Hot Best Seller

Alone Out Here

Availability: Ready to download

What do you stand for, when you're one of the last left standing? The year is 2072. Soon a volcanic eruption will trigger catastrophic devastation, and the only way out is up. While the world’s leaders, scientists, and engineers oversee the frantic production of a space fleet meant to save humankind, their children are brought in for a weekend of touring the Lazarus, a h What do you stand for, when you're one of the last left standing? The year is 2072. Soon a volcanic eruption will trigger catastrophic devastation, and the only way out is up. While the world’s leaders, scientists, and engineers oversee the frantic production of a space fleet meant to save humankind, their children are brought in for a weekend of touring the Lazarus, a high-tech prototype spaceship. But when the apocalypse arrives months ahead of schedule, First Daughter Leigh Chen and a handful of teens from the tour are the only ones to escape the planet. This is the new world: a starship loaded with a catalog of human artifacts, a frozen menagerie of animal DNA, and fifty-three terrified survivors. From the panic arises a coalition of leaders, spearheaded by the pilot’s enigmatic daughter, Eli, who takes the wheel in their hunt for a habitable planet. But as isolation presses in, their uneasy peace begins to fracture. The struggle for control will mean the difference between survival and oblivion, and Leigh must decide whether to stand on the side of the mission or of her own humanity. With aching poignancy and tense, heart-in-your-mouth action, this enthralling saga will stay with readers long after the final page.


Compare

What do you stand for, when you're one of the last left standing? The year is 2072. Soon a volcanic eruption will trigger catastrophic devastation, and the only way out is up. While the world’s leaders, scientists, and engineers oversee the frantic production of a space fleet meant to save humankind, their children are brought in for a weekend of touring the Lazarus, a h What do you stand for, when you're one of the last left standing? The year is 2072. Soon a volcanic eruption will trigger catastrophic devastation, and the only way out is up. While the world’s leaders, scientists, and engineers oversee the frantic production of a space fleet meant to save humankind, their children are brought in for a weekend of touring the Lazarus, a high-tech prototype spaceship. But when the apocalypse arrives months ahead of schedule, First Daughter Leigh Chen and a handful of teens from the tour are the only ones to escape the planet. This is the new world: a starship loaded with a catalog of human artifacts, a frozen menagerie of animal DNA, and fifty-three terrified survivors. From the panic arises a coalition of leaders, spearheaded by the pilot’s enigmatic daughter, Eli, who takes the wheel in their hunt for a habitable planet. But as isolation presses in, their uneasy peace begins to fracture. The struggle for control will mean the difference between survival and oblivion, and Leigh must decide whether to stand on the side of the mission or of her own humanity. With aching poignancy and tense, heart-in-your-mouth action, this enthralling saga will stay with readers long after the final page.

30 review for Alone Out Here

  1. 5 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    I always feel like I need to provide a disclaimer when I write a 3-star review. I definitely feel like that is the case with Alone Out Here. If you see 3-stars and think that I didn't like this, let me assure you, that's not the case. This is a good book and I can appreciate what Redgate created here. I know there are a lot of Readers out there that are going to adore this thoughtful-YA SF tale. In 2072, moments before a volcanic eruption that is predicted to be an extinction event hits, several t I always feel like I need to provide a disclaimer when I write a 3-star review. I definitely feel like that is the case with Alone Out Here. If you see 3-stars and think that I didn't like this, let me assure you, that's not the case. This is a good book and I can appreciate what Redgate created here. I know there are a lot of Readers out there that are going to adore this thoughtful-YA SF tale. In 2072, moments before a volcanic eruption that is predicted to be an extinction event hits, several teens on a tour of a high-tech spaceship, the Lazarus, are able to escape the planet just in time. The world's greatest minds have been working on this issue for a while. Knowing that someday their only chance of survival would be to flee Earth. The Lazarus was just a prototype for the vast fleet they were ultimately planning to build and utilize. Leigh Chen, first-daughter of the United States, is one of the lucky few to be aboard the Lazarus as it launches. As the reality of their situation sets in, the teens begin to take stock of what they have. With 53-individuals aboard the vessel, they are going to need to ration their supplies. In addition to that, and really more importantly, they need to decide on a game plan. Where are they going? How will they run this ship? This wasn't supposed to happen. There were supposed to be Adults on board, professionals, who knew what they were doing. This was originally pitched to me as Lord of the Flies set in space and I would definitely agree with that comparison. As the situation really begins to set in for the teens, tensions rise. Certain characters stand out as leaders, some driven it seems mostly by power, but some for other reasons. There's definitely a lot of thought-provoking content included here. I was constantly wondering how I would handle certain situations the teens were facing. Would I stand out as a leader, or try to remain more in the background? How would I handle the stress of losing literally everything all at once? The tone of this novel is definitely heavy. I think with a lot of YA-SF stories, there's quite a bit of humor and snarky dialogue woven throughout. That's definitely not the case here. This is a serious story and in a sense, it felt a bit depressing for me. There's also not a ton happening. I mean there is, but it doesn't feel like it. I would say it is more character-focused, but I had a hard time remembering any of the characters and couldn't tell them apart most of the time. They all seemed interchangeable to me, except Leigh. I appreciate the themes explored and the thought that Redgate put into it, but besides trying to picture myself living through something like this, I was really never engaged by the narrative. I never felt invested and frankly, I'm glad, because the ending may have disappointed me if I had been more invested in these characters. Regardless of all of that, even though I wasn't completely sold on this one, I know a lot of people will love it. So, don't take my word for it. If the synopsis sounds interesting to you, pick it up and give it a go. You may love it! Thank you to the publisher, Disney-Hyperion, for providing me with a copy to read and review. I appreciate the opportunity to provide my feedback.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Riley Redgate

    hello! riley here. this is my fourth book, which has been described as "Lord of the Flies in space." that's pretty accurate, although it features less mud than the golding, and less criticism of anarchy, and also fewer british schoolboys. in fact there are no british schoolboys. sorry. the book has, instead: -an international cast -a main character in a constant state of moral crisis -an abundance of what do we owe to each other? energy -wistfulness for the dying earth -wistfulness in general. lots hello! riley here. this is my fourth book, which has been described as "Lord of the Flies in space." that's pretty accurate, although it features less mud than the golding, and less criticism of anarchy, and also fewer british schoolboys. in fact there are no british schoolboys. sorry. the book has, instead: -an international cast -a main character in a constant state of moral crisis -an abundance of what do we owe to each other? energy -wistfulness for the dying earth -wistfulness in general. lots In an alternate reality, I never think about alternate realities. I am sleepwalking through every blissful, quiet day. I am happy in a way that I will never realize. OK. a few things. unsurprisingly (apocalypse book, etc) some violence is involved, so i've put up a list of content warnings here. (they won't spoil the book as much as an AO3-style taglist, but still: spoiler-sensitive page.) also, while googling my own book title in an entirely ordinary and not at all anxious way, i've seen AOH on a few Upcoming Queer Book lists. so i feel like i need to state for the record that this is my straightest book. the only romantic subplot is f/m. but don't worry, i'll get back to normal soon cheers and love, riley

  3. 5 out of 5

    Creya

    While this book was described as being Lord of the Flies in space, I can’t say whether that’s true or not - I’ve never read LotF! This book was okay, with many highs and lows. I was bored at times but also eager to see how the story might end. Following Earth’s collapse, a group of 50 or so teenagers find themselves on the Lazarus, alone without the ship’s commander. They attempt to form a Council, which at first glance is quite impressive. They establish their own school, assign maintenance chec While this book was described as being Lord of the Flies in space, I can’t say whether that’s true or not - I’ve never read LotF! This book was okay, with many highs and lows. I was bored at times but also eager to see how the story might end. Following Earth’s collapse, a group of 50 or so teenagers find themselves on the Lazarus, alone without the ship’s commander. They attempt to form a Council, which at first glance is quite impressive. They establish their own school, assign maintenance checks, and ration their food supply accordingly. You can probably guess that their plans were not fool proof, and people quickly turn on each other in the name of survival. This book has strong female leads, including the First Daughter of the United States and the commander’s daughter, but there was a lot of teenage bickering that was kind of annoying on paper. Simply put, I guess it wasn’t the worst book I’ve read. The target audience of ages 14-18 seems appropriate, and I would give this author another try. “As the words fall from my lips, I know I will never go back to that place again. It’s a promise. I choose the future. I choose to face forward, to follow her.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mara YA Mood Reader

    4/5/2020 A reverse The 100? But we going up instead of down! 😆All I needed to see was Lord of the Flies! *eeeek*

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sheena

    The year is 2072 and a volcanic eruption will soon make the Earth inhabitable. In preparation, spaceships are being built to save them when the time comes. In the meantime, a group of kids are brought in to tour the first prototype of the spaceship called the Lazarus - their future home. It turns out that the volcano is ready to erupt now, leaving only 53 teens and kids being the sole survivors. As they journey into space, the kids begin to struggle getting along and figuring out how to survive The year is 2072 and a volcanic eruption will soon make the Earth inhabitable. In preparation, spaceships are being built to save them when the time comes. In the meantime, a group of kids are brought in to tour the first prototype of the spaceship called the Lazarus - their future home. It turns out that the volcano is ready to erupt now, leaving only 53 teens and kids being the sole survivors. As they journey into space, the kids begin to struggle getting along and figuring out how to survive until they make it to their new planet. This started interesting enough but after 20% - I almost have up. It gets extremely slow and turns into some teenage drama. I expected the lord of the flies vibes that were promised and maybe thought I would get some Hunger Game influences too but I got nothing even close. Also, the ending and explanation of certain things was…… not it. Some of it was kind of disappointing. Thanks to Netgalley and Disney-Hyperion for an advanced copy of this book!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Avery TheLibrariansDaughter

    I wanted gays in space. I got space but no gays :( Rant below, I will be spoiling the ending so read at your own risk. (view spoiler)[ It's Lord of The Flies in space, as advertised. Does it bring up interesting points about survival and humanity? Yes, yes it does. I enjoyed that, but idk the ending and lack of gay ruined it for me. One of the first tags that comes up when you look up this book is LGBT and the only other character mentioned in the premise is Eli, the pilot's daughter. So I (incorr I wanted gays in space. I got space but no gays :( Rant below, I will be spoiling the ending so read at your own risk. (view spoiler)[ It's Lord of The Flies in space, as advertised. Does it bring up interesting points about survival and humanity? Yes, yes it does. I enjoyed that, but idk the ending and lack of gay ruined it for me. One of the first tags that comes up when you look up this book is LGBT and the only other character mentioned in the premise is Eli, the pilot's daughter. So I (incorrectly) assumed this was gonna be a sapphic love story and until about half-way through I thought that's where it was going. But there was no gay. Okay, there is one gay supporting character who briefly mentions that it was hard to be gay in Russia but ELI AND LEIGH ARE NOT IN A RELATIONSHIP I AM SO DISAPPOINTED! And oh my god that stupid ending. What they thought was the apocalypse was actually just bombs going off nearby? So they left Earth for nothing? And they were gone for months that could have been used to get this spaceship ready for launch? Now the world is behind schedule with this spaceship because someone got trigger happy and took off without realizing there was no apocalypse. Also Leigh contacted so many military bases how come NONE of them got back to her? Just because there were explosions where they took off doesn't mean there wasn't anyone at the other stations and wouldn't those stations be trying desperately to bring them back once everything had calmed down? And don't even get me started on the fact that Leigh fucking dies. Idk, I just thought this would go in a different direction. I would have had the teens reach that colony planet and learn that the colonist faked the transmission of the explosion because they wanted Earth to think the planet was uninhabitable and they all died but instead they found alien life and they knew that if Earth found out they would kill the planet's natives so they decided to stay on the planet and live their lives. Idk I think that would have been a more interesting narrative. Plus I'd make it sapphic with a rivals to hesitant friends to lovers between Leigh and Eli. (hide spoiler)]

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elle (ellexamines)

    New Riley Redgate... I would like to see it

  8. 5 out of 5

    Fifi’s Bookshelf

    This book had me at Lord of the Flies in space! Sci-fi horror is BADASS and this book’s synopsis had me in a chokehold. We need more outer space thrillers/horror in YA! Basically, the premise of this book was amazing. I so very wanted to like this book, and I was expecting to. Unfortunately this fell super flat. With a premise this enticing and gripping, you’d expect the book to be the same. And it started out AMAZING. The first couple pages were filled with so much tension and I geared myself u This book had me at Lord of the Flies in space! Sci-fi horror is BADASS and this book’s synopsis had me in a chokehold. We need more outer space thrillers/horror in YA! Basically, the premise of this book was amazing. I so very wanted to like this book, and I was expecting to. Unfortunately this fell super flat. With a premise this enticing and gripping, you’d expect the book to be the same. And it started out AMAZING. The first couple pages were filled with so much tension and I geared myself up for a super thrilling and intense ride. Yet, this book wasn’t that. Not at all. Basically this book was interesting until they boarded the ship, and they boarded the ship within the first chapter, so… It’s weird because this book DID have high stakes obviously, as you can tell from the synopsis, but it didn’t feel high stakes. You can tell by how long it took me to finish this arc. Granted I am in a reading slump this long but geez, I can’t remember the last time it took me so long to finish an arc. Also this is a minor thing but it made absolutely no sense; a huge part of this book is how they have limited food resources on the ship and in danger of starving, yet two of the characters go on intense runs every night. If you guys are literally limiting food intake and starving, why would you do intense cardio everyday, even as a stress reliever you CANNOT actually think that’s a good idea. I mean, come on. Great concept, and I LOVE seeing that the mc is Chinese. Yay for Asian rep! But the execution was still poor. Sorry, but this was just super boring for me. A huge plus however, this book puts a massive fear of climate change in you, and that’s something our world desperately needs to take seriously right now. This will probably be an unpopular opinion, but I actually liked how this ended! Thank you to Netgalley and Disney Hyperion for sending me an advanced copy in return for my honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Celia

    Reasons to read: Lord of the Flies in space. Full stop. I DEVOURED this book and I'm not saying that lightly. Sci-Fi books are a tread-lightly genre for me because so many of them are alike and are just not original. But it's one of my favorite genres because of gems like this. What about you do if you knew devasting volcano eruption was going to destroy Earth as you knew it? That's the question the world asked when such a thing was predicted. In response, several countries scrambled to organize Reasons to read: Lord of the Flies in space. Full stop. I DEVOURED this book and I'm not saying that lightly. Sci-Fi books are a tread-lightly genre for me because so many of them are alike and are just not original. But it's one of my favorite genres because of gems like this. What about you do if you knew devasting volcano eruption was going to destroy Earth as you knew it? That's the question the world asked when such a thing was predicted. In response, several countries scrambled to organize lotteries, build ships and map out the exact route to a new world. The Lazarus, a prototype spaceship is one of those preparing to house thousands of people, but almost a year early-while the world's leader's children are touring the ship and its base-chaos erupts, forcing fifty-three teens to board the ship and launch from Earth. Helmed by the pilot's daughter, Eli, Leigh (our MC) at the others set up a loose system of government all while charting their course to a new home despite the supplies on The Lazarus dwindling. But supplies are not the only thing, the teens are missing. Leigh and the others are thrust into leadership roles ahead of their time. While she has experience (her mother is the president) the others take a little bit of training. Things fall apart rather quickly. Without rules or laws, proper supervision etc the mental state of the teens begins to deteriorate. This is one of the things I loved about the book; it doesn't skim over the emotional turmoil one would endure when you believe your home has just been destroyed and everyone you ever loved, is dead. Leigh may seem cold and emotionless at the beginning, but there was a reason for it, as I learned. But like everyone on board, she's learning whether or not she's the First Daughter or the person she's growing to be. This reminded me a lot of Jericho (a tv show that regrettably was canceled before it got a proper ending). In the show, a town must come together when the country is attacked by bombs and most of its leaders killed. This book touches upon a group of people unraveling, just like the show, where they have to figure out how to keep everyone in line all while not becoming the monsters people can become. I loved the cast of characters and the slow-burn romance (M-F) as well as Leigh's flashbacks to her old life and her love of her two best friends. The tone of this book is one of dread and fear (think Event Horizon but without the aliens). The moments of reflection came in the form of Leigh running the track onboard the ship and it made for a quiet break from the tension. I loved every moment of it. But that ending...I kind of thought things would go that way BUT I didn't expect the cliffhanger. I am desperate for book two (please let there be one!) Trigger warnings here: https://batmansymbol.tumblr.com/post/... Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

  10. 5 out of 5

    Librariann

    **I received an ARC of this book from the publisher, because I am a librarian and librarians are awesome** 34% DNF. When you've read Stephen King, who knows how to take a cast of characters and build interpersonal tensions in a life-or-death survival scenario, this just ain't gonna cut it. The premise is great, and some of the characters (Eli, especially) have promise, but most of them are underdrawn to this point in the narrative, and the ship science is ... underwhelming, to say the least. I'm **I received an ARC of this book from the publisher, because I am a librarian and librarians are awesome** 34% DNF. When you've read Stephen King, who knows how to take a cast of characters and build interpersonal tensions in a life-or-death survival scenario, this just ain't gonna cut it. The premise is great, and some of the characters (Eli, especially) have promise, but most of them are underdrawn to this point in the narrative, and the ship science is ... underwhelming, to say the least. I'm a stickler for world building - the world can be ridiculous and fantastical, but it has to make sense for the story that's being told. So they're going for the Arcteus - and I don't even know where it is. At first I thought it had reached its planet landfall? But then the overall science of .4% light speed came up and...yeah. So the Lazarus ship was originally for an 1100 year journey? With capacity for 90K passengers? But what about population growth? And I GET that the teens here aren't supposed to have all the answers (it's kind of the point) but if your MC has read the entire report on how the Lazarus is supposed to work (NOT JUST THE SUMMARY, she points out, as it was so helpfully pointed out in the text) why aren't the big questions being talked about? I mean, if they're calorie-strapped, why the hell are two characters RUNNING for an hour every night?? Through the reading, I thought about everyone who did it better, from King's Boulder Free Zone in The Stand or the people Under the Dome, to the geopolitical machinations in Clarke's Rama ship, to the cramped quarters on the moon in Gibb's Space Case. Books don't have to be sophisticated to feel like a complete and cohesive world. See: Ice Planet Barbarians. Honestly, if I didn't have another million books to read, I would probably finish this one because I'm curious about where it goes, from a plot perspective, but I don't have high hopes for it becoming any more personally satisfying/less annoying to me. It feels like sci-fi lite for teen audiences, which will be satisfying to some, but not to the kids who came away wide-eyed from Scythe looking for more like it. If you're looking for a better space survival scenario, read The Martian or Hail Mary. If you're looking for a better teen survival scenario, read a book about zombies - there are lots of those. If you want some teens in space, read the Binti Trilogy. (Note: given the high first printing run for this title, it's probably going to be purchased for my library if the reviews are good, but I'll reserve recommending it to my teens who are just starting to explore sci-fi, rather than those who are hardcore fans)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kayla (yourshelformine)

    This book is pitched as lord of flies in space and it doesn’t disappoint! This book was engaging and fast paced throughout. I was invested in the main characters and thought the supporting characters were well developed and added something to the overall story. I listened to this on audio and I highly recommended, as the author narrates her own story and it was very well performed. I don’t say this often (if you have read my other reviews you know this to be true) I wouldn’t have minded more pag This book is pitched as lord of flies in space and it doesn’t disappoint! This book was engaging and fast paced throughout. I was invested in the main characters and thought the supporting characters were well developed and added something to the overall story. I listened to this on audio and I highly recommended, as the author narrates her own story and it was very well performed. I don’t say this often (if you have read my other reviews you know this to be true) I wouldn’t have minded more pages. You heard that right, I would have actually liked more time with these characters. I would have loved more time to really see some of the gritty, poor decisions a bunch of teenagers as the sole survivors of earth could make. I would love a sequel to see how time would play out. Could they create a new better world or would they always be doomed to repeat the mistakes of humankind? This book is for readers who love space or post-apocalyptic type stories. Not sure what age this is marketed for, but I would say this reads as young adult.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Cresse

    It has been almost 70 years since Lord of the Flies was published; we need a new retelling that this generation can appreciate. Alone Out Here meets that need. This time the story takes place in space instead of an island and includes a diverse list of characters. I started and finished it in one day and a week and several books later, I'm still thinking about it. While not all the tech aspects may be realistic, I was willing to suspend my disbelief over this space odyssey and found many of the It has been almost 70 years since Lord of the Flies was published; we need a new retelling that this generation can appreciate. Alone Out Here meets that need. This time the story takes place in space instead of an island and includes a diverse list of characters. I started and finished it in one day and a week and several books later, I'm still thinking about it. While not all the tech aspects may be realistic, I was willing to suspend my disbelief over this space odyssey and found many of the technology dilemmas' solutions well thought out.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jade Melody

    lord of flies in space is 10000% what sold me on adding this book to my TBR

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    *Source* Publisher *Genre* Young Adult / SyFy *Rating* 3-3.5 *Thoughts* Riley Redgate's Alone Out Here is being sold as Lord of the Flies set in space. The year is 2072. Soon a volcanic eruption will trigger catastrophic devastation, and the only way out is up. While the world’s leaders, scientists, and engineers oversee the frantic production of a space fleet meant to save humankind, their children are brought in for a weekend of touring the Lazarus, a high-tech prototype spaceship. *Full Review @ *Source* Publisher *Genre* Young Adult / SyFy *Rating* 3-3.5 *Thoughts* Riley Redgate's Alone Out Here is being sold as Lord of the Flies set in space. The year is 2072. Soon a volcanic eruption will trigger catastrophic devastation, and the only way out is up. While the world’s leaders, scientists, and engineers oversee the frantic production of a space fleet meant to save humankind, their children are brought in for a weekend of touring the Lazarus, a high-tech prototype spaceship. *Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews* https://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/20...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    It's the year 2072 and the world knows that in the near future there will be a massive volcanic eruption that will mean the end of life on Earth. A global plan is in place to build rockets to send some people to the nearest inhabitable planet. When an eruption happens months too early, 53 of the kids whose parents are working on the rocket prototypes are the only survivors. They boarded the prototype Lazarus that they were there to tour and launched into space on a journey of over 1000 years. Lu It's the year 2072 and the world knows that in the near future there will be a massive volcanic eruption that will mean the end of life on Earth. A global plan is in place to build rockets to send some people to the nearest inhabitable planet. When an eruption happens months too early, 53 of the kids whose parents are working on the rocket prototypes are the only survivors. They boarded the prototype Lazarus that they were there to tour and launched into space on a journey of over 1000 years. Luckily, Eli, the pilot's daughter, is onboard along with Leigh Chen, First Daughter of the US President. Leigh is well trained as a politician, to say the right thing at the right time, to give answers that aren't really answers and calm everyone's nerves. Eli, who has never had friends her own age, relishes her position of power and becomes the de facto leader of the group of kids from around the world. Leigh is appointed Chief of Staff, a voice to Eli's one-sided decisions based solely on survival. However, as tensions rise within the group over everything from time in the VR simulator to food to turning around to rescue an astronaut that may still be aboard a space station, Leigh begins to question her decisions and find a voice of her own. Alone Out Here is a suspenseful and realistic young adult science fiction story of survival. I loved the premise of Earth's political leaders being woefully underprepared for a climate catastrophe and unable to come to consensus on how to solve it without greed and corruption taking hold. A bunch of teens and pre-teens aboard a spaceship alone goes about as well as anyone would expect as they try to survive with limited resources, constant power struggles, differences in opinion and trying to manage the grief and disbelief of their planet and everyone on it being destroyed. The characters were a very diverse group since they were children of Lazurus' engineers, scientists, pilots and World Leaders. Leigh and Eli's characters were focused on the most as their seemingly similar personalities diverged as they discovered who they truly were aboard the Lazarus. I enjoyed watching Leigh develop from a people pleaser into a person who could still help others while being true to herself. Her relationship with Anis was also well done, helping her realize her potential while not overtaking the story. Eli's character is interesting, at first it seems like she is the only one willing to make difficult decisions and have a plan, but as she becomes more powerful, her decisions seem more and more self-serving. While being set in space in a not-so-distant future, Alone Out Here still deals with very real teen issues such as depression, addiction, friendship and romance in thoughtful ways. With a thrilling and unexpected ending, Alone Out Here is an exciting young adult science fiction drama. This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cheyenne

    5 ⭐ CW: death of a parent, survivor guilt, grief, self-harm, suicidal thoughts, assault, murder/death Alone Out Here by Riley Redgate is a speculative fiction scifi thriller that is basically Lord of the Flies in space. This book kept me on the edge of my seat the whole time! We follow Leigh, the First Daughter to an Asian-American female president. Children of dignitaries from all over the world have gathered to tour the generation ship Lazarus, which is a prototype that has been built as a way 5 ⭐ CW: death of a parent, survivor guilt, grief, self-harm, suicidal thoughts, assault, murder/death Alone Out Here by Riley Redgate is a speculative fiction scifi thriller that is basically Lord of the Flies in space. This book kept me on the edge of my seat the whole time! We follow Leigh, the First Daughter to an Asian-American female president. Children of dignitaries from all over the world have gathered to tour the generation ship Lazarus, which is a prototype that has been built as a way to transport as many humans off of Earth as possible in anticipation of super volcanoes going off and making it uninhabitable. Unfortunately, the volcanoes go off months before they are predicted to and the only people to escape to the Lazarus are the teens already at the launch site. As far as they know, they are the only survivors. This book was so intense! It kept wondering what was going to happen. Redgate makes excellent use of the thriller genre by using a countdown clock to show how long they have to reach another planet. Because the eruptions happened sooner than anticipated, things weren't completely ready onboard. Not enough food, no supplies, no adults, no crew. The teens had to figure it out for themselves. We get a really diverse cast since they are from all over the world. Redgate explores nihilistic themes and the existential crisis of being alone in space and ripped away from everything you know and the complex grief that comes with it. We also see how things escalate quickly when weapons are involved. I loved Leigh's character development and her relationship with Anis. The ending wrecked me. I've just been huffing and sighing about it lol. Go read this book!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Andrade

    This book was received as a DRC from Disney Publishing Worldwide in exchange for an honest review. Alone out here takes us to the year 2072, when the earth is facing the consequences of global warming causing all the volcanoes on our planet to erupt. World leaders have come together to build spaceships to evacuate as many people as possible. The selection is through a lottery. In the eye of the hurricane, Leigh, the first daughter, and 50 more children see themselves forced to board as eruptions This book was received as a DRC from Disney Publishing Worldwide in exchange for an honest review. Alone out here takes us to the year 2072, when the earth is facing the consequences of global warming causing all the volcanoes on our planet to erupt. World leaders have come together to build spaceships to evacuate as many people as possible. The selection is through a lottery. In the eye of the hurricane, Leigh, the first daughter, and 50 more children see themselves forced to board as eruptions started sooner than they had expected. Without the supervision of any adults, these kids will have to create their own society and its sets of rules. But some rebellious kids have something else in mind. The only chance of survival is to work together and keep their moral compass pointing north. ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

  18. 5 out of 5

    Angie Jenkins

    This is a story about the only ones left alive. I was not prepared for the stress this book would cause me. It’s like someone read Lord of the Flies & saw The Village and also felt like space was the correct setting for these things. Don’t let the deceptively calm cover fool you, this book took off immediately and I didn’t spend a single page feeling relaxed. I’m looking forward to reading others by the author! Thank you so much Disney Publishing Worldwide & Netgalley!

  19. 5 out of 5

    The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)

    DNF @ 40% Unfortunately, I’m having trouble getting into this one. There are so many characters to keep track of, and as a result of this, I’m finding that none of them feel very developed or memorable. The pacing is also slower than I was expecting. That being said, I loved Riley Redgate’s other books, so I might try and pick this one up again in the future.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jamie (The Perpetual Page-Turner)

    This is giving me so many vibes of 'The 100' except like right in the beginning of them first leaving the earth. I'm excited!! P.S. I'm still mad at how badly Jason made the show suck after several amazing seasons. Couldn't even finish it. This is giving me so many vibes of 'The 100' except like right in the beginning of them first leaving the earth. I'm excited!! P.S. I'm still mad at how badly Jason made the show suck after several amazing seasons. Couldn't even finish it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    rhi ✰

    if this isn't gays in space i might cry but i'm reading this anyway because.... riley redgate if this isn't gays in space i might cry but i'm reading this anyway because.... riley redgate

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shelf Blame

    Thank you to Disney Hyperion for the ARC of this book! Alone Out Here follows Leigh Chen, first daughter of the United States, and her fight for survival. There's a volcanic eruption looming that threatens the life of everyone on earth, and in an attempt to save humankind, scientists have been working for years to create a way to get people off-planet. When the eruption happens unexpectedly, Leigh and her fellow children of various important adults race to make it to the ship that will take them Thank you to Disney Hyperion for the ARC of this book! Alone Out Here follows Leigh Chen, first daughter of the United States, and her fight for survival. There's a volcanic eruption looming that threatens the life of everyone on earth, and in an attempt to save humankind, scientists have been working for years to create a way to get people off-planet. When the eruption happens unexpectedly, Leigh and her fellow children of various important adults race to make it to the ship that will take them safely into space. Only after they've left earth do they realize they're completely alone. No adults made it onto the ship, and the kids are forced to fend for themselves. With a shortage of food and leadership, things quickly begin to unravel, and Leigh has to decide if she stays the politician's daughter or if she remains true to herself. The first thing I want to address is the queer rep in this book because I've seen a lot of people excited about it and it's on a lot of queer lists. There IS queer rep here, in the form of one character mentioning their sexuality briefly. It's not the forefront of the story and there is not a queer relationship. HOWEVER, I really loved this book! I was hoping for more rep, but the story really grabbed me from the beginning. I love Lord of the Flies, so I guess it's no surprise. The entire tone of the book is a bit melancholic, as from the beginning we know there's a good chance everyone on earth is gone. These are children living through a very real trauma, and in response, they try to protect themselves. We follow Leigh as she goes on a journey. She misses earth just as much as anyone, but she's been raised to show a very subdued side of herself, as to stay likable to the masses. As a result, she's the ship's mediator, always trying to keep the peace and never stepping on toes. When things start to devolve and spiral into a police state, we really see her begin to realize what's happening. There are 53 kids on board, and of the ones that we really get to see we're able to recognize the desperation and fear. The side characters were all well done, and I really loved that because the entire cast is so diverse (the kids come from all over the world), we get to see specific issues that arise because of it. The tone was perfect, the story engaging, and that ENDING THO. Definitely recommend if you're a fan of Lord of the Flies and also space operas!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tory

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A decent enough storyline and an ending that I'm unsure of, but I think I liked. The opening quote from Station Eleven lifted my expectations higher than they should've been -- thought this was going to be more of an adult novel than YA. But then again, they didn't go into many boring YA tropes or silly love tangents, so that was good. SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS Things that didn't make much sense: running for hours every night while on rationed food? The chronology -- how this was meant to be a gener A decent enough storyline and an ending that I'm unsure of, but I think I liked. The opening quote from Station Eleven lifted my expectations higher than they should've been -- thought this was going to be more of an adult novel than YA. But then again, they didn't go into many boring YA tropes or silly love tangents, so that was good. SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS Things that didn't make much sense: running for hours every night while on rationed food? The chronology -- how this was meant to be a generations-long flight to the new planet? It didn't match up with the tone and tenor of their decision-making. Action was very fast, to the point where I found myself skimming because there was *so much* that happened all at once that none of it felt like actually mattered. Does that make any sense?

  24. 5 out of 5

    rachel ☾

    ... pitched as LORD OF THE FLIES in space, a thriller set in a future in which the first daughter and 53 other teens end up on the only ship escaping a dying Earth and must contend with being the last hope for humanity's survival as they fight to preserve their own humanity i need more information 👀 Blog • Trigger Warning Database • Twitter • Instagram ... pitched as LORD OF THE FLIES in space, a thriller set in a future in which the first daughter and 53 other teens end up on the only ship escaping a dying Earth and must contend with being the last hope for humanity's survival as they fight to preserve their own humanity i need more information 👀 Blog • Trigger Warning Database • Twitter • Instagram

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alexa Blart, Library Cop

    Confession time: for a period of my life, I was rabidly obsessed with the CW original series The 100. (A rabid obsession that was bludgeoned to death on March 3, 2016, at around 10pm--not that I'm keeping track or anything.) So when I picked up this book (with its absolutely GORGEOUS cover!), my expectations were for something similar: teens in way over their heads in a survival situation they should never have wound up in, forced to make all kinds of difficult choices and confront the people th Confession time: for a period of my life, I was rabidly obsessed with the CW original series The 100. (A rabid obsession that was bludgeoned to death on March 3, 2016, at around 10pm--not that I'm keeping track or anything.) So when I picked up this book (with its absolutely GORGEOUS cover!), my expectations were for something similar: teens in way over their heads in a survival situation they should never have wound up in, forced to make all kinds of difficult choices and confront the people that they become from living under such dire circumstances. And...I was right! (Mostly.) Survival is a huge theme that this book wrestles with: the survival of the human race, which is mere months out from a mass extinction event, and then, when the event comes sooner than predicted, the survival of the only people who managed to make it off the planet in time. Namely: fifty-three unsupervised teenagers, the children of global heads of state and architects on the project to build a fleet of spaceships that will take them off the dying Earth and set them on track to find a new home. With no clear way forward, and only one among them with any experience piloting spacecraft, they're forced to reorder society from the ground up, all with the legacy of the fact that the Global Fleet Planning Commission, made up of heads of state from al around the world and the designers of the plan to escape Earth, wasn't able to agree on much, either. Firstly, I loved the way this novel felt super grounded in realism, despite being based in rather fantastical events and technologies. It's set fifty-some years in the future, so you get little hints here and there of huge technological advancements--hoverboards that hover six feet off the ground and "space tourism" being the norm--but never to the point where it feels very sci-fi futuristic, and certainly never to the point where you feel great about the chances humanity has to get off the dying Earth and find a new home. Secondly, and especially at the beginning before tensions begin to ramp up, this is such a sad and longing kind of book, and that's a good thing. The fifty-four survivors on board the Lazarus are on a journey to a new planet that will take eleven hundred years. They know, as they leave Earth, that they're never going to touch grass again, or feel rain, or experience a change of seasons. Never going to see their families again, or anyone except each other--these are the people they'll have to start families with, too, to ensure that the human race makes it to their new planet. It really forces you to consider what it would be like in a similar situation, and gives you new appreciation for just how incredible the world is, and the fact that you get to experience so much of it. Of course, however, things immediately begin to go wrong--technical errors from the fleet not yet being fully prepared for a disaster that wasn't due for months, but also, the errors of a bunch of teenagers essentially trying to build a new society from the ground up. Redgate does a really amazing job of slowly, naturally ramping up the tension, and building characters with complex motivations and ideas about what survival actually means. You never get the impression that anyone is purely evil, even if sometimes their actions come across that way--instead each character is a tapestry of good intentions altered by fear, hunger, uncertainty, the weight of responsibility, and a longing for everything they've left behind. It's a fascinating character study, and Redgate conveys all of it beautifully, with some of the most gorgeous prose I've encountered in YA. Other things I loved: the characters were actually ethnically diverse (not to drag The 100 into this again, but they also had a space coalition made up of multiple nations and somehow 90% of people were still white), in a way that made sense, considering they were the children of delegates from multiple nations around the world. The ending was simultaneously heartbreaking and perfect. And the last fifty pages or so had me absolutely holding my breath, they were so fast-paced and terrifying. In the immortal words of the Pontiac Bandit: "Space is scary! You saw what it did to Sandy Bullock!"

  26. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    I am a huge fan of sci-fi and fantasy, so I am thrilled to be part of this tour for Alone Out Here. In this book we have a near future situation in which humanity has learned that a world-ending ecological disaster is forthcoming, so the world comes together to figure out how to save as many humans as possible and take to the skies. Along with people will go artifacts like art, books, archaeological discoveries, maps, Internet archives, etc., as well as cryo-preserved animals (like a technologic I am a huge fan of sci-fi and fantasy, so I am thrilled to be part of this tour for Alone Out Here. In this book we have a near future situation in which humanity has learned that a world-ending ecological disaster is forthcoming, so the world comes together to figure out how to save as many humans as possible and take to the skies. Along with people will go artifacts like art, books, archaeological discoveries, maps, Internet archives, etc., as well as cryo-preserved animals (like a technologically-advanced Noah’s Ark). At first, the various countries work beautifully together, sharing ideas and technology and coming up with plans for how to structure life aboard the tens of thousands of spaceships that will be designed to hold 1,000 people each. Of course, soon the fractures begin to show, arguments break out, and no country is very happy with what has been arranged. While the world’s leaders meet to attempt to reconcile, their children are invited to tour the prototype spaceship that has been chosen as the model that will be used. Unfortunately, early one morning the unthinkable happens: the apocalypse has arrived far earlier than anticipated. Only 53 of these young people get on board before they are forced to lift off -- 53 out of the expected 1,000 that would fit. These teens from countries all over the world must work together to figure out where they will go and how they will survive along the way. Once again, at first it’s going swimmingly, but soon cracks appear in the fragile peace that has been achieved in the aftermath of the emergency takeoff. Our main character, Leigh Chen, the daughter of the President of the United States, finds herself in the role of politician and peacemaker, always trying to smooth things over, never really answering questions that are presented but rather deftly redirecting attention and aggravation. Soon, however, she’s called out by one of the others on board, Anis, whose opinion of her she finds herself caring too much about; he questions what *she* actually stands for, which leads her on a journey of self-discovery. In the meantime, there are some violent acts and theft that must be dealt with, which means the kids must figure out some sort of rules -- about which, of course, they do not all agree. In some respects, this book reminded my of the Netflix show The Society, which is a really fantastic show. (It was announced that they were renewing for a second season, but then for some reason that was cancelled, *but* it’s still definitely worth watching even if it’s technically unfinished.) While the teens in The Society are on Earth and not in a spaceship among the stars, with the sudden disappearance of any and all adults, they must go through the same growing pains of figuring out how to structure a society. In Alone Out Here, the teens know they want to do better than their parents did, with, for example, flawed lotteries to get aboard the spaceships and questions about whether ships should be mono-cultural or include people from a mix of countries. But Leigh comes to wonder if it’s even possible to do differently than what you’ve learned and always known, if it’s possible to have a society without armed guards or harsh punishments for crimes, etc. I have always found this whole thought experiment fascinating and loved exploring it again with this book. And when you add the mystery aspect of figuring out who is committing violent acts, plus the disagreements about where the ship should be heading, I found myself absolutely racing through the last half of the book. Not only was it thought-provoking and also thrilling, but it actually made me cry! I would highly recommend this book to fans of sci-fi and post-apocalyptic books, as well as those who are intrigued by the question of how an “ideal” society could be structured, especially when no adults are involved. If you do read it, let me know what you think! Rating: 4 stars! **Disclosure: I received an early e-copy of this book from the publisher for purposes of this blog tour. This review is voluntary on my part and reflects my honest rating and review of the book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy Sharony

    Here’s the thing: We have put a lot of pressure on this next generation. We have made a mess, and they are going to have to clean it up. That’s a heavy burden to carry before you even have your driver’s license, and I think it’s one that Riley Redgate handles really well in Alone Out Here. Earth is on the brink of collapse, and the future depends on getting off the planet and into outer space. Politically, this has been a nightmare, with in-fighting and one-upmanship pushing back deadlines, stymy Here’s the thing: We have put a lot of pressure on this next generation. We have made a mess, and they are going to have to clean it up. That’s a heavy burden to carry before you even have your driver’s license, and I think it’s one that Riley Redgate handles really well in Alone Out Here. Earth is on the brink of collapse, and the future depends on getting off the planet and into outer space. Politically, this has been a nightmare, with in-fighting and one-upmanship pushing back deadlines, stymying communication, and generally making everybody suspicious of everybody else. That’s an adult problem, even if it’s one that constantly permeates every aspect of teenage life — until a weather disaster strikes earlier than planned, forcing the launch of a prototype spacecraft with a crew of diplomat offspring as humanity’s last hope. Some of the promos called this “Lord of the Flies in space” (which I would read!), but I think that reduces Alone Out Here in a way that misses the point. These are kids — they’ve been taught to mistrust each other. The protagonist Leigh — First Daughter of the United States — has been trained to put the mission first and herself last. These are smart, committed, caring kids who really can save the world — but no one has ever taught them how to actually work together toward a common goal. As the crew clashes over who should be in charge, what their priorities should be, and how to make their not-ready-for-launch ship support their present and future needs, it’s clear that they have the same goals. Everybody wants to survive, even if they don’t agree what survival should look like I don’t know, maybe it’s the state for the world, but this book made me surprisingly emotional. Like, can we please stop othering each other so that we have a chance to survive with our humanity intact? I really enjoyed this book and recommend it for your YA reading list.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Sherman

    It's 2072 and the Earth, as they knew it, was coming to an end as of the result of global warming. I actually devoured this book and was sucked in from the very beginning. It was fast paced and very entertaining; especially the last 50 or so pages. Really enjoyed the characters' descriptions and how they interacted with one another. In my opinion, character development within this story was so important and Redgate did a heartfelt job of doing so. Her descriptions of the various parts of the ship It's 2072 and the Earth, as they knew it, was coming to an end as of the result of global warming. I actually devoured this book and was sucked in from the very beginning. It was fast paced and very entertaining; especially the last 50 or so pages. Really enjoyed the characters' descriptions and how they interacted with one another. In my opinion, character development within this story was so important and Redgate did a heartfelt job of doing so. Her descriptions of the various parts of the ship allowed you to visualize more clearly what was happening. The ending was a total surprise to me and I loved the way Redgate built up to it. I couldn't put my book down and was anxious about finding out what was going to happen. I'm nots really sure how I feel about the ending and think it would be a great topic discussion. I think I needed more closure to the story. I highly recommend this book with 4.5 stars and add that it would be a great read for lovers of science fiction.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nele

    Yeah, I'm a total sucker for books set into space... *shrug Yeah, I'm a total sucker for books set into space... *shrug

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tori Forte

    Overall, I enjoyed this book. I was hooked from chapter one, and didn't want to put it down. I loved the tech solutions to language barriers. I also liked that the tech is present but doesn’t solve all their problems for them, in fact some of the tech creates tension and issues within the group. The way the author set up the stakes of the book is so well done, in chapter one I felt worried for the characters and their future and how they were going to proceed. I enjoyed the mix of flashbacks and Overall, I enjoyed this book. I was hooked from chapter one, and didn't want to put it down. I loved the tech solutions to language barriers. I also liked that the tech is present but doesn’t solve all their problems for them, in fact some of the tech creates tension and issues within the group. The way the author set up the stakes of the book is so well done, in chapter one I felt worried for the characters and their future and how they were going to proceed. I enjoyed the mix of flashbacks and current to show the entire arc of the main character’s journey and to show the lead up of apocalyptic events. The discussion of genocide/ethnic cleansing around the apocalypse is not one I thought I would see in the book, but I’m glad too. It shows realism and brings up obvious tension between characters from different nations. I like the exploration of the cast of characters and how each of them gets brought up, even just briefly, because that’s natural to happen in a group only 50 in size. The discussion around grief and apocalyptic narratives is heavy, but a necessary with the plot. The way the author crafts longing and desire for home and what used to be is incredibly well done. Loved the realistic and neutral depictions of acne, which is something I don’t think I’ve ever seen in books (YA or adult) before. The conflict slowly built and then slaps you in face when it starts to kick off. The author left little breadcrumbs up to conflict, which was nice, so it all felt tied in. The end of the story did feel a bit rushed in the wrap-up and we lose a bit of fragments of time at points. There are moments where the characters are discussing something and then it seems to suddenly jump to something else (this is not part of breaks to the next day), it could just be the way the e-ARC was formatted. Thank you to Netgalley and Disney-Hyperion for an e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. TW: graphic depictions of death, blood, discussion of genocide/ethnic genocide, suicide attempt, suicidal ideation, heavy discussion of grief, vomit, graphic violence

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.