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Glitterati

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Simone is one of the Glitterati, the elite living lives of luxury and leisure. Slave to the ever-changing tides – and brutal judgements - of fashion, he is immaculate. To be anything else is to be unfashionable, and no one wants to be unfashionable, or even worse, ugly… When Simone accidentally starts a new fashion with a nosebleed at a party, another Glitterati takes the c Simone is one of the Glitterati, the elite living lives of luxury and leisure. Slave to the ever-changing tides – and brutal judgements - of fashion, he is immaculate. To be anything else is to be unfashionable, and no one wants to be unfashionable, or even worse, ugly… When Simone accidentally starts a new fashion with a nosebleed at a party, another Glitterati takes the credit. Soon their rivalry threatens to raze their opulent utopia to the ground, as no one knows how to be vicious like the beautiful ones. Enter a world of the most fantastic costumes, grand palaces in the sky, the grandest parties known to mankind and the unbreakable rules of how to eat ice cream. A fabulous dystopian fable about fashion, family and the feckless billionaire class.


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Simone is one of the Glitterati, the elite living lives of luxury and leisure. Slave to the ever-changing tides – and brutal judgements - of fashion, he is immaculate. To be anything else is to be unfashionable, and no one wants to be unfashionable, or even worse, ugly… When Simone accidentally starts a new fashion with a nosebleed at a party, another Glitterati takes the c Simone is one of the Glitterati, the elite living lives of luxury and leisure. Slave to the ever-changing tides – and brutal judgements - of fashion, he is immaculate. To be anything else is to be unfashionable, and no one wants to be unfashionable, or even worse, ugly… When Simone accidentally starts a new fashion with a nosebleed at a party, another Glitterati takes the credit. Soon their rivalry threatens to raze their opulent utopia to the ground, as no one knows how to be vicious like the beautiful ones. Enter a world of the most fantastic costumes, grand palaces in the sky, the grandest parties known to mankind and the unbreakable rules of how to eat ice cream. A fabulous dystopian fable about fashion, family and the feckless billionaire class.

30 review for Glitterati

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Hall

    Source of book: NetGalley (thank you) Relevant disclaimers: none Please note: This review may not be reproduced or quoted, in whole or in part, without explicit consent from the author. And remember: I am not here to judge your drag, I mean your book. Books are art and art is subjective. These are just my personal thoughts. They are not meant to be taken as broader commentary on the general quality of the work. Believe me, I have not enjoyed many an excellent book, and my individual lack of enjoyme Source of book: NetGalley (thank you) Relevant disclaimers: none Please note: This review may not be reproduced or quoted, in whole or in part, without explicit consent from the author. And remember: I am not here to judge your drag, I mean your book. Books are art and art is subjective. These are just my personal thoughts. They are not meant to be taken as broader commentary on the general quality of the work. Believe me, I have not enjoyed many an excellent book, and my individual lack of enjoyment has not made any of those books less excellent or (more relevantly) less successful. Further disclaimer: Readers, please stop accusing me of trying to take down “my competition” because I wrote a review you didn’t like. This is complete nonsense. Firstly, writing isn’t a competitive sport. Secondly, I only publish reviews of books in the subgenre where I’m best known (queer romcom) if they’re glowing. And finally: taking time out of my life to read an entire book, then write a detailed review about it that some people on GR will look at would be a profoundly inefficient and ineffective way to damage the careers of other authors. If you can’t credit me with simply being a person who loves books and likes talking about them, at least credit me with enough common sense to be a better villain. ******************************************* Spoilers ho. Nrgh, I don’t quite know what to say about this. And it might just be a case of wrong reader wrong book. Potentially wrong reader wrong book wrong genre altogether. Because, the thing is, satire is a difficult beast to corral. By its nature, it requires you not to care. And the problem with not caring is that, well, you don’t care? On top of which Glitterati seems to sort of hedge its bets between not-caring and secretly trying to make you care. Except the people, or maybe the one person, it wants you to care about is a member of the ultraelite who is so detached from the world at large that, even if he does develop a flair for art near the end, still has no idea what capitalism or childhood is. Glitterati is set in a nebulous far future where the lives of the ultrarich have been completely detached from the rest of society: with any elements of experience deemed to be traumatic, be that a trip to the doctors, childhood, understanding of their own wealth, or the way society works, literally erased from their brains they live lives entirely dedicated to aesthetic ideals. The hero, Simone, inadvertently wears white one day, believing it to be Tuesday, when it is instead Wednesday, upon which people wear purple, which catalyses a chain of events that lead to him becoming a trendsetter, getting locked in a ruthless rivalry with a fellow fashionista, encountering a child (which he and his wife understand as a small drunk human) and finally inadvertently committing a crime which throws him to contact with all sorts of unaesthetic elements of reality like prison and the law. Weirdly, despite the book being mostly a fever dream of excess and vapidity, it does kind of have a happy ending? In any case, there were definitely things I admired here: the writing is fluid and vivid, the characterisation is, y’know, about as sound as it can be considering the POV character is literally missing most of his brain, there were some amusing moments (like the sequence with the lemon), some unexpectedly touching moments (Simone’s relationship with his wife is genuinely sweet, tender and sincere), and the world is imaginatively realised, with some decent neo-future fashion porn if that’s your thing. I also liked that there’s a kind of … interestingly de-gendered quality to everything: from the characters names (Simone and his wife, Georgie, for example) to the clothes they wear (Simone wears skirts and dresses interchangeably with more conventionally masculine attire, and Georgie vice versa), and while Simone is very in love with his wife he isn’t above admiring the rippling physique of his best friend Darlington (who is married to another man). Frankly, I rather admired Darlington’s rippling physique myself. Where the book kind of lost me was around, um, what it was actually about? I mean, what was it a satire *of*? That the lives of the ultrarich are detached and inaccessible to the rest of us? Yeah, I think I got that memo already? That the ultrarich are, in their own way, an industry? Uh-huh. That even people who exist in rarefied spheres can be exploited or victimised? Okay. That fashion is kind of shallow? Wait, are we still doing that after Miranda Priestly’s ‘Cerulean’ monologue? Surely not. And I, honestly, have no idea what to make of Simone’s redemption arc, whereby he kind of undergoes emotional development in prison (because prisons, right, so beneficial to the incarcerated), buys a child from her mother (because poor people will literally sell their kids for a pair of designer shoes), and ultimately runs away from getting his memory wiped again because he wants to retain his personal growth, ending up on a massive luxury yacht with Georgie and the kid that has been gifted to them by a famous fashion designer who has recognised that Simone is an artist. I don’t even know what to do with any of this. Maybe just be dazzled and not think too hard about what it means? I couldn’t even tell if I was meant to be pleased Simone got some kind of privilege-fuelled happy ending i.e. that his discovery of art was supposed to be genuinely redemptive for him or if it was simply another expression of wealth and power in action. Like, the ultrarich get to explore ART. Poor people get to sell their kids. And, y’know, it’s more than possible I just failed to “get” this book and what it was saying. Or, ironically, it could be a case of style over substance?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lukasz

    4.5/5 "Today was Friday, which meant neon" Glitterati is wild. It explores the insane world of hardcore fashionistas who despise ugliness. And denim (shudder). The Ultrarich live a life of absolute luxury, isolated from “uglies” (the normal people), and have their every whim catered to. Simone is one of them. Unaware of his overwhelming financial power (he doesn’t even know what money is), he enjoys life and beauty in all forms. As long as colorful cocktails complement his attire, and others admire 4.5/5 "Today was Friday, which meant neon" Glitterati is wild. It explores the insane world of hardcore fashionistas who despise ugliness. And denim (shudder). The Ultrarich live a life of absolute luxury, isolated from “uglies” (the normal people), and have their every whim catered to. Simone is one of them. Unaware of his overwhelming financial power (he doesn’t even know what money is), he enjoys life and beauty in all forms. As long as colorful cocktails complement his attire, and others admire him, life is good. Unlike most Glitterati, however, Simone doesn’t just follow new fashion trends, he accidentally sets new ones. Call it intuition. Like when he gets a nosebleed at the party, but someone else takes credit for that new trend (which inevitably leads to overzealous fashionistas lobotomizing themselves while trying to make their noses bleed with something sharp). This accident starts Simone’s feud with Justine, which has dire consequences. Glitterati had me enthralled with its fast pace and wild ideas. I followed Simone’s story with bated breath and laughed a lot. I love grotesque elements woven into the narrative, and Langmead incorporates them effortlessly into the story. And the world of Glitterati IS absurd: their memories are regularly erased because retaining traumatic (or even unpleasant) memories can lead to esthetic impairment (with symptoms such as frowning, sighing, or weeping; not esthetic.) If you’re foolish enough to wear something unfashionable, you’ll be ostracized and ridiculed. Fashions change all the time, and some trends are dangerous - like a fashion for deadly clothes. Yup, as in outfits that can kill you at any moment. Because of frequent memory erasure, Glitterati have no memory of their childhood. They don’t even know what a child is. When a child gets lost on Simone and Georgie’s property and they find it unconscious, they decide to dispose of the body, but are afraid that if they touch it, they’ll catch a disease that made the child small and unfashionable. It’s wild, I tell you, but in the best possible way. Manic, effortlessly and darkly funny, utterly unpredictable. Now, a word about Simone. Some readers will hate him from the start. Like all Glitterati, he’s comically self-absorbed and empty. Fashion is his religion, as is beauty. I adored his narration and even cheered for him to win the fight for the latest suit from the Dramaskil’s Blue collection! If you can connect with absurd characters, you’ll be ok. If, however, you prefer protagonists you can relate to, well, look for them elsewhere. To be fair, Simone changes significantly as the story progresses (though the change happens in the last 20% of the book). The world takes place in a dystopian world with Vibro-rails gliding across cities, but the world-building is minimal. There’s little explanation of how The Glitterati function or how the economics work. Hundreds of people rely on Glitterati's continued placidity and living in the moment without focusing on trivial things (like money). Don’t expect any in-depth examination of the dystopia, though. You won’t get one. I loved Glitterati; it’s probably the craziest book I read this year. And the most fun. I recommend it to anyone looking for a wild read that doesn’t take itself seriously and makes entertainment its priority. Great prose and Langmead's vivid imagination make it a pleasure to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    The nitty-gritty: Bizarre, funny, and shocking, Glitterati is as sparkling and dangerous as the outfits worn by the characters. Glitterati is one of those books that creeps up on you. It starts slow, dumping the reader into a bizarre world with seemingly unlikable characters doing odd things, and before you know it, those same characters have wormed their way into your heart. This is the fourth book I’ve read by Oliver K. Langmead, and it’s completely different from anything else he’s written. In The nitty-gritty: Bizarre, funny, and shocking, Glitterati is as sparkling and dangerous as the outfits worn by the characters. Glitterati is one of those books that creeps up on you. It starts slow, dumping the reader into a bizarre world with seemingly unlikable characters doing odd things, and before you know it, those same characters have wormed their way into your heart. This is the fourth book I’ve read by Oliver K. Langmead, and it’s completely different from anything else he’s written. In Glitterati, the author uses satire to explore class differences and prejudices in unexpected and humorous ways. This story is full of the absurd and the grotesque, and the backdrop is a futuristic fashion industry full of outrageous characters whose sole purpose in life is to be fashionable. Simone is a glitterati, one of the upper class privileged whose life revolves around fashion. Simone spends his days looking at fashion magazines, agonizing over which outfit to wear, and practicing poses so that people will notice how fashionable and aesthetic he is. Simone is married to Georgie, who is just as fashionable as he is. Anyone who isn’t a glitterati is an unfashionable, or an ugly. Those people are to be avoided at all costs, and why would Simone come into contact with them anyway? Simone, Georgie and the other glitterati live in a bubble of fashion, protected from a life of drudgery they know nothing about. But one day, everything changes. Simone’s coworker Justine invites them to a party, where Simone suffers a nosebleed and ruins the perfectly pristine white suit he’s wearing. He tries to escape the party unnoticed, but a photographer manages to snap a picture of the disaster. The next day, he’s shocked to see Justine plastered all over the fashion magazines with blood dripping down her face and covering her outfit. Justine has stolen Simone’s nosebleed and turned it into fashion! Simone vows to get back at her, but this sets off a chain of events that threaten to bring Simone’s carefully preserved fashionable world to an end. What a weird story this was! And trust me, this is my type of “weird.” The first part of the story introduces the reader to a very odd world, where the life of the glitterati, or fashionistas as they are also called, revolves around staying on top of the latest trends at all costs. For example, each day of the week has a fashionable color, so if Wednesdays are for wearing purple, you do not want to show up in white. Fashion extends to hair, makeup and accessories, so each piece of the wardrobe is carefully executed to have the most impact in public. Glitterati know exactly which poses to strike (cue Madonna) and what kind of light to stand under in order to look their best at all times. I was fascinated by the detailed descriptions of the outlandish outfits and the glitterati’s focus on living a life devoted to fashion. And at first, it seems that’s all the story has to offer, description after strange description of the glitterati and their wild outfits. But little by little, cracks begin to appear in Simone’s world, and that’s when things get interesting. When Simone shatters a crystal champagne glass upon seeing Justine’s betrayal, he must go to the doctor to get his hand fixed up, and that’s when we meet Dr. Cask for the first time. Dr. Cask performs a horrific procedure that results in a completely new hand for Simone, after which he surgically erases all the awful memories of the party. Simone takes all this in stride, as if he’s been through this many times before, but for the reader it’s a sinister story element that makes you wonder what the hell is going on. Georgie and Simone discover a child in their garden, which leads to all kinds of ridiculous things happening, but the child is also an important catalyst for some big life changes for Simone. It’s during this time that Simone begins to realize that his life is not what he thought it was—at all—and that perhaps he has been wrong about many things, including fashion. I loved this character growth so much, especially since Simone isn’t that likable in the beginning of the story and nearly impossible to root for. The story has a sort of gender-bent quality to it, and after a confusing start, I really started to enjoy Langmead’s treatment of gender. First, Simone is male but his name is feminine, and Georgie is female but her name is masculine. Simone wears dresses and makeup and high heels and even appreciates his friend Darlington’s (also male) cut physique and tight swim trunks, but he’s deeply in love with his wife. It’s a society where gender doesn’t really have much meaning and anyone can wear anything, and I thought it was a refreshing change. The story veers from shocking (glitterati sticking ice picks up their nose in order to bleed all over their outfits for the sake of fashion) to anger-inducing (the way the glitterati look down on the uglies) to ludicrous (Simone dressing in medieval armor in order to confront Justine)  to moments of unexpected tenderness (when Simone realizes that Georgie’s beauty has nothing to do with fashion at all). In short, the story is one surprise after another, all of it skillfully handled and executed. In the midst of all this lively entertainment, Langmead makes some sharp observations about class privilege and division and the elite’s ability to ignore the lower, working classes completely. When we finally learn why the glitterati exist, it’s like the author has pulled back the curtain and exposed the grease-crusted gears that make society work, and it was horrifying. The ending was surprisingly emotional and hopeful, and I was so proud of Simone for embracing such an uncomfortable journey. Readers looking for unusual, high quality speculative fiction do not want to miss this. Big thanks to the publisher for providing a review copy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anna Stephens

    An absurd, dark, hilarious satire full of some of the worst - and morally ugly - people I've ever encountered. I delighted in hating absolutely everyone, but I also couldn't stop reading. Fabulous. An absurd, dark, hilarious satire full of some of the worst - and morally ugly - people I've ever encountered. I delighted in hating absolutely everyone, but I also couldn't stop reading. Fabulous.

  5. 5 out of 5

    C

    A very dystopian novel indeed. I found it so hilarious at Simone’s reaction of what a child was and what to do with It LOL. This novel is so far over the top and absurd. I found it to be interesting. Although it was a little long. The world in this novel is run by the rich who are obsessed with fashion. They even remove memories of giving birth. It appears as if this novel is based on so much bitchy-ness on upstaging each other and taking each other’s idea and so on. It does come across as very i A very dystopian novel indeed. I found it so hilarious at Simone’s reaction of what a child was and what to do with It LOL. This novel is so far over the top and absurd. I found it to be interesting. Although it was a little long. The world in this novel is run by the rich who are obsessed with fashion. They even remove memories of giving birth. It appears as if this novel is based on so much bitchy-ness on upstaging each other and taking each other’s idea and so on. It does come across as very immature for a world of adults. I felt as if it was going in circles of what to wear and what not to wear and who dared to wear whichever outfit. At times Simone was referred to as a she and then a he? Is this a grammar error? I did enjoy the plot to an extent so I am being polite in my rating today. 3/5 stars ———————- Review on: https://clife.blog/2022/04/28/book-re...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Georga Hackworth

    There is a full review of this book on my website. It is one of the most original books I have come across. It tackles so many problems with the world we live in like how disconnected the 1% is from rest of society, influencer culture, and the absurd trends that come and go. This book is amazing on so many levels.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jo Ladzinski

    Read an eARC from NetGalley Content warning: Nosebleeds, vomiting, drug abuse, graphic depiction of surgery, fatphobia Glitterati takes place in a futuristic world where fashion rules the lives of its elite. Simone is one such denizen, bound by rules until he makes a faux pas that proves to be fashionable. A friendly competition between him and a coworker turns deadly when being in the upper echelon of society isn’t enough. Fascinating in the precision of its prose, this glamorous tale is full of a Read an eARC from NetGalley Content warning: Nosebleeds, vomiting, drug abuse, graphic depiction of surgery, fatphobia Glitterati takes place in a futuristic world where fashion rules the lives of its elite. Simone is one such denizen, bound by rules until he makes a faux pas that proves to be fashionable. A friendly competition between him and a coworker turns deadly when being in the upper echelon of society isn’t enough. Fascinating in the precision of its prose, this glamorous tale is full of aesthetic and takes fashion rules to their highest extremes. I don’t think anyone told Langmead that a protagonist has to be likeable. Simone is vapid, contemptable, and deep under the trance of his high fashion, Glitterati lifestyle. Unlike other stories, he is not one looking to upset the status quo. In fact, the status quo is entirely the appeal of this book. Like a beautiful train wreck, you can’t stop staring, even as the more horrendous elements come to light. For example, I am still disturbed by the free use of medicinal memory erasure. The aesthetic is futuristic and precise in its language. There’s a lot of care put into the crafting of invented fashion designers, trends, and even the weekly rituals around accepted colors and outfits. With regards to social conventions, there are ways to greet each other, specific rhythms and patterns of speech. It’s so meticulously realized and finely crafted. Not a single element of world-building can exist beyond this book. The tone can also be cheeky at times. The story takes a sharp turn towards plot when a child appears in Georgie and Simone’s estate and where this cheekiness shines. Because of aforementioned brain washing, the elite have no memories of children, so when the kid shows up, they think it’s a creature not unlike a drunk adult. It’s funny in that way that prevents tears. The commitment to the dehumanization within the society is, again, something I couldn’t tear my eyes away from. I anticipate this might not be a read for everyone, but I found myself entranced by this deadly world of dramatic fashion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Leighton

    Thank you to Titan Books and NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review! Glitterati by Oliver K. Langmead is a fun, campy dystopian novel with elements of horror. The story revolves around Simone, one of the Glitterati, the elite class in a dystopian world. He spends his time going to parties with other fashion-obsessed people and sniffing their noses at the so-called "uglies" of the world, who are the lower class. But is everything really perfect in the lives of the rich and fashion Thank you to Titan Books and NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review! Glitterati by Oliver K. Langmead is a fun, campy dystopian novel with elements of horror. The story revolves around Simone, one of the Glitterati, the elite class in a dystopian world. He spends his time going to parties with other fashion-obsessed people and sniffing their noses at the so-called "uglies" of the world, who are the lower class. But is everything really perfect in the lives of the rich and fashionable? When a "ugly" child turns up unexpectedly in Simone's garden, it ends up turning his life upside down. Here is a humorous excerpt from Chapter 1, which introduces us to Simone and his wife Georgie: "“Is it Wednesday, or Tuesday?” “It’s Tuesday today.” “Did we not have a Tuesday yesterday?” Georgie paused, to consider. Then, she said, “No, dearest. We had a Monday yesterday. I recall it being Monday quite clearly, in fact, because Gabriel was wearing a beaded Savinchay dress, and as you well know, it would be outrageous to wear beads on any other day of the week.” That settled it, then. Simone unpeeled his face from the pink leather chaise-longue. Last night had been a rainbow of cocktails, resulting in the headache now threatening to impinge on his usually immaculate poise. He went across to the gold-plated Manchodroi dresser, which he only ever used on Tuesdays, and was astonished to find that his usual dose of painkillers was gone." Overall, Glitterati is a dystopian novel that comments on our society's obsession with beauty, money, and status. One highlight of this book is how fun it is. There are several humorous moments, especially when discovering how looks-obsessed Simone is. The world that he inhabits is interesting and engrossing to read about. I did take off 1 star, because I did get tired of the premise and the main character after a while. What was original at the beginning started to grate as the story went on. If you're intrigued by the excerpt above, or if you're a fan of dystopian novels, I recommend that you check out this book when it comes out in May!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Sweeney

    Oliver Langmead’s Glitterati is a rollercoaster of a book. The story follows Simone – one of the Glitterati. The Glitterati are the absolute elite in society – they live their lives in complete luxury, but they must follow the strict rules around what is fashionable and what is not. If a new fashion comes along they must join in, or risk being seen as unfashionable. When Simone attends a party and accidentally has a nosebleed, it sparks a new trend. Simone expects to be hailed as a fashion geniu Oliver Langmead’s Glitterati is a rollercoaster of a book. The story follows Simone – one of the Glitterati. The Glitterati are the absolute elite in society – they live their lives in complete luxury, but they must follow the strict rules around what is fashionable and what is not. If a new fashion comes along they must join in, or risk being seen as unfashionable. When Simone attends a party and accidentally has a nosebleed, it sparks a new trend. Simone expects to be hailed as a fashion genius, but another Gltterati – Justine – takes credit. This sparks an intense rivalry between the two and Simone must do everything he can to stop Justine from destroying him. Glitterati is a fast-paced read, and one I read in just a few sittings. It’s such a unique idea and I was fascinated by the absurd, over the top life that Simone and the other Glitterati lead. The ever-changing fashions were unreal – even ones that could kill you. There are some quite funny moments in the story too – such as when Simone is confronted with denim or children. Langmead has a really vivid writing style so each scene practically leaps off the page. The story felt well written and well executed. Overall Glitterati is an enjoyable read, but the characters are so unlikeable it’s hard to root for Simone to succeed. As a result, I didn’t feel as invested in the story. Glitterati is certainly a unique tale and if you’re on the hunt for a fresh take on the dystopian genre, Glitterati should definitely be your next read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Federica

    Wow, I think this is the craziest book I've ever read! Think Zoolander meets Blackmirror meets Isimov, but in a dystopian world where beauty and fashion are everything. It's wild, fun, grotesque, absurd, vividly imaginative and highly entertaining. Langmead, besides being creatively a genius, is also a great writer and his prose is excellent. It might not be everybody's cup of tea, but I'm sure if you give it a try you will find it as engaging and enticing as I did. Thank you to NetGalley and the pu Wow, I think this is the craziest book I've ever read! Think Zoolander meets Blackmirror meets Isimov, but in a dystopian world where beauty and fashion are everything. It's wild, fun, grotesque, absurd, vividly imaginative and highly entertaining. Langmead, besides being creatively a genius, is also a great writer and his prose is excellent. It might not be everybody's cup of tea, but I'm sure if you give it a try you will find it as engaging and enticing as I did. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Honey

    Honestly, I did not expect to like this book as much as I did. This book follows Simone, a member of a mysterious ultra-rich society obsessed with fashion. Trends come and go and there is always a hunt for a new trend. Simone accidentally does commit a fashion atrocity and while asking a friend to make sure there are no pictures, the friend instead steals the idea and becomes a fashion icon. This causes Simone's world to go into chaos and with every decision he makes and an abundance of secrets Honestly, I did not expect to like this book as much as I did. This book follows Simone, a member of a mysterious ultra-rich society obsessed with fashion. Trends come and go and there is always a hunt for a new trend. Simone accidentally does commit a fashion atrocity and while asking a friend to make sure there are no pictures, the friend instead steals the idea and becomes a fashion icon. This causes Simone's world to go into chaos and with every decision he makes and an abundance of secrets about the world he lives in gets revealed. This book was definitely a slow starter. I was really apprehensive about the way things were written and didn't think that it would be for me but once it started getting weirder I got immediately more interested. I loved the way that the fashion and places were described and found it really easy to visualise. The characters I didn't really root for but I don't think I was supposed to, so that's okay. I thought they were described well and it was clear what their motivations etc were. I was not a fan of the ending though. I felt like it came out of nowhere and while I appreciate the message it attempted to send, I don't feel like it fit the story particularly well. I just wanted a little more of a buildup or an exploration of the elements leading to it. Overall, I really enjoyed this, every time I thought I knew where this was going to go, I was very wrong. Though a little weird and a slow start it definitely kept my interest until the very end.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Zara

    I was approved for an e-arc on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I don’t really know what to say about this book. It’s a bit nonsensical: the plot goes all over the place and reads a bit like a trashy book you’d read on the beach but with a dystopian twist. I don’t mean this in a bad way either. My biggest gripe is that I think more could have been done to explore the deeper themes. There were some very interesting questions raised but it felt a bit surface level. If you want something I was approved for an e-arc on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I don’t really know what to say about this book. It’s a bit nonsensical: the plot goes all over the place and reads a bit like a trashy book you’d read on the beach but with a dystopian twist. I don’t mean this in a bad way either. My biggest gripe is that I think more could have been done to explore the deeper themes. There were some very interesting questions raised but it felt a bit surface level. If you want something that requires you to suspend all belief but is, oddly, quite enjoyable, then this is the book for you. I was reading this alongside some very heavy books and it was a nice change.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sachi

    Welcome to the fashionable world of the GLITTERATI! I absolutely loved this story! Everything was perfect - the dystopian world, the main character, the aesthetic...just wow! The dystopian concept was interesting, original and relevant, I was totally transported to Simone's world, with the clink of champagne glasses and the ever-changing rules of fashion. I really liked how the plot progressed, and how these rules were defied, but not in the way Simone expected. Simone was a fantastic protagonist. Welcome to the fashionable world of the GLITTERATI! I absolutely loved this story! Everything was perfect - the dystopian world, the main character, the aesthetic...just wow! The dystopian concept was interesting, original and relevant, I was totally transported to Simone's world, with the clink of champagne glasses and the ever-changing rules of fashion. I really liked how the plot progressed, and how these rules were defied, but not in the way Simone expected. Simone was a fantastic protagonist. His inner conflict with Justine as well as his perceptions of the events that occurred around him were so enjoyable to read. Even though he was (I assume) supposed to be unlikeable, I formed an attachment with him and very much rooted for him the whole way through. This story gave me kind of American Psycho vibes in the sense that everything is about the latest fashion, everyone is competing with each other - and money is certainly not an object! Highly recommend!

  14. 4 out of 5

    George Prew

    Excellent! Opulent grotesque cyberglam. Body horror sci fi Wodehouse. Langmead manages a surprisingly good-spirited satire of fashion, the fashionable, and ridiculous wealth - If any of that appeals, then go out and get this book!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amy Walker - Trans-Scribe Reviews

    Glitterati is the latest novel from Oliver K. Langmead, who wrote the stunning Birds of Paradise last year. Whilst Birds of Paradise looked backwards, taking a look at the history of the world, the garden of Eden, and the first humans, Glitterati looks forward, to an unspecified future point where the mega rich live lives of luxury. Glitterati follows Simone, a man who lives a life of absolute luxury. He, and the other Glliterati, spend their days obsessing over fashion, about looking fabulous, a Glitterati is the latest novel from Oliver K. Langmead, who wrote the stunning Birds of Paradise last year. Whilst Birds of Paradise looked backwards, taking a look at the history of the world, the garden of Eden, and the first humans, Glitterati looks forward, to an unspecified future point where the mega rich live lives of luxury. Glitterati follows Simone, a man who lives a life of absolute luxury. He, and the other Glliterati, spend their days obsessing over fashion, about looking fabulous, and chasing the next trend. Simone has a job in a beautiful, gleaming building with other Glitterati, but the job seems to consist of posing around the office, reading magazines, and pretending to be in meetings. Jobs themselves seem to be a fashion choice, and no real Glitterati would actually work for a living. When Simone gets his days mixed up and arrives to work wearing white rather than the expected purple that he should have been wearing on a Wednesday, he gets praised for his daring choice, and is invited to a swanky party held by the much beloved Justine. The party goes well, until Simone snorts too much cocaine and ends up having a nosebleed. Simone escapes the party, hiding his shame; but is outraged the next day when Justine is on the covers of magazines sporting her latest fashion, nosebleeds. Simone believes that Justine stole his look and sets out to get back at her. This spurs off a series of events that sets the two Glitterati as enemies, and ends up changing Simone's life forever. I feel bad saying this, but I really don't think Glitterati was the right book for me. There's nothing wrong with it, it's written really well and has some beautiful prose, but I think the subject matter is just too far out of the area of things I enjoy for me to have been the target audience for this book. Which is a shame, because Birds of Paradise was one of my favourite books of last year; I really wanted to like this one. But, not every book is going to appeal to every person, and that's fine. And whilst this review may seem negative, please be aware that this is only my opinion, and that others love this book. So please, if it sounds like something you like pick up a copy and give it a try. Glitterati is a book that seems to celebrate in the excess of the ultra wealthy and the mega fashionable. It feels like a combination of reality shows like Keeping Up With The Kardashians and London Fashion Week. Simone, and every other person we spend any real time with in this book, are wealthy to the point where they never have to think about money, where they can do whatever they like whenever they like, and don't even need to acknowledge that capitalism is a thing because they have enough money to make it happen. And everything they do is shaped around fashion and aesthetic beauty to the point where their actual lives seem empty of any real goals, passion, or personality. The fashions on display in the book are often over the top. They seem impractical and often silly, and the lives of the fashionables seems to be one long exercise in showing off how opulent and pretty you are. Clothing isn't worn to be comfortable, or practical. Fashion seems to either be used to fit in with the crowds, with everyone dressing to certain themes on certain days, or as a way of expressing certain moods as facial expressions seem to be a thing forgotten for the Glitterati as any change in the face could ruin their perfect make-up. For example, if you're upset with someone and want to confront them about something you dress in armour, strapping decorative plates and weapons to yourself. I know I'm not a fashionable person in real life, and I care about comfort more than how fashionable I look, so I know I don't get things like this; but it felt like Langmead had taken a look at the strangest and weirdest runway fashions in the world and asked 'what if that was everyday?'. And that's not a bad idea, and it presents some interesting and unique things that make the book stand out. But it also made it feel like this was something that I just didn't understand too. I wasn't sure if it was a satire or a serious look at what a future where these trends and themes evolved into everyday wear. I can't help but feel if I knew more about fashion, make-up, and being glamorous that I'd have gotten more out it. The book is filled with long descriptions of clothing, make-up, and accessories that Simone uses in order to make himself fashionable. The reader gets given names of designers and companies, dropped in as casual references as a way of building the world. I liked this, I enjoyed the fact that Langmead slowly built the world of the fashionable with small context details like this, and that as the book went on you'd begin to see the same names pop up again and again. But there's a lack of larger world-building that I found left me scratching my head by the end of the book. The fashionables live in paradise, existing in a world away from the 'uglies'. Their homes , their playgrounds, and their jobs exist near regular people, but above them or to one side. The two groups never meet, never mix, and the fashionables try not to think of regular folks. But regular people clean their homes, they cook their meals, they make their clothes. Regular folk exist within the Glitterati world unseen and un-thought of. The Glitterati are able to remove memories, to have their entire childhoods erased, and to wipe away any unkind moments of their lives. They have all this advanced technology, and have this system set up where they live in luxurious ignorance because regular people work behind the scenes. But the book never explains how or why. We never learn how the fashionable society came into existence, how they're able to live like this whilst the rest of the world struggles on like normal. We don't know why they have more advanced technology whilst other people seem to be living in a world that seems contemporary to ours. And we never get an explanation as to why people simply don't just revolt against this system and tear down the Glitterati way of life. This is stuff that I wanted desperately to know, that I found much more interesting that simply watching Simone going to the beach or the gym and seeing how he picks out his outfits. It felt like there was an interesting world here, yet we never went beyond a narrow, surface level look at it. I also failed to connect with Simone in any real way. Simone is, frankly, an awful person. He's vapid, self absorbed, thoughtless, selfish, whiny, and has no real redeeming features. I'm not saying every protagonist needs to be good, or even likeable, but they need to have something to them that makes me care. And I just didn't have that with Simone. He gets upset that someone 'stole' is look, but Justine didn't steal anything. It wasn't Simone's look. He was running away with a nosebleed. Justine was inspired by what happened to Simone, but it wasn't a fashion he'd made and she took the idea. But in his head it is, because he thinks he's wonderful and amazing and fabulous. And I just couldn't get on board with that. Yes, Simone does begin to change towards the end of the book, but it felt like it was too little too late, and by then I'd already come to dislike him and couldn't care if he'd finally come to realise cruelty to children wasn't okay. I feel like I've come across as too negative towards the book with this review. Please don't feel that this is me saying it's bad. Please, try the book yourselves and come to your own conclusions about it; because there's a chance you could end up being one of the folks this book was definitely made for. There's an audience for this book, and they're loving it. It simply isn't me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Aria Harlow

    You had me at A Clockwork Orange meets RuPaul's Drag Race. This book made me both really sad and yet laugh out loud at the same time. The writing is extremely well done with vivid descriptions and rich imagery. I really liked it. You had me at A Clockwork Orange meets RuPaul's Drag Race. This book made me both really sad and yet laugh out loud at the same time. The writing is extremely well done with vivid descriptions and rich imagery. I really liked it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nora

    Thank you to NetGalley and Titan for the opportunity to read an eARC of Glitterati! CWs: Blood, graphic descriptions of nosebleeds, graphic depiction of surgery, self-harm, drug use, fatphobia, mention of death, mention of heart attack **** Glitterati is over the top, absurd, and vivid. I enjoyed it! However, I think it would have been far more captivating and impactful as a short story. This novel is set in a dystopian society run by the billionaire class, called ‘glitterati’ or ‘fashionists.’ This Thank you to NetGalley and Titan for the opportunity to read an eARC of Glitterati! CWs: Blood, graphic descriptions of nosebleeds, graphic depiction of surgery, self-harm, drug use, fatphobia, mention of death, mention of heart attack **** Glitterati is over the top, absurd, and vivid. I enjoyed it! However, I think it would have been far more captivating and impactful as a short story. This novel is set in a dystopian society run by the billionaire class, called ‘glitterati’ or ‘fashionists.’ This fashionable class is so far removed from their unfashionable counterparts that their society is entirely separate, they remove all unpleasant memories of unfashionable things - including all experiences of adolescence (because what could be more traumatic) - and their lives revolve around designers, parties and upstaging one another. The story follows Simone, a glitterati in a bitter fashion rivalry with aesthetic-thief Justine. Their petty feud leads to all sorts of ridiculous scenarios, including Simone’s brush with unfashionableness and almost-downfall. The first 75% of this book is very repetitive, as the lives of the glitterati and their petty existences are the same day in and day out! While it’s an interesting world, it doesn’t lend itself well to a full length novel. There are only so many examples of the glitterati being absolutely out of touch, vapid, petty and ridiculous that are needed to get the point across. I did like the last bit – Simone’s redemption arc is well done, and the way he’s able to change, while the rest of the billionaires continue on in a mindless pattern of consumption and cruelty, was satisfying. However, I found the “point” a bit muddled. You’d think, as this is dystopian, that the exaggerated culture of overconsumption and cruelty is a lesson about the dangers of capitalism and how such wealth inequality is clearly immoral. Which is it and does! But then, I found that the point was undercut by the fact that [SPOILER] the middle-class are more in control than we thought. I found this muddied an otherwise compelling ending. Other enjoyable things: over the top aesthetics, what felt like a nostalgic nod to mid-2000s dystopian YA villains (hello Capitol), and a lot of funny moments from the utterly clueless characters.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lori L (She Treads Softly)

    Glitterati by Oliver K. Langmead is a highly recommended satirical, allegorical dystopian novel. Simone is one of the beautiful people, the Glitterati. The Glitterati are at the top echelon of society, the extremely wealthy leisure class who all closely follow the rules of fashion. They ardently follow the daily couture magazines on trends, the rules of what to wear on each day of the week, and how to act in every situation. No one wants to be one of the unfashionable or ugly people. The pinnacle Glitterati by Oliver K. Langmead is a highly recommended satirical, allegorical dystopian novel. Simone is one of the beautiful people, the Glitterati. The Glitterati are at the top echelon of society, the extremely wealthy leisure class who all closely follow the rules of fashion. They ardently follow the daily couture magazines on trends, the rules of what to wear on each day of the week, and how to act in every situation. No one wants to be one of the unfashionable or ugly people. The pinnacle of the top of the Glitterati would be to set a new fashion trend. Then several disconcerting events happen to Simone and his wife Georgie. Simone has, shudder, a nosebleed at fellow fashionista Justine's party and he asks her to make sure there are no pictures of it. Justine instead takes this incident and steals it, using it to set a new trend. The second event was when Georgie and Simone find a child in their garden. The creature, as they are unsure exactly what this is, is dressed in another shudder, denim. They shoo it into their greenhouse for the time being but have to deal with her more later. The vapid Glitterati are living in a weird dystopian world of their own choosing and their concerns are so removed from any reality it is farcical. This is actually a humorous novel throughout the majority of the plot and you will find yourself laughing at the absurdity. Within the narrative Glitterati is also a satire which becomes allegorical as it exposes uncomfortable truths about a wealthy ruling leisure class that is disconnected with all reality, like children, and are totally consumed with themselves, fashion, and appearances. Character development is present, as Simone goes through a drastic change which is a major part of the denouement. I was actually surprised at how much I enjoyed this novel by the end. The introduction to the Glitterati and their obsessions was interesting and funny, but I did wonder where the plot was going to go as their lives were too silly and tedious to hold your attention throughout a novel. Readers should keep reading until they reach the event that changes things and results in real depth to the character of Simone; it will be obvious. Disclosure: My review copy was courtesy of Titan Books. http://www.shetreadssoftly.com/2022/0...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Siavahda

    The problem with Glitterati is that it does one thing very well – making its MC vapid and contemptable, even despicable. But by definition then, we don’t give a damn about him being upstaged, or having his trend stolen – there’s absolutely nothing to make the reader attached to him, and that’s more an effect of the vapidity than the despicability, because despicable characters can be interesting, even weirdly likable if they’re also funny or acting on feelings we all have but most of us repress. The problem with Glitterati is that it does one thing very well – making its MC vapid and contemptable, even despicable. But by definition then, we don’t give a damn about him being upstaged, or having his trend stolen – there’s absolutely nothing to make the reader attached to him, and that’s more an effect of the vapidity than the despicability, because despicable characters can be interesting, even weirdly likable if they’re also funny or acting on feelings we all have but most of us repress. Etc. Simone is an airhead in the most extreme definition of the word, and also gross and stupid and horrible. That’s not even the tiniest bit interesting. So why would I care what happens to him? I thought that Langmead might compensate with lovely prose, or by going wildly imaginative (and hopefully descriptive) with all the fashion stuff, but he doesn’t. There’s some interesting worldbuilding, like the way glitterati communicate through body language rather than facial expressions (which might damage their makeup or, horror, cause wrinkles!), but there’s not enough of it to keep me reading past the first third of the book. To say nothing of the worldbuilding holes: bodily fluids are The Most DisgustingTM, but the glitterati like sex? Um. (Also? He doesn’t have his trend stolen. That’s an extremely generous, biased way to describe what happened. So on top of him being boring, his outrage at having his trend nicked is just eye-rolling.) No thank you, I’m not interested in hanging out with this brainless little twit one moment longer when you give me nothing to enjoy about the experience.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Divya Kaushik

    Glitterati was a fabulous read for me. It isn't your basic dystopian read. It's a strange book, but in a delightful way. The beginning was mostly about the world building and I was sure I wouldn't like the book much. But once I deep dived in the storyline, I was shocked how much I enjoyed it.! There were so many funny scenes like Simone calling the child "just a drunk adult" and asking when will 'it' sober up. Their behaviour towards unfashionables and towards a child was just so funny, that you' Glitterati was a fabulous read for me. It isn't your basic dystopian read. It's a strange book, but in a delightful way. The beginning was mostly about the world building and I was sure I wouldn't like the book much. But once I deep dived in the storyline, I was shocked how much I enjoyed it.! There were so many funny scenes like Simone calling the child "just a drunk adult" and asking when will 'it' sober up. Their behaviour towards unfashionables and towards a child was just so funny, that you'll find yourself laughing at the weirdest stuff.! Even though the world set in Glitterati is fictional beyond reality, there are some elements you can relate to, including the societal difference between those who are rich and the normal working class. The ignorance of fashionables towards the difficult lifestyle of uglies (unfashionables) was absurd, yet on-point.! The world building itself was a master-piece. I cannot contain how brilliantly Langmead created the whole environment to such specific detail, that goes beyond your imagination. It's simply marvelous.! The journey of Simone from being a fashionista, who only cares about what he's going to wear to upstage everyone, to living a life of uglies and understanding true happiness, was inspiring. I also loved the ending and might have shed a tear for the child who was just too cute.! Glitterati was definitely a crazy read, unlike any I have ever read and would definitely recommend you to read it.! Thank you @titanbooks fir the #gifted copy. ❤️

  21. 4 out of 5

    Luce

    Although this book is satire and dark humour, I actually read this as a horror. Glitterati is a fascinating dystopian novel where the rich members of the Glitterati are separated from normal people, who they call the uglies. I’m not too sure what their purpose in life is, apart from to be seen as fashionable it all times. They do this in absolutely dark ways and the details will certainly send a shiver up your spine. The story follows Simone who accidentally starts fashion trends, but these trends Although this book is satire and dark humour, I actually read this as a horror. Glitterati is a fascinating dystopian novel where the rich members of the Glitterati are separated from normal people, who they call the uglies. I’m not too sure what their purpose in life is, apart from to be seen as fashionable it all times. They do this in absolutely dark ways and the details will certainly send a shiver up your spine. The story follows Simone who accidentally starts fashion trends, but these trends are stolen by another member of the Glitterati, Justine. Justine takes all the credit and so Simone eventually must confront her -the way he does confront her is nothing short of insane. The society reminds me of the Capitol in The Hunger Games, but even darker. These people partake in constant drugs, body part removal, memory loss treatment and horrific, gory medical procedures. There were moments were I actually spat my coffee out as I couldn’t believe what I was reading. “Oh my god” was definitely uttered quite a lot and I did need breaks because the content was just so mad. That doesn’t mean, however, that this book wasn’t brilliant, because it is. I’ve never read a book like it and this new style of dystopian writing is captivating. I feel like it’s how the world would be if the Kardashian’s were in charge, and you’ll either be hysterically laughing at the horror of it all or absolutely speechless.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Misha

    I don’t want to yuck your yum, but this book is NOT for me. Not only is it not really a dystopian (not that I picked it up for that) story (maybe, partially on p270) but … it didn’t stick with me. I read to page 241 all in one go while a quiet day of subbing, then completely forgot I hadn’t finished it until after bedtime. So I’m finishing it today and… wow, it’s just not much interesting for the length- just about the point I would have considered stopping (and would have switched books if I ha I don’t want to yuck your yum, but this book is NOT for me. Not only is it not really a dystopian (not that I picked it up for that) story (maybe, partially on p270) but … it didn’t stick with me. I read to page 241 all in one go while a quiet day of subbing, then completely forgot I hadn’t finished it until after bedtime. So I’m finishing it today and… wow, it’s just not much interesting for the length- just about the point I would have considered stopping (and would have switched books if I had another with me) it felt like something started, only to wind on seemingly pointlessly. It’s filled with descriptions of how this world works from the POV character with maybe a dystopian aspect for them 10 pages from the end but…. Only read this if you have time to spare or really like the window dressing on alternate worlds. I think I might have preferred the short story this was expanded from.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Liberto

    A very dystopian, interesting read. The story was unpredictable, captivating, and well written. The author creates such a unique world with characters who are so oblivious to the “ugliness” of the mundane that they make you laugh at how ridiculous they can be. Simone and Georgie have had so many of their memories removed that they don’t even know what a child is, and it’s hilarious to see them learn that children are just small drunk people, as Simone observes. But even with all of the wealth th A very dystopian, interesting read. The story was unpredictable, captivating, and well written. The author creates such a unique world with characters who are so oblivious to the “ugliness” of the mundane that they make you laugh at how ridiculous they can be. Simone and Georgie have had so many of their memories removed that they don’t even know what a child is, and it’s hilarious to see them learn that children are just small drunk people, as Simone observes. But even with all of the wealth that they have mysteriously accumulated, there are plenty of people ready to take advantage of Simone and Georgie’s ignorance and it’s satisfying to watch as they stray from the norms of the fashonites to forge their own path.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Presley

    This was one of the more interesting premises of a book I've read this year. Simone lives in a society that reminded me distinctly of what District #1 from Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games must have looked like. Fashion, glitter, posing, and the horror of standing out from the crowd all combined with a dark undertone of the clash between what Simone calls the "Uglies" and the Glitterati. I really didn't think I'd like this book as much as I did. The first paragraph had me just in a bit of disbel This was one of the more interesting premises of a book I've read this year. Simone lives in a society that reminded me distinctly of what District #1 from Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games must have looked like. Fashion, glitter, posing, and the horror of standing out from the crowd all combined with a dark undertone of the clash between what Simone calls the "Uglies" and the Glitterati. I really didn't think I'd like this book as much as I did. The first paragraph had me just in a bit of disbelief as I read, wanted to just put the book down, but found I couldn't. There's a sort of gawking quality that story had that just had me not wanting to look away and, instead, devouring it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... I really enjoyed Glitterati. It’s a strange sort of book. In a good way. There is a vain ridiculousness to it, to the lives of the wealthy, beautiful people who have no concept of the real world, safely cocooned and pampered in their mansions. The book is laced with satire and there are some very funny moments especially when Simone and Justine become rivals. There are some dark moments as well when Simone is accused of a crime and discovers the truth abou https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... I really enjoyed Glitterati. It’s a strange sort of book. In a good way. There is a vain ridiculousness to it, to the lives of the wealthy, beautiful people who have no concept of the real world, safely cocooned and pampered in their mansions. The book is laced with satire and there are some very funny moments especially when Simone and Justine become rivals. There are some dark moments as well when Simone is accused of a crime and discovers the truth about the not-so-perfect world he inhabits. This is a lot of fun. I’d recommend it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sofia

    Hum the story is well written, it has his funny side, but this book is not for me, I was expecting like a kind of uglies for adults and I got something that I can’t really define what it was, maybe you will love, it just wasn’t for me… Thank you NetGalley for the free ARC, this is my honest opinion.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I will not be finishing this. Just setting it as finished to remove it from the list. Got about halfway through and realized I didn't have to finish this well written book about terrible people. I can appreciate shows like Arrested Development and Schitt's Creek for their artistry, but that doesn't mean I can watch them make fools of themselves. I will not be finishing this. Just setting it as finished to remove it from the list. Got about halfway through and realized I didn't have to finish this well written book about terrible people. I can appreciate shows like Arrested Development and Schitt's Creek for their artistry, but that doesn't mean I can watch them make fools of themselves.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rogueish

    Ok so the biggest issue I had with this book was the total disregard for animal cruelty... The characters didn't actually do anything to animals, but they did talk about kitten gloves, polar bear coats, and puppy house shoes. The story itself was interesting, the rival was interesting too. Idk what exactly this one was missing... Ok so the biggest issue I had with this book was the total disregard for animal cruelty... The characters didn't actually do anything to animals, but they did talk about kitten gloves, polar bear coats, and puppy house shoes. The story itself was interesting, the rival was interesting too. Idk what exactly this one was missing...

  29. 5 out of 5

    B

    I had so much fun reading this book, the most bizarre, silly and imaginative book I've read this year. I struggled at the start as the characters are despicable but found myself more or less touched towards the end which I wasn't expecting. I was so entertained by the spectacle I basically inhaled it. Unsettling, fascinating and hilarious. I had so much fun reading this book, the most bizarre, silly and imaginative book I've read this year. I struggled at the start as the characters are despicable but found myself more or less touched towards the end which I wasn't expecting. I was so entertained by the spectacle I basically inhaled it. Unsettling, fascinating and hilarious.

  30. 4 out of 5

    bookishcharli

    Absolutely loved this book, what a fantastic (albeit very realistic) plot. This could easily become reality at some point in the future. Thank you so much to Titan!

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