using scifi to tell about otherwise normal people and their complicated lives. But after spending 90% of the novel on three women, it suddenly brought in the story of a fourth woman who was The Most Important. It's not as if she just came out of nowhere or anything, but it was jarring to have the focus shift so suddenly when we were far more invested in Anna, Molly, and Raisa's lives.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Canyen Heimuli

    This book was so touching in voice and so masterfully constructed. It’s a beautiful journey into the themes of how decisions can define and corrupt us, the impermanence of all things, the stubbornness of the flow of time, and how love can reach across lifetimes. And it was chock full of smart, powerful, courageous women to boot!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jessi - Jessisreadingbetweenthewines

    2.5 If you could go back in time and change an event, would you? That’s the basic premise of this story. The idea is to find a way to travel back in time and fix two pivotal mistakes. The big questions are, what else changes when one adjustment is made, and is it worth it? Okay, I can see some people really enjoying this one. It has a lot going on and some good stories within the story. However, I struggled with 75% of the it. So much was happening, so many different timelines with some convergenc 2.5 If you could go back in time and change an event, would you? That’s the basic premise of this story. The idea is to find a way to travel back in time and fix two pivotal mistakes. The big questions are, what else changes when one adjustment is made, and is it worth it? Okay, I can see some people really enjoying this one. It has a lot going on and some good stories within the story. However, I struggled with 75% of the it. So much was happening, so many different timelines with some convergence but it had me constantly wondering where it was going and if it would ever truly make sense. It did, but it took A LOT to get there. There was also a fun comic book aspect that had serious potential but went no where. I respect the complexity of writing that went into this, it just didn’t fit well with my reading style. Thanks to Grand Central Publishing for the gifted advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Ford

    Absolutely loved Rachel’s debut, and her second novel delivers the same excitement and page-turning experience. A juicy and epic—yet intimate! How does she do it??—tale with time travel, family, intrigue, Philly, Chernobyl, romance (y’all know I love it), and women in STEM. 💪 And also, COMICS! I LOVED this book. SO GOOD.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lisa | Read Between the Spines

    Atomic Anna is a story about family, mistakes, and second chances. Part historical fiction and part science fiction novel, Atomic Anna follows three women of the same family as they try to stop Chernobyl with a time machine. While Atomic Anna discusses heavy topics at times, I could not put it down. Rachel Barenbaum’s writing enchanted me while I grew immersed in Anna, Yulia, Molly, and Raisa’s stories. There is a decent amount of science in this book, but Barenbaum did a solid job making it unde Atomic Anna is a story about family, mistakes, and second chances. Part historical fiction and part science fiction novel, Atomic Anna follows three women of the same family as they try to stop Chernobyl with a time machine. While Atomic Anna discusses heavy topics at times, I could not put it down. Rachel Barenbaum’s writing enchanted me while I grew immersed in Anna, Yulia, Molly, and Raisa’s stories. There is a decent amount of science in this book, but Barenbaum did a solid job making it understandable to the common reader. She also managed to write a book that is both plot- and character-driven – my favorite. Despite their flaws and mistakes, the characters were endearing. They are written in a way that depicts their humanity, and there is context to better understand their choices. I felt like I grew to know the characters as I was captivated by their stories. As Atomic Anna is a story about time travel, there is quite a bit of jumping around in time. However, Barenbaum did a great job handling this. So much so, that I did not need to necessarily pay close attention to the dates. In addition to the dates, Barenbaum includes time in relation to a big event in the book. It really helped me keep track of things, and it is something I have wished other authors would do. I was worried as Atomic Anna drew towards the end that I would feel it was unfinished or was left hanging. However, I was very satisfied with the ending. Overall, Atomic Anna is a book about brilliant, strong women that I thoroughly enjoyed. I highly recommend it, and I suggest that you set a good chunk of time to read it, as it took me some time to get through. Note: I received an ARC from the publisher, Grand Central Publishing. Regardless, I always provide a fair and honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shanna McClennen

    I received an ARC of this fantastic adventure! I loved this multi-generational race through time exploring the question of what if you could go back in time and change events? How would you choose differently? Plus I’m always a sucker for a science plot!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Three generations of women sort out the mistakes in their relationships with each other, but this time, nuclear physics and time travel are involved. And the women frequently communicate via the unpublished comic books that one of them creates. This is really about the drug addiction and recovery of Molly (the middle generation woman), her slow reconnection with her mother (Anna) as the mother begins to have dementia (treated here as a symptom of time travel jumps), and the impacts of Molly’s ad Three generations of women sort out the mistakes in their relationships with each other, but this time, nuclear physics and time travel are involved. And the women frequently communicate via the unpublished comic books that one of them creates. This is really about the drug addiction and recovery of Molly (the middle generation woman), her slow reconnection with her mother (Anna) as the mother begins to have dementia (treated here as a symptom of time travel jumps), and the impacts of Molly’s addiction on the youngest generation, Raisa (in the best timeline, an overachiever with all the rejection/abandonment issues you’d expect in a child of addicted parents). The questions this book raises about parenting are more interesting than the questions it raises about changing timelines to avoid large-scale disasters like Chernobyl. Best parts: --the Soviet immigrant experience in Philadelphia in the 1970s & 80s. Living in a tiny room behind the butcher shop (why would the shop always smell like chicken fat, though? What does raw fat smell like?), dreaming of a franchise but always being denied loans, being at the mercy of a shady cousin who arrived in the US first, trying to hold it together despite all the trauma you experienced and also keep that trauma from holding back the younger generations. Touching, tossed in detail: a 60-year-old immigrant from the USSR having his bar mitzvah. --reflections on math as a language to express reality, on the mathematician’s process as being about ideas first and then equations. --the sympathetic treatment of Molly and the advice a corrections officer gives Raisa about not trying to find her if she doesn’t want to come home yet. What didn’t work for me: the pace was slow and repetitive; everything about Anna and her best friend/unrequited love Yulia being in Berlin in 1938-ish felt off; the book vacillated about what motivates Anna (guilt about the bomb & Chernobyl, or more therapy-speak unresolved issues with her early relationships?). I get that the author was probably aiming for the effect of an old-school action-hero comic book or a 1940s movie—everyone is hyper-serious all the time, academics sit around with nothing to do until high school prodigies need their data and equipment and tutorials, Soviet Jewish women on espionage missions kiss Nazis in beer halls just for the fun of kissing. I have a hard time turning off the voice that says “that would never happen” or “people don’t talk like that.”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ky Venn

    hands down, EASILY a five star read for me! this book didn’t have anything i didn’t like, and it ended phenomenally! Anyone who knows me, knows I’m terrible about explaining what books are about, but y’all are just going to have to trust me and check out the blurb below and me the judge yourself! “Three brilliant women. Two life-changing mistakes. One chance to reset the future. In 1986, renowned nuclear scientist, Anna Berkova, is sleeping in her bed in the Soviet Union when Chernobyl’s reactor mel hands down, EASILY a five star read for me! this book didn’t have anything i didn’t like, and it ended phenomenally! Anyone who knows me, knows I’m terrible about explaining what books are about, but y’all are just going to have to trust me and check out the blurb below and me the judge yourself! “Three brilliant women. Two life-changing mistakes. One chance to reset the future. In 1986, renowned nuclear scientist, Anna Berkova, is sleeping in her bed in the Soviet Union when Chernobyl’s reactor melts down. It’s the exact moment she tears through time—and it’s an accident. When she opens her eyes, she’s landed in 1992 only to discover Molly, her estranged daughter, shot in the chest. Molly, with her dying breath, begs Anna to go back in time and stop the disaster, to save Molly’s daughter Raisa, and put their family’s future on a better path. In ‘60s Philadelphia, Molly is coming of age as an adopted refusenik. Her family is full of secrets and a past they won’t share. She finds solace in comic books, drawing her own series, Atomic Anna, and she’s determined to make it as an artist. When she meets the volatile, charismatic Viktor, their romance sets her life on a very different course. In the ‘80s, Raisa, is a lonely teen and math prodigy, until a quiet, handsome boy moves in across the street and an odd old woman shows up claiming to be her biological grandmother. As Raisa finds new issues of Atomic Anna in unexpected places, she notices each comic challenges her to solve equations leading to one impossible conclusion: time travel. And she finally understands what she has to do. As these remarkable women work together to prevent the greatest nuclear disaster of the 20th century, they grapple with the power their discoveries hold. Just because you can change the past, does it mean you should?” “just because you can change the past, does it mean you should?” is a major theme through out the story, passed down to each woman as a piece of advice. If you aren’t reading this book, what are you doing?? thank you @grandcentralpub for this amazing book! i am so happy i chose it! thank you @barenbaumrachel for writing this masterpiece! #bookreview #atomicanna

  29. 5 out of 5

    Liz Helfrich

    Overall: A multi-generational family story focused on mothers and daughters, Atomic Anna stretches across much of the 20th century. The Anna of the title is Anna Berkova, a Soviet nuclear scientist living in Pripyat (the city supporting Chernobyl) at the time of the accident in 1986. When she discovers that the accident caused her to jump through time, confirming theories she’s been working on for decades, Anna decides to build a time machine to both prevent the nuclear meltdown and fix everythi Overall: A multi-generational family story focused on mothers and daughters, Atomic Anna stretches across much of the 20th century. The Anna of the title is Anna Berkova, a Soviet nuclear scientist living in Pripyat (the city supporting Chernobyl) at the time of the accident in 1986. When she discovers that the accident caused her to jump through time, confirming theories she’s been working on for decades, Anna decides to build a time machine to both prevent the nuclear meltdown and fix everything that’s gone wrong with her family. In vignettes told from the perspectives of Anna, her daughter Molly, and her granddaughter Raisa, the reader follows Anna’s family from the revolution of 1917 all the way up to the early 1990s, through pre-World War II Berlin, Molly’s journey to Philadelphia with her adoptive parents, her relationship with drugs and alcohol, the birth of Raisa, and Raisa’s adolescence. Please don’t shy away from this book if you don’t usually read science fiction! If you can follow Back to the Future, you can read this one! Likes: The three narrators’ stories weave together seamlessly, even through multiple jumps of time and perspective. Anna’s a scientist, Molly becomes a struggling artist, and Raisa has a calling for mathematics. The book addresses the Jewish experience in Russia and Europe more broadly as well as the experience of Soviet Jewish immigrants in the United States. It also addresses the complicated relationship between work, motherhood, and personal identity. And there are all kinds of mothers: very young mothers, older first-time mothers, adoptive mothers, eager mothers, reluctant mothers. This is a long book, but towards the end the pace picked up and I could not turn the pages fast enough! Dislikes: I would have liked to understand a little better why Yasha chose Anna. (Anything more would be a spoiler!) FYI: one of the characters develops a serious addiction to drugs and alcohol. There are scenes of child neglect and references to Nazi crimes during the Holocaust. There are a couple of very brief scenes related to gun violence.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    ✨ Review ✨ Atomic Anna by Rachel Barenbaum This is one of my FAVORITE books I've read so far this year! Atomic Anna centers three generations of women - Anna, her daughter Molly, and Molly's daughter Raisa - across the 20th century. From the 1910s to the 1990s, these women struggle with the meaning of family and their obligations to society as they strive to prioritize their passions (science / comics / math & engineering). When Anna discovers a mechanism to time travel, she strives to right the ✨ Review ✨ Atomic Anna by Rachel Barenbaum This is one of my FAVORITE books I've read so far this year! Atomic Anna centers three generations of women - Anna, her daughter Molly, and Molly's daughter Raisa - across the 20th century. From the 1910s to the 1990s, these women struggle with the meaning of family and their obligations to society as they strive to prioritize their passions (science / comics / math & engineering). When Anna discovers a mechanism to time travel, she strives to right the wrongs of her life while keeping her family safe across the century. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Genre: Historical Fiction, Family Drama Location: USSR, Philadelphia, Berlin, Chernobyl Pub Date: April 5, 2022 Barenbaum delivers EVERYTHING I love best in historical fiction -- badass women, multiple timelines (in this case, via time travel), global historical context (WWII, Cold War, Chernobyl, and migrant communities in the U.S.). The book weaves in ethical discussions of atomic energy, violence and revenge, and the potential dangers of scientific research alongside questions of family and parenting, gender roles, and more. I loved that it tackled WWII and the Cold War through a Soviet perspective, and through a Russian Jewish woman who certainly wasn't a Soviet diehard - this provided a fascinating, thought-provoking take on these global political conflicts from the view of a marginalized scientist. I was hooked from the first pages of the prologue and could barely put this book down. She so brilliantly uses time travel to create a nonlinear timeline where characters cross paths and shape each other's lives in surprising ways throughout the book. While I've read books where time travel is more science-based than magic-based, this world of time travel comes with many limitations, which ramped up the intensity of the suspense within. VERY VAGUE SPOILER BELOW.... . . I was a little disappointed in the ending of the book. Everything seemed tied up a little too seamlessly, and I'd have loved for a little more nuance and complexity here. . . Read this if you like: ⭕️ Time-travel stories, historical fiction of the 20th century ⭕️ Badass women in STEM ⭕️ Complex multi-generational family dramas Thanks to Grand Central Publishing and #netgalley for a digital and physical copy of this book!

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