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End of the World House

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Bertie and Kate have been best friends since high school. Bertie is a semi-failed cartoonist, working for a prominent Silicon Valley tech firm. Her job depresses her, but not as much as the fact that Kate has recently decided to move from San Francisco to Los Angeles. When Bertie’s attempts to make Kate stay fail, she suggests the next-best thing: a trip to Paris that will Bertie and Kate have been best friends since high school. Bertie is a semi-failed cartoonist, working for a prominent Silicon Valley tech firm. Her job depresses her, but not as much as the fact that Kate has recently decided to move from San Francisco to Los Angeles. When Bertie’s attempts to make Kate stay fail, she suggests the next-best thing: a trip to Paris that will hopefully distract the duo from their upcoming separation. The vacation is also a sort of last hurrah, coming during a ceasefire in a series of escalating world conflicts. One night in Paris, they meet a strange man in a bar who offers them a private tour of the Louvre. The women find themselves alone in the museum, where nothing is quite as it seems. Caught up in a day that keeps repeating itself, Bertie and Kate are eventually separated, and Bertie is faced with a mystery that threatens to derail everything. In order to make her way back to Kate, Bertie has to figure out how much control she has over her future—and her past—and how to survive an apocalypse when the world keeps refusing to end.


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Bertie and Kate have been best friends since high school. Bertie is a semi-failed cartoonist, working for a prominent Silicon Valley tech firm. Her job depresses her, but not as much as the fact that Kate has recently decided to move from San Francisco to Los Angeles. When Bertie’s attempts to make Kate stay fail, she suggests the next-best thing: a trip to Paris that will Bertie and Kate have been best friends since high school. Bertie is a semi-failed cartoonist, working for a prominent Silicon Valley tech firm. Her job depresses her, but not as much as the fact that Kate has recently decided to move from San Francisco to Los Angeles. When Bertie’s attempts to make Kate stay fail, she suggests the next-best thing: a trip to Paris that will hopefully distract the duo from their upcoming separation. The vacation is also a sort of last hurrah, coming during a ceasefire in a series of escalating world conflicts. One night in Paris, they meet a strange man in a bar who offers them a private tour of the Louvre. The women find themselves alone in the museum, where nothing is quite as it seems. Caught up in a day that keeps repeating itself, Bertie and Kate are eventually separated, and Bertie is faced with a mystery that threatens to derail everything. In order to make her way back to Kate, Bertie has to figure out how much control she has over her future—and her past—and how to survive an apocalypse when the world keeps refusing to end.

30 review for End of the World House

  1. 4 out of 5

    Catherine (alternativelytitledbooks)

    **Many thanks to NetGalley, Simon & Schuster, and Adrienne Celt for an ARC of this book! Now available as of 4.19!** If you dumped out a bag of Scrabble tiles, tossed in some comics from the Sunday paper, and threw in a pocket watch stuck at 12:00, you'd have two things: -a jumbled, odd, and incoherent mess -a visual representation of this confusing and wholly unlikable book...which is itself a jumbled, odd and incoherent mess The loose framework for this one is as follows: best friends Bertie and K **Many thanks to NetGalley, Simon & Schuster, and Adrienne Celt for an ARC of this book! Now available as of 4.19!** If you dumped out a bag of Scrabble tiles, tossed in some comics from the Sunday paper, and threw in a pocket watch stuck at 12:00, you'd have two things: -a jumbled, odd, and incoherent mess -a visual representation of this confusing and wholly unlikable book...which is itself a jumbled, odd and incoherent mess The loose framework for this one is as follows: best friends Bertie and Kate have taken one last 'we're-the-best-of-girlfriends' trip to Paris. Bertie is a cartoonist, and paying the bills by doodling for a tech company...while Kate is...moving from San Francisco to L.A. (how this embodies her entire character, I'm still not sure.) A man at a bar named Javier promises them a magical special secret tour of the Louvre while nobody else is there...and at some point along the way, the two friends end up separated from one another, searching for Javier, locked in the museum, and stuck in a time loop (supposedly). And apparently the world is also ending. (There is a coffee shortage, which I DID find tragic, and honestly the saddest thing about this book.) Can the two ever break the chain and find one another? And can you keep yourself reading long enough to find out? I'm sorry, but even trying to write a synopsis for this was painful and brought back the days-long headache I endured trying to get through this book. Calling this novel "comedic" is a stretch...a Stretch Armstrong type stretch. Not only didn't I laugh once while reading this, I found the attempts at 'humor' incredibly odd and off-putting. It felt like the author was trying to be highbrow and literary, but it just came off as strange. This book is also about 40% chock full of anecdotes about Bertie and Kate's LONG, LONG friendship...which all felt incredibly boring, like a long-winded elderly person rambling on and on. The timelines also don't make ANY sense, I honestly wouldn't have even known time loops or multi-verses were going on for about 70% of the book if it hadn't been mentioned now and again. Granted, sci-fi and speculative fiction aren't my genre of choice, but I have read plenty of time travel books that were executed well: this one just isn't. I am also not sure what the relevance of the 'end of the world' even had in this book: it certainly didn't add to the dramatic tension. There is also a LONG section in the middle where we get to hear extensively about Bertie's time at her obnoxious corporate job. ...Fun. To make matters even stranger, the ending is so cliched, so bizarre, and so unfulfilling I have no idea what the author was going for, since 90% of the book is about how Kate can't live without Bertie and Bertie can't live without Kate....and the ending is about another character entirely and was cringe-worthy in its own way. Every book has an audience, and I'm sure there are those who will enjoy this one...but as for me, I'll stick to watching Groundhog Day...over and over and over. 2.5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    Can you imagine being trapped in Louvre museum in the middle of the apocalypse, stuck in a time loop: trying to find your missing friend! That’s what Bertie is dealing with! Most of the people in the world dealt with similar situation but they were not lucky enough to get trapped in one of the most inspiring museums of the world; they stuck in their own houses, living the same hellish Groundhog Day! So this book is easy to relate and the apocalyptic universe the author created has so many simila Can you imagine being trapped in Louvre museum in the middle of the apocalypse, stuck in a time loop: trying to find your missing friend! That’s what Bertie is dealing with! Most of the people in the world dealt with similar situation but they were not lucky enough to get trapped in one of the most inspiring museums of the world; they stuck in their own houses, living the same hellish Groundhog Day! So this book is easy to relate and the apocalyptic universe the author created has so many similarities with our modern world which makes this book more terrifying and jaw dropping. At the first part: we’re informed about how the world slowly ends with detailed and extra realistic descriptions which make us think what if those depictions are just horrifying true premonitions. We’re also introduced two close friends who will part their ways in a few days, deciding to visit Paris as if this would be their last chance to see the city. Bertie is a talented cartoonist who is doing mostly dinosaur avatar illustrations for a large tech company in Silicon Valley. She stuck in this job, procrastinating her dream to work on her own graphic novel. Kate works as fundraiser and publicist of nonprofit organization lobbied to improve the school lunches. But now she gets an offer from L. A. and her decision to leave the city immediately reminds Bertie of her own loneliness. When they meet an eccentric stranger at a bar who promises them to provide an early entrance opportunity to Louvre museum, the girls get excited. As they arrive to the museum early in the morning, Kate performs secret knock she’s told and the museum workers let them in. But the girls finally confront each other about their boiled up feelings and they have an argument. When Bertie leaves her friend alone to freshen up at the restroom, she doesn’t find her at the same place she left. She keeps looking for her friend, trying to find her way out from the museum and she finally realizes this actual day turns into her own Groundhog Day she has to live over and over again. I was a little worried how the story would conclude but thankfully time loop and romantic turn of the plot wrapped up adroitly. I love the creative idea of plot but I had a little problem to connect with main characters. It’s still one of the original, well written, post apocalyptic- fantasy- romance story I mostly enjoyed! Special thanks to NetGalley and Simon Schuster for sharing this digital reviewer copy with me in exchange my honest opinions.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Taking place sometime in the future, End of The World House envisions a world in the process of collapsing. There are perpetual fires and floods, terrorist bombings in major cities, all leading to shortages and rationing. In the midst of all this, during a period of ceasefire peace talks, Bertie and Kate head to Paris for a vacation before Kate moves from Silicon Valley to LA. Once there, they meet a man who promises them private access to the Louvre. This is where the book launches into a Groun Taking place sometime in the future, End of The World House envisions a world in the process of collapsing. There are perpetual fires and floods, terrorist bombings in major cities, all leading to shortages and rationing. In the midst of all this, during a period of ceasefire peace talks, Bertie and Kate head to Paris for a vacation before Kate moves from Silicon Valley to LA. Once there, they meet a man who promises them private access to the Louvre. This is where the book launches into a Groundhog Day scenario, told from Bertie’s viewpoint. But unlike Groundhog Day, each re-start has minor differences and it became fun to pick up on each inconsistency. Then the book takes a hard turn. I can’t go into much about the second part of the book without spoilers. Suffice it to say it's about Bertie’s life without Kate. The problem was I just couldn’t get invested in the story. There are some minor discussions about the multiverse (as opposed to the universe) and other philosophical thoughts meant to be deep. I am not a big fan of Sci-fi, so others that are might be more invested in this story. My thanks to Netgalley and Simon & Schuster for an advance copy of this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    End of the World House by Adrienne Celt is a dystopian science fiction fantasy novel set in a future version of our world. The world has been at war with fires and floods and bombings in the cities and of course shortages in the supplies. Bertie and Kate have been best friends since high school and have gotten one another through this tough time but Kate has decided to move from San Francisco to Los Angeles. Bertie doesn’t want to see Kate go but Kate had made up her mind to leave the city. Bertie End of the World House by Adrienne Celt is a dystopian science fiction fantasy novel set in a future version of our world. The world has been at war with fires and floods and bombings in the cities and of course shortages in the supplies. Bertie and Kate have been best friends since high school and have gotten one another through this tough time but Kate has decided to move from San Francisco to Los Angeles. Bertie doesn’t want to see Kate go but Kate had made up her mind to leave the city. Bertie decides that a girl’s trip is just what the pair need to take their minds off of the separation and there is currently a ceasefire going on in the world making it safer to travel. Bertie and Kate head to Paris but after arriving they meet a strange man and end up trapped in a time loop in the Louvre. I’m one that is always up for a good science fiction or dystopian read so when I saw End of the World House by Adrienne Celt and noticed it was compared to Groundhog Day, which I enjoyed, I couldn’t help but be curious. Well, this one did not pull me in the way I completely expected it to. One wouldn’t think that maybe it was the repetitive nature that did me in but no, it just simply fell flat and I couldn’t not connect to the characters at all. Also sold as a humorous read I didn’t find that at all for me either so in the end I gave this one two and a half stars as it certainly had potential but could have been better executed in my opinion. I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley. For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.com/

  5. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Alan

    I didn’t find this gripping. There have been bombings and other things that have halted travel and normal living, but when the world opens back up, cartoonist Bertie asks her friend Kate to visit Paris with her. Kate has accepted a promotion that will transfer her from San Francisco and Bertie to Los Angeles, something Bertie finds even more depressing than doing cartoons for her Silicon Valley tech firm. While there, they get an invite from a man in bar to visit the Louvre on a day it’s closed I didn’t find this gripping. There have been bombings and other things that have halted travel and normal living, but when the world opens back up, cartoonist Bertie asks her friend Kate to visit Paris with her. Kate has accepted a promotion that will transfer her from San Francisco and Bertie to Los Angeles, something Bertie finds even more depressing than doing cartoons for her Silicon Valley tech firm. While there, they get an invite from a man in bar to visit the Louvre on a day it’s closed to the public, and they get stuck there, living a similar day over and over again. You’d think it would be interesting reading about someone passionate about art whose goals to write her own graphic novels are thwarted by making money doing art on command for an actual paycheck to get stuck at the greatest museum in the world, but not a lot happens—it’s repetitious. That’s partly the point—that between our jobs and how we unwind from our jobs, the endless terrible headlines repeated day after day, many of us live most of our lives in a half-awake routine. The backstory of her and Kate’s friendship was more interesting to me than their present-day conundrum and more interesting than Bertie’s relationship with her boyfriend. Thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to review this novel, which a RELEASES APRIL 19, 2022.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    “We aren’t the same. But we are one person. I don’t know if that makes sense”. No, it does not make sense. And this book does not illuminate that statement in any way. It is a hot mess about a very close friendship and multiverses in a vague, post-apocalyptic world. I should have stopped reading but I stuck it out to the end. Do not believe the blurb’s comparison to Groundhog Day. That movie had charm and redemption. This book just has confusing, boring loops. I received a free copy of this book “We aren’t the same. But we are one person. I don’t know if that makes sense”. No, it does not make sense. And this book does not illuminate that statement in any way. It is a hot mess about a very close friendship and multiverses in a vague, post-apocalyptic world. I should have stopped reading but I stuck it out to the end. Do not believe the blurb’s comparison to Groundhog Day. That movie had charm and redemption. This book just has confusing, boring loops. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jordan (Jordy’s Book Club)

    QUICK TAKE: wanted to love it, liked a lot about it, but ultimately was turned off by the toxic masculinity/gaslighting subplot that felt a little off for me. I liked the female friendship at the center of the story, but that gets pushed aside for a dark and icky relationship story. Still, interested in reading more from this author, and I love the cover art.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    Bertie and Kate are the kind of friends who reconnect in an instant, have inside jokes and their own universe when they are together. The world around them is falling apart with bombings and refugees, and Kate decides to move to Los Angeles instead of buying a house in northern California like they'd planned. They end up in Paris on a last hurrah, where they meet a mysterious man who can get them into the Louvre even though it is closed for safety. And that's where the strangeness begins, or at l Bertie and Kate are the kind of friends who reconnect in an instant, have inside jokes and their own universe when they are together. The world around them is falling apart with bombings and refugees, and Kate decides to move to Los Angeles instead of buying a house in northern California like they'd planned. They end up in Paris on a last hurrah, where they meet a mysterious man who can get them into the Louvre even though it is closed for safety. And that's where the strangeness begins, or at least, when they start to notice it. Is it part of the apocalypse? Is someone experimenting with them? Is it the museum or the world? Regardless, days seem very familiar, and then Kate disappears. This was a fun read..I'm not sure I'm satisfied by the ending entirely but I did enjoy the journey. I feel like this is a mix of Piranesi and the film Seeking a Friend for the End of World, but I liked it more than Piranesi. Another reading friend also found the tone to be similar to Leave the World Behind, and I thought that was a good comparison, the doom of the surrounding events that aren't entirely understood, and knowing that what is happening simultaneously has something to do with what is happening and that it wouldn't be happening without those events. Thanks to the publisher for providing access through NetGalley. The book came out April 19, 2022.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ellis

    "The thing that made the world's collapse so hard to parse was the regularity that persisted, in spite of everything." It's not often that a writer pulls a four-or-five-star rug out from under my feet ten pages from the end of their book, but damned if it didn't happen here. I'm never not going to inhale alternating timelines, especially those set against a slow-moving apocalypse and I adored the deep friendship of Bertie and Kate. I was hoping that Celt had a non-disappointing finale up her slee "The thing that made the world's collapse so hard to parse was the regularity that persisted, in spite of everything." It's not often that a writer pulls a four-or-five-star rug out from under my feet ten pages from the end of their book, but damned if it didn't happen here. I'm never not going to inhale alternating timelines, especially those set against a slow-moving apocalypse and I adored the deep friendship of Bertie and Kate. I was hoping that Celt had a non-disappointing finale up her sleeve, especially since the basis of the fraught, clandestine trip to the Louvre (and really Paris in general) was based around the concept that the two women were separating and Kate was okay with that while Bertie was not, but alas, especially after the revelation that (view spoiler)[Kate was the one who wanted them to be split up, which was where Dylan came in (hide spoiler)] I'm not sure where she was going with the confusing and, to borrow a word from Chrissie's far superior review, unearned ending. I grouse about endings a lot in my reviews, how I don't get where authors are going or how I always wish I could've had a bit more info to flesh things out, but I hereby take all of that back because THIS is the book that I was absolutely loving and really needed to stick the landing more than almost any I've read this year and it just did not.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sheena

    Kate and Bertie have been best friends since high school. Kate has decided to move from San Francisco to Los Angeles for a new job. Bertie tries to get Kate to stay but her mind is set in stone. They decide to go on a trip to Paris as a final way to celebrate their friendship. They are also in the middle of a world apocalypse with war, fires and bloods, and shortages of supplies. In Paris they meet a man who offers them private tours of the Louvre. The women find that the day continues to repeat Kate and Bertie have been best friends since high school. Kate has decided to move from San Francisco to Los Angeles for a new job. Bertie tries to get Kate to stay but her mind is set in stone. They decide to go on a trip to Paris as a final way to celebrate their friendship. They are also in the middle of a world apocalypse with war, fires and bloods, and shortages of supplies. In Paris they meet a man who offers them private tours of the Louvre. The women find that the day continues to repeat itself. The book alternated between the girls friendship in the past and their current situation in Paris. I was super excited to read about females trying to navigate not only an apocalypse but also their possible crumbling friendship. Instead, I found it extremely boring honestly and a little repetitive. Obviously the whole ground hog day thing can be repetitive but I don’t like the way it was written. I found myself bored and then of course a man comes in and it becomes all about him. The man also can change the future with the snap of his fingers? Like what are you, Thanos? Cliche and unoriginal. As you’ve guessed, I was sorely disappointed. Thank you to Netgalley and Simon & Schuster for an advanced copy of this book. Side note, this cover is amazing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chrissie

    Having to hit this one in the middle with the rating. Ooof. One of those where a solid grouping of stars just doesn't cut it. I need two ratings — one for the first 90% of the book and another for the last 10%. End of the World House started out strong. A couple of women, thirty-ish in age, on a trip together in Paris. Fresh off a night out and headed to the Louvre, Celt sets up a story of a dynamic female friendship on a mid-point climate and political crisis stage. But the friendship, once stro Having to hit this one in the middle with the rating. Ooof. One of those where a solid grouping of stars just doesn't cut it. I need two ratings — one for the first 90% of the book and another for the last 10%. End of the World House started out strong. A couple of women, thirty-ish in age, on a trip together in Paris. Fresh off a night out and headed to the Louvre, Celt sets up a story of a dynamic female friendship on a mid-point climate and political crisis stage. But the friendship, once strong and life affirming, seems to be heading into trouble. Bertie is trying hard to not be angry with Kate, and to enjoy this trip, before Kate moves to another city and leaves Bertie behind. But the outing to the Louvre isn't a typical one. Kate met a man named Javier the night before while she and Bertie were out, and he offered to get both women into the Louvre on a Tuesday — the day of the week when the museum is typically closed. And as the women cross the courtyard to enter the Louvre by way of giving Javier's name to the guard behind the door, there are ominous sounding lines woven into the text: Later, she would remember...but in the moment.... The atmosphere was ripe with the possibilities promised in the book's blurb: Groundhog Day meets Ling Ma’s Severance. (And now, having read the book through, I'd add The Truman Show to that for extra layers.) The time spent in the museum is thick with an argument waiting to drop — or the tension from steadfastly avoiding a fight. It's thrillingly quiet — they are alone in the Louvre, but they can't seem to enjoy it with the personal betrayals so close to the surface, valiant efforts aside. The two get separated. The chapter ends, and the next chapter begins with a replay of that Tuesday, with slightly different variables, leading them back to the Louvre. The slightest hint of questioning awareness scratches at Bertie's mind, but she ignores it and shrugs these strange feelings off. What follows is a series of events that sheds Kate from the story and brings about a new character into the picture: Dylan. Suddenly he's at the museum at one point when Kate seems to have disappeared. He's Bertie's boyfriend. It resets. Bertie and Dylan meet in California. They work at the same company. They start dating. Bertie struggles to put the pieces together from her memory recall overload that slowly creeps its way in — something that only gets worse for her as the story continues — and her time, place, location, and known friends come together in her mind like ill-fitting puzzle pieces, a near fit but they're from different puzzles. Dylan steers her back to him — and she does seem to find comfort and love from knowing him. Still, Kate exists for her and pulls at her mind, even when they no longer know each other in Bertie's current reality. Bertie's thoughts return to Kate again and again — the need to find her, even when Bertie doesn't remember that Kate is missing somewhere in Paris, maybe still in the Louvre. The constant examination of their friendship, the need for companionship, and the way that dynamic is set up in the story is incredibly compelling. Kate and Bertie feel like a matched set, a complementary pair if there ever was one. But where Celt lost me was very late in the book, and without giving away spoilers, what constituted an ending made the entire journey fruitless and frustrating. Dylan as a character is interesting, but because of his particular role by the time the story closes, his relationship with both Bertie and the story's plot overall, feels like the antithesis of the actual design behind the majority of the writing and character development for Bertie. Or at least the intention presented by the novel's first eighty to ninety percent. The beautiful confusion and the taut need of a friendship that seems to be preordained that swirls around Bertie throughout much of the novel made me think I was headed for a five-star book. The untangling of all that was built as the foundation of the End of the World House seems to have been as suddenly and swiftly forgotten as Kate's initial disappearance around a corner in the Louvre. I thought Celt's writing throughout was lyrical and weighty, but the hammered in resolution was puzzling and disappointing. Even after I finished the book and the sharp sting of betrayal to the story, I struggled to categorize my thoughts on it. The events and confusion of the ending reminded me exactly of Bertie's feelings when she'd emanate confusion about her newly reset circumstances — which she'd only allow to intrude for the briefest of moments. If that is the intention, it was not an earned ending for me. I received this book for free from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This affected neither my opinion of the book nor the content of my review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    "Who knows who you’ll meet, in Paris. Anything was possible there, in a city so old, so full of ghosts, that the ground could shift beneath your feet without appearing to change at all…" Science fiction is my sweet spot, especially books that deal with time warps, time travel, or other similar paradoxes. So when I read the synopsis for End of the World House, with its seemingly infinite, Groundhog Day-esque time loop, I was sure it would be a hit. "Is it easier on you if I pretend you’ve never bee "Who knows who you’ll meet, in Paris. Anything was possible there, in a city so old, so full of ghosts, that the ground could shift beneath your feet without appearing to change at all…" Science fiction is my sweet spot, especially books that deal with time warps, time travel, or other similar paradoxes. So when I read the synopsis for End of the World House, with its seemingly infinite, Groundhog Day-esque time loop, I was sure it would be a hit. "Is it easier on you if I pretend you’ve never been here before? Never lived through this day?" I was expecting something similar to In a Holidaze , or in the same vein as some of Rebecca Serle’s writing - something light, romantic, and fun, with the added sci-fi twist to make it feel innovative and unexpected. I usually really enjoy books like that, and was so excited to read this one! "It became hard, in waking life, to know which things were too strange to be real, and which were just strange enough." Unfortunately, End of the World House didn’t live up to those expectations, and ended up being sort of a miss for me. With its unusual, not-fully-explained apocalyptic backdrop, a la Leave the World Behind , and its hallucinogenic descriptions of the repeating day in the museum, it almost reminded me of All's Well - kind of cringey, a little uncomfortable, and super confusing. "We’re all trapped here…. There’s no way out. Even when I manage to leave, they bring me back again." When the characters started to recall (false?) memories from their previous lived experiences through the day, I thought the story might redeem itself and become something like Recursion , but it never really got there. And then in the second half, it almost becomes a… different book altogether, about corporate ethics? Honestly I was left with more questions than answers. (view spoiler)[(Why can Dylan, some random chubby man, control the time loop with just a snap of his fingers, yet claims he can’t escape from it? Why does Bertie not know, at first, that she is living the same day over and over, but then suddenly she does know? Why these people? Why this day? How can Kate just be in the museum? What the hell was the deal with the graphic novel pages at the end? Literally nothing makes sense.) (hide spoiler)] "This place draws us in, from all the different lives we’ve lived. All the different versions of us who found a reason to be in this museum." And ultimately, I don’t think I understand the larger point the author was trying to make here, and that’s probably what bothered me the most. Most time-travel / repeating-day stories tend to say something about missed opportunities, do-overs, or second chances; I didn’t pick up on any deeper message here. So basically I’m just very confused, and my head hurts. —— ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Deedi Brown (DeediReads)

    All my reviews live at https://deedispeaking.com/reads/. TL;DR REVIEW: End of the World House is a trippy literary page-turner with a great premise and an ending I’ll be thinking about for a long time. It manages to be very readable and also very smart. For you if: You like novels that border commercial and literary fiction with a weird, speculative premise. FULL REVIEW: Thank you, Simon & Schuster, for the review copy of this book! As soon as I saw the synopsis, I knew I had to read it — and it did All my reviews live at https://deedispeaking.com/reads/. TL;DR REVIEW: End of the World House is a trippy literary page-turner with a great premise and an ending I’ll be thinking about for a long time. It manages to be very readable and also very smart. For you if: You like novels that border commercial and literary fiction with a weird, speculative premise. FULL REVIEW: Thank you, Simon & Schuster, for the review copy of this book! As soon as I saw the synopsis, I knew I had to read it — and it did not disappoint. End of the World House is about a young woman named Bertie who is a cartoonist at a tech startup in a near-future, apocalyptic, WWIII-type world. She and her soon-to-move-away best friend, Kate, decide to go on a vacation to Paris while the world is at (what could be its last) ceasefire. A man they met in a bar gets them into the Louvre while its closed But in the midst of their exploration, Bertie finds herself not only separated from Kate, but also in a Groundhog-Day-esque time loop. I don’t want to spoil anything, but one of the best parts of this book is that it goes in a totally different direction than you probably expect based on the synopsis. I was totally hooked and finished the book in one sitting — it’s not a thriller or anything, but it’s definitely got a good pace to it. This book is readable and also smart, a great fit for people who like to land in that sweet spot between a contemporary and literary type of feeling. The apocalyptic state of the world feels eerily possible and only a few steps up from how things are today, which makes for resonant ideas to ruminate on — that we are all wildly imperfect in relationship to one another, and all just doing our best; the way we cling to those imperfect relationships when things are scary and we are lonely; the feeling of futility around going to work and leading normal lives as society crumbles around us; the question of whether it’s worth following our dreams as the world burns. I can’t wait for more people to read this so I can talk to them about it! CONTENT AND TRIGGER WARNINGS: Death of one’s parents; Grief; Bombing/warfare; Toxic relationship

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    [I was given an advanced digital copy from NetGalley] Childhood best friends Bertie and Kate have reached a strenuous point in their relationship—the world is balancing on an uneven scale that might just lean towards apocalyptic by the next morning, and Kate is moving. In effort to ignore the doom and gloom of the world, and Kate’s soon-to-be distance, the two embark on a Paris vacation, which leads them to the jewel of the city—the Louvre. Their chance visit to the museum seems too good to be tr [I was given an advanced digital copy from NetGalley] Childhood best friends Bertie and Kate have reached a strenuous point in their relationship—the world is balancing on an uneven scale that might just lean towards apocalyptic by the next morning, and Kate is moving. In effort to ignore the doom and gloom of the world, and Kate’s soon-to-be distance, the two embark on a Paris vacation, which leads them to the jewel of the city—the Louvre. Their chance visit to the museum seems too good to be true (read: they’re the only visitors that day), but things quickly take a turn, and so does time. The concept of time in this novel was an intriguing catch—I found myself really wanting to understand how time functioned, and yet I don’t think I ever really figured that out. I don’t think that lack of understanding mattered too much, because, like Bertie and others, they didn’t understand it in the end either. However, the last half of the novel didn’t live up to its own intrigue. The plot slowed down and took an unpleasant turn, the characters fell flat and seemed to dig themselves into a hole of unfortunate characterization. The story seemed to hint in one direction, but then that direction was completely disregarded and forgotten. I think I would have liked to have been able to connect with the characters more, but I don’t feel like we’re given much of a chance. As for the novel overall, the world-building was laid out and unique, and I think that really gave the story its substance that kept me reading.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maine Colonial

    I received a free publisher's review copy, via Netgalley. We start with 30-somethings Kate and Roberta (“Bertie”), friends since high school, taking a spur of the moment trip to Paris before Kate moves to Los Angeles from Mountain View CA, where Bertie is an illustrator for an internet company and Kate has an important job for a nonprofit. Sounds fun, right? Think again. The story takes place in an unspecified near future, when the world—including the US—is overwhelmed with natural disasters due t I received a free publisher's review copy, via Netgalley. We start with 30-somethings Kate and Roberta (“Bertie”), friends since high school, taking a spur of the moment trip to Paris before Kate moves to Los Angeles from Mountain View CA, where Bertie is an illustrator for an internet company and Kate has an important job for a nonprofit. Sounds fun, right? Think again. The story takes place in an unspecified near future, when the world—including the US—is overwhelmed with natural disasters due to climate change, large and small terrorist attacks, and apparently has had dirty-bomb strikes in the not-too-distant past. Kate and Bertie’s trip is spur of the moment because the window for travel is temporarily open and they decide to grab it, since it could be who knows how long, maybe forever, before they will have a chance to visit Paris. A guy named Javier, whom Bertie thinks seemed sketchy tells Kate that if they show up the next morning at the Louvre and mention his name, they’ll be allowed in even though it will be one of the museum’s normal closed days. The reader sees right away that the day of the Louvre visit repeats, but also notices that the repeats play out differently; hugely differently by the third time around and the loop is broken. The story’s main character is Bertie, and the focus is on how she reacts to the strange events at the Louvre and over the following year. Other characters include a few of Bertie’s co-workers, and her boyfriend Dylan. I was impressed by Celt’s depiction of how Americans react to their imperiled world. In their in-person lives, people turn inward and engage in selfish and irrational behaviors in the name of “self care.” They anxiously watch reports of attacks that kill many people, but in social media they meme-ify everything and make sick jokes about it. When they decide they should do something about what is happening, they take lots of photos and post them on social media. The rest of the time, they continue to do their jobs, stepping around more and more homeless people, working around the periodic food category shortages, rationing, and dwindling natural resources. While the description of this near-future dystopia is masterful, it’s deeply depressing—especially right now, as Russia is attacking Ukraine, and we are talking about the real possibility of World War III. The Bertie and Kate story doesn’t at all lighten the load, either. I think it’s a marketing mistake to refer to Groundhog Day in the book description. That made me think of Bill Murray, humor, sweetness, learning how to be a good and present person. But in this story, Bertie is full of anxiety, with good reason. There is a constant air of foreboding. On top of it all, to me Dylan seemed like a real creep, and I never felt like the whole time-travel-ish stuff made much sense. Maybe somebody who is a big fan of dystopian fiction would like this a lot more than I did.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    The best way I can describe End of the World House is genre-defying. It has elements of just about everything: sci-fi, fantasy, horror/thriller, romance, and I guess technically it would count as contemporary. Like a good multiverse story? Boom. End of the world scenario? Bam. Ah-ha moments and plot twists? Pow. Plot set in France? Got you covered. I couldn’t put this book down. I loved that I had no idea where it was going the whole time and could never hazard a solid guess. I can’t immediately The best way I can describe End of the World House is genre-defying. It has elements of just about everything: sci-fi, fantasy, horror/thriller, romance, and I guess technically it would count as contemporary. Like a good multiverse story? Boom. End of the world scenario? Bam. Ah-ha moments and plot twists? Pow. Plot set in France? Got you covered. I couldn’t put this book down. I loved that I had no idea where it was going the whole time and could never hazard a solid guess. I can’t immediately recall a book like this one. Maybe there is and I’m just uncultured. But for me, this felt fresh and original and I thoroughly enjoyed it. That being said, I can see why the book has so-so reviews on here as the trippy Groundhog Day type scenario can be confusing or boring, therefore frustrating to get through. I’d say, boiled down, the book has its heart in sci-fi so if that’s not your thing, I might skip this one. 4/5

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    ok, 3.5, mostly because I think the concept outpaces the prose. I think it starts off super strong, and then as it backtracks and loops around for the whole middle, some of the scenes lag, some of the dialogue is a little on the nose. all of this is to say, I tore through this, I needed to know what happened to the main character, which just goes to show you that this book has ~something~ ! I will also say that maybe I shouldn't have started a book about the end of days and dissolution of a majo ok, 3.5, mostly because I think the concept outpaces the prose. I think it starts off super strong, and then as it backtracks and loops around for the whole middle, some of the scenes lag, some of the dialogue is a little on the nose. all of this is to say, I tore through this, I needed to know what happened to the main character, which just goes to show you that this book has ~something~ ! I will also say that maybe I shouldn't have started a book about the end of days and dissolution of a major friendship in the midst of war, maybe this pushed me into a weird spiral, I simply do not know! tysm to netgalley and simon & schuster for the arc, I did have some kind of a blast!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of End of the World House. I loved the Groundhog Day premise entwined with the post-apocalyptic setting so I was excited when my request was approved. ** Minor Quantum Leap spoilers ahead ** The writing was good, but like some novels with great premises, there was too much going on. And not in a good way. Is this a novel about a relationship between two women during a post-apocalyptic Earth and how their friendship will survive when one is moving away after so Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of End of the World House. I loved the Groundhog Day premise entwined with the post-apocalyptic setting so I was excited when my request was approved. ** Minor Quantum Leap spoilers ahead ** The writing was good, but like some novels with great premises, there was too much going on. And not in a good way. Is this a novel about a relationship between two women during a post-apocalyptic Earth and how their friendship will survive when one is moving away after so many years of leaning on each other for moral, mental and emotional support? Or is this about time travel, the multiverse and the roads not taken? Or maybe this is about our place in the world after a world crisis and how we continue to go on; mourn our losses in friendship and families; what the world used to be, how we were able to travel and go to the market and get whatever we needed whenever we needed. Instead, the novel was a jumble of the above with no clear delineation of what the author was trying to say; there is repetitive filler about Bertie's job, the power hungry tech CEOs of companies that want to shape the world and people to their image. I expected the narrative to be similar to Groundhog Day a time lapse or jump in which the friends must redo the same day over and over to mend their fractured relationship but instead we get rando characters like Javier and Dylan, whose characters are superfluous and unnecessary. Especially Dylan. He is a schlub, toxic and a creep. I don't understand why the author would add a male character to guide Bertie in the time loop at the Louvre, giving him the power to manipulate Bertie and restart the loop with the snap of his fingers. I was not a fan of that. Why does a man and a relationship factor into every novel? Why not use Bertie's parents to guide her, compel her emotionally and mentally? Why not explore the friendship between Kate and Bertie instead of devoting more than half of the pages to the phony relationship between Bertie and Dylan? There are lots of unanswered questions including why is there a time loop at the Louvre and why does Kate stay? What I did love: The relationship between Kate and Bertie; the honesty between both women who become even more dependent on each other after a world crisis the author evokes with mentions of a war and food shortages. I love the brief drawings in the novel (wish there were more) and the End of the World House title refers to the graphic novel Kate is creating in her graphic novel. The writing was good and the author does raise some interesting questions about the paths we take but they get muddled along the way, which made this hard to continue reading after I put it down to read something else. But I finished!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Do Kate and Bertie survive? Do they learn how to grow crops, and make friends with the people in town, or do the animals come and take over the house and leave behind their skin and bones? How would you draw the end of the world, what would that look like to you? I'm not sure anymore that it's real. Maybe when one world ends, another one begins, but I have to admit, I love this Bertie and I love this Kate, and if they died, I think a piece of my heart would die with them. Maybe you always mourn Do Kate and Bertie survive? Do they learn how to grow crops, and make friends with the people in town, or do the animals come and take over the house and leave behind their skin and bones? How would you draw the end of the world, what would that look like to you? I'm not sure anymore that it's real. Maybe when one world ends, another one begins, but I have to admit, I love this Bertie and I love this Kate, and if they died, I think a piece of my heart would die with them. Maybe you always mourn the lost thing, despite the new. OOF this made me so, so sad. a book that knows that the only thing more tragic, more terrifying, more pressing than the end of the world is growing apart from your best friend. part 1 is so much stronger than part 2 (dylan didn't really do anything for me as a character, knocking off a star for his lack of Spark) but still so OOF so good. thanks for the emotional tailspin adrienne !!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bandit

    I didn’t realize this right away, but this wasn’t a first celt read for me. I’ve read her Invitation to the Bonfire some time ago and liked it, mostly. I’ve just revisited my review of it and the phrase that stood out was that it had a nice twist but it took you down the WTF road to get there. Because that is very much the case with this book also. This is a story of friendship, first and foremost. A sort of dedicated female friendship that evolves or devolves over time, a sort of thing that pot I didn’t realize this right away, but this wasn’t a first celt read for me. I’ve read her Invitation to the Bonfire some time ago and liked it, mostly. I’ve just revisited my review of it and the phrase that stood out was that it had a nice twist but it took you down the WTF road to get there. Because that is very much the case with this book also. This is a story of friendship, first and foremost. A sort of dedicated female friendship that evolves or devolves over time, a sort of thing that potentially I’d label and dismiss as women’s fiction. But it is set in a mildly apocalyptic world and had time loops in it. Now that’s interesting. If you’re wondering what constitutes a mild apocalypse…well, it’s the one that sort of fades to the background. Most apocalyptic stories feature it front and center, but in this book it’s merely a stage setting. There are expositions that are not attributed to anyone, there are climate change based disasters, but overall majority of lives remain unaffected or at least there is still a consistent semblance of the world as we know it. And in this world two best friends, Bertie and Kate, decide to do it up and go to Paris, where Kate promptly disappears in the Louvre and Bertie finds herself groundhogging the same day over and over. It takes a while for her and for the readers to figure out what’s going on, by which time the book takes a decidedly romantic turn. But it’s all connected, in a trippy and loopy (literally) way and it’ll all be understood in the end. So definitely an interesting and origjnal plot. The execution…well, it was pretty good too. I didn’t love it, to be honest, for two main reasons…a. the plot was too precociously trippy as if enamored with its own weirdness and b. I didn’t really connect with the characters. I’m not sure if they were too girly for me or too millennial or just not interesting enough, but there it is. Something that’ll probably vary for different readers, but reading is personal like that. It was a pretty fun read, I was entertained, the writing itself was very good, the plot had cleverness about it, so the overall result is much the same as my previous book by the author, somewhere inbetween. Thanks Netgalley. This and more at https://advancetheplot.weebly.com/

  21. 5 out of 5

    agata

    Bertie and Kate have been best friends for years, so when they agree that it's probably the last moment for traveling abroad in their crumbling society, they decide to have their last hurrah together in Paris. One night in a Parisian pub, just a few days before they're supposed to leave, they are approached by a stranger who promises to get them into the Louvre on a day its doors are closed to the public. It's no surprise that Bertie and Kate agree to a private tour of the most famous museum in Bertie and Kate have been best friends for years, so when they agree that it's probably the last moment for traveling abroad in their crumbling society, they decide to have their last hurrah together in Paris. One night in a Parisian pub, just a few days before they're supposed to leave, they are approached by a stranger who promises to get them into the Louvre on a day its doors are closed to the public. It's no surprise that Bertie and Kate agree to a private tour of the most famous museum in the world, and the next day they find themselves walking the corridors of the Louvre completely alone. But Bertie and Kate's relationship isn't without its troubles and when they separate, finding their way to each other again becomes more difficult than anyone could expect. In more ways than one, especially when Kate vanishes without a trace and Bertie realizes they're stuck in a loop, reliving the same day over and over again. End of the World House is a very trippy, very original story about fighting for and letting go of different relationships in our lives. The bond between Kate and Bertie was beautiful and felt deeply realistic, especially with all the small insecurities, gestures, and inside jokes they shared. It definitely tugged on my heart because I don't come across many books about dealing with grief over losing a friendship, even though it's such an important part of life, so it was great to see the characters struggle with that. I also felt very connected to the setting; the end of the world that doesn't happen in a single monstrous event but is a sum of smaller ones, ones that we more or less get used to. It was very strange to read about that while basically living during similar circumstances - there's a scene where Bertie uses a handkerchief both as a fashion statement and as a breathing filter. The time loop element was pretty confusing to me, especially in the beginning, but it created such a dreamlike and odd atmosphere, that I ended up just letting myself enjoy the story without desperately trying to figure out all the mechanics.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Martin

    I’m truly not sure what to make of this book. I want to feel positively toward the premise, at the very least—it’s curious, unique and anchored me into a surreal Groundhogs Day environment at the Louvre. The characters were somehow the weakest point of this novel; for a book about loyalty, friendship and relentless codependency, we learn a startling little about the main characters’ inner life and workings. When the plot wasn’t playing with multiple realities, it was actually super dull. The mec I’m truly not sure what to make of this book. I want to feel positively toward the premise, at the very least—it’s curious, unique and anchored me into a surreal Groundhogs Day environment at the Louvre. The characters were somehow the weakest point of this novel; for a book about loyalty, friendship and relentless codependency, we learn a startling little about the main characters’ inner life and workings. When the plot wasn’t playing with multiple realities, it was actually super dull. The mechanics of the time bending and the purpose the boyfriend character plays is speculative… The last page turns the entire book into a romance meet cute, why? Still trying to process how I feel about it, at the very least it’s not a book I’ll soon forget.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Geonn Cannon

    In the end, a very solid read. I thought it was much stronger in the first half, before the mystery started to unravel and it was focused more on Bertie and Kate and their friendship. The second half was a bit more of a slog, but the end brings it all together. I also liked the slow apocalypse going on in the background of the story. After living through 2020, it was all too plausible to imagine the world ending this way. Advanced copy provided by Netgalley in exchange for this review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Ooo. This is bound to be a controversial book. I guess one thing I can guarantee is that you'll have feelings about it. Part of the "problem" is the premise is brilliant and the writing is strong, so you're bound to a) hear about it from someone or b) be tempted by reviews to read it. Just be prepared for your responses to be very hot or very cold. I've read a number of time loop stories, and I loved that this one took a very different approach, basically wondering what happens when our minds get Ooo. This is bound to be a controversial book. I guess one thing I can guarantee is that you'll have feelings about it. Part of the "problem" is the premise is brilliant and the writing is strong, so you're bound to a) hear about it from someone or b) be tempted by reviews to read it. Just be prepared for your responses to be very hot or very cold. I've read a number of time loop stories, and I loved that this one took a very different approach, basically wondering what happens when our minds get a little wiped by each loop. (And if that's true, who's to say we're not all operating in various loops this very moment?) I thought Bertie was a cool character and enjoyed seeing where her loops took her and how those residual memories bled through and effected the decisions she made. She's very much the heart of the story and that was a choice that suited me just fine. The part I did NOT like is the part I can't get too deeply into without spoilers. Let's just say that the Bertie/Kate relationship is billed as the main one in the book, (although in reality, it's nearly almost all Bertie's story.) But a second relationship (one that's, in my opinion, suuuuuuuuper toxic) gets thrown into the mix too. This second relationship takes up a HUGE portion of the book, which kind of bummed me out because I really wanted to just follow Bertie and Kate and I thought this third person seemed like a garbage human. In the end, I'm not sure what to think about this one. I HATED the choice at the ending, but liked how it was done technically. I thought the time loop thing was well done, and I liked Bertie. But the book does take wide swings with the plot and some of those swings were, for me, total misses. I'm not sure that made me hate the book, per se. But it did make me want to knock a star, (and it makes me understand why someone people wanted to throw it out the window entirely.) Thanks to the author and NetGalley for granting me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    Two 30-ish women, Bertie and Kate, have been besties since high school. Both are single and childless and work in San Francisco. Bertie is alarmed and, truth be told, heartbroken when Kate decides to move to L. A. So they decide to take a “last hurrah” vacation to Paris together. Oh, and did I mention that this is in the near future and the world is falling apart, what with all the war with (unnamed) antagonists, complete with nuclear warheads and dirty bombs, as well as the ongoing environmenta Two 30-ish women, Bertie and Kate, have been besties since high school. Both are single and childless and work in San Francisco. Bertie is alarmed and, truth be told, heartbroken when Kate decides to move to L. A. So they decide to take a “last hurrah” vacation to Paris together. Oh, and did I mention that this is in the near future and the world is falling apart, what with all the war with (unnamed) antagonists, complete with nuclear warheads and dirty bombs, as well as the ongoing environmental collapse etc. etc. So this trip is a big deal, taken as there’s a lull in hostilities, unlike anything they’ve done together before. One night, a sketchy guy in a bar offers them private entree into the Louvre the next day, when it’s closed to visitors. They take him up on it, have the place seemingly to themselves, but Kate somehow… disappears. Bertie frantically hunts for her, without success. Then, mysteriously, she wakes up again in their hotel room, and it’s Groundhog Day. Kate’s back and they’re planning a trip to the Louvre that day because some guy in a bar the night before promised to get them in even though it’s closed to the public that day… You get the picture. The novel is told from Bertie’s point of view, and the first half is propulsive and fun and really captures the voice of a restless 30-ish creative (she’s a graphic artist for a big tech firm). But it loses steam in the second half, as Bertie finds herself not on vacation with Kate but at home with boyfriend Dylan. Wait, what boyfriend? And they’re discussing a vacation to—wait for it—Paris. We’re caught in some sort of time loop where new elements are introduced each go-round and it gradually becomes clear that Dylan is somehow involved. Pfffffftt. Faster than you can say space-time continuum, I lost interest. No matter. It turns out this is just a sci-fi-adjacent package to explore the nature of friendship and love and end-of-the-world angst.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brianna

    3.5 stars I wasn't sure what to expect going into this book. I didn't even read the synopsis after I first requested a copy on NetGalley, so I let the story take me to all its crazy corners. I was immediately drawn in by Bertie & Kate's story, two millennial-types living life at what feels like, or is(?) the end of times. Bombs are exploding around the country, coffee is hard to come by, gas costs close to $10 a gallon, and the world is in turmoil. It all feels eerily possible in the real world, 3.5 stars I wasn't sure what to expect going into this book. I didn't even read the synopsis after I first requested a copy on NetGalley, so I let the story take me to all its crazy corners. I was immediately drawn in by Bertie & Kate's story, two millennial-types living life at what feels like, or is(?) the end of times. Bombs are exploding around the country, coffee is hard to come by, gas costs close to $10 a gallon, and the world is in turmoil. It all feels eerily possible in the real world, which makes the atmosphere of this story feel all the more real and entrancing. The two venture off to Paris, and things... happen... and happen again. I'll leave it there. Read this book without spoiling it for yourself. Ignore the jacket synopsis and just dive in; you'll be glad you did. If you liked "Leave the World Behind", this feels adjacent. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for gifting me an ARC in exchange for a free review!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joann

    What an interesting concept and read to end my reading year for 2021. We've got a slow burning apocalypse in the background keeping things going throughout. Throw in a Groundhog Day situation in Paris at the Louvre, and the ongoing saga of two best friends and you've got a very solid read. I enjoyed this twisty book, although it did take me a minute to understand what was happening when the groundhog day time warp stuff started, once it clicked it became more enjoyable. Thankful for this ARC! What an interesting concept and read to end my reading year for 2021. We've got a slow burning apocalypse in the background keeping things going throughout. Throw in a Groundhog Day situation in Paris at the Louvre, and the ongoing saga of two best friends and you've got a very solid read. I enjoyed this twisty book, although it did take me a minute to understand what was happening when the groundhog day time warp stuff started, once it clicked it became more enjoyable. Thankful for this ARC!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This book was weird but so so good. I thought I knew how it was going to end a quarter of the way through, but then it continued to take unexpected turns and go in wildly different directions. The ending leaves things very open to interpretation but I can't imagine it any other way. This book was weird but so so good. I thought I knew how it was going to end a quarter of the way through, but then it continued to take unexpected turns and go in wildly different directions. The ending leaves things very open to interpretation but I can't imagine it any other way.

  29. 4 out of 5

    niri

    made me very, very anxious. the first half is spectacular

  30. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    End of the World House is a difficult book to pull off. It takes place in a future nearing the apocalypse. Bertie is an animator and aspiring graphic novelist. She and her best friend Kate decide to take one last trip together before Kate goes to her new job in LA and before the world shuts down to all travel. They go to Paris, and when they're invited to The Louvre on the day it's closed, Bertie finds herself trapped in a time loop, and she can't find Kate. The premise is intriguing and Celt doe End of the World House is a difficult book to pull off. It takes place in a future nearing the apocalypse. Bertie is an animator and aspiring graphic novelist. She and her best friend Kate decide to take one last trip together before Kate goes to her new job in LA and before the world shuts down to all travel. They go to Paris, and when they're invited to The Louvre on the day it's closed, Bertie finds herself trapped in a time loop, and she can't find Kate. The premise is intriguing and Celt does a good job of not making a time loop boring to read over and over. Right when my attention was beginning to wonder, she would change things up. I loved her take on how memory would work in such a scenario. But from the beginning, I suspected I would be disappointed by the ending. I just could not imagine a satisfying ending, and indeed I wound up really disliking the ending. I can't give any details because literally everything I could talk about that takes place after the first 25% would be a spoiler, but there were some lack of consent things that I didn't like. 2.5/5

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